35 Burst results for "Delta Airlines"

Are Most Words Already Trademarked

BrainStuff

03:22 min | 3 weeks ago

Are Most Words Already Trademarked

"The writer of today's episode. John Perry Tano rescued two cats from a local vet back in nineteen ninety nine and named one Pandora. He says, he was reading a lot of Greek mythology back then. A couple of years later and Dora Brandon jewelry became all the rage. What if John had trademarked that name I, but he and his friend could have been swimming and cat treats. Yet even if he had thought of it according to to New York University, law professors, it probably would have been too late to cash in. It seems that many of the words we use every day are traded marked, which means it's difficult for entrepreneurs to find good names for new companies. Take Pandora for instance, search the US patent and trademark office database, and you'd find a number of companies that already use Pandora in their name avatars and logos. There's a Pandora Hair Collection Pandora radio and yes Pandora's box. The two professors looked at the six point seven, million trademark. Filed at the US patent and trademark office between two, thousand, three and two, thousand sixteen, they then studied a database of the hundred thousand most frequently used words in American English it's called the Corpus of contemporary American English according to the Oxford English dictionary. There are a bit under two hundred thousand words currently and using the English language but according to the website test your vocab dot com, the median adult native English Speaker knows only about twenty to thirty, five, thousand of them. But back to this study, the authors also reviewed a US census list of the hundred, fifty, one, thousand, six, hundred, seventy, two, most frequently occurring surnames in the United. States. What they found will knock your socks off which by the way is also trademarked they wrote in a two thousand eighteen issue of the Harvard law review the data present compelling evidence of substantial word, mark depletion, a particularly with respect to the sets of potential marks that businesses prefer most standard. English words, Short neologisms that are pronounced by speaking and common American surnames. NEOLOGISM is a term for newly coined words or expressions. NEOLOGISM is still available to be trademarked though other common words do have pending registrations including even the word the. Yes. The currently has eleven active trademark resignations. The result of so many trademarks is that new businesses have to strain their noggins and use variations of Noggin are already taken to come up with Mon. occurs that aren't already claimed or resort to what's called a parallel registration. That's when two companies use the exact same name as long as it won't confuse consumers a for example, Delta faucets versus Delta. Airlines. The authors wrote given these conditions. New applicants are increasingly resorting to sub optimal marks. The data indicate that applicants are applying less often for standard English words and common surnames and more often for complex marks as measured by character syllable and word. Count. and. All of this could likely explain why we see more company names like flicker Tumbler and lift olive which leave out letters or incorporate other misspellings of common words.

Pandora Hair Collection Pandor United States John Perry Tano New York University Writer Dora Brandon Harvard Law Review Delta
Atlanta-Based Delta Airlines Eliminates Change Fees For Most Domestic Flights

Atlanta's Morning News

00:20 sec | 3 weeks ago

Atlanta-Based Delta Airlines Eliminates Change Fees For Most Domestic Flights

"United's lead. Atlanta based Delta also drops $200 change fees for domestic flights The airline hasn't applied hasn't applied them in months. Delta CEO at Bastion says he wants cost customers to book and travel with peace of mind, He says the pandemic requires a flexible approach. Delta is also waving change fees for international flights through the end of the year.

Delta Bastion CEO Atlanta United
Atlanta based Delta Announces Plans To Furlough Nearly 2,000 Pilots By October

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:32 sec | Last month

Atlanta based Delta Announces Plans To Furlough Nearly 2,000 Pilots By October

"Pilots of a major airline could be out of work on October 1st. ABC is Lionel Louise reports Delta Airlines plans to furlough close to 2000 pilots following the expiration of relief from the cares act. This. As airlines nationwide have warned at least 75,000 employees, their jobs are at risk. Delta says the cuts will happen. October 1st unless the perils support program is extended, or deal is reached with the union 1500 pilots had already taken buyouts are often for early retirement. Lionel Moise ABC NEWS

Delta Airlines Lionel Moise Lionel Louise ABC
Airlines to shed tens of thousands of workers as pandemic aid expires

Rush Limbaugh

00:25 sec | Last month

Airlines to shed tens of thousands of workers as pandemic aid expires

"Airlines is warning today that without some government help major layoffs are coming soon. United and Delta Airlines have said they also planned to lay off tens of thousands of workers on October 1st. If government aid is not extended today, American Airlines, saying it plans to lay off or furlough up to 19,000 employees. That, combined with voluntary leaves will reduce American Airlines staff by 40,000 people.

American Airlines Delta Airlines
Airlines to shed tens of thousands of workers as pandemic aid expires

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:30 sec | Last month

Airlines to shed tens of thousands of workers as pandemic aid expires

"Corona. Virus outbreak continues to take a toll on air travel. With US infection rates still high American airlines, signaling without new government aid, major cuts will be necessary. United and Delta Airlines have said they also planned to lay off tens of thousands of workers on October 1st if government aid is not extended. Today. American Airlines, saying it plans to lay offer for a low up to 19,000 employees. That combined with voluntary leaves will reduce American Airlines staff by 40,000 people. BBC's Alex Stone in the

American Airlines Delta Airlines Alex Stone BBC
Ex-SEAL involved in bin Laden raid banned from Delta

Keepin' It Real with Rev. Al Sharpton

00:10 sec | Last month

Ex-SEAL involved in bin Laden raid banned from Delta

"A former Navy seal who participated in the raid that killed Osama bin Laden is being banned from Delta Airlines. Robert O'Neil tweeted a photo of himself on a Delta flight without a mask on

Osama Bin Laden Delta Airlines Robert O'neil Delta Navy
Delta bans purported bin Laden killer for not wearing a mask

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last month

Delta bans purported bin Laden killer for not wearing a mask

"The former navy seal who said he killed Osama bin laden has been banned from a domestic airline for refusing to keep on his face mask Robert o'neill tweeted about his experience with delta airlines he posted a selfie with no mask on a delta connection flight Wednesday from Minneapolis to Newark New Jersey that tweet was taken down but the next day he tweeted thank god it wasn't delta flying us in when we killed bin laden we weren't wearing masks delta says that prior to traveling every passenger is required to acknowledge their updated travel policies which include wearing a mask and that failure to comply can result in losing the ability to fly delta in the future o'neill came forward in twenty fourteen three years after the raid on Osama bin laden's compound to say he fired the shots that killed the terrorist leader I'm Jackie Quinn

Osama Bin Laden Robert O'neill Delta Airlines Minneapolis New Jersey Jackie Quinn Navy Newark
Atlanta based Delta airlines will restart flights between US and China, departing from Seattle and Detroit

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:26 sec | Last month

Atlanta based Delta airlines will restart flights between US and China, departing from Seattle and Detroit

"To weekly flights between the US and China next week. This will bring the total number of flights to four. The action is due largely to increased customer demand and also recent government approval for such services. Flights will depart from Seattle and Detroit beginning on August. 24th Delta said they'll fly to Inchon International Airport in Seoul before continuing on to Shanghai Pooed on international airport. Well as you say

Inchon International Airport Shanghai Pooed Seoul United States Seattle China Detroit
City: Pandemic Widened Boston's Child Care Gap

