36 Burst results for "Dementia"

Fresh update on "dementia" discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

00:37 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "dementia" discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"And I will try to get to all of those responses later in the program. Again, I'll talk about that with Dale and Tim coming up ten 30 eastern and I ask they answer that is one of several topics I will present to them. They're also going to have a special remembrance of trainer angel Penn and junior who passed away on Tuesday. He was suffering from dementia and I believe 74 years old. And that's a big loss for so many people in the sport so many people were so kind on social media posting beautiful things about angel Penn and junior. Many people have asked me over the years if we were related because of the same last name, same spelling, we were not. Matter of fact, I never even had the chance to meet angel Penn and junior. But I wish I had, because of some of the things that I've read about him and some of the things that have been said, he sounds like he was a pretty cool dude. So we'll do that. We'll talk about that with Dale and Tim coming up too. And again, chuck Simon kicking off the show with me to talk about this new era with really no handicap races. Those have gone by the wayside. I'll talk to chuck coming up at 8 15. Coming up at 8 35 in the second segment here in the first hour. Woodbine handicapper, Jeff bratt will be with me to talk about the gray stakes and the mazarine stakes later today, north of the border. He'll have his thoughts there. Unsung heroes presented by woodbine, comes up at 9 o'clock. I'm going to welcome Sami almarez, who is now working for Tom van Berg as his assistant, Tom joining me on trainer talk for a full hour this past Wednesday night. And if you haven't heard it, go back and listen to the podcast. He spends a lot of time crediting Sammy.

Angel Penn Dale TIM Chuck Simon Dementia Jeff Bratt Woodbine Sami Almarez Chuck Tom Van Berg TOM Sammy
We're Convinced Joe Biden Has Dementia

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:10 min | 3 weeks ago

We're Convinced Joe Biden Has Dementia

"Here's a text message on the MyPillow text line. I'd like to thank the president the governor and our local representatives for telling me that the economy is great and they've lowered my costs. I didn't realize my bank account, my grocery Bill and fuel costs were all lying to me. Remember the guy in front of the burning building during the George Floyd riots? Saying, fiery, but mostly peaceful. As the building was on fire behind him, mostly peaceful as a mostly peaceful fire. He's riots are mostly peaceful. Pay no attention to your lying eyes and all the video you're seeing all over social media of random attacks. People being slugged and stabbed and shot and beat up, people being carjacked. And a president who's oblivious, maybe even worse than oblivious, and I'm careful in the way I use my words, but I'm completely convinced that Joe Biden has dementia.

George Floyd Joe Biden Dementia
You're Dealing With a Team That Is NOT Smart...

The Trish Regan Show

01:06 min | Last month

You're Dealing With a Team That Is NOT Smart...

"Reality is you're dealing with a team here that is not smart. I wish I wish. I wish they would get Larry summers on their team. Former treasury secretary under Bill Clinton and also the former head of the national economic council under Barack Obama. He's like the only guy that's actually willing to admit the truth. And by the way, the Democrats aren't too happy about them because of it. But he, like me, actually, I was saying it much earlier than him. Understands understands really and truly what is at stake and it's a lot. It's a lot because we are now in an environment where the fed is not properly positioned to be able to reign in this inflation. They are not willing to actually engage in the so called quantitative tightening, which they need to engage in. In other words, they had all that easing. They went out and bought a $120 billion worth of mortgage backed securities and treasury bills for months and months and months and months for years. Pumping 7 nearly $7 trillion into the economy. You couple in all those $1 trillion programs that Joe Biden and the Democrats before still along and you get an environment with just too much cash floating around in the system.

Larry Summers National Economic Council Bill Clinton Treasury Barack Obama FED Joe Biden
Dementia? Biden Says Economy Is 'Stronger Than Hell!'

The Trish Regan Show

02:12 min | Last month

Dementia? Biden Says Economy Is 'Stronger Than Hell!'

"We've got a president here who just really wants to ignore if you ask me reality. I don't know if he understands reality. I don't know if it's an age thing. He's coming up on 80 and look, I'm not an agent, but let's face the facts. He's not seemingly all there. And when he says what he said, just recently, while eating an ice cream cone, that's a theme for him, right? All that ice cream. Well, he says things like this and I'm going to play it for you. You have to take a step back and say, does he really understand what's going on? Does he really understand the pain that Americans are feeling in terms of this inflation? And why is he so willing to just blame everyone? Literally, everyone else, in a way that absolutely positively doesn't make sense. Take a listen to this here. I'm not concerned about the truth Nobel. I'm concerned about the rest of the world. Inflation is worldwide. Or so everyone else knows the mistakes. Other countries not so much better. Okay, it's their fault. It's their fault. The problem is the lack of economic growth in other countries, not us. I'm concerned about them. Not us. I mean, that's a stretch. Well, first of all, the president of the United States, so frankly, you ought to be concerned about us. You ought to be concerned about us. First and foremost. Second of all, the lack of economic growth in other countries is actually a direct result of the strong dollar. Let's not forget we are the world's reserve currency. So when dollars become more expensive because we're pulling them out of circulation in my estimation, not enough. But when we pull those out of circulation with higher interest rates, that means the rest of the world suddenly is facing higher costs

United States
Caller: No Way Joe Biden Could Pass a Cognitive Test

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:11 min | 2 months ago

Caller: No Way Joe Biden Could Pass a Cognitive Test

"I'm just sitting here in the state of shock over the president and calling on a dead congresswoman. So I happen to lose my brother in 2018. Because the last couple of years of his life, my grandmother had Alzheimer's and dementia and we started seeing things in my father and then he had cancer and we saw it at worst, but I actually sat in on these cognitive tests that they give people who have Alzheimer's and dementia. Right. And I remember when Biden was elected within the first, I think month or two, it was big news that, oh yeah, no Biden had a cognitive test that he was fine. I've sat through those. I watched my father go through it. I can 100% say there's no way that he would have passed a normal cognitive test. I mean, how could this not be an issue of dementia? How in the world, if he's calling on a woman who was killed in a very high profile, terrible accident that everybody knew about and he's standing at the podium saying, hey Jackie, come on up. Come on up and speak. How's that not dementia? Or Alzheimer's or some cognitive crisis?

