18 Burst results for "Dementia Alzheimer's Disease"

"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

05:55 min | 10 months ago

"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on DNA Today

"Radio. I'm your host cure. Janine and i'm also a prenatal. Genetic counselor on the show explored genetics impact on our health through conversations with leaders in genetics. These are genetic counselors researchers doctor's patient advocates researchers and many many more people. My guest today is dr day in good now. He is the founder and ceo of program sciences. And this episode. We're gonna be talking about dementia. Alzheimer's disease parkinson's disease. And what we know about biomarkers and genetic predispositions for these conditions so predominant all this today so dr goodenow thank you so much for coming on the show. Your book just came out for breaking alzheimer's is the name of it. So thank you so much for coming on and exploring all of these topics with us today. Well thank you. It's really a pleasure to be here. So i thought we could start out with making sure. Everybody understands the relationship with dementia and alzheimer's disease. Because it's not necessarily the same thing. So i wanted to make sure that everybody understands this background. Information before we get into all the biomarkers and the network predisposition. So how are these two related. How are they different now. Alzheimer's as we currently understand it was discovered by dr alice. Alzheimer's alzheimer bike in the early. Nineteen tanner fifteen in that range. And it was really related to pre senile dementia. He had a patient who had dementia and she was young and after she died he. He did neuro-pathological analysis. And he and he discovered that there were these amyloid plaques in between the neurons and there were neurofibrillary tangles within the neurons. So this became called. Alzheimer's disease and alzheimer's was considered a type of pre senile dementia at the time people thought senile dementia which was more common obviously was more related to cardiovascular disease after roses. And then you fast forward around fifty years or so. Then in the nineteen sixties people were looking at people that were dying postmortem analysis with alzheimer's with dementia. And they're recognizing hey these older people have similar pathological formations in their brain as classical alzheimer's and so then they created a subclass of dementia called dementia of the alzheimer's type or late onset onstage dementia in the as time goes on but we have really four types of dementia. There's the alzheimer's type. There's the basket of dementia frontal temporal lobe dementia lewy body dementia. So dementia is a reduction in cognitive functioning. And then when you sub classified it's kind of what type of dementia. How do i can't. How do i characterize this particular patient. And most the time. That's been done post mortem so we don't necessarily know what the actual characterization of that dementia patient is until postmortem. We're getting better. And better now. With symptomology with better technology we can we can diagnose the type of dementia pre death much more accurately than we ever used to be able to but that's still most of a classification scheme. It's not really a causation scheme. Now we've known what causes dementia since the seventies it's coroner neuron dysfunction. That's absolute and the very first drug ever approved for alzheimer's was a drug that improved calling each function in the brain. So dementia at the biochemical perspective is reduced transmission of calling ignorance whereas parkinson's is reduced transmission of dopamine neurons. And then he will have. Anxiety and depression typically.

alzheimer's senile dementia Alzheimer's disease parkinson' dr goodenow alzheimer's type dr alice Alzheimer's alzheimer Nineteen tanner Janine pre senile dementia onset onstage dementia dementia frontal temporal lobe cardiovascular disease parkinson's depression
"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

04:33 min | 10 months ago

"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

"Older folks can lead to all kinds of setbacks and what concerns me is memory loss and cognitive decline because most older folks are concerned about dementia. Alzheimer's disease parkinson's disease. And if you have a heavy metal exposure that is above way above the legal limits it could look like dementia and your doc may not even consider it because you think about lead poisoning. Children and lead exposure also cause joint muscle pain wreck havoc with your gut. It can make your blood pressure. Go up and these are common problems. Here's what you say. But i wonder if you're you're you're family doctor your primary care caregiver. Even things about lead poisoning so you know. All days cannot be cured incurable disease. I'm sorry to say by lead poisoning and seniors can be treated. It can be treated. So i guess if someone has dementia and has chronic pain they should be referred to someone that can treat lead poisoning. It's called the procedures called key latian but you have to think about it to be treated about it. So this is what we're talking about. Lead poised lead exposure. And what it can do to your system and not just children. I is focused on adults and seniors. And i think the research that i'm looking at is discovering that exposure to lead. Grownups is much worse than we anticipate it. There's findings from a team of us and canadian. Researchers that said that hundreds of thousands of americans die every year due to this heavy metal. A number that's ten times higher than was originally thought you know can hit in the heart to these. Researchers discovered that adults with the highest concentrations of lead in their.

dementia Alzheimer's disease parkinson' incurable disease
Top Benefits of a Ketogenic Lifestyle

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

02:07 min | 11 months ago

Top Benefits of a Ketogenic Lifestyle

"Chronic sugar burning mode when their sugar burners they're producing a lot of metabolic waste that's damaging their cells and very little energy. it's energy inefficient. We want to create metabolic flexibility. Where we have the ability to not only use sugar. We need to but really to use fat or key tunes as an energy source. And there's nothing better for that than the ketogenic diet and lifestyle and so the top benefits number one reducing really. Stabilizing your blood sugar. So reducing it and then balancing it at a really good point and what does that do. That's going to give you better. Mental emotional stability one of the worst things we can do for. Our body has have blood sugar imbalances. We eat a meal blood. Sugar jumps way up then it crashes down. Our body produces the hormone called insulin. Insulin take sugar out of the bloodstream. Puts into the cells when it does that it also triggers inflammation and we have elevated insulin. It stores fat so we actually are unable to burn fat for fuel. We actually have storing fat so a ketogenic diet and lifestyle helps balance your blood. Sugar helps improve your mental emotional state and helps your body become more resilient to stress test. Really the second benefit is this resiliency to stress and mental emotional balance the third benefit as it reduces inflammation in your body so we burned sugar. We produce a ton of oxidative stress and free radicals and when that happens we allot of inflammation and that inflammation tears down major tissues barbati and ultimately over time leads the development of chronic disease whether it's chronic pain in our body whether it's organs that are malfunctioning. Wonder it's our brain losing our memory if it's brain fog early on or depression. These are inflammatory. Conditions long-term it ends up being something like dementia alzheimer's disease in our brains. So we gotta make sure reducing implementation ketogenic diet and lifestyle really really good. At doing exactly that k- the fourth big thing is

Chronic Disease Dementia Alzheimer's Disease Depression
"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on Let's Talk Wellness Now

Let's Talk Wellness Now

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on Let's Talk Wellness Now

"Yeah i think everyone thinks about sugar and thinking that it's just a weight thing and it's such a bigger issue that you know. It's dementia alzheimer's disease cardiovascular disease. It's the number one thing that causes cancer. Besides talk said you know i mean. There's just so many things that sugar does is we..

dementia alzheimer's one
"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on Switch4Good