WBZ Afternoon News

01:09 min | Last month

City: Pandemic Widened Boston's Child Care Gap

"Today, the Boston City Council hearing testimony on what they call a child care crisis in the state. Massachusetts has the second most expensive childcare in the entire country. A number of providers and family based operations has been shrinking. For years, W. B. C's Madison Rodgers reports with the pandemic that number is getting ever smaller One single corporation, Delta Airlines received more cares act funding than the entire child care system did. Several testifier is called for a bailout of the child care industry, which by the city's estimate has only 65% of the capacity it did before the panda. Like with more and more kids being kept out of the classroom. It makes for a looming disaster, especially for low income parents who can't do their jobs remotely Mama formula. Montero says she has no idea how she's going to make it work in the fall. The deck is the sun does not work for people like me because it's very expensive. I've had to resort to unlicensed care from relatives. My kids get in the school reading the skills that they need. Child care is an enormously complicated issue, but it's also one that needs action fast in the council plans to continue working toward Aking action. Madison Rogers W. B C Boston News

Boston City Council Montero Madison Rogers Madison Rodgers Delta Airlines C Boston News Massachusetts W. B. C
Atlanta-based Delta urges 3,000 flight attendants to take unpaid leave, shorter schedules to avoid furloughs

Ground Zero with Clyde Lewis

00:25 sec | Last month

Atlanta-based Delta urges 3,000 flight attendants to take unpaid leave, shorter schedules to avoid furloughs

"Delta Airlines asking flight attendants to take up to a year off to avoid being forced to go on furlough. About 17,000 Delta employees have already accepted voluntary buyouts or taken early retirement. As travel demand remains weak amid the Corona virus pandemic. In a note to employees, a Delta senior vice president said the airline would need at least 3000 flight attendants to take unpaid leave or share schedules to help preserve jobs through next

Delta Airlines Delta Senior Vice President
UPS Plans Hefty Holiday Fees for Large Shippers

Mark Blazor

00:26 sec | Last month

UPS Plans Hefty Holiday Fees for Large Shippers

"Surcharges of up to $4 a package for some air shipments. Those extra fees will be based on the items weight when it is sent, and the volume of packages that are being sent. FedEx has already hiked up some of their fees is shipping demand has been rising amid the Corona virus pandemic. Delta Airlines says today they're asking flight attendants to take up to a year off to avoid being forced to go on furlough.

Delta Airlines Fedex
Southwest, American tighten mask rules; Delta widens testing

All Things Considered

00:17 sec | 2 months ago

Southwest, American tighten mask rules; Delta widens testing

"Some other airlines, Southwest now says it will not allow health waivers to its face mask on all flights rule. Instead, the airlines has only Children under two will be exempt from wearing a mask while onboard its planes. Delta Airlines has announced it plans to expand corner virus testing of employees to include at home tests. Stocks

Delta Airlines Southwest
Delta seeks to cut pilots' minimum pay to avoid furloughs

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 2 months ago

Delta seeks to cut pilots' minimum pay to avoid furloughs

"Well, nobody likes a pay cut. But when Delta Airline pilots were given that option, they agreed In an effort to help avoid layoffs Come October, Delta Airlines asked its pilots to take a 15% cut in minimum guaranteed pay for a year. A Delta executives said Friday. The airline must shrink because of the Corona virus pandemic. And it prefers to spread the work of a smaller airline among all its pilots. The proposal shows the pressure facing airlines and their employees as air travel struggles to recover with the

Delta Airlines
United gets deal with pilots, Delta seeks 1-year pay cut

Dennis Prager

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

United gets deal with pilots, Delta seeks 1-year pay cut

"Continue to reign in spending in the wake of the Corona virus. Delta Airlines is asking pilots to take a 15% cut in minimum guaranteed pay for a year, which it says could help the airline avoid layoffs in October at United Airlines, the company and the pilot's union have agreed on early out and leave provisions that might avoid furloughs. Delta executives have Friday the airline mush ring because of the Corona virus pandemic, and it prefers to spread the work of a smaller airline among all its pilots. The proposal shows the pressure facing airlines and their employees is air travel struggles to recover with new Corona virus cases surging across the south and southwest. Keith

Delta Airlines United Airlines Keith
For those claiming health issues, Delta to require pre-flight evaluation for exceptions to mask policy

Todd Schnitt

00:11 sec | 2 months ago

For those claiming health issues, Delta to require pre-flight evaluation for exceptions to mask policy

"Travelers about to fly and don't think they have to wear a mask will have to prove it. Delta Airlines said they will require anyone who says they are medically exempt from wearing a mask to take a medical