Alzheimer's Dementia Biden Cancer Jackie
Karine Jean-Pierre Defends Biden's Gaffe of Calling on a Dead Lawmaker

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:52 min | 2 months ago

Karine Jean-Pierre Defends Biden's Gaffe of Calling on a Dead Lawmaker

"Don't you think this man has dementia? Do you forget that somebody died like a, oh, I don't know, congresswoman? Listen to Korea Jean Pierre, desperately try to pretend that that was normal. To return to this question of the congresswoman. And I think we all totally get why she's top of mind. You've made that case pretty effectively. The confusing part is why if she and the family is top of mind, does the president think that she's living and in the root? I don't find that confusing. I mean, I think many people can speak to sometimes when you have someone top of mind, they're a top of mind exactly that. And it is also you put it into the context, it's not like it happened without outside of contacts, right? It happened at an event where we were calling out the champions, congressional champions in particular of this issue. This is important issue when it comes to food insecurities, something that this administration has led on led on from the beginning of this administration, not just across the country, but also globally. You heard him talk about food insecurity last week at the UN and the investments that we have put forward as the United States of America and helping and helping deal with that. Look, he was at an event. You all saw you all watched, which is why you're asking the question, right? Where he was calling out again, congressional leaders, a bipartisan leadership that we have seen on this particular issue. And again, he's going to see her family in just two days. And she was on top of mine. I mean, that is, I mean, that is not an unusual, unusual scenario there.

Jean Pierre Dementia Korea United States Of America UN
Guest Host Grant Stinchfield: Joe Biden Is Dementia-Ridden

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

Guest Host Grant Stinchfield: Joe Biden Is Dementia-Ridden

"About this disastrous 60 minutes interview that Joe Biden did last night. There's a reason why he put this off. He just is not good on his feet at all. I mean, the man is dementia ridden. I am confident of that and he does not have a mental acuity capable of keeping America on the right track. And you add in really bad policies being pushed by him and his party. It's a total recipe for chaos in America, which is what we're seeing. Now, last week I swear, you correct me if I'm wrong. I watched Joe Biden wear a mask. I know I saw him just last week wearing a mask. Now we know it is ridiculous right now to be wearing a mask. They didn't work, by the way. And I have plenty of evidence to back that up.

Joe Biden Dementia America
What's so Bad About Making America Great Again?

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:49 min | 3 months ago

What's so Bad About Making America Great Again?

"You watch the speech last night? Biden's speech, the demonic deranged President Biden declaring war on conservative Americans. Not only was the setting bizarre and perhaps you've seen on Twitter, Facebook, other social media, the setting where he was posed in front of this kind of dark black and red scene with marines in uniform standing behind him, you know, politicizing, of course, the U.S. Marine Corps. As he gave this just hateful derisive divisive, angry speech that was supposed to be about unity and supposed to be nonpartisan. You know, the president of the United States gave a political speech on taxpayer dollar last night. Now the good news is you probably didn't see it because ABC NBC, CBS, Fox News, MSNBC. Most of the media broadcasting units chose not to air it because they knew what was coming. They knew it was a partisan political speech, portrayed as a, you know, bring us together, kumbaya, can't we all get along speech by this deranged and divisive president. And yet, if you did get a chance to see it, I want to hear your thoughts on it. I mean, folks are panning it all over the map. We'll share some of the thoughts on Twitter and otherwise, president Trump, weighed in, questioning whether or not President Biden is suffering from severe dementia and urging somebody to very slowly. Very slowly. And passionately. It actually explained to him what maga is. Now you do know that maga stands for make America great again. What about making America great again? Is so disturbing to Democrats. So disturbing to liberals so disturbing to this deranged dementia addled, president of the United States. What's so bad about making America great again that the Democrats are so opposed to? I

President Biden Biden U.S. Marine Corps Twitter President Trump America Msnbc Facebook Fox News NBC CBS ABC Dementia Maga
Zombie cells central to the quest for active, vital old age

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 3 months ago

Zombie cells central to the quest for active, vital old age

"Scientists are working toward an ancient goal staying healthy and active late in life The field of cellular senescence looks at how as we age our cells eventually stop dividing University of California scientist Leonard hayflick discovered the phenomenon by accident in 1960 After about 50 population doublings of the original cells I noticed that the cells stopped dividing It's a hot topic for research as scientists explore vaccines and drugs dubbed senolytics that might stop the accumulation of not quite dead cells which can trigger inflammation and are believed to lead to an array of conditions like dementia osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease Pairing a chemotherapy drug with a plant pigment showed promise in pilot studies of lung and kidney disease by the Mayo Clinic I've always thought that exercise is the best medicine there ever was invented 95 year old athlete and senior games medalist Richard solar returned to the track at age 50 and has his own prescription for a healthy old age Keep moving That's my motto I'm Jennifer King

Leonard Hayflick Dementia Osteoporosis University Of California Cardiovascular Disease Kidney Disease Mayo Clinic Richard Solar Lung Jennifer King
Thanks Joe, But Dems Are Ready for More Energy Says Maury Blackman

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:45 min | 4 months ago

Thanks Joe, But Dems Are Ready for More Energy Says Maury Blackman

"Let's talk about the democratic side, more, 'cause that's the other thing bob cesca or friend tweeted about this morning about polling, I think, has a lot to do with how the mainstream media portrays the Biden and politics in general. But secondarily, he said, you know, this is what I like about alpha liberals. It stands strong and stands strong for your leadership. If anything you're polling shows, is this a cult of Trump? They stand by Trump no matter. I mean, it doesn't matter how many crimes out crimes he commits, whereas what you're polling shows in other polls have shown, of course, are that Democrats are nervous already about Joe Biden. First of all, as you know politically, 2024 is a billion years away from now, right? But the thing is, Democrats are nervous, right? That's what basically came out of this. You have, here it is. Democrats have a clear message for President Biden don't run again by a margin of 23.61% to 38%. They reject another Biden run. The preferences include Kamala Harris at 21%, Hillary Clinton at 19% Gavin Newsom and Pete Buttigieg's tied for third at 9%. Where do you see that coming from? Is it generation is a generational? Is it that, you know, but again, Fox News, all they cover 24/7 is Biden old Biden dementia Biden, you know, I mean, just first of all, a bunch of stuff that's not true, you know? But I don't know how much that plays into Democrats nervousness. What do you think? Is we love you? You did your job. You got Donald Trump out of office. Now we're ready for a new type of leadership. I think it's very clear to Americans that Joe's lost a little bit of a step and they're ready for a more energetic candidate in 2024. That's just my take.