"There's bleeding into the brain. The closer usually formed because of damage wall arteries same way that we have heart attacks. We actually have strokes in the brain and then it bursts open sometimes because again multiple reasons but the most common one is high blood pressure. High blood pressure causes hemorrhagic strokes. Most often dementia is an umbrella. Category the definition of dementia is when people have memory problems to the point where they can't really take care of themselves or their activities of daily living. Alzheimer's is a type of dementia. It is being most common type of dementia sixty to seventy percent of all dementia. Alzheimer's disease there other types to like vascular dementia because of small strokes parkinson's dementia lewy body. Dementia as you may have heard so. There are multiple types but usually the word dementia and alzheimer's is used synonymous because alzheimer's is such a major type of dementia high. See and how is it. is it how. what makes it different Is it is it on. And how does food affect it so first of all. Let me tell you how big these two categories are the second most expensive and biggest disease in the country is heart disease at one hundred twenty billion alzheimer's by itself direct cost three hundred. Four billion indirect cost another two hundred forty billion. Six million people suffer from alzheimer's and is the fastest growing epidemic beyond coronavirus and the west number one in uk and one cause of mortality morbidity uk in japan and it will be number one in us. That's how fast just alzheimer's movie and then stroke. Seven hundred thousand people per year have strokes now all of this. We say nine. More than ninety percent can be avoided can be prevented. And why because much of what's underlying this is vascular we talked about blood pressure. Cholesterol diabetes We're talking about inflammation and the things that we talked about. What what effects does things by far by. Far the most important chronic intervention or a as food food causes inflammation or actually as anti anti-inflammatory effects caused food causes. This regulation of glucose be it through sugar or through fats or can actually heal that process. Food can cause oxidation through and lipids or can take away oxidation. This is why food and every meal we have is so profound. that's why loma linda which are the healthiest people in the world. And we see ninety year olds walking around in the gym and jason center and all that pre covid era that five miles away and san bernardino which is one of the unhealthiest places in us. Five miles away. You have people in which we just came from. The free clinic in their forties have strokes here. We have ninety year olds fully functional over there. Forty abso- why what was the difference now geography they're five miles apart. It had to do with food and access to food. Mostly the difference in food mostly And if we just changed a food contact twenty percent that's twenty percents savings from heart disease stroke and dementia is not worth it. Why isn't there more.

Four billion twenty percent three hundred Five miles five miles san bernardino uk nine two hundred forty billion sixty japan ninety year Six million people twenty percents More than ninety percent seventy percent second two categories Forty abso jason center
"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on WJR 760

"Name is radio show. I'm your host. And Marie Cronin here tonight, Talking with Dr Nemeth board Certified periodontist in Southfield, Michigan. Doctor Nemeth is with us tonight discussing his state of the art clinic. Latest treatments and period and take care on the relationship between gum disease and many systemic diseases from cardiac issues to cancer. The doctor needed the last star segment. I was going down this endless list here of all the systemic diseases that can be manifestations of plural aural health and gum disease. And, of course, what caught my eye was dementia, Alzheimer's disease. And I'm looking here. The statistic that says 70% more likely. Can you clarify that or tell us a little bit more about that? Yeah, according to studies, people who have gum disease or period on Titus Are 70 70% more likely to suffer from cognitive decline Alzheimer's disease Now you asked me a little while ago doesn't cause Alzheimer's disease. Well, we know there's a strong link. In other words, If you've got gum disease, it's much more likely that you're going to have Alzheimer's disease. We haven't quite proven that it causes it. But with this latest study of this just recently a few months ago, there now is extremely strong evidence. Off, not just a link, but a causative factor. So this is being developed more and more, and I think it's going to come out because I really believe from what I've seen that periodontal disease. Is I believe it is a causative factor in initiating Alice harmless disease as well as so many, many other systemic or general diseases. The truth is, I can almost not think of any disease that isn't linked to parry Donald Disease, almost anything that you suffer from in almost all cases. There's an increased risk. If you have gum disease or periodontal disease. We see people all the time in myself. Field office coming in with inflamed gums and these people very often or they have guns. Other forms of bone loss from gum disease. They often have diabetes. They may have rheumatoid arthritis, kidney disease, and all of these diseases are linked. To gum disease, or Perry Donald Disease because the bacteria From gum disease. They're not limited to your mouth, but they get into your bloodstream. They get into your bloodstream, and they cause what's called a generalized inflammation or generalized inflammatory response. Throughout your whole body. Which effects every organ in your body. And many of these organisms actually congest through what's called the blood brain barrier, and we find them in much larger numbers in a Alzheimer's Pete patients than we do in non elles harmless patients, So the link is there. It's frightening, not just for Alzheimer's. But I can almost not think of anything that isn't linked to gum disease or parry Donald Disease, and it's definitely a blockbuster with the information and Dimension Alzheimer's disease. But let me take you back a little, but the average person out there Most of us go to our dentist. Most visited filling is most of us go for check ups. Do we know? Does a person know they have gum disease is it is it can you find out yourself or do you have to be diagnosed by your dentist? First of all, you know, that's why I call it the other silent killer because you don't know most people don't know it doesn't cause pain. There are very few things in the way of symptoms. You may have bleeding gums. Teeth may shop start shifting are moving. But it's not something that calls people to action necessary. Something my mouth hurts. No, that doesn't happen till the late stages and by the time you're at the late stages where you're feeling pain very often, it's too late, and those teeth have to be lost or sacrificed. So It doesn't really manifest itself. I mean, in the way of paying people don't often know that they have it. And so most of my patients are referred by General Dennis to recognize the disease and then refer them to myself feel practice. Let me ask you another question. Should patients actually be going into see someone like yourself a period on just to be checked? Because what if your regular dentist doesn't check for that, or do they all shape for it? I don't even know. Well, they're all supposed to check for. I don't know if they all do many of my patients. Referred to me when they see a new dentist for the first time, right? And they've been seeing somebody, unfortunately that you know they weren't It wasn't picked up. But now they see a new dentist with fresh eyes and that Dennis says, you know, you got some concerns. Why don't you go see Dr. Any method? You better get this checked out. So they, don't you So you shouldn't be like going on your own volition. You need to be first of all screened rhino are I wear many patients who come on their own volition because they may notice their gums are bleeding or their parents or their relatives have a history of gum disease, or they've heard so much now about gum disease and the link between gum disease. And systemic diseases, diabetes, etcetera that they want to get there. Miles checked out, so a lot of patients come to us directly now we still of course, have many referred by their dentist. But more and more patients are being coming aware of periodontal disease, its destruction. How dangerous it is, and they're coming on their own. And I see on your list here. Another big, frightening disease, colon cancer. So that's another one that people find out in the later on last stages, and it's too late by that time to do anything about it. Absolutely. There's a definitely increased risk with colon cancer. Breast cancer, lung cancer. Um, you know, one of my favorite ones is because I can.

gum disease Alzheimer's disease Donald Disease Perry Donald Disease Alzheimer diabetes Doctor Nemeth colon cancer General Dennis Southfield Dr Nemeth Michigan Certified periodontist Marie Cronin inflammation bone loss Alice Miles
"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on WJR 760