Delta Airlines
Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

Software Engineering Daily

54:31 min | 2 months ago

Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

"Blair and Chris Welcome to the show. Thank, you good to be here. We're talking about capital allocation today and I'd like you to start off by describing the problems that you see with modern capital allocation for technology companies. I'm happy happy to start there. So I think it might be helpful to give. The listeners, a little bit of our backgrounds so I was a venture capitalist at draper. Fisher Jurvetson for five years I worked very closely with Steve. Jurvetson and we were financing are very MD intensive. Technology projects that became businesses things like satellite companies companies that were making chips to challenge the GP you new applications of machine learning algorithm so on and so forth and I think the most important thing to recognize is that the vast majority of technology funding does not actually go to those kinds of companies. The venture space is a two hundred fifty billion dollars per year investment space. The vast majority of the capital goes to parts of businesses that are pretty predictable like raising money in in investing that in sales, marketing and inventory or building technologies that have a fairly low technical risk profile, so the vast majority of tech companies find themselves raising money. From a industry that was designed to finance crazy high technology risk projects at a time where that industry because technology so pervasive you know really do the great work of of many entrepreneurs over the past twenty to thirty years, technology is now mainstream, but the financing structure to finance businesses not has not really changed much in that period of time. Yeah, and then I guess I'll talk a little bit. My my background is I came from consumer education sort of background, so direct to consumer, thinking about how you use tools and make tools that ingrained into the lives of teachers, parents students I was down in the junior class dojo before starting capital with Blair. We were working on the Earth thesis He. He was telling me a lot about this. The the date out. There exists to make more data driven in data rich decisions. How do we go software to make that easy to access in self service and sort of servicing the signal from the noise, and we kicked around the idea and I thought that they were just a tremendous opportunity to bring. What Silicon Valley really pioneered which is I think making software that is easy to use in agreeing to your live into kind of old industry fund raising capital Haitian. The kinds of capital allocation that exist there's. And debt, financing and different flavors of these. Of these things say more about the different classes of fundraising in how they are typically appropriated two different kinds of businesses. So. You have the main the main groups you know. Absolutely correct, so there's. Equity means you sell part of your business forever to a group of people and as Business Rosen succeeds. They'll get a share in that. Success and ultimately income forever. Debt means you temporarily borrow money from somebody you pay them money, and then at some point in time that money's paid back and you all future income for your business, so equities permanent, not permanent. If you think about how companies are finance like. Let's take the P five hundred. About thirty percents of the capital that S&P five hundred companies use to run. Businesses comes from debt. In the venture world that's remarkably just two percent. And the thing that's crazy is this is two percent with early stage seed companies, also two percent with public venture, backed companies in places like the best cloud index, which is like a one trillion dollar index of publicly traded technology companies started their life, and in with injure backing many of them SAS companies, these companies, also just two percent finance with debt, but nonetheless within these these classes, the reason it's obviously economically much better for a business and pretty much every case to finance itself with debt because it's not. Not It's not permanent, and it can be paid back. It's much much cheaper to use debt. That's why you buy a house with a mortgage show. You know you don't sell twenty percent of your future income forever to your bank help you buy a house, but the reason that people use equity comes back to the risk profile so just like. If you lose your job and you can't pay off your mortgage. The bank owns your home. Same exact thing happens with debt in so restorick Louis, if there's very low. Certainty around the outcome in typically early stage investment you're you're doing a lot of brand new are indeed you have no idea if it's GonNa work you cope. You know over time that you'll be successful, but there's really quite a bit of uncertainty equities a great tool because you're. You'RE NOT GONNA lose a business, you know everybody can basically react to a failed. Are Indeed project. Decide what to do next had saints. Equity is kind of the continent tool for high technical risk, high uncertainty investments, and then debt is basically the tool for everything else, and it can be used as most companies do for. Ninety percent of The places that businesses are investing so if you're spending money on sales and marketing, and you know what you're doing and you've been running campaigns before. That were successful, very. Little reason you should use equity for that if you're buying inventory if you are a big business that's. Reach a level of success that on. Means you have a bunch of diversified cashless. Coming in businesses might take out dead on business kind of overall, so it's less important what specifically you're using the money for, but it's important to recognize that most companies are financed roughly fifty fifty equity versus dead, just just intra back companies that. That are kind of uniquely Equity Finance. Scaling a sequel cluster has historically been a difficult task cockroach. DB Makes Scaling your relational database much easier. COCKROACH! DVD's a distributed sequel database that makes it simple to build resilient scalable applications quickly. COCKROACH DB is post grass compatible giving the same familiar sequel interface that database developers have used for years. But unlike databases scaling with Cockroach DB's handled within the database itself, so you don't need to manage shards from your client application. And because the data is distributed, you won't lose data if a machine or data center goes down. cockroach D is resilient and adaptable to any environment. You can hosted on Prem. You can run in a hybrid cloud, and you can even deploy across multiple clouds. Some of the world's largest banks and massive online retailers and gaming platforms and developers from companies of all sizes, trust cockroach DB with their most critical data. Sign up for a free thirty day trial and get a free t shirt at cockroach labs dot com slash save daily thanks to coach labs for being a sponsor and nice work with cockroach DB. The capital that is being steered towards a recipient. It's often originating in a large source, a sovereign wealth fund or family office in it's being routed through something like capital allocators cater like a venture capital firm for example or a bank. How does this capital get allocated to these smaller sources? What is the supply chain of capital in the traditional sense? You know it's kind of funny to think about capital and things like the stock market in the form of a supply supply chain, but this is exactly how we think about it so at the end of the day. Capital originate. In somebody savings, basically society savings right you. You have a retirement account or your population like you know in in Singapore and Norway with a lot of capital, it sort of accumulated from. From the population and these sovereign wealth funds, or you're an endowment that's you know managing donations of accumulated over many many years, and ultimately you're trying to invest capital to earn a return and pay for something pay for your retirement pay for the university's operation so on so forth so that's Capitol starts, and it basically flows through the economy in theory. To all of the economic projects that are most profitable, inefficient for society, and so, if you step back, and you think about like how how is it that the American dream or the Chinese Miracle Happen? You know in in both of those cases different points of the last hundred years. Why is it that society basically stagnated? You know the world was a pretty scary. Scary place to live in up until about seventeen fifty, the industrial revolution started. Why is it that you know basically for all of human history? People fought each other for food and died at the age of thirty or forty, and over the last two hundred fifty years that it's totally changed. It's because we have an economic system that converts capital from its original owners. Diverts it to the most productive projects. which if they're successful, replace some old more expensive way of doing something with newer better way and so I think when when I described that like you know I, think most people can step back and say yeah, okay I. kind of see how capital flows through the system, it goes automatically to someone making an investment decision like a venture capital firm ultimately gets into the hands of the company company decides to invest in creating some great product that people love. Let's. Let's say like Amazon and then everybody switches from you know buying goods at some store that may or may not be out of you know may or may not being stock to the world's best selection of anything you'd never wanted. The most efficient price that's society gets wealthier basically through these these kind of steps in these transformations, but it's asking if you step back and think about it like nobody actually thinks it's processes as efficient as it could be like. We asked people all the time. People were interviewing journalists companies. We work with sewn. So how efficient do you think world's capital allocation is? I've never met a person that says it's pretty good. You know we're like ninety percent of the way there. In fact, most people think it's pretty inefficient. They think of companies like you know we work, and some of the more famous cases lately of of Silicon. Valley back businesses that that totally. underwhelmed disappointed. Their initial expectations and I think most people admit that the efficiency of capital allocation is either broken or nowhere close to achieving its potential, and so we basically we'll talk more about our technology and how we do we do. We basically think of this problem our problem to solve. There's an incredible amount of Apache inefficiency in how data that goes from a project or a company, ultimately funneling up to an investor flows, and so you know it's hard to place blame because there's so many people in the supply chain, but. But I think it super clear that if it's difficult to measure whether or not a project or a business is good at converting capital into value in wealth, and you know products that people want, it's nearly impossible for society to become really good and efficient at allocating its capital, so we're we're here basically to make the data gathering data transformation visualization communication of what's actually going on under the out of business as efficient as possible and you know from that, we thank some great things are going to happen to the economy. Goes a little bit deeper on the role that a bank typically plays in capital allocation. If you think about our bank works like let's take. Let's take a consumer bank that most people think about you gotTA checking account. Right, now you've got some money in that checking account. That account actually takes your money or dot and most people know this your dollars sitting in that account. You know just waiting around. You'd withdraw them. Your dollars are actually rolling up into the bank's treasury. There's somebody at the bank working with the regulators to say hey, how much of this money can we actually put into things like mortgages, commercial loans, all of the the uses of capital that society. Has In some some effort to. To, move the world forward and make the economy efficient, and so those deposits basically roll up into a big investment fund, and there's ratios that regulators set globally that say those dollars needed to be kept in reserve, versus