Biden Bob Cesca President Biden Pete Buttigieg Donald Trump Joe Biden Kamala Harris Gavin Newsom Hillary Clinton Fox News JOE
Another Child Falls Prey to Biden’s Hair Sniffing Habit in Delaware

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

00:49 sec | 4 months ago

Another Child Falls Prey to Biden’s Hair Sniffing Habit in Delaware

"What happened over in Delaware Biden, and we've got the video up on our website Todd stern's dot com, a Joe Biden, meaning the constituency and he was out riding his little bicycle with the training wheels. And the big helmet and he stops and he's like taking a photograph with this little girl he's standing behind her and he's like leans in and you start sniffing her hair and you can hear people, somebody was just randomly filming it and you could hear people saying this woman. Oh my God, he's sniffing the girl's hair. What's going is that normal? For people suffering dementia and is that normal behavior or is that just like a pervo creepy kind of a thing for a guide to do, especially in old man? To a little girl. 8

Todd Stern Biden Joe Biden Delaware Dementia
Charlie Takes Listeners Back in Time to February 2020

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:27 min | 4 months ago

Charlie Takes Listeners Back in Time to February 2020

"I want to ask this question, which is, who do we think we're dealing with? Let's go back in the time machine. You kind of think back to a time when we thought we were going to win massively. I remember being at Mar-a-Lago, producer Andrew was there with me for one of the book launch parties for the maga doctrine. If my memory serves me correctly, this was in late February of 2020 and oh times were good. It's kind of the beginning of the tale of two cities. It was the best of times and yet it was the worst of times. It was the best of times because it felt like it was the best of times. It was the worst of times because we didn't quite realize what was happening under the surface. There was a subterranean risk that was emerging. You see, we were at Mar-a-Lago and hier Bolsonaro was there. It was Kimberly Guilfoyle's birthday. The good times were flowing. Tucker Carlson was there. It was a who's who of a typical winter, Saturday evening, at Mar-a-Lago. But I would say some people were there were a couple people Tucker in particular. Tucker was there actually to warn Trump. About COVID. Ahead of the curve is always saying you better take this seriously because this could end up being a massive risk to your presidency. The economy was great. We were exporting oil, the border was largely secure. We weren't involving ourselves in foreign entanglements. Our enemies feared us, our Friends respected us. Times were great. And I remember that evening at Mar-a-Lago, higher Bolsonaro was there, the birthday parties, the times were flowing. It felt like The Great Gatsby all over again. It was the roaring 20s you could say. In February of 2020, they were talking about inauguration plans for the coming January. There was a cockiness that almost permeated the air. There was an attitude that we got this. There is nothing they can throw at us. We're the incumbent president, the economy's fabulous, they're going to nominate either a socialist or a dementia filled candidate, the mainstream media was even writing stories saying Trump will be very difficult to beat. And then everything changed.

Lago Hier Bolsonaro Kimberly Guilfoyle Tucker Tucker Carlson Andrew Bolsonaro Donald Trump Dementia
"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:23 min | 5 months ago

"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"And I always tell people the next time I'll let you be the host again. The next time you think about the statement persons with dementia can not learn, please remember this woman because definitely not true. It's just not true. Yeah, yeah. So this is, this is what we're about. This is about changing the way people think about dementia, changing what they see, enabling people to use capacities that they have giving people purpose and meaning and the ability to live well with dimension. We work with people literally on the day they die, engaging them and showing staff and families how to engage them using this approach, enabling people to be their best selves persons with dementia and those who are their care partners. It's about a way of living and we just applying it in this population here. So that is kind of sort of who we are and what we do, but I told people I don't have a job I have a mission. I can relate. There's a difference. And it's about trying to change the world. It's trying to change the very way we think. And view the world and the people around us and we have a montessori pledged that we ask people to consider taking when they work with us. I will work to create the kind of place I would want to live. I will remember I must earn the trust of others, they must learn to trust me. I will remember I'm a guest in the home of residence. I will try to be a good guest. If you have a bad guest in your home, you don't ask them back. And they take over the TV and the whole 9 yards and when I go to my room and I stay there. This is human stuff. It says I will use the montessori principles in everything that I do, things like always demonstrate, give choice, give meaning, move it their speed, give people something to hold. And I will treat everyone I meet with respect, dignity, and equality, the key roles, and then finally I will treat people the way I wish to be treated. Yep. We need a lot more of that nowadays. Yeah, and you see what happens is it spills over beyond like a job. We're beyond visits. It's about like giving children choice at home, which of these chores that we need to have done with you like to do. As opposed to clean.

dementia
"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:23 min | 5 months ago

"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"And I always tell people the next time I'll let you be the host again. The next time you think about the statement persons with dementia can not learn, please remember this woman because definitely not true. It's just not true. Yeah, yeah. So this is, this is what we're about. This is about changing the way people think about dementia, changing what they see, enabling people to use capacities that they have giving people purpose and meaning and the ability to live well with dimension. We work with people literally on the day they die, engaging them and showing staff and families how to engage them using this approach, enabling people to be their best selves persons with dementia and those who are their care partners. It's about a way of living and we just applying it in this population here. So that is kind of sort of who we are and what we do, but I told people I don't have a job I have a mission. I can relate. There's a difference. And it's about trying to change the world. It's trying to change the very way we think. And view the world and the people around us and we have a montessori pledged that we ask people to consider taking when they work with us. I will work to create the kind of place I would want to live. I will remember I must earn the trust of others, they must learn to trust me. I will remember I'm a guest in the home of residence. I will try to be a good guest. If you have a bad guest in your home, you don't ask them back. And they take over the TV and the whole 9 yards and when I go to my room and I stay there. This is human stuff. It says I will use the montessori principles in everything that I do, things like always demonstrate, give choice, give meaning, move it their speed, give people something to hold. And I will treat everyone I meet with respect, dignity, and equality, the key roles, and then finally I will treat people the way I wish to be treated. Yep. We need a lot more of that nowadays. Yeah, and you see what happens is it spills over beyond like a job. We're beyond visits. It's about like giving children choice at home, which of these chores that we need to have done with you like to do. As opposed to clean.

dementia
"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:13 min | 5 months ago