"Name is radio show. I'm your host. And Marie Cronin here tonight, Talking with Dr Nemeth board, Sort of hide periodontist in Southfield, Michigan. Dr Nemeth is with us tonight discussing his state of the art clinic, the latest treatments and periodontal care on the relationship between gum disease and many systemic diseases from cardiac issues to cancer. The doctor needed the last segment. I was going down this endless list here of all the systemic diseases that can be manifestations of plural aural health and gum disease. And of course, what caught my eye was dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and I'm looking here. The statistic that says 70% more likely. Can you clarify that or tell us a little bit more about that? Yeah, according to studies, people who have gum disease or period on Titus Are 70 70% more likely to suffer from cognitive decline Alzheimer's disease Now you asked me a little while ago doesn't cause Alzheimer's disease. Well, we know there's a strong link. In other words, If you've got gum disease, it's much more likely that you're going to have Alzheimer's disease. We haven't quite proven that it causes it. But with this latest study of this just recently a few months ago, there now is extremely strong evidence. Off, not just a link, but a causative factor. So this is being developed more and more, and I think it's going to come out because I really believe from what I've seen that periodontal disease. Is I believe it is a cause of a factor in initiating Alice harmless disease as well as so many, many other systemic or general diseases. The truth is, I can almost not think of any disease. That isn't linked to periodontal disease. Almost anything that you suffer from. In almost all cases. There's an increased risk. If you have gum disease or periodontal disease. We see people all the time in myself, Field office coming in with inflamed gums and these people very often or they have governed. Other forms of bone loss from gum disease. They often have diabetes. They may have rheumatoid arthritis, kidney disease, and all of these diseases are linked. To gum disease, or Perry Donald Disease because the bacteria From gum disease. They're not limited to your mouth, but they get into your bloodstream. They get into your bloodstream, and they cause what's called a generalized inflammation or generalized inflammatory response. Throughout your whole body. Which effects every organ in your body. And many of these organisms actually congest through what's called the blood brain barrier, and we find them in much larger numbers, and Ellis harbors Pete patients than we do in non Alzheimer's patients. So the link is there. It's frightening, not just for Alzheimer's. But I can almost not think of anything that isn't linked to gum disease or parry Donald Disease, and it's definitely a blockbuster with the information Dimension Alzheimer's disease, But let me take you back a little, but the average person out there Most of us go to our dentist. Most visited filling is most of us go for check ups. Do we know? Does a person know they have gum disease is it is it can you find out yourself or do you have to be diagnosed by your dentist? First of all, you know, that's why I call it the other silent killer because you don't know most people don't know it doesn't cause pain. There are very few things in the way of symptoms. You may have bleeding gums. Teeth may shop start shifting are moving, but it's not something that calls people to action necessary. Something my mouth hurts. No, that doesn't happen till the Late stages, and by the time you're at the late stages where you're feeling pain very often, it's too late, and those teeth have to be lost or sacrificed. So It doesn't really manifest itself. I mean, in the way of paying people don't often know that they have it. And so most of my patients are referred by General Dennis to recognize the disease and then refer them to myself feel practice. Let me ask you another question. Should patients actually be going into see someone like yourself a periodontist to be checked? Because what if your regular dentist doesn't check for that? Or do they all change for it? I don't even know. Well, they're all supposed to check for. I don't know if they all do. Many of my patients are referred to me when they see a new dentist for the first time, right? And they've been seeing somebody. Unfortunately. That, you know, they weren't. It wasn't picked up. But now they see a new dentist with fresh eyes. And that Dennis says, you know, you got some concerns. Why don't you go see Dr. Any method? You better get this checked out. So they, don't you So you shouldn't be like going on your own volition. You need to be first of all screened rhino are I wear many patients who come on their own volition Because they may notice their gums are bleeding or their parents or their relatives have a history of gum disease. Or they've heard so much now about gum disease and the link between gum disease and systemic diseases, diabetes, etcetera. That they want to get there. Miles checked out, so a lot of patients come to us directly now we still of course, have many referred by their dentist. But more and more patients are being coming aware of periodontal disease, its destruction. Dangerous It is and they're coming on their own. And I see on your list here. Another big, frightening disease, colon cancer. So that's another one that people find out in the later on last stages, and it's too late by that time to do anything about it. Absolutely. There's a definitely increased risk with colon cancer. Breast cancer, lung cancer. Um, you know, one of my favorite ones is because I can see the.

gum disease Alzheimer's disease Alzheimer Perry Donald Disease Donald Disease Dr Nemeth diabetes colon cancer General Dennis Southfield Michigan Marie Cronin inflammation bone loss Alice Miles
"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"It actually very gradually shrinks and this is associated with a slowing down of our thinking and occasional Misplacing of your keys forgetting someone's names but when these problems become more regular or start to interfere with our ability to function in an independent way. That's when we need to be more concerned and is there a typical age where you see that happening. Most commonly we start to see this in the seventies eighties but we do follow a number of people who develop these problems at younger ages. And that's something. We specialize at mayo clinic because well as many people use the was dementia alzheimer's disease to mean the same thing other the same thing. They're not the same thing. So dementia is a non specific term that refers to a change in your thinking abilities that interferes with your ability to function independently. So it may interfere with your ability to balance a checkbook. Prepare a meal or live by yourself. In contrast alzheimer's disease is a specific disease. Due to a build up of toxic proteins in the brain that is the most common form of dementia but there's other forms of dementia as well. Now we see all the time advertisements about how we can sort of train of rano. Make it better as we get older to prevent this from happening. Any thoughts about this and decreasing risk of dementia. This is an exciting area of science. That's really blossomed. Over the last ten years we know a lot more about the lifestyles that are associated with decreasing our risk of developing dementia. The ones that have been studied. The best are certain diet so a heart healthy diet like a mediterranean type diet which includes eating fish regularly eating Lots of olive oil fruits vegetables and nuts has been associated with decreasing your risk of dementia also cardiovascular exercise getting your heart rate up while you're exercising They recommend you do about one hundred and fifty minutes of that a week that has also been associated with decreasing your risk.

alzheimer's disease mayo clinic rano
"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