how many are actually able to be invested, but with the portion that's able to be invested. It's there to fun. You know building a house to fund a business back -Tory to fund sales and marketing or inventory procurement for some other business, and so a bank was was basically the original investment fund, and a bank has unlike venture funds and other sources of. We typically think private capital. The bank has tricky. Problem were any moment all of the depositors holding the checking accounts could show up and say hey. I want my money back and so that's why banks have to deal with reserving capital predicting the amount of withdraw and classically everybody wants her money at once at the worst possible time, and so banks have to deal with quite a bit of volatility now if you take an investment fund on the other hand. Totally totally different structure, so your typical venture fund will have money available to it for a period of ten years from you know typically these larger pools of capital. We talked we talked about so very rarely. Individuals are investing retirement savings in venture funds, typically sovereign wealth funds down that's. Basically pools of that individuals capable. Win One of these funds makes a commitment to a venture fund. It'll say you've got the capital for ten years. You've gotta pay back. You know as investments exit, but other than that will check in ten years from now. We hope that we have more than we gave you the star with and there there's no liquidity problem because the fun has effectively carte blanche to keep the money invested until some set of businesses grow and succeed and go public and make distributions so one thing that's fascinating. The Tappan in the last twenty five years is private capital capital in the format of these kinds of funds. Have just grown tremendously and so today. There's a little over five trillion dollars. Of private capital being allocated in this way to think like buyout funds venture funds so on and so forth. Funds don't have the liquidity problems of banks. They can make much longer term for looking investments. This is created tremendous potential to make the economy more more efficient by taking out the time spectrum. You know this is why venture investors can do things like finance spacex or Tesla. Really. Build fundamental technologies in the way that a bank never could so this is an amazing thing it. However leads to a very long. You DAK cycle, so the incentive goes down when you take out the time line over which investment needs to pay back. To carefully monitor and understand what's going on in the business day today, so it's pretty interesting thing about the different pools of capital. There's not not to. Make it sound too confusing, but I think everybody will admit that the financial markets are incredibly diverse complicated we track basically about fifteen different kinds of capital, and they're sort of pros and cons with each one, but you know a bank is one. A private fund is wanted insurance companies balancing as another. You've got things like ETF and public vehicles that hold capital so there's quite a bit of complexity and the the structure of the financial markets. All right well. That's maybe the supply side of Capitol on. All kinds of middlemen and all kinds of different arrangements, but ultimately there is also the demand side of Capitol, at least from the point of view of companies getting started which is. Startups or computer in later stage with the maybe they're not exactly considered startup anymore, but they're mature. These companies have models for how they are predicting. They're going to grow, but oftentimes these companies are very. Lumpy in terms of how their their revenues come in how closely their predictions can track reality. So how do technology companies even model their finances? Is there a way to model their finances? That actually has some meaningful trajectory. Sure so first. Companies you know need need a base think of all the places that they're spending our money and. We're pretty. We Do I. Think a pretty good job of organizing this and making it simple so when we look at companies and we can, we can talk more about how the the cabinet machine operates, but when we look at companies, we basically think they're only a handful of places of money. Get spent you spend money on. Short term projects that you hope proficient things, sales and marketing. Houston money on paying for your sources of financing like paying interest on debt, making distributions to your investors, and then you spend money on everything else and everything else can be designing software building products on, and so forth, and so if you break the demand for capital down into just those three buckets. And look at them that way. Some pretty interesting things happen. The first is for the short term investments that you hope productive. You can track pretty granular nearly whether or not they are, and we'll come back to that. For paying back your investors, you sort of know exactly how much you're paying your investors so a pretty easy thing to track, and then for the operating costs you know most people will help us. Apax, that you're paying to keep the lights on things like Renton the your accountants, the CEO salaries on and so forth these are these are table stakes expenditures. You need to stay in business and so. Amongst each of those three things, there's different things that you wanna do to optimize and I'm happy to go into more detail sort of go through each one. If you think that'd be useful. Yeah Bliss a little bit more about about how these companies should be a modeling, their revenues are that is meaningful to model their revenue so that you can potentially think of them as targets for for capital allocation so. If we think about. Understanding what company might be a viable recipient of capital? How can you accurately predict the trajectory of that company, or or do they? Would they present a model? Would they develop a model good through a little more detail? How a company would serve justify? It's need for capital. So typically what what most companies do and this is not terribly useful or accurate, but I'll tell you what most people do I mean by the way like how central the entire economy predicts, predicts demand for capital works like this. Companies take. Their income statement on their. Balance Sheet historically. And they they basically have this excel file got a bunch of you know, rose and have different things like my revenue, my you revenue that sort of linked or my expenses that are linked revenue Mukasey could sold so on and so forth, and they grow each of those rose by some number that they hope to hit so if you want your revenue to double next year, you'll say my revenue one hundred dollars today I wanted to be two hundred. Hundred dollars twelve months from now I'm just GONNA draw a line between those two points and every month. There will be some number that's on that line, and that's why monthly revenue I want my expenses. You know everyone knows. Expenses are going to have to go up if my revenue goes up but I don't want them to go up as much as my revenue, so I'm going to draw a line. That's you know somewhere less than a doubling. and. You pull these lines together on one big excel file and there's your you know they're your corporate projections. In general, this is true for big companies small companies, but that's not actually how. Company revenue works because if you go back to the three categories, we talked about before, and you just focus on the one that talks about the short term investments. The. Way Company Revenue Actually Works is a company this month. Let's say they spend one hundred dollars on sales marketing. Well. They're hoping to get a return on that sales marketing, and so they're hoping that in the next you know six months. That's paid back. Twelve months that's paid back. You can actually track every time they spend money on sales and marketing. how quickly it gets paid back so it's that level of precision that can accurately predict revenue, and so what we do is we basically just get a list of every time? Money was spent on one of these short-term investments, so you sales and marketing for for an example, and then we get a list of all of the revenue that was ever earned. And we attribute between both of those lists causing effect. And we do that using a bunch of techniques that are pretty commonplace in your typical data, company or machine learning company. We use some math things like factor graphs. We use simple kind of correlations. We have You know a whole kind of financial framework to. Guess. What attribution should be because you learn a lot as you see different businesses and you see a bunch of different different patterns, which you can basically cluster on, but it is this linkage between spending on something like sales and marketing emceeing seeing revenue, go up or down, but makes or breaks a business, and you want to look at it and I is. Not a bundled. Entirety which is how financial projections are typically built? Okay, well! Let's talk a little bit more about what you actually do so if you're talking about early stage technology companies. Describe how you are modeling, those companies and how you are making decisions as to whether they should receive capital. When a company comes to capital they they come to our website. They sign up for this system that we built which which we've called the capital machine. And the first thing that they do is they connect their accounting system their payment processor typically, so think like a strike, and then sometimes they'll provide other things like a pitch deck or a data room, or whatever other information they have prepared. The system pulls down. All of the date in the accounting system and the the payment processor, and we look at other systems to these are the two key ones that all all dive into detail, and so, what ends up happening is from the accounting system. We get a list of all the times. Businesses spend money on these things like sales and marketing that we were talking about before. From the payment processor we get a list of all the revenue transactions in crucially we get it at. The level of each. Each customer payment, and so you know we scrub I all we really care about is having a customer ID, but once we have data at that level. We can start to do this linkage and say all right look. You know this business spent. A million dollars on sales and marketing and March of two thousand eighteen in April of twenty eighteen, and we saw revenue grow by twenty percent. That was a pretty substantial chain. You know what actually happened here. You can typically identify the subcategories of sales and marketing and start to do this link between these two, and this is really the you know the magic behind our our data science in our team pairing with our engineering team to figure out this problem and solve away that is, that's robust. Bud once we have these two data feeds, and the system goes through, and does all of these attribution. Populations were able to present that back to accompany a pretty clear picture of what's going on, and so we'll say things like hey. Your Business is pretty seasonal, and in the summer is when you're typically more more efficient at converting your sales and marketing dollars into growth so I, you want to finance growth in the summer. The second thing is only about eighty percent of your businesses financeable. There's twenty percent where you might not know it because you're not looking at this level of detail, you're busy building your business, which is exactly exactly what you should be doing, but Twenty percent of your businesses, not efficient. You're spending money on on your sales and marketing categories, product lines, and CETERA that just shouldn't exist and so if you get rid of those. If you double down on the part of Your Business, it is efficient. Then we predict your revenue will be act fifty percent higher, and we'll tell you exactly how much money you need to invest to raise money to to raise the revenue by fifty percent. We give you a bunch of charts that allow you to see how history and projections merged together and dig down. Inspect how we do that linkage to make sure you agree, but. This is what the capital machine does at its core. It Converts Company data into a fully audited completely transparent picture of. How business works where it sufficient where it's not efficient. And then that's where our technology stops, and where balanced she comes in, and so we then