"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Ability to feed yourself. But it all starts with the understanding of the person with dementia can still learn. The person with dementia is a normal person who has a disability. We need to look at dementia, not as a disease medicalized process, but as a disability. And what that means is that our job then is to enable a person to circumvent their deficits. And to be able to use the ability to stay have as opposed to focusing on what they can't do. So for example, we talk about cognitive ramps, okay? No, if you're driving down the street and you see a ramp that's built up in the front yard to somebody's house, you don't think anything of it. You say, you know, there's someone there who is, say, in a wheelchair, and this lets them get into the house without having to go up steps or be carried up the steps. So for a person with dementia, cognitive ramps are things that allow you to circumvent your deficits. So for example, I remember talking to a woman who said, you know, it's really sad, but when I come to visit my husband, he doesn't know me anymore. He calls me by his mother's name or his Antony. And what I told her was he knows he just can't name you. There's a real, that's not a random choice of names. So what if you wear a name tag in large print when you come to visit? And he can read that and call you by name. And that is a cognitive ramp. And I'll tell you the nature of a relationship changes when a person can call you by name or when they can't. We say it's a little thing that's a big thing. Another thing is, for example, I always talk to staff and I say, all right, so a person comes up to you and says, you know, my wife doesn't visit me anymore or my daughter. They don't know if I'm alive or dead. Please call them. And of course, the person left 45 minutes ago after their visit. And they might not be even home. They're on the way. They're on the way home, see. Why laugh because when my mom was in memory care the first year ish, oh my goodness, all the ladies there, they were demanding the phone in the yellow pages, which of course cracked me up because I'm not even sure they still print yellow pages anymore, but that's what they remember though. Yeah. So what we say is you need to, if this is a community, you need to have a visitor center. You need to have a place where people can go who are coming for a visit who can see what's coming up who can figure out how to get to places, but also how to have a good time. And so one of the things we talk about is what we call a visitor's book. This is a thing that I got actually an Oslo when I was giving the conference, but.

dementia Antony Oslo
"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:49 min | 6 months ago

"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Did you use the documentation to help the medical profession understand that she was good at, you know, the little fibbing, the, I forget exactly what they call it, but it's basically like social posturing like. You know, they're very good with the doctor and the Friends, but they're just atrocious with us, the caregiver, their children. For sure. Did that help the doctors or did you not use that tool? I did. I called ahead. I would call ahead of the doctor's appointment and say something's wrong with my mother and I'm bringing her in for an annual checkup. That's what we're going to call this. She's not going to let me come in the room with her because she's this suspicious. But please know that there's something wrong and she's going to present to you perfectly normal. I did this so many times and I have to say, even sometimes the doctors didn't get it right. I had one Doctor Who said, they were going to talk to you a little bit today about some questions and we're going to see how cognitively you're doing. Well, as soon as my mother heard that, you know, she clenched right up and the interview was over. And again, this was a doctor that I had called ahead. So like you said, there's just levels of expertise out there that still aren't that still aren't in place. Nope. Is like one of the number one growing diseases out there, especially with the baby boomer population that's aging. Yep. I know. I'm assuming you are prepared. Oh, definitely. It's terrifying. I keep telling my husband, you know, I hope it improves because if it's as bad, so he's 57, I'm 55. If it's this bad in 20 or 25 years, I don't even want to think about it. You know, we do everything we can, lifestyle choices, to prevent the possibility of dementia. I mean, you can't prevent it a 100%. You can delay it maybe if you're destined to get it. You can delay it with lifestyle. Choices, and that's what we're doing, but my paternal grandmother lived to a 103, so I got a long ways to postpone anything. And it's just sad, you know, where the quote unquote richest country in the world. And yet, you know, we just dump dump is probably not a great word, but we just expect families to just drop everything and take care of their loved ones and no training. No, no real help. It's very frustrating. So we're starting to go down the depressing path. So we'll turn that around. So what are some of the obviously many of us have experienced the whole? Faking it really well with the doctors and other people. What were some of the besides driving down the wrong side of the road? That's a new one on me. What are some of the interesting uncharted things that she did in the beginning stages that you wrote down? Yeah. That's a good question. You know, it started with the typical somebody's coming into my house at night. And they're moving all of your grandmother's quilts all over the place. And I come in, I wake up in the morning and somebody has stirring the quilts everywhere. And then it was somebody's paying my bills for me. And I wanted to stop. I said, that's a great problem to have..

dementia
Joe Biden: 'The Strength That We Build Is Inflation'

Mark Levin

01:14 min | 7 months ago

Joe Biden: 'The Strength That We Build Is Inflation'

"Go ahead I build a strong we've built a strong economy with a strong job market No you haven't built a damn thing you fool I mean ultra full And build a thing How did he build a strong economy He brought an immense overarching Brutal government Go ahead I agree with what chairman Paul said last week that the number one threat is the strength and that strength that we built is inflation Oh the strength that we build is inflation What strength does he talking up now This guy has gone full psycho He's delusional self delusional So in addition to being I mean clearly in the early if not mid stages of dementia and I say that actually without trying to be funny in any respect because it's a horrible horrible disease He is utterly delusional but he's always been delusional He's always been a liar

Paul Dementia
Sly Stallone Buries the Hatchet With Bruce Willis

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:09 min | 8 months ago

Sly Stallone Buries the Hatchet With Bruce Willis

"We talked about Bruce Willis suffering from a dementia like illness, which is really sad. And, you know, a few years ago, when Sylvester Stallone was doing the next expendables, Bruce Willis held out for a lot of dough. He wouldn't do it unless he got paid a lot of money. And it got to be a bad thing. It got to be, you know, Stallone was bad bouncing him in the press and on Twitter and it was like, oh my God, these guys were mad. But now because of the illness, Stallone is keeping Bruce Willis in his prayers and, you know, I think he's doing the right thing. The other day he posted photos of him and Bruce Willis over the years. And he wrote a very heartwarming message to Bruce's family, despite the fact that these two guys were once engaged in this very public feud and sly said, we go back a long way. I'm praying for the best for you and your wonderful family.

Bruce Willis Stallone Sylvester Stallone Dementia Twitter Bruce SLY
Oleg Atbashian: Russian Influence Operations Targeted U.S. For Decades

Mark Levin

01:58 min | 8 months ago

Oleg Atbashian: Russian Influence Operations Targeted U.S. For Decades

"Russian influence operation are active measures have been targeting the U.S. for decades Amy to demoralize Americans and make them hate one another Judging by the state of affairs today Russian operations have been quite effective The KGB was dissolved in the early 90s Followed by a short respite then Putin a former KGB colonel restarted the influence game and enhanced it with digital gadgets This time an addition to the traditional leftist radicals he started targeting conservatives as potential agents of influence Again this from the American thinker Russian propaganda is deeply embedded in his sophisticated enough to appear as honest opinions of concerned citizens But what often betrays it is the narcissistic desire making everything about Russia Where there are fuming over Russian election interference or over Russia setting up fake BLM pages on Facebook or being dragged into sympathizing with Russia over its bogus fears of NATO expansion It's so called national interest It's religiosity and spirituality Another felony And so on The Soviet days of communist propaganda any American influencer could get away with it by claiming it was simply a selfless Marxist But today when Russia's ideology is chauvinistic nationalism it's a bit odd for regular Americans to be simply a regular American to be simply selfless defender of Russia's national interests While Russia's defenders point out the existence of Ukrainian nationalism they somehow neglect dementia the unhinged Russian nationalism The two are not equal The nationalism of a dominant ethnicity in an empire that aims to subjugate other ethnicities as inferior to the main one is called chauvinism or supremacism The nationalism of a smaller ethnicity trying to free its neck from under its big brothers boot It's called a movement for dignity freedom and independence something American conservatives have always identified with