Wealth Transformation Podcast

11:24 min | 2 years ago

"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

"Alzheimer's I wonder why I'm not too sure what we tried to find A. I have read that Alzheimer's 'cause I I like to read different avenues and I have read did Alcohol isn't also contributes to Al Alzheimer's and You know I don't know what to what degree but you know I mean it makes sense because if you're drinking constantly is GonNa Affect Your brain cells so I'm not. Yeah Yeah I think. A lot of substance abuse. Yeah any any excess her. Secret Diction Yeah. All that's going to affect affect do also. Alzheimer's disease lasts like three on average three to ten years. Who's really long and the problem is the suffering. Is this long? Well I I have witnessed a couple. They were married for years. But I witnessed He had Alzheimer's for eight years. And then finally he actually got a little violent towards the end and He waited for his son. His son was in Zurich and he was in San Francisco But he waited for his son to come back to see him because all of his organs started shutting down but he waited for his son and the last five minutes of his breathing he became totally clear his mind and he could talk to his son. Wow Yeah I know was like a miracle but then he gave out after he died after right so it's kind of funny. How things work you know. Can't explain it whether it's universe or God or whatever you know But I I've witnessed the Alzheimer's I know a horrible disease horrible disease. They know which brains going to go and people will lose the mechanics of eating. My Dad actually lost his ability to swallow. So you can eat it. Couldn't but mechanic is good it. Just bring the timing of the swallowing attitude of some kind of ingestion makes them if they put the liquid directly to the stomach of some sort. So it was yeah. There's so many way of suffering from father still alive past couple of years ago. Yeah Yeah Yeah. So what was he a seventy nine eighty eight? That's young today I know so. That's one reason why we need to not only live longer but Lee health healthier. Well that's the whole key is health and happier dancing right Also a fine. You doesn't matter where you are. You could be spending forty dollars to get into Blackhawk to dance dance event or you go to Oakland to spend four dollars. It's the same. Dance is the same it is. It is You the same amount of pleasure. I guess it's the company in which You keep yourself you dance you know. Have the statement health benefit same. And I think that's one of the item you don't have you don't have to spend. I mean you can't. You cannot value by the or you can start your own. Dance Group. Yeah I would like to. I would like church. Do It in a church a big facility and if they recognize benefit of tango. I'm so maybe this is a hard push tag. Go but what. How tangles your passion Why not so church could definitely help and see the road in the mouth okay. Well we're isn't. Isn't that what tango you have? The rose up in but I saw a movie something somewhere. Yes yeah where where? It's more dramatic dramatic. I think spending she liked Spanish spanning. Yeah but definitely I believe. Church can do more for ballroom dancing because caring people is a good opportunity for them to get a new members and tried they have facilities and I personally I really think the government should pay more attention to this because As a matter of fact they need An advocate they need an advocate for two to the government. I think so. I think we need to empower the doctor to Prescribe Harlem dancing and pre reimbursable by Medicare and debt will really bring well. We have to educate the doctors so they aren't hung up on the on the buck on the money. The money well. That's that's part of the problem too to find to find doctors. That are passionate about you. Know healing assisting in this is really a prevention program in according to the New England Journal. He's so prevention. How `Bout the New England Journal of Medicine? How about the doctors that wrote that the study or the steady by Albert Einstein? College in New York. Well why not? Why not get contact them and have them get amped up to to you. Know go to the larger organization so yeah that's a lot of revenue that's why public Tv's so important to get this message out in and get the public aware. You don't have to spend a lot of money. You can do a lot more well. It's just getting you know perseverence perseverance. Perseverance and getting it. Just keep talking about it. And that's what I do on my show. You keep talking about this talking you just have to keep talking getting out there and more talking to more people and I think there's some dance group in Marine County too. So maybe we can contact them or clubs. Different social clubs around in there's tons in San Francisco. You know just to you know to any kind of social club that men and women come together. That can do that too. I mean there's really a plethora of information to to be able to spread the word Willie. I totally agree. Yeah we'll we'll we'll do your team you know. Well that's why thinking I will bring the PSA to the bay area trying to contact like organization like yours and find all these dense groups together and then let them Appeti- step and And hopefully the show the benefit. Oh Yeah I mean. There's lots of benefits. Not just one or two absolutely help. Healthier and happier seniors definitely big benefits and they go directly to the bottom line of you know healthier happier less money on depression less money for we spend two hundred twenty six billion dollars in caring dementia. Alzheimer's Disease. And two hundred twenty six billion dollars in these every one out of five dollars for Medicare goto the Alzheimer's care. There's no cure so you have a lot of caring and to hire people to facilitate count your home. My goodness and it will go even more. When when you go down to twenty fifty could go to one in every three dollars. We'll go there so see how much money if we didn't get cure but there's no guarantee neater so prevention is well dancing. Prevention is worth a pound of cure. Is that yeah? I mean and that's with anything really right and this is the good. Prevention is not lie. You have to be suffering fun you dancing. So so what? This is the best prevention program. You can't have you still not look early in the six o'clock in the morning and do your title or whatever enjoy your evening. I get up at four thing about it. What kind of activity? You have to make up finding new shoes dress yourself pretty and then you go and enjoy you. Enjoy your workout. This is really not just workout. You really a social events. You really enjoy it well. I think you've sold me when you're gonNA come to life dance. Well we will do a demonstration or you will do a demonstration and then I'll follow okay. We'll do that. I think we have a very good steps and I believe would help not only promoting tangle but also helping seniors have better posture. Well it's it's not just good for seniors. Yes good for anyone absolutely I take you about. You're absolutely right. I think a lot of us of sitting too much I know yeah and sitting way too much reading too much and and really hurt our spine and we can do some exercise this way with music. Of course yes yes. Did you bring any music? Oh no maybe we can. We can funnel it in you. Can you sing well? I did study classical. I like classical music with Terry years. I I studied but I I. I don't know I just try it too critical. My voice is the main interpretation of the basic. If you can sing I can dance with your singing.

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease Al Alzheimer San Francisco Medicare Dance Group New England Journal of Medicin Albert Einstein Zurich New England Journal Blackhawk Marine County New York Harlem Terry Oakland
"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