take this information, and we make balancing investments directly in companies, and so primarily at this point we lend money to technology companies that we see from their data are eligible for non dilutive funding. We make capital available to them directly. We basically allow them to access it through the capital machine. We use one system to communicate changes to the business. No keep both sides and form so on and so forth, but this is the kind of analytics layer that's essential to making these capital allocation decisions more efficient, and so I think you could imagine a day at least for us in the not too distant future when it's not just US using our balance sheet in this tool to make investments, but in fact, just like excel, every investor can benefit from a similar level of analytics and transparency, as can companies by getting more accurately priced faster access to capital less friction so on and so forth. Get Lab commit, is! Get labs inaugural community event. Get Lab is changing how people think about tools and engineering best practices and get lab commit in Brooklyn is a place for people to learn about the newest practices in devops, and how tools and processes come together to improve the software development life cycle. Get Lab commit is the official conference. Forget lab. It's coming to Brooklyn new. York September Seventeenth Twenty nineteen. If you can make it to Brooklyn, on September Seventeenth Mark Your calendar, forget lab, commit and go to software engineering daily dot, com slash commit. You can sign up with code commit s E. D.. That's COM MIT S. E. D.. And Save thirty percent on. Conference passes. If you're working in devops, and you can make it to New York. It's a great opportunity to take a day away from the office. Your company will probably pay for it, and you get thirty percent off if you sign up with code, commit S, e. There a great speakers from Delta. Airlines Goldman. Sachs northwestern, mutual, T, mobile and more. Check it out at software engineering daily Dot Com slash, commit and use code. Commit S. E. D.. Thank you to get lab for being sponsor. The inputs specifically if you think about a model for determining whether or not, a company should should be eligible to receive capital. I'd like to know how the the models are built. The the data science models that you're building are constructed from the point of view of the inputs. So how are you determining or how do you like company comes to you? How do you turn that company into some structured form of data that you could put into your models and determine whether it's worthy of capital. Yeah I mean it comes down to what what the data is your down so when we talk to a system like striper transaction records system, you know that that's the revenue of the company now where things get interesting when we connect to balance sheets in penalizing, it's of accompanying really onto understanding. Weighing. What exactly these numbers mean, and that sort of where we made our pipelines were built from the ground up to give us that granular. Of A company's cash family revolutions. Where's the money going where they allocating? And it's savable greenway or you once. What do you understand that data through that Lens? That let's build pretty sophisticated financial models Linda. And you know as soon as you have the picture of Company You can really do a lot of flexible analysis on the back leg distributed computation. Come stuff that you would never be able to excel and quite frankly a lot of these companies don't have the stacking internally or really the tools to understand for themselves, so you'd be surprised it you know when we surface this analysis back to the company by virtue of just being transparent on how we're making decision how it is perceived their business, the signals that were uncovering. These operators the CEO's the CFO's that are really focused on building company. Really surprising. They're really making these insights really transforming. How they think they should have capital. Should invest growing business. Are there any? Sources of Third Party data that you can gather to improve decision making. There are at a macro economic sense, and so it's actually quite useful to look at public company performance and say hey. SAS businesses in general. Most people notice, but facilities in general are seasonal in the fourth quarter. Budgets basically expire and people come in, and they buy a bunch of SAS. Software and so to take concepts like that basically shapes of curves, signals and apply them to private company. Financials is useful. Crucially though there is no private company. Data repository of any kind like it just doesn't exist, and you know notoriously even even with small businesses. It's actually quite quite difficult to get access to any sort of meaningful credit data, and so, what ends up happening is these aw. These businesses. Give you a picture of their business directly as an investor and you have to interpret it directly, and that's basically how this works totally unlike consumer credit, there's no credit bureau that people paying so most investors are analyzing the state and excel. Excel notoriously breaks when there's about a million cells worth of data, and so we've got this great visualization showing our data pipeline, and it's basically a bunch of boxes, and there's a little tiny. Tiny box in the bottom of corner that's excel, and there's a bunch of other boxes across the entire rest of the page that are nodes in our in our distributed computations, but accelerate very very limited, and so it makes it impossible to actually understand what's going on in business from the source data, and it's at the source that you see this variability in this linkage between profitable capital allocation decisions in unprofitable capital allocation decisions. Describing more detail, the workflow so a company comes to you and they're going to put their inputs into the. Would you call the capital machine? What does that workflow look like in a little bit more depth? Yes when they come to the website, they creighton count much like you would on. Twitter facebook account. When your details your email, you terrify your email, and then you on what's recalling like the capital portable on there? You have et CETERA. Tools to connect your sins record and these are typical offload. So you know people are very familiar with you. You know you say hey, let's connect by quickbooks you in your credentials and sort of be as secure way, and you click okay and the system checkmark by your quickbooks in the system start pulling that data out of regular cadence and. Depending on what system you're connecting you of the characteristics of that's not go systems of record, and how much data you have you know. The data's available anywhere from ten minutes to a couple of hours later and you know once we have Dr. System, we run that through our partake analysis pipeline in the users as a company. You get you get charged. In Tableau kind of call it, the insight Saban's these refused that we think would be helpful for you as an operator company understanding about Your Business in separately. We also get views of that data that are useful to our our internal investment team. Whoever is looking to capitalization systems? Are there certain business categories that are a better fit for modeling in better fit for the kind of. Predictable capital returns that you can, you can expect with the investments that you're making so like you ride sharing or Gig economy businesses or some businesses. What are the categories that are the best fit? Say Very few categories don't shit from the from the perspective of of linkages, but they're certainly models at their easier to think through and easier to understand, but our our system can underwrite today A. Lease on a commercial aircraft, a fleet of ships and Insurance Agency ask company the most important. Thing about our system is that the financial theory that underlies it is very general, just like p. e. rate is very general, and so that's kind of sounds crazy like. A lot of. A. Lot of people say what what businesses the best fit for your your system and you know it's kind of like asking what businesses the best for Warren Buffett like Warren. Buffett is a generalist. In any business, and he has a framework in his own head to figure out how to make ship comparable to American Express our assistant has a very similar framework. It just operates at the level of transactions instead of at the level of financial statements, but certainly within. That framework there's some examples that are just easier describes I think like you know thinking through the fishing of sales and marketing something. That's a lot more obvious than thinking through like the stability in refurbishment of commercial aircraft parts, which is a key question you know. Pricing pricing refurbished parts, which is a key question if your financing commercial aircraft and Our team, the ambassadors that use the capital machine internally which we primarily do internally do a little bit of partnering with without the groups to to use this as well. These people are all specialists in some particular area, but it's crucial to understand. They're looking at the exact same chance as all the other specialists and all the other areas, so it's like literally the the Fast Company and a commercial aircraft will have the same series of charts at investors. Are there two two draw their conclusion? Is the question for Chris. Can you describe the stack of technologies that you built in more detail? Yeah Yeah. Of course on the front, we are react type script, xjs, you know everything is on aws, and in the back, and we're. We're all python, and in really the reason for that is if you're doing any serious machine, learning or data science today can't really get away in python stack, so we're all python them back in. We have flasks. As a as our API late here and That's the that's a high level. And get a little bit more detail about how the data science layer works. Yeah, yeah, yeah, of course, so we put on the dea into basically a data lake the that goes down into Ardito pipeline in that's all air orchestrated on top of each called airflow, and we use a technology called desk for are distributed computation, and I think that this is a good choice. Choice for us at this moment you know I see us doing a lot of work on. You know using a spark in other distributed technologies in the future and his team and it turns out that when we pull this data down organizing the data was really important to us as we build a lot of attractions to make accessing that data, really easy for quantitative analysts. Important central to our whole technology is that we're able to do a lot of different financials experiment very quickly on top of this so the the implications of that really cascade down all the way into. You know what technologies where choosing how we structure our delayed. Even even how strokes are teams, so it really is brought up locations across all product. How is it when you're analyzing company that you have enough data that it warrants a spark cluster because I can imagine? The financial data around the company. How can there really be that much data to analyze how you do surprised in a lot of these transactions systems taking up the companies have been around a couple of years and their direct to consumer. These data sets can be can be pretty large. You know we're talking about in the millions and millions and millions of transactions that were pulling down and storing. Storing and that just on a per company basis. You know that's not even talking about if we wanted to. Benchmarks Cross companies, and also if we want to do scenario analysis, so you know one of the things we was part of a pipeline is take this data, and through like nine ninety nine hundred thousand simulations to understand the sensitivity of different variables on the performance of Your Business and If, you're starting out with starting that already large. Sort of a multiplying effect. On how much data the system is the old process? is you go through those different stages? And, can you tell me a little more detail? What would a typical spark job? Look like for a company that you're assessing. Yes, so first episode is ribbon. Our our financial didn't ingestion parts, so we download something on the order of you know forty fifty bytes of Tim's action data for for a company. We have to do all the work to interpret and understand what that means in reorganized that data in a way that are downstream analysis and primitives can. Make sense of and use for useful analysis so really the first step at this point job is is transformed the datum some it's useful, and then there's all the work on what are the clusters in order to machines and analysis in the computational. Resources needed to run simulations. You know not not just say local computer locally owned of fall over the only about thirty to sixty four gigabytes of Ram what league, so that's where workflow comes in creating easier faces into data, clusters and being. Should you know when you run a job? You know when it fails. You know it's done. You know when the team can't okay. This part of analysis done I had intermediate date asset to do more analysis on now get back to work is a lot of the time we spend developing internal tools to make. One other thing that'll mentioned that I think's important is. A lot of the underlying technology in our data pipeline it's no different than like what a tableau or you need. Traditional BI business would have access to, but what's fascinating when you have a vertically specific domain so financial data in our case you can make a lot of interpretations about the date of the let you do much more intelligent things, and so for example we. Don't have to make your own charts as a user of the capital machine. We make all the charts for you can of course. As a business we work with. Give us ideas for charts. You can mock up your own. We we basically have an interface for for business. The I team's to to write some code if they if they want to bought when you have clients who are thinking about financial risk, financial attribution across all of the companies that we see distilling that down into a series of indicators that are detailed, but generalize -able, and then publishing that back to all of the companies that use the capital machine to run their own capital, allocation, decisions and access, external fundraising and capital. Some pretty amazing things happen in so it's only with a vertical view. You actually having these we, we call our data scientists Kwan's, but but actually having these people who you know typically are graduate level economists, thinking for the first time about using transaction level data in their analysis, which is notoriously not not available to to normal economists that you get the kinds of insights and analysis the actionable for businesses, and then in terms of the data pipeline that then means we actually store a bunch of intermediate data that's opinionated in that way, and that makes it much faster to access much easier to benchmark much more useful across a network of companies, versus just that isolated excel model that. Explains only one business. One thing I'd like to ask you about. Capital intensity so there are kinds of businesses that are capital intensive for example where you have to pay upfront for a lot of ridesharing rides, and you know as Uber or lift. His has known in much detail. You allocate all this capital two things to subsidize rise because you try to win a market, there's all kinds of other capital intensive businesses. How does capital intensity change? What makes sense with regard to the equity financing the debt financing that you are shepherding for these companies? That is a great question and be because of where you focus in your audience. You totally get the most financiers don't so. The first point exactly like you said. Capital intensity means a business consumes a lot of capital. It doesn't mean a business has a physical factory or plant or railcars, so it is absolutely true exactly like you said that there are a lot of tech businesses that are incredibly capital intensive. If you are capital intensive business that means UNI especially if you're growing, you need to raise a lot of external capital, and so it is even more important that your capital or a big portion of your capital base is not dilutive. That's that's just essential. Table stakes because what you see with these businesses, the ride sharing companies are great. Example is by the time one of these things actually goes public the early owners in the business on a very very very miniscule. KEESA that business, still if you contrast that to company like Viva Systems which I think is one of the most capital capitol efficient businesses in venture history, I think that this race something like twelve or fifteen million dollars total before it went public in a at a multi billion dollar market cap. So capital intensity. Is a synonym for dilution your own way less. Than you think when you exit entities even more important that you figure out a way to raise capital non ludicrously upfront. Some broader questions zooming out in in getting your perspective. Do a thesis for what is going on in the economy right now where you look at. The fact that We have. Obvious pressures to. Reducing the size of the economy through the lack of tourism, the lack of social gatherings while the stock market climbs higher and higher, and it appears that the technology side of things is almost unaffected by Corona virus is there. Is there a thesis that you've arrived at or or their set of theses that through conversations with other people, you've found most compelling. Sure the most important thing to realize about the stock market is that it discounts all cash flows from all businesses in the stock market to infinity, and so the value, the stock market about eighty percent of the value. The stock market is. Pretty far into the future like more than three years from now, and so if you believe that the current economic crisis and this is why there's always a. At least in the Western, world, last two hundred fifty years after an economic crisis. If you believe the crisis will eventually revert, and there will be a recovery, then it only makes sense discount stock market assets by anywhere between ten and twenty five percent. If you believe businesses fundamentally going to go out of business because of this crisis, that's a different story, but that explains why something as terrible as Kobe nineteen and a pandemic. Only discount the stock market by by roughly thirty thirty five percent in a in March, but that's not what's actually going on today as you mentioned and so stock market prices now have completely recovered. That is something that we think is a little bit of out of sync with reality but I. I mention you know we're not. We don't spend too much time about the stock market beyond that we just look at you. Know Private Company fundamentals. We try to understand what's actually going on in individual businesses across all businesses that are network to see what you know what we can understand, and you know what kind of conclusions we can draw, and so if you take that Lens and you actually look at what's happening to businesses due to Cova nineteen, it's fascinating. Some businesses like think the food delivery space have gotten a lot more efficient, so those businesses lot like ridesharing businesses back twelve months ago, there was sort of a bloodbath between bunch of companies competing in local markets to acquire customers all all fighting Google and facebook console, and so forth you subsidies drivers, etc.. That's essentially stopped. These businesses incredibly profitable, the cost acquire customers has fallen by more than half a lot of cases. The channels were slot less competitive, and so if you're running one of those businesses. Now is a great time to be aggressively expanding. Weird things like commercial construction businesses. They're actually a handful businesses that we've seen do things like install windows and doors and commercial buildings whose businesses have accelerated because all of these buildings are closed down. Construction project timelines have gotten pulled up. All of these orders are coming. Do in they're you know sort of rapidly doing it solutions? There's obviously a bunch of other businesses have been that have been hurt by by the pandemic, but our general thesis are we've studied. Pretty detailed way the Spanish flu in nineteen eighteen, you know. These things eventually go away. There will be a vaccine. Economy will get back to normal, and as long as we can stay focused on working through this as as a society and of maintain our our fabric of of kind of economic progress then. DESAGUADERO values today will eventually make sense just sort of a question of of win for the stock market, and then if you're if you're actually running business in thinking about your own performance in isolation, really being clear about is now the time to invest and grow my business now the time to be very careful with my expenses interest, get through this for the next year or however long it takes for there to be a vaccine. So the way to think about your company, if I understand correctly if I was to to put in a nutshell, is that. I think of you as a data science middleman between large capital allocators, and and start ups deserving of capital, so the the sovereign wealth funds the banks the I guess. Funds of funds. These kinds of sources are essentially looking to you for guidance on where to direct the capital, and you're on the on the other side, absorbing data and creating opportunities from these startups to source the good directions of that capital. Just wrap up. Would you put any more color around that description or or refining anyway. Yeah I mean I. think that at the core of what capital is is where the. Core Technology Ambler of sort of. The private market if you think about public markets today, you've clearing-houses like the New York Stock Exchange, and you have companies that provide analysis on top of that like Bloomberg, you know we see a tremendous opportunity to shift the paradigm where you know the place where all the financial transactions happen. is also the place that collects the data improvise information for those making these decisions and yeah, so I think capitals really at the center of making a transparent technologically enabled financial marketplace. Guys. Thank you so much for coming on the show and discussing capital, and I guess one last question is. Do you have any predictions for how capital allocation for startups will look differently in five ten years? Sure so! The first prediction. And this is happening now. I mean the the infrastructure is. In place both within. And others. Most startups fairly early in their life. Think is equity only way to do this and. So. That's a cultural shift. That's that's already happened. People are starting to ask that question. The second prediction is. Seed and series a funding will be entirely unchanged. After series. There'll be a bifurcation between businesses that. Are Really. Capital intensive gigantic rnd projects think like SPACEX. The series, B. C. d. e. enough are really about building and launching a rocket. Those businesses will by and large not. Turn outside of equity to finance themselves, but there's very few of those businesses. Pretty much every other business businesses that you see raising a series B. Serie C. Will like any normal business in the entire rest of the economy raise maybe half of that capital nine allegedly either in the form of debt. Royalty financing factoring all of the other instruments that normal companies use to finance themselves in the void delusion that will happen roughly three years her. Now that'll that'll kind of we'll see obvious obvious signs of that from very early very early base, and then the final the final thing is. Steve Case talks a lot about this. With the rise of the rest, he's got this great venture fund that invests explicitly outside the coast, so kind of the rest of America and we've seen that there's there's a pretty dramatic distinction between being a coastal business non-coastal business from capital access perspective, but there's no distinction from an actual performance perspective, and so we'll start to see some of the regional. Differences in bias sees around where capital flows, go away. And so I would maybe put that on a five year timeline like raising capital is actually much more predictable, much less biased, and that's great back to the beginning of our conversation. That's great for the economy I mean every project or business that can convert capital, two products and services that people love should get finance. No questions asked doesn't mean it doesn't matter what the color of your skin is. What background you have whether you went to college didn't go to. College doesn't matter. You have a business with data that can prove whether people love it

Steve Case Business Rosen Fisher Jurvetson New York Chris Welcome Blair Silicon Valley CEO Restorick Louis Spacex Facebook Singapore
Atlanta-Based Delta Air Lines Loses $2.8 Billion, Cuts Flights

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

Atlanta-Based Delta Air Lines Loses $2.8 Billion, Cuts Flights

"From the drop in traveled. Delta Airlines had a record $5.7 billion loss last quarter. Delta is now cutting half of the number of flights and planned to add back in August. United Airlines is making big cuts of both Reagan national and at Dulles, one of its major hubs in Washington Business Journal says the layoffs could be close to 3200 jobs, most of them at villas. It'll be about half of United's DC area employees. United is the biggest carrier at Dulles flying about 65% of passengers there.

United Airlines Delta Airlines Dulles Washington Business Journal Reagan DC
Delta Flight Diverted To New York's JFK Airport After Nose Caved In

Rush Limbaugh

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

Delta Flight Diverted To New York's JFK Airport After Nose Caved In

"Delta Airlines flight almost made it to to its its final final destination destination last last night night when when it it had had to to be be diverted diverted for for an an an emergency emergency emergency landing. landing. landing. A A A 3 3 3 19 19 19 was was was on on on its its its way way way to to to LaGuardia LaGuardia LaGuardia Airport Airport Airport when when when it it it was was was diverted diverted diverted to to to nearby nearby nearby JFK JFK JFK to to to make make make an an an emergency emergency landing landing A A little little before before 7 7 p.m. p.m. Delta Flight 10 76 sustained damage to the nose of the plane, apparently after hitting a bird. The jet carrying 43 passengers from Palm Beach, Florida, landed safely at Kennedy Airport. Photos showed the nose of the planes smashed in

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"delta airlines" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:30 min | 3 months ago

"delta airlines" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Up 217 Delta Airlines is not following its peers with plans to fill middle seats wins news time. From the 10 10 wins Traffic center. Here's Karen Stewart. All right, Larry, We've got some train issues I'd like to get to hear both directions with seven are not running between 74th and Broadway and Court Square. The Manhattan bound sevens are ending at 74th and Broadway and the Queens bound Sevens are ending a court square while the moves a train with mechanical problems out of Queensboro Plaza. Transfer between the E F M R in or W trains. You could do that in 74th and Broadway or at Queensboro Soothe sevens with some pretty big problems right now, the rest of mass transit doing very, very well with no issues to tell you about. There's an accident. Now in the northern suburbs on the Thruway, it's North bound at 16 and Woodberry. Their accident there. We've got at least one leg closed, and the delays are starting in New Jersey. We've still got that crash on 21 North bound on an extensive delay trying to get out into 46 which is where it's at on the left lane is blocked. Here's what you need to know about the bridges and tunnels, the outbound George's 45 from the cross Bronx and from the North bound side of the Harlem River Drive. It's about 20 to 25 minutes. The Henry Hudson is the best or local roads like Broadway, Queens bound Whitestone and Throgs Neck completely banged out, and the Bronx bound span of the Throgs Neck is just as heavy. It's got the ClearView completely stopped dead and the Cross Island Parkway with some delays going north bound approaching.

Throgs Neck Queensboro Soothe Queensboro Plaza Court Square Delta Airlines Henry Hudson Cross Island Woodberry Karen Stewart Queens Manhattan Harlem River Drive New Jersey Larry E F M R George
"delta airlines" Discussed on Crack the Customer Code

Crack the Customer Code

09:46 min | 8 months ago

"delta airlines" Discussed on Crack the Customer Code

"And now it's time for Adam and Jeanie Jeanie. We had a discussion offline I wanNA share with of our audience and it was about flying. We're talking ingenious. Like oh well direct. I always go direct anytime I can and I thought about it. I was like you know most speakers most insult so she will travel do that. I will say I actually go you. You know through Hartsfield International Airport Atlanta pretty much on purpose when I could get a direct flight many times in the reason I do that is because I am a loyal Delta Airlines customer now that I don't like other airlines and don't fly other airlines on occasion when it is just makes sense but I have committed to Delta and you know what it's worth the extra leg. So what are you going Greenie. Well frankly I get it because Delta I think his investing in the customer experience in ways that other airlines have not been known to do said very diplomatically the airlines and lots of great airline employees that are not dealt. Oh for sure that's true. That's out there but I do feel like Delta has made a play hey where they have. Invested in the customer experience in very visible ways and customers are seeing that and feeling that and are willing. I'm to throw their loyalty into that. And I totally get that. Because you know where I live out just for a disclaimer where I live. Delta's not a hub. So I would be you know. Traveling through Minneapolis or Atlanta or some other hubs that they have instead of just going direct for most of my flights lights but I have flown out the somewhat recently and I was really impressed. They are clearly making a stand dand for being different. And it's showing it showing up in my opinion you fly them a lot more than I do. But that's I saw that just from a recent one on flight. So is that your experience as well off percent of course look. It's a huge airline with light. I'd get a fifty thousand boys. What I don I? I don't even know but at a gazillion employees right. So of course you're going to have your Experiences at aren't great. You're just love wars numbers. Big Picture I I love 'em Great Service There on time. And here's the thing it's not just me. They just Wall Street Journal ranked the airlines and they came came out number one and they've been basically up at the top for a long time now I think they foot yeah. They floated in and Inada the one position. But I think they've been one more than any other domestic airlines my understanding or thankless. And here's the thing you know. They operate at such scale. Yeah all the majors do right. The scale of the enterprise is simply staggering and what it takes to execute experience of that scale is phenomenal. And we've talked a lot about the airlines on the podcasts constraints. They have how they don't own a lot of the experience you know we talked about Gosh what airport was that. Has Experience Grants of Dallas Right Dallas Fan Right That does trying to manage the airport. Experience some so. It's a complicated industry. It's a heavily really regulated industries got some content coming out in a in a little bit. It's all about how you can't even change the product for the most part seat configurations. I mean obviously. They can't a little title. But you're pretty boxed in right there's not a lot of variation in the core product. But they've done. They've differentiated through service and Eh experience and all of that and what really prompted this conversation. This is all prelude to the main conversation. What prompted this conversation Asian? y'All is they just announced a few weeks ago that they had incredible financial results which is a result of this experience. Let's and they are going to be paying their employees one point six billion in bonuses. I'll take point one of that. I'm happy based on the two thousand nineteen basically said it's going to come out to like Gees like two months salary for everyone in the. Yeah that's what. The the average is two months salary for each employee which is pretty amazing and think about how life changing that can be for some people since I've their article in front of me now it's ninety thousand thousand employees so I mean yeah I think that nine thousand employees are getting Two extra month salary and The question this brings up and we've talked about it a little bit but it's interesting to see a big company here. A lot of these mission based company is like the shoe. Tom Shoes and all this. You rarely hear about these huge monster. Legacy companies right that are been around for fifty plus years. Ah Dame's at you know. been around longer than people of our generation. Even you rarely hear about them doing these things and it's not idea You know came up at the business. Roundtable last year of having other stakeholders not shareholders. Yep and really understanding standing that you have to serve customers and employees in order to really be a successful organization. You can't just worry about that shareholder value you and you know one of the other things that I saw that Delta's doing recently which falls in line with this too. Is there They created a new kind of pet carrier for Pets that need to go in the cargo. Hold because one of the things as you and I both know as animal people When you have a pet it's really hard to think they're going to be in the belly of the plane with luggage and a lot of pets? Don't do well there's anxiety and things like that and so they Have have these new crates which have built in water bowls that automatically refill. They have angled ventilation. Slates that reduce stress they Minimize the jarring lighting transition transition. There's thicker walls so that no animal can chew through. Because that's the other thing they have is that Animals escaped their crates because they get so anxious and so they provide better climate control and so the fact that they're even looking beyond just. What's it like to sit on our plane? What's it like ticket? And they're thinking about all these issues around around the actual customer journey It's impressive to think about because this is what we keep preaching right. This is what we keep talking about. You need to look at all these different touch points throughout the journey and not think of it as this one solitary group of customers or this one way that things can go and it's clear they're investing in that aspect aspect of it as well so basically at this whole episode is basically Kudos to Delta. And you know like bill hub in Chicago. Maybe that's I'm going to put that out there. Well you know I'm not in a hub. You would definitely be going through Detroit and yeah but but it's it's just one one of the things they do and I think it's interesting when you look at how they position themselves you know. They're basically been growing their staff aggressively five five years so imagine growing your staff aggressively and still do this type town You know bore job offering so they're just growing and and did they are competing on the basis of and it's paying off for them in simple this paying off and it's paying their employees right at all it's also a circular it's all circular. It's all reinforcing right. And that's what's amazing So Yeah Kudos Delta will be seen in a week eh but yeah we just thought it was interesting. It's an interesting thing to talk about and to really to share that it's not always ups that can not just put the shareholder. I and I think I saw the co Ed bastion comment. I couldn't find the article. Michael though pretty short sean comment on social that are shareholders. Understand that this is how we provide. Share value is by reinvesting in our team and Artas on what a great message for other leaders to see and start considering as well that this is not just about these esoteric ideas of serving customers better it actually early is something that produces value all the way around. It's a win win. Win Win Win Win. Also are we'll we'll take act. We hope you're winning by listening to crack the customer code and of course we thank you for being here so please. If you get a minute let us know what you think ratings reviews to help us and our audience check. Check it out on apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to podcasts and let us know what you think I m genie walters we so appreciate you spending your valuable time with us. You can learn more about me. And our journey mapping programs customer experience training writing and speaking at the and I should say my own company name better experience investigators dot com back at customers anyways. I'm Adam before you can find out about the keynote. Speaking or customer experiences service training or advisory all that good stuff at customers that stick dot com but of course until next time take care yourself and take care of your customers.

Delta Adam Hartsfield International Airpo Wall Street Journal Jeanie Jeanie Dallas Artas Gees apple Atlanta Tom Shoes Minneapolis Ed bastion Detroit Chicago Michael sean
"delta airlines" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"delta airlines" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Based delta airlines flight heading to fort Lauderdale W. S. B.'s Michelle Wright reports slide the pilot diverts the plan to make it a Martin of the plane rather to make an emergency landing yeah talk about scary the three thirty PM flight taking off from Hartsfield Jackson without incident then somewhere above central Florida the plane starts to drop falling nearly thirty thousand feet like seven minute walk in was on board and says. it's active moments so does yours around a lot of people were. hyperventilating breed early art the pilot making an emergency landing in Tampa with the plane still sits as mechanics trying to figure out what went wrong most of those passengers on board are now at their final destinations reporting live Michelle right ninety five point five W. SP troubling new information emerges about the American Airlines worker who had been found tampering a passenger jet into Florida first authorities thought I'll do Majeed a lot he was trying to generate some overtime for himself when he sabotaged an American flight into live from Miami to the Bahamas now federal prosecutors said the FBI found an ISIS video on a cell phone ABC's Erica Turkey reports a Lani is been denied bond he faces up to twenty years in prison just for tampering with that plane the trump administration plans to transfer federal land to military control in order to build about seventy miles of wall along the border with Mexico five hundred sixty acres of federal land will be transferred to the army some in Yuma county Arizona in the el Paso Texas area and in San Diego county California A. B. C.'s trucks Iverson says opponents worry about the environmental impacts part of the work will run along a wildlife refuge in Arizona Democrats want to follow the money as Congress prepares to grant billions in bailouts for farmers hurt by the trade war I'm Jeannie do pre in Washington in exchange for funding twenty eight billion dollars in bail outs for farmers