Russia KGB Putin AMY BLM U.S. Nato Facebook Dementia
Sebastian and Charlie Kirk Discuss the Latest on Ukraine

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:10 min | 9 months ago

Sebastian and Charlie Kirk Discuss the Latest on Ukraine

"He is the founder of the president of one of the most influential and important organizations in America turning point USA taking back our nation one high school one college campus at a time. Charlie, welcome. Doctor gorka great to be here. Thank you. So we had a kind of two minute grad school session in the break about my take on what's happening in Ukraine. I'm going to take my life in my hands and get your opinion about what should happen. You asked me what we should do. I'm actually just curious. I'm not an expert in that part of my advice that I doubt the senile old man in The White House will take, but if 1776 in masses, guess what? Ukrainians are also made in the image of God and they should be fighting. We should support them in their fight for liberty, not deploy the 82nd airborne, not our job. But NATO should be providing lethal assistance, meaning weapons and ammunitions to Ukraine so they can fight for themselves instead of the Taliban. Second thing NATO could do because of the PLS intelligence capability we have is provide intelligence to Ukraine on how to hurt Russia the most. So the next country invaded is a Poland or the LAT or Latvia or Lithuania. That's my concrete certificate advice. So I'm so busy running all over this place and I'm not like caught up to date. So I saw the map you showed me. What is the latest? I think your listeners would be interested to hear this. It seems like a full fledged invasion. So most commentators were expecting a small incremental increase beyond donets in Luhansk in the east. That's not what happened. For some reason, this man has gone totally for a full bore invasion, strategic bombers, strike attack aircraft taking out Ukrainian runways, even this shows you that the dementia of the cycle that's running the Kremlin. He has taken Chernobyl, which I understand is a Soviet symbol, but it's also a radioactive hunk of concrete. So capturing Chernobyl is not exactly strategic. It's kind of mythical, but it's not strategic. So no, this is a full scale

Gorka Ukraine America Nato Charlie White House Luhansk Taliban Latvia Lithuania Poland Russia Dementia Kremlin
Retired Marine Lt General Says Many Americans Have 'Warfare Dementia'

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:47 min | 9 months ago

Retired Marine Lt General Says Many Americans Have 'Warfare Dementia'

"Every now and then it's really refreshing to hear from a marine who is not in high heels. And I'm using that phrase metaphorically because we have here a retired marine three star general who in the face of all this kind of wokeness, this racial propaganda, this gender nonsense is climate, you know, climate change is the greatest threat facing the country and the military is now going to be prepared to deal with climate change. So here is lieutenant general Gregory newbold. And I think what he said to himself is I need to. I need to put down. I need to remind the civilian population of what the military is and what it does. And I think it's for me, it was kind of a sobering article to read. Gregory, by the way, retired Marine Corps lieutenant general, his commanded platoons divisions. He was directive operations for the joint chief of staff in The Pentagon. So this is basically a heavy hitter. And I want to read some of his statements because I think they kind of know them to be true, but you can see how alien woke culture is to what this guy is talking about. He goes many Americans, especially our most senior politicians and military leaders. He's including military leaders, seem to have developed a form of dementia when it comes to warfare. Think of how serious this is and how dangerous. He goes, the result is confusion or denial about the essential ingredients of a competent military force. And he says the danger, it's one thing if politicians go blah blah blah, but he goes to the condition is exacerbated and enabled when the most senior military leaders who want to know better. The far to the idealistic judgments of those whose credentials are either nonexistent, or formed entirely by ideology. Now, we get to the meat of his point. The U.S. Military has two main purposes, he says. To deter our enemies from engaging us in warfare, and if that fails to defeat them in combat, deterrence is only possible of the opposing force believes it will be defeated, respect is not good enough, fear and certainty are required. So that's the theory of deterrence in a nutshell. Now, the U.S. Military says general newbold can not be a mirror image of the society it serves. Values that are admirable in civilian society, sensitivity, individuality, compassion, tolerance for the less capable, are often antithetical to the traits that deter a potential enemy in wind wars that must be fought. General newborn goes on to say the values of the military cultivates conformity, discipline, duty.

Lieutenant General Gregory New Marine Corps Gregory Pentagon Dementia U.S. Military Confusion General Newbold
"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:00 min | 10 months ago

"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Is there anything else people should know about this tour or the data that you're gathering other than I'm endorsing it because it's definitely an eye opening experience. It's not scary. It might be a little frustrating, but it's short, short lived, and it really will help you if you thought you understood what they were going through. It'll affirm it or change your mind. It's well worth spending ten 15 minutes doing this tour. What else should people know from your side of the aisle here? I think one, it's nothing to be afraid of. It can feel frustrating in there, but that's part of the point. But we'll take care of folks afterwards and make sure people understand everything and why it's done and so we don't leave people hanging. Certainly, secondly, I think it really does help change change everyone. Makes life better for everyone. And I think the other thing to know about it is that the program itself, the virtual dementia tour was donated to our parent organization segment dreams. And second wind dreams mission is to change the perception of aging. And so we do that primarily through fulfilling dreams of elders who live usually the ones who live in long-term care elder care communities who don't have anybody. Because we want people to understand that we have dreams and hopes no matter what our age is. And we don't stop being people just because they're all we're still viable and important. So it's a way to create awareness. So all the funds when people buy the virtual dementia program or donate to it or whatever all of that goes back to helping fulfill dreams. So there's another good cause to add on to that as well as the effectiveness of taking the tour itself. So we've reached several million people so far, but there's still some people on the planet. We have to reach. So if you haven't taken the tour, definitely definitely would encourage you to do that. Of course, yes, I am biased, but I think it really is effective..

dementia
"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:19 min | 10 months ago