08:54 min | 2 years ago

"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on WJR 760

"That can be manifestations of poor all oral health and gum disease and of course what caught my eye was dementia Alzheimers disease and I'm looking here at a statistic that says seventy percent more likely can you clarify that are tell us a little bit more about that yeah according to studies people will have gum disease are periodontitis are seventy peace seventy percent more likely to suffer from cognitive decline al's timers disease now you asked me a little while ago does it cause else timers disease well we know there is a strong link in other words you've got gum disease it's much more likely that you're going to have bells timers disease we haven't quite proven that it causes it but with this latest study of this in it just recently a few months ago there now is extremely strong evidence of not just a link but a causative factor so this is being developed more and more and I think it's going to come out because I really believe from what I've seen that periodontal disease is I believe it is a causative factor in an initiating Alice armistice sees as well as so many many other systemic or general diseases the truth is I can almost not think of any disease that isn't linked to periodontal disease almost anything that you suffer from in almost all cases there's an increased risk if you have gum disease or periodontal disease we see people all the time in myself field office coming in with inflamed gums and these people very often or they have gone to other forms of bone loss from gum disease they often have diabetes as they may have rheumatoid arthritis kidney disease and all of these diseases are linked to gum disease or periodontal disease because the bacteria from gum disease they're not limited to your mouth and they get into your bloodstream they get into your bloodstream and they because what's called a generalized inflammation or generalized inflammatory response throughout your whole body which affects every organ in your body and many of these organisms actually can get through what's called the blood brain barrier yeah and we find them in much larger numbers in al's Hymers Pete patience than we do and al's Harmer's patience so the link is there it's frightening not just for Alzheimer's but I can almost not think of anything that isn't linked to gum disease or periodontal disease and it's definitely a blockbuster with the I. information dementia and Alzheimer's disease but let me I'll take you back a little bit the average person are they are not most of us go to our dentist most was give filling is most of us go for checkups do we know does a person know they have gum disease as it is it did you find out yourself or do you have to be diagnosed by your dentist first of all you know that's why I call it the other side with killer because you don't know most people don't know it doesn't cause pain there are very few things in the way of symptoms you may have bleeding gums teeth may sharp start shifting or moving but it's not something that calls people to action necessary something cool my mouth hurts no that doesn't happen till the late stages and by the time you're at the late stages where you're feeling pain very often it's too late and those two you have to be lost or sacrificed so it doesn't really manifest itself I mean in the way of paying people don't often know that they have it and so most of my patients are referred by general Dennis to recognize the disease and then refer them to myself practice now let me ask you another question should to our patients actually be going in to see someone like yourself a period on does to be check because what if your regular dentist doesn't check for that or do they all check for and I don't even know well they're all supposed to check for I don't know if they all do many of my patients are referred to me when they see a new dentist for the first time right and they've been saying somebody unfortunately that you know they weren't it wasn't picked up but now they see a new Dennis with fresh eyes and that Dennis says that you know you got some concerns once you go see doctor Nemeth you better get this checked out so they don't you so you shouldn't be like going on your own volition you you you need to be first of all screen right arm we have many patients who come on their own volition because they may notice the gums are bleeding or their parents or their their relatives have a history of gum disease or they've heard so much now about gum disease in the link between gum disease and systemic diseases diabetes at cetera that they want to get their miles checked out so a lot of patients come to us directly now we still course have many referred by their dentist but more and more patients are becoming aware of periodontal disease its destruction how dangerous it is and they're coming on their own and I see on your list here another big frightening disease colon cancer so that's another one that people find out in the later on last stages and it's too late by that time to do anything about it absolutely those are definitely increased risk of colon cancer breast cancer lung cancer you know that one of my favorite ones is because I can see the difference is diabetes these people come with diabetes their blood sugar is astronomically high sometimes sometimes a moderately high we get rid of the mouse infection the diabetes gets better so their blood sugar goes down it's just an incredible improvement and some of them have been able to reduce and in some cases cases actually get off of their diabetes medication it's so so gratifying to get these patients better and general these patients die even if it's they're not diabetic they just feel better when they're miles are healthier the infection from their miles and therefore their whole body is gone and they feel healthier and they know it and they like it so really wouldn't be a bad idea for there's so many people out there that are diagnosed with diabetes and so many people that are on insulin I mean I'm I'm just amazed at the thought that you can actually see an improvement where people the blood sugar drops but also you might be able to get them off insulin my understanding Frank like in some okay sometimes I can't promise that night but very often the medication can be reduced and occasionally are predictably it can even be eliminated but it's not just diabetes I mean do they remember their mouth is infected doesn't mean their mouth is infected their bodies in fact yeah these parasites these bacteria these organisms get in the bloodstream and cause a in Iraq a reaction inflammatory response or reaction throughout the whole body so they come and see you and tell us a little bit about what what is involved in the treatment what do you do when you first see a patient well we take a sample from under their gone we actually take a slide we take a sample from under the patient's garments not painful at all and we look and see what is under there and what we see when we take that slide lets us know if they have periodontal disease to some degree how severe the periodontal disease is and we actually show the patient so I'm looking and the patient is looking we have a very large television screens and we're looking at what we see when we look under that microscope and very often we'll see a meatball trichomonas Spiro keys various other bacteria and parasites that infect the mouth and then the body and when we see that we know there's a problem and then we use typically a laser these days to treat it it's great it's very very effective very little discomfort or pain is minimally invasive it's much different than the kind of semi barbaric treatment that used to be done for gum disease in the past at least that's what we're doing now I think this is very dramatic visually I'm just thinking about seeing a TV screen out there somewhere and looking at an army by our parents site you know crawling around that's going to be a very dramatic thing for patients like common well it's very important it's important because these patients often don't know they have anything sure and we showed what they've got on the screen it makes an indelible impression that they never never forget absolutely well we'll have to come back and talk about the laser treatment after the break in the meantime you're listening.

Alzheimers disease periodontitis
"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on 710 WOR

"A foster tell Colin reduce their risk of all dementia Alzheimers disease late dementia lower body dementia Parkinson's dementia every call vascular dementia by twenty eight percent that's a very well powered study there's plenty of men and has plenty of time and it's a great research institution I never fall of I mean it's just and it was well reported and it was lacking bias so here's another one this is Central Michigan University as funder journal neuroscience research a great journal and it's a couple weeks ago August twenty first grill is better absorbed in fish oils for to bring krill gets into your brain better known specials and it's better for the brain the officials because it has fought for a title Coleen bound to officials now normally an official capsule the fish you all are attach to triglycerides so you first have to absorb officials they get damaged by your digestive juices on your stomach acids and it has to go to the liver with a liver removes the triglycerides and replaces them what phosphor title calling well the cruel already comes like that it's bio identical as body ready and because of that the foster total Coleen being attached to fish you all's protection for Mister McKesson protection from your digestive juices and Aaron's arms and you absorb much more completely and intact but it gets into the brain better and it reduces inflammation and bring his what the university of central Michigan such thank you it's better for the brain it has to foster tell calling for the brain it reduces inflammation of the brain it improves spatial memory and improves learning it helps prevent memory loss and it improves symptoms of depression on top of being better absorbed in official so here is Boston University school of medicine phosphor title coaling containing EPA DHEA another words foster title calling containing fish oils or decreased in the brain of al summers patience and it is associated with higher memory performance and resistance to cognitive decline another words to talking about crow the cruel officials because their attached to foster total Coleen they are missing and the brain of Alzheimer's patients so that's a second research institution saying the same thing and if you have an abundance of them in.

Colin Parkinson Central Michigan University Coleen Aaron EPA Alzheimer official Mister McKesson Boston University school of me twenty eight percent
"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

04:47 min | 3 years ago

"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Called a one day could help you if you're a quadriplegic for example and one day a could be years something that you you hear me talking on one of my other programs your hidden power about telepathy and this will perhaps interpret telepathic input the really amazing brain idea neural link is the company was founded a couple years ago already tested in early wired version of this implant a put it in rats Yvonne musk's as human trials destroyed by the end of the year at the company doesn't yet have approval from the food and drug administration that be interesting get their approval for the study knurling promises the brain can I did device looks as nondescript as a hearing aid so my number's gonna know that you've got it implanted or embedded in your brain during his presentation recently to investors he said the aim to make his surgery for this to implant equivalent to a Lazic type of thing we use it Adam sheen does the thing on your eye and you walk away in a couple of hours so how about that Simona interesting news about what may be the future of your brain from the lan must gear on good day health the sport this is professional sports can yeah we're looking at here who are the players in white game that lead longer healthier lives all right during the American medical association network open medical journal this week the answer is professional baseball players MLB they may be the healthiest athletes of the mall athletes in Major League Baseball they tend to live about twenty four percent longer than the average American guy also baseball players appear to have a lower death rate the National Football League players when it comes to a neuro degenerative diseases and heart conditions and obviously the baseball players take a lot less hits to their head and that's really what it is that's the secret to all of this hello we talked recently about catcher's there was one catcher who quit because he keeps getting hit in the head by these balls at ninety five miles an hour yeah even though they wear that cage there are buyers well that's a dangerous place those balls you know you're a baseball fan right what kind of a base of any like the kind of so and the borrow when you're there at of ninety five miles an hour he can't get out of the way of it bingo right and those who the neuro degenerative diseases like dementia Alzheimer's disease Parkinson's Lou Gehrig's disease but also the heart conditions are less frequent for in the major why do you think that is why why why is that I think the the conditioning look at the baseball players of today compared to fifty years ago the conditioning is unbelievable and a lot of them live healthy lifestyles okay so that's good it's all about lifestyle yeah right exercising yeah right okay so the other thing I was thinking about that be appropriate in the time we have left in this segment the heat this summer and heat stroke I think I told you that I felt like I had heat stroke over the weekend what's the best way of handling that for people who are going through it what made you think the air and heat stroke I had a my I my heart was Talbot tailing had indigestion my shoulders are aching I had a headache I was just look sergeant have felt awful so you're the guy was heat stroke well maybe the early forms of it is you know just to to prolong exposure to high temperatures your body temperature can go up to a hundred and for altered mental status the nausea vomiting flushed skin rapid breathing racing heart rate headaches you just want to make sure you keep well hydrated and avoid prolonged exposure to the hot sun and that's the way to prevent where the right clothing you know I had a dark loading sunglasses suntan lotion all those things and what I just wear excess clothing drinking alcohol can be a problem here and don't get dehydrated all right yeah I did too but not the Gatorade or stuff has salt and I was told better don't just drink a lot of water well if you want to search the is in waters okay but if you're not yet thirsty to keep the tank full you have to drink something as the same tone as blood like get sugar free Gatorade something like that there's a lot of things out there that have the electrolytes in the.

one day twenty four percent fifty years
"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:04 min | 3 years ago

"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on KCRW

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin the sound of someone chewing or smacking gum can be annoying. But for some people these noises trigger instant, rage panic. This is not just an accent. It is a real condition, and it's. Called me. So phony a-, here's NPR's April Fulton when eighteen year old Ellie wraps. It's down to dinner. This happens. My heart begins to pound, I go one of two ways. I either start to cry or I just get really intensely angry. That's because the sound of her family chewing creates an automatic and extreme emotional response. She has to eat in another room. It's really intense. I mean, it's as if you're going to die, and she's been experiencing this intense reaction to certain noises since she was a toddler, but it wasn't until middle school. When her mom showed her an article about something called me Safaniah that she was able to put a name on it. I said this is what I have this is it. She started seeing Jillian Jaffe a psychotherapist in Los Angeles who specializes in Mesa Fonje Jaffe, says the most common triggers for people like Ellie our mouth noises chewing is almost universal gum chewing is almost universal. They also don't like the sound of throat clearing. Coughing sniffing. It could also be humming tapping pen clicking sometimes just the sight of someone chewing is enough to cause a panic attack. It's as if the survival part of the brain thinks somehow it's being attacked, and this prompts the fighter flight reaction. Now not much is known about me. So phony a- it was only given a name a few years ago and people who have it often think they're going crazy. Many doctors have never heard of it. And if people do talk about their symptoms, they're dismissed or diagnosed with a mood disorder, but a small study published recently suggests that the brains of people with me Safaniah actually react differently to certain sounds Philip gander studies, how the brain makes sense of sound at the university of Iowa we pretty convinced that we found some very good evidence for relating this disorder to particular patterns of brain activity when researchers put people in an MRI scanner and played trigger sounds like chewing and eating. He says you could see the difference. Let me group the activity was far, greater and. Particular areas of their brain. And they showed classic signs of stress their heart rate increased. And also their palms were sweating more. It was phenomenal. It was the first piece of research that showed our our population that what they have is real. That's Marcia Johnson. She's not just in Portland, Oregon. She was one of the first to recognize the disorder in the nineteen ninety s she says Mesa phone is really devastating to families. If you're a mother, and your child has is a means of phony person, and this sibling is the trigger you trying to stop this one from eating and this one from reacting. It's just absolutely awful. The national institutes of health calls me Safaniah, a chronic condition, and the causes unknown. More research is needed to understand it. But for people who have me Safaniah, they need strategies. Now Johnson says for one don't force everyone to sit around the dinner table together have a buffet style. Everybody eats where they want. But why don't you plan the big event of a family? Day called taking a hike going up to a waterfall going bowling, of course, people suffering from USA phony can't totally avoid their trigger noises. So Johnson suggests try wearing headphones to flood the ears with pleasant sounds or mindful breathing, but the most important advice comes from Elliot. Mom, Kathy Rapp, if your child complains of these symptoms, don't dismiss them. It sounds bizarre. But it's very real and a family's help. I think is critical to helping somebody live a fuller. Life April, Fulton NPR news, Los Angeles when older people have dementia. It's commonly assumed that they have Alzheimer's disease. But that is not the only form of dementia. There are other causes NPR's. John Hamilton reports on why it's important to get the right diagnosis when Jewish Neider was training to be a doctor in the nineteen eighties and nineties dementia was simple. We were taught that almost all dementia Alzheimer's disease, and that there wasn't other things going on in the brain. Rain today. Schneider is a professor at the rush Alzheimer's disease center in Chicago. And last week she served as scientific chair of a summit on dementias at the national institutes of health. Schneider says one key message from that summit is that dementia can have many causes these include strokes a form of Parkinson's disease that damages brain areas that regulate emotion and behavior, we still believe that Alzheimer's is important, but these other pathologies are also important Alzheimer's is associated with plaques and tangles in the brain. But Schneider says a different culprit causes Lewy body dementia which affects more than one million people in the US. It's these little aggregates called Lewy bodies, which were first identified in the brains of people with Parkinson's disease and Schneider says people with Lewy body disease can expect different challenges than people.

Alzheimer's disease NPR Marcia Johnson Schneider Alzheimer Ellie USA Steve Inskeep Los Angeles Rachel Martin Safaniah mood disorder Parkinson Mesa Fonje Jaffe Jillian Jaffe April Fulton John Hamilton Kathy Rapp
"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:12 min | 3 years ago

"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin the sound of someone chewing or smacking gum can be annoying. But for some people these noises trigger instant, rage or panic. This is not just an eccentric trinity. It is a real condition, and it's called me. So phony a- here's NPR's April Fulton when eighteen year old alley raps sits down to dinner. This happens. My heart begins to pound, I go one of two ways. I either start to cry or I just get really intensely angry. That's because the sound of her family chewing creates an automatic extreme emotional response. She has to eat in another room. It's really intense. I mean, it's as if you're going to die, and she's been experiencing this intense reaction to certain noises since she was a toddler, but it wasn't until middle school. When her mom showed her an article about something called me Safaniah that she was able to put a name on it. I said this is what I have this is it. She started seeing Julian Jaffe, a psychotherapist in Los Angeles. Who specializes in Mesa. Fonje Jaffe says the most common triggers for people like Ellie R mouth noises. Shoeing is almost universal gum chewing is almost universal. They also don't like the sound of throat clearing coughing sniffing. It could also be humming tapping or pen clicking. Sometimes just the sight of someone chewing is enough to cause a panic attack. It's as if the survival part of the brain thinks somehow it's being attacked, and this prompts the fighter flight reaction. Now, not much is known about me Safaniah. It was only given a name a few years ago and people who have it often think they're going crazy. Many doctors have never heard of it. And if people do talk about their symptoms, they're dismissed or diagnosed with a mood disorder, but a small study published recently suggests that the brains of people with me Safaniah actually react differently to certain sounds Philip gander studies how the brain makes sense of sound at the university of Iowa we pretty. Convinced that we found some very good evidence for relating this disorder to particular patterns of brain activity when researchers put people in an MRI scanner and played trigger sounds like chewing and eating. He says you could see the difference. Let me Safaniah group the activity was far greater in particular areas of their brain. And they showed classic signs of stress their heart rate increased. And also their palms were sweating more. It was phenomenal. It was the first piece of research that showed our our population that what they have is real. That's Marcia Johnson. She's not just in Portland, Oregon. She was one of the first to recognize the disorder in the nineteen ninety s she says me Safaniah is really devastating to families. If you're a mother, and your child has is a means of phony person, and this sibling is the trigger you trying to stop this one from eating and this one from reacting. It's just absolutely awful, the national institutes of health calls me, Sonia, chronic condition, and the causes. Is unknown. More research is needed to understand it. But for people who have me Safaniah, they need strategies. Now Johnson says for one don't force everyone to sit around the dinner table together have a buffet style. Everybody eats where they want. But why don't you plan the big event of a family day called taking hike going up to a waterfall going bowling, of course. People suffering from me funny can't totally avoid their trigger noises. So Johnson suggests try wearing headphones to flood the ears with pleasant sounds or mindful breathing, but the most important advice comes from Eli's. Mom, Kathy Rapp, if your child complains of these symptoms, don't dismiss them. It sounds bizarre. But it's very real and a family's help. I think is critical to helping somebody live a fuller. Life April, Fulton NPR news, Los Angeles when older people have dementia. It's commonly assumed that they have Alzheimer's disease. But that is not the only form of dementia. There are other causes. NPR's John Hamilton reports on why it's important to get the right diagnosis when Julie Schneider was training to be a doctor in the nineteen eighties. Nineties dementia was simple. We were taught that almost all dementia Alzheimer's disease, and that there wasn't other things going on in the brain today. Schneider is a professor at the rush Alzheimer's disease center in Chicago last week. She served as scientific chair of a summit on dementias at the national institutes of health. Schneider says one key message from that summit is that dementia can have many causes these include strokes form of Parkinson's and a disease that damages brain areas that regulate emotion and behavior, we still believe that Alzheimer's is important, but these other pathologies are also important Alzheimer's is associated with plaques and tangles in the brain. But Schneider has a different culprit causes Lewy body dementia which affects more than one million people in the US. It's these little aggregates called Lewy bodies, which were first identified in the brains of people with parking. Nsen disease and Schneider says people with Lewy body disease can expect different challenges than people with Alzheimer's. You couldn't be more rapidly declining. You might have more motor problems, more falls, gate changes balanced problems. Sleep problems, hallucinations, many of these symptoms can be treated, even though the underlying disease can't be Dr Walter Coronets directs the National Institute of neurological disorders and stroke. He says frontal temporal dementia damages areas of the brain involved in personality and behavior. Me says that can lead to tragic misunderstandings. If family members don't know the cause not infrequently the spouse thinks that their spouses, just not worth being married to anymore, and they believe it's a psychological thing. And they get divorced and later there's a lot of guilt. One preventable. Cause of dementia is stroke says Rodrick Corvo a program director at the NIH one third of the people who have strokes. Go onto have dementia preventing strokes is about preventing damage to your brain. Carbo says people who've had one stroke can often avoid a second by taking blood thinners and controlling their blood pressure..

NPR Julie Schneider Alzheimer Safaniah Alzheimer's disease Marcia Johnson Los Angeles Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Julian Jaffe April Fulton mood disorder Kathy Rapp hallucinations throat clearing Portland Oregon Rodrick Corvo Mesa
"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:35 min | 3 years ago

"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"New Clarkston half. We're getting less than external dice radiation than on flight over three times less than what we go on the airplane coming over. I she is one of the least contaminated parts of design. Two decades of this evidence being presented at the meeting here could lift the town at the exclusion zone. The good and out of the long shadow of the accident today. Do think we're certainly in agreement here that there needs to be changed. So the next step is to communicate with the politicians, tell them we'll our scientific conclusions are tell them what the narrative district one. And we hope that they will take action. The next time people see headlines like deadly cancer risk from Genova. Then people think again and look at what the science says because the sign says something completely different. That report there by Victoria Gill. It's newsday. Shaimaa Khalil and Clermont tunnel with you. Here's a question. What happens to on brains? As we age and get forgetful, new says suggests the process can be reversed it has been unveiled at this year's meeting of the American Association for the advancement of science in Washington is truly groundbreaking research. And from there is spoke to the woman behind it all Daniele cofer. She is a professor of neuroscience. That's a lot of processes in the brain that has to do with. We we know that something is wrong with neural connections and synapses and snap the connections. And we know that cells that are dying. There's a lot of research that really has to do with dementia Alzheimer's disease neurodegenerative disorders, we were trying to ask the question a little bit different and ask about natural aging and see if we can follow the very early steps that lead from very useful. Young functioning brain to age brain do. What do you understand at this stage? What is it about aging? The physical process that leads to this deterioration. It actually has to do with the blood vessels. And so this neural connections the way that they work or sort of in an environment that is secluded from the blood. There is a barrier that we call blood brain barrier that prevents things to pass from the blood into the brain freely. And we saw that in aging this deteriorates a little bit. We were not the only ones to see it. But we were able to find is the pathway that leads after some pro teams get into the brain and push the environment to be inflammatory and creates this deterioration in the neural functioning. So what have you discovered that would change that because you would think on the face of it? That's just an aging process that we cannot fight again. What do you? What's your discovery started doing it by thinking, we're gonna understand? And what happens to the brain? Maybe we can find a biomarker. Maybe we can find something that we could tell has time maybe middle ages were at the patients that are going to be at risk, and we were able to do that. But then got a little bit cocky and said well now, if we know all of that what happens if we block this process, and would we saw that was completely surprise to us is that we can reverse this. So we could take an H now in block the process that already happened, and it turned out turned out the the brain itself had the capacity of a young brain. But it was masked by this process. And when we removed it restored a youthful functioning to the brain dot is quite incredible. And it must have come as a surprise to you as well by the sounds of things. It was a surprise. So what exactly did did you do to initiate this change, this discovery what we did is? We did a couple of things first we found the mechanism itself. And then we said we want to do something that we call him biology game to function and loss of function. We took a young mouse and said if we were to expose this young brain to this one protein, can we make it age, and we were able to do that. If we were able to block this one protein, can we reverse this, and we were able to do that genetically? And then the next step, of course, was to team up with a medicinal chemists and find a drug, and so we made a drug a small molecule inhibitor that we can give the pill and.

Daniele cofer Clarkston Genova Alzheimer Shaimaa Khalil Clermont tunnel Victoria Gill American Association Washington Two decades
"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

04:41 min | 3 years ago

"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"The liver and the kidneys in legs and so on now the secret here is to stay off the bad foods forever. Everybody in the household. Got to do that the arteries will heal themselves. If you do that if you keep hitting yourself with these bad foods, you just keep re damaging the lining the arteries. Okay. And so it's imperative that you take the ninety cents a nutrients take that ultimate daily classic tablets. They will support healthy blood flow to the blocked arteries all over the body. They will support healthy blood pressure can't fail. Let's go to Tom for final. Text in tweet Thomas. Go ahead tweet in I suffered a severe traumatic brain injury. And now have anger issues mood swings and memory issues. What can I do to help these please help me? That's a toughie dark. Okay. Go ahead with to how they're being and heart PAKs for months. None of the baptism fried foods are processed meats gluten to get blood flowing to the blood vessels, the brain the daily classic Chambliss. They'd go ahead and take three those three times. Today, the three bottles month. I'd also take these three of those twice bottles a month. And they're designed to support the cells in the brain talking to each other brain function is is for the brain to make neurotransmitters. And then, of course, the de-stress castles three of those twice a day for brain metabolism the ultimate plus to those twice a day. And that's going to give the brain everything needs to do all the right things. But don't forget those three or four eggs twice a day soft yolks, but not fried cooked in oils, and the brain has an enormous capacity to heal itself. But it does need that raw materials it needs, tablets and work. Probably needs to blood supply, the brain has an enormous capacity to heal and has a tremendous ability to rebound. But it does need the raw materials. Let's go to John in citrus heights, California. First time caller for us, John. Go ahead, sir. Yeah. Hi, duck. I tell everybody that you're my doctor and the pharmacist. I'm in my eighty four year. Good for you. And I'll make this quick as I can. And so that's gonna be on. But my dad came down with Alzheimer's, and he was about my age ninety seven and a half. He got pneumonia was realizing and die before kids genetic. Yeah. And then my brother is about three years older than I am he came down with Alzheimer's about ten years ago. And then my sister who is your younger than I am. She has it. Okay. Well, let me stop you there. Family. Okay. Every day with black pepper. And then I was raised on the street ages a day. Yeah. I still take a bus created today. Again, I've gone through the VA they've done it memory tests on me. I came out great. I'm writing my book, and I don't want to get Alzheimer's. So I was talking to this past Saturday. And he says that actually start taking blocks of coconut oil people in the Philippines. Don't get Alzheimer's. Then that's why because of the coconut oil. And then I started taking limitless. No. I haven't been taking your products yet. I didn't tend to do it. I haven't gotten around to it yet. But I will and anything else. What what do you think about the coconut oil? Okay. Well, first of all they do get. Alzheimer's disease and other dementias and Pacific islands. Anybody who says you don't get that? It's nonsense. Coconut oil is very dangerous. Okay. You can get initially is a nice effect because it has we'll make it threes in it and gives your body some things your cell walls needs and so forth. But over period time Munster years, it will cause plaque in your arteries Lashley 'cause. That's the main thing because in the arteries very very dangerous, and especially if it's heated for cooking. And that kind of thing you want to stay away from coconut oil. They don't live as long as you'd like to think they do I think they only live in their fifties. And they do get dementia Alzheimer's disease. So anybody who tells you they don't have they're not telling the truth? So how much you weigh, sir? Fifty one fifty. Yeah. One fifty. Ok yeah. None of the bad. Susan fried food process means no oils, including coconut MCTL's, gotta go..

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease coconut MCTL Chambliss Thomas John Tom Philippines California pneumonia Susan Munster Lashley eighty four year three years ten years
"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"And then I was raised on the street ages a date, and I feel about today again, I've gone through the VA convicts they've done it memory tests on me. I came out great. I'm reading my book, and I don't want to get Alzheimer's. So I was talking to. This past Saturday, and he says that actually start taking blocks of coconut oil, the people in the teams don't get Alzheimer's, then that's why because of the coconut oil. And then I've also started taking limitless. No, I haven't been taking your products yet. I tend to do it. I haven't gotten around yet. But I will and anything else or what what do you think about the coconut oil? Okay. Well, first of all, they do get Alzheimer's disease and other dementias in Pacific islands. Anybody who says you don't get that nonsense. Coconut oil is very dangerous. Okay. You can get initially as a nice effect because it has will make it threes in it and gives your body some things your cell walls needs and so forth. But over a period of time months or years, it will cause plaque in your arteries, actually 'cause. That's the main thing because plank in the arteries, very very dangerous. And especially if it's heated for cooking. And that kind of thing you want to stay away from coconut oil. They don't live as long as you'd like to think they do I think they only live in their fifties. And they do get dementia Alzheimer's disease. So anybody who tells you they don't says they're not telling the truth? So how much she, sir? Fifty one. Yeah. One fifty. Ok yeah. None of the bad foods and fried food process means no oils, including coconut M, C T O. He's gotta go. No gluten that we've run around take three.

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease
"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"dementia alzheimer disease" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Well, there were studies done, you know, decades ago that showed that this you held a cell phone to your head that you increase the permeability of the spare your that surround the brain is called the blood brain barrier. The brain is protected by the body, you know, by this barrier for you know, from the rest of the body. So you have things like toxic mercury floating around in your body that blood brain barrier. We'll keep a lot of that mercury out out of your brain. When you expose the brain to microwave radiation at the same frequencies that we use an in cell phones, it causes that barrier to liquefy and it puts holes in it, basically. And so things that shouldn't get into your brain actually can penetrate into the brain. And this has been found, you know, repeatedly. And consequently doctors are now beginning to use microwave exposure of the brain to get. Drugs into the brain that you know, because it's hard to get drugs into the brain as well. And so they're actually using it to help drugs penetrate this barrier. So it's used as being used therapeutically under very controlled conditions. So the difference between that as you want the drug to get into the brain to do, you know, whatever does but with some of the other chemicals in your body. You don't want them to get into the brain. That's why you have the blood brain barrier. So if you have mercury in your body, most of us do from feelings or eating fish, or you know, some people are occupationally exposed mercury is a toxin, and if it can penetrate that blood brain barrier, get into your brain, it can cause all sorts of neurological damage once it starts, killing the nerve cells nurse sows don't regenerate very quickly at all specially in the brain. And it can then lead to all sorts of things like dementia, Alzheimer's disease and other kinds of neurological disorders that are becoming. Increasingly prevalent in our society. What about DNA damage? Well, you know, one of the things that a lot of physicists will tell you is that there's a difference between I ninety nine nine nine, radiation and radiation. We first things like xrays, for example. We know that they have enough energy to break chemical bonds. And so they can damage DNA. And if they can damage DNA, then they can potentially damage other kinds of, you know, chemical bonds and contribute to cancer, Dr Havis, pardon the interruption. I've got to take a quick time out. We'll come back and delve further into the serious health. Concerns surrounding five G, wireless networks, here's Motorhead and their version of sympathy for the devil. Taking us into the break on coast to coast AM find out more about tonight's guest. Log on to coast to coast AM dot com. Isn't it time? We tell our side of the story. I'm Patrick Karachi. I'm Adriana Cortes..

DNA damage Adriana Cortes Patrick Karachi Dr Havis Alzheimer's disease Motorhead five G