"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"That question. What are you going to do differently? And the answers are usually things like, I'll be more patient. I will be more understanding. I will talk slower. I will break tasks down. One thing at a time. You know, lots of things like that. So that learning is beginning before we even process what they just went through. They're already making those connections. And I think that's kind of universal no matter who takes the tour. So that's a very encouraging thing, but I think some of the other lessons that people get out of it besides adjusting their own feelings about it are just realizing that they need to be slower, as I said, slow down with people, take it one day at a time. Take it one minute at a time sometimes if you're providing care. And I think also, it's changed how people who work in the community and interact with people who are older adults or who have cognitive issues. You know, whether it's in a faith based organization or the bank or the shopping center or whatever. It helps people in all of these sort of community venues to become a little more dementia friendly. And that's real important too. So it's not just for people who provide care directly. It's really for anybody. I always tell people and I might be jumping ahead here, but I always say, you know, people are always asking me, who should take this tour and I always say, if you've reached puberty, you don't have cognitive issues yourself. It's not for people with dementia, certainly. And you breathe there, then you probably need to take the tour because you're going to interact with people with dementia at some point in your life in some venue, whether it's personally or professionally, probably both. At some point. So anyway, so I think a lot of the.

dementia
"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:19 min | 10 months ago

"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"That question. What are you going to do differently? And the answers are usually things like, I'll be more patient. I will be more understanding. I will talk slower. I will break tasks down. One thing at a time. You know, lots of things like that. So that learning is beginning before we even process what they just went through. They're already making those connections. And I think that's kind of universal no matter who takes the tour. So that's a very encouraging thing, but I think some of the other lessons that people get out of it besides adjusting their own feelings about it are just realizing that they need to be slower, as I said, slow down with people, take it one day at a time. Take it one minute at a time sometimes if you're providing care. And I think also, it's changed how people who work in the community and interact with people who are older adults or who have cognitive issues. You know, whether it's in a faith based organization or the bank or the shopping center or whatever. It helps people in all of these sort of community venues to become a little more dementia friendly. And that's real important too. So it's not just for people who provide care directly. It's really for anybody. I always tell people and I might be jumping ahead here, but I always say, you know, people are always asking me, who should take this tour and I always say, if you've reached puberty, you don't have cognitive issues yourself. It's not for people with dementia, certainly. And you breathe there, then you probably need to take the tour because you're going to interact with people with dementia at some point in your life in some venue, whether it's personally or professionally, probably both. At some point. So anyway, so I think a lot of the.

dementia
"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:44 min | 10 months ago

"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"So we try to make sense of it all because it can be confusing. If you people are in the tour for a while, sometimes some of their behavior mimics the behavior of people with dementia. So it's interesting for people to be able to draw those parallels between how they behaved and how they thought and what the people with dementia are experiencing and how they behave and how it helps normalize what it's like to have dimension quite a bit. Well, I can confirm that because it feels like a lot longer than a few minutes. Trust me. So that's an interesting realization because I, you know, it's been what two or three years now? But I still remember at one point just feeling like, this is ridiculous. Why am I doing this? And just kind of that feeling of forget it. I'm just not going to do it, which would be a typical attitude for my mom. So that was very helpful. I've always, I frequently tell people I have weird vision, so I don't have depth perception, and I don't, you know, in low light, it's like really hard to tell what is where in relationship to me is like, is it close? Is it middle? Is it far and sometimes shadows? Like low contrast just it just messes with my brain. So I did have the benefit of that personal experience. I understood my mom's visual processing not being great pretty well, but the tour was like I said, it was definitely helpful, because I could feel some of the things she felt. And which is obviously the point. Yeah. Yeah, definitely. And I think too, you know, obviously not everybody's going to have those visual issues, but it will give other people a chance to experience the same things you're living with day to day..

dementia
"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:44 min | 10 months ago

"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"So we try to make sense of it all because it can be confusing. If you people are in the tour for a while, sometimes some of their behavior mimics the behavior of people with dementia. So it's interesting for people to be able to draw those parallels between how they behaved and how they thought and what the people with dementia are experiencing and how they behave and how it helps normalize what it's like to have dimension quite a bit. Well, I can confirm that because it feels like a lot longer than a few minutes. Trust me. So that's an interesting realization because I, you know, it's been what two or three years now? But I still remember at one point just feeling like, this is ridiculous. Why am I doing this? And just kind of that feeling of forget it. I'm just not going to do it, which would be a typical attitude for my mom. So that was very helpful. I've always, I frequently tell people I have weird vision, so I don't have depth perception, and I don't, you know, in low light, it's like really hard to tell what is where in relationship to me is like, is it close? Is it middle? Is it far and sometimes shadows? Like low contrast just it just messes with my brain. So I did have the benefit of that personal experience. I understood my mom's visual processing not being great pretty well, but the tour was like I said, it was definitely helpful, because I could feel some of the things she felt. And which is obviously the point. Yeah. Yeah, definitely. And I think too, you know, obviously not everybody's going to have those visual issues, but it will give other people a chance to experience the same things you're living with day to day..

dementia
"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:26 min | 10 months ago

"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Find the link in our show notes and on our website. If you aren't familiar with a virtual dementia tour, you may think it's just another online resource. Not quite. Or all much more familiar with virtual worlds thanks to the pandemic, but a virtual dementia tour predates these times. A virtual dimension tour puts us the caregiver into the world of someone living with some form of dementia. I had the opportunity to participate in a dementia tour back in 2019 and it was definitely a learning opportunity. I don't know how many of the challenges I experienced, my mom had, but that didn't matter. Having as close to a firsthand experience into her world was transformative. Virtual.

dementia
"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:26 min | 10 months ago

"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Find the link in our show notes and on our website. If you aren't familiar with a virtual dementia tour, you may think it's just another online resource. Not quite. Or all much more familiar with virtual worlds thanks to the pandemic, but a virtual dementia tour predates these times. A virtual dimension tour puts us the caregiver into the world of someone living with some form of dementia. I had the opportunity to participate in a dementia tour back in 2019 and it was definitely a learning opportunity. I don't know how many of the challenges I experienced, my mom had, but that didn't matter. Having as close to a firsthand experience into her world was transformative. Virtual.

dementia
"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

04:09 min | 10 months ago

"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"The link in our show notes and on our website. This week we're discussing dementia and your money. I talked to Courtney haydn, who has a very personal reason to focus on this topic. In 2015, her father was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's at the age of 58. Prior to knowing what was going on with him, his home ended up in foreclosure. With this in mind, Courtney launched a financial planning practice. She specializes in helping families find quality care for their loved ones without losing everything. Courtney's goal is to be a light and a voice filled with hope and confidence in the lives of those around her. I know you're gonna find this conversation hopeful and heartwarming and I'm sure you know people that have been in a similar situation. So be sure to share her information and this episode with all the caregivers and the families living with dementia that you know. With me today is Courtney haydn and we are going to be discussing dementia and your money. Courtney and I have had a huge challenge getting together because as caregivers all know, life is never predictable and it's we've had to rearrange and reschedule and we finally made it so thanks for joining me Courtney. Thank you so much for having me, Jennifer. I'm excited that we finally are able to have this conversation. I'm excited because it's one of the biggest challenges for families when we don't plan ahead, which, thankfully, my husband, I have, and, you know, it's hard to get a financial planner on the show because, you know, people that listen to this two years from now, the information may have changed and their compliance people don't want that. So I am so glad that you reached out and offered to talk to us. So, why don't you tell us a little bit about your background because I know one of the reasons we've had to juggle around caregiving or scheduling is because you're still caregiving for your dad, correct? That is correct. And as many of my followers know, my father was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's at the age of 58 back in 2016. So we're several years into his diagnosis. And he experienced a lot of symptoms much before he was diagnosed in some of the earliest symptoms of his dimension, majorly impacted my parents finances. And of course, 58 years old is an age where none of us see it coming. I know before my father was diagnosed, we oftentimes thought of Alzheimer's is something that impacted you and your 70s or your 80s. My grandmother passed away with Alzheimer's, but she was in her 80s when this happened. So unfortunately, when my dad was diagnosed, he could no longer work or drive. So of course, 58 is not an age where many of us plan to retire..

Courtney haydn Courtney onset Alzheimer dementia Jennifer Alzheimer's
"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

03:23 min | 11 months ago

"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Because that thing looks scary to me. They're actually not as bad as they look if I'm really honest. I have written them quite a bit during my life. And then I had a long break from riding one. So it wasn't as though it was a brand new experience for me. And I was pleased that it was something that I hadn't forgotten how to do. So I'd never ridden one for any real distance. So the challenge was actually riding at any distance. And the penny farthing that I have is a brand new one, or it's only 6 or 7 years old. So it's a modern take on the 1875 or whatever it was. The same design. But what I wanted to do, I think, really is a guy cycling on a bicycle doing challenges is one thing. But I wanted to take my dimension to a different level. And I think as my condition changed, I wanted to try and challenge myself more. I've always been somebody who has challenging myself challenging myself all the while. And I thought, well, riding a penny farthing just seemed a great way of just, I don't know, just educating people again that, you know, just because I had a condition, didn't mean that I couldn't do something different. I couldn't do something a bit new. People with dementia, other people's idea is that we can't achieve anything. And basically you've had a diagnosis and then your life is a downhill slope until you're a dribbling wreck. Well, we want to show people that that's not the case. You still can learn to do things. Whether it's just doing something like making a wooden bird box, you know, it's still something that you can do. And for me, I wanted to do something completely crazy so that people sat up and looked and said, wow, you know, this guy is doing this and we want to get people to ride with us, didn't we? As well. So we had the traditional other conditions even if I wrote two three four 5 miles in us to join us on that ride to show anything as possible. You can achieve, yes. Yeah. We did we had a few people who joined us and it was a great week. It was, yeah, and I think that we achieved more than I think I set out to achieve because I don't know, I hope that I put this eye. I suppose I set a bar for myself. And my dementia wants to keep knocking this bar over. But the higher I put it, then I want to grow. And I want to just keep setting level high. So I achieved so much, I think, in my own mind. Better than anything of that. That probably doesn't make a lot sense, but I know what I mean. It's sometimes difficult for me sometimes to portray exactly what I'm feeling. That I suppose really we just, I don't know, we just want to just show people that stuff with dementia is very doable still. And we did raise a lot of money for a dimensional church or two..

dementia
"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

04:45 min | 11 months ago

"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"The book is also to help raise awareness of dementia and I'm assuming Alzheimer's. Tell me how you guys kind of came about the book because obviously that hasn't been out a year about now. And so this is the end of September when we're recording this. I'm not sure when it's coming out because I'm not awake yet. So anyway, how did the book come about? Okay, well I think it's important to say to begin with that it never I don't think it ever intended on being a book. I don't think depth thought, oh, here's the guy I can write a book, a book about it. I think what we try to educate people about dementia is that I don't know what it's like in your part of the world, but we have a lot of support groups here, but support is for older people. And we sort of got together as friends through cycling. And that is a type of support. Now dead supports me in certain ways and I support her. It's not a care package. It's just a friendship. And because my memory is quite poor, I was saying lots of things because I worked all around this area for all of my working life. So riding around here was just like really going through the corridors of my memory really. It opened all sorts of floodgates of memories. And because I was talking these memories out allowed. And debs thought that that would be great to record these because I was forgetting. And something that I suppose my wife and daughter and people could look at it later on. Now it's fair to say that prior to that I was doing weekly videos on YouTube, I did them for about two years. And I got so I couldn't do them. And I couldn't really record my own journey as it was with this condition. And then as time went on, they thought well, it's so much stuff. We ought to consider turning it into a book to help raise people or to help raise awareness and get people to understand dementia. Because we weren't doing many talks and things like that at that time. So it was really just another stage or another platform to stand and shout about dementia and to try and show people that life wasn't over. It was just quite a bit different. Is that a really good summary?.

Alzheimer's dementia debs YouTube
"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

04:45 min | 11 months ago

"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"The book is also to help raise awareness of dementia and I'm assuming Alzheimer's. Tell me how you guys kind of came about the book because obviously that hasn't been out a year about now. And so this is the end of September when we're recording this. I'm not sure when it's coming out because I'm not awake yet. So anyway, how did the book come about? Okay, well I think it's important to say to begin with that it never I don't think it ever intended on being a book. I don't think depth thought, oh, here's the guy I can write a book, a book about it. I think what we try to educate people about dementia is that I don't know what it's like in your part of the world, but we have a lot of support groups here, but support is for older people. And we sort of got together as friends through cycling. And that is a type of support. Now dead supports me in certain ways and I support her. It's not a care package. It's just a friendship. And because my memory is quite poor, I was saying lots of things because I worked all around this area for all of my working life. So riding around here was just like really going through the corridors of my memory really. It opened all sorts of floodgates of memories. And because I was talking these memories out allowed. And debs thought that that would be great to record these because I was forgetting. And something that I suppose my wife and daughter and people could look at it later on. Now it's fair to say that prior to that I was doing weekly videos on YouTube, I did them for about two years. And I got so I couldn't do them. And I couldn't really record my own journey as it was with this condition. And then as time went on, they thought well, it's so much stuff. We ought to consider turning it into a book to help raise people or to help raise awareness and get people to understand dementia. Because we weren't doing many talks and things like that at that time. So it was really just another stage or another platform to stand and shout about dementia and to try and show people that life wasn't over. It was just quite a bit different. Is that a really good summary?.

Alzheimer's dementia debs YouTube
Medicare proposes restricting coverage of Alzheimer's drug

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 11 months ago

Medicare proposes restricting coverage of Alzheimer's drug

"Medicare Medicare is is putting putting limits limits on on coverage coverage of of a a pricey pricey and and controversial controversial new new drugs drugs for for Alzheimer's Alzheimer's disease disease drugmaker drugmaker Biogen Biogen says says it it disagrees disagrees with with Medicare's Medicare's decision decision to to limit limit coverage coverage of of their their new new Alzheimer's Alzheimer's drug drug ads ads you you held held the the treatment treatment is is delivered delivered by by IV IV in in cost cost twenty twenty eight eight thousand thousand dollars dollars a a year year the the centers centers for for Medicare Medicare and and Medicaid Medicaid services services says says that that for for Medicare Medicare to to pay pay patients patients taking taking the the drug drug will will have have to to be be part part of of clinical clinical trials trials to to assess assess the the drug drug safety safety and and effectiveness effectiveness in in slowing slowing the the progression progression of of early early stage stage dementia dementia the the medicine medicine has has not not been been shown shown to to reverse reverse or or significantly significantly slow slow Alzheimer's Alzheimer's but but the the FDA FDA approved approved it it against against the the recommendation recommendation of of outside outside advisers advisers saying saying that that its its ability ability to to reduce reduce costs costs of of plaque plaque in in the the brain brain is is likely likely to to work work there there will will be be a a public public comment comment period period and and further further evaluation evaluation before before the the decision decision becomes becomes final final in in mid mid April April Jennifer Jennifer king king Washington Washington Medicare Medicare is is putting putting limits limits on on coverage coverage of of a a pricey pricey and and controversial controversial new new drugs drugs for for Alzheimer's Alzheimer's disease disease drugmaker drugmaker

Medicare Medicare Alzheimer's Alzheimer's Diseas Biogen Biogen Alzheimer's Alzheimer's Drug Medicare Medicare And And Medi Medicare Dementia Dementia Alzheimer's Alzheimer FDA Jennifer Jennifer King King Wa Washington
Former Broncos, Falcons, Giants coach Dan Reeves dies at 77

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 11 months ago

Former Broncos, Falcons, Giants coach Dan Reeves dies at 77

"Dan Dan Reeves Reeves gave gave a a lot lot of of credit credit for for his his NFL NFL success success the the Dallas Dallas cowboys cowboys coach coach Tom Tom Landry Landry with with whom whom he he won won a a Super Super Bowl Bowl as as a a running running back back in in the the nineteen nineteen sixties sixties referring referring to to you you know know I I have have a a collection collection of of football football I I would would because because winter's winter's res res coaching coaching career career is is where where he he truly truly left left his his mark mark on on the the league league in in twenty twenty three three seasons seasons with with the the Broncos Broncos the the giants giants and and the the Atlanta Atlanta Falcons Falcons going going and and four four in in four four trips trips to to the the Super Super Bowl Bowl he he took took over over as as coach coach of of the the Broncos Broncos in in nineteen nineteen eighty eighty one one building building a a team team around around quarterback quarterback John John Elway Elway that that made made three three Super Super Bowl Bowl appearances appearances breeze breeze moved moved to to New New York York to to coach coach the the giants giants in in nineteen nineteen ninety ninety three three getting getting fired fired after after four four seasons seasons then then in in nineteen nineteen ninety ninety eight eight guided guided the the Atlanta Atlanta Falcons Falcons to to their their first first Super Super Bowl Bowl the the server server not not certain certain that that you you look look at at it it and and said said it it was was realistic realistic mineralization mineralization starch starch started started that that this this team team has has been been unbelievable unbelievable they they lost lost to to the the Broncos Broncos Rees Rees brought brought controversial controversial quarterback quarterback Michael Michael Vick Vick to to the the falcons falcons and and eventually eventually fired fired in in two two thousand thousand three three a a statement statement released released by by his his family family said said Reeves Reeves died died of of complications complications from from dementia dementia I'm I'm Jennifer Jennifer king king

Super Super Bowl Bowl Atlanta Atlanta Falcons Dan Dan Reeves Reeves Dallas Dallas Cowboys Tom Tom Landry Landry Giants League League Broncos NFL Broncos Broncos John John Elway Elway Football New New York York Falcons Cowboys Rees Rees Michael Michael Vick Vick Reeves Reeves Dementia Dementia
"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"dementia" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"App you survived a longer. Earlier lady will develop dementia was parkinson. Then have a temporal lobe dementia. There are many other dimension many other tax which accountable less than ten percents so alzheimer's dementia. Can you actually prevent it. Well the simple on say es no there are things. We can do that with me weekend. So the dementia the alzheimer's dementia which accounts for majority of dementia itself divided into early onset. Dementia before the age of sixty five usually and it is to do with certain mutations which are responsible for the alzheimer's disease and diaries not much. You can do to prevent that. If it's meant to be meant to be and then of course will have late onset. Dementia which is alzheimer's dementia. Which is often they. You're sixty five entities The travelers goes up his age all that exponentially day the older. You are the more your chance to get dementia. Good at his statistics. A frontal mia that The patients over the age of eighty five. Almost one in four us. Forget dementia was survived beyond eighty-five five. So now if we talk about the late onset dementia the right. Hugh things you can do. Maybe look quite prevented Postponement.

alzheimer's dementia dementia parkinson Hugh
"dementia" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"dementia" Discussed on DNA Today

"The biochemistry people think genetics your genes give you this mortality risk. But what they do is they give you a disease. Risk disease is what kills you not the genes. So april four gino type have no increase mortality. So the only risk of death of an e four carrier is those before carries it become demented. But if you're an easy for carrier and you can avoid dementia. There's no mortality association. That he for gino type anymore. Full to be able to take the supplement that you've developed because you can bring up those plasma login levels so that you're decreasing the risk of all of these downstream effects of what you're saying of decreasing you know of of developing dementia from this exactly and then there's two types like the evolved into our assay neuro which has the dha plasminogen. I say you take neuro for performance. uk athletes..

dementia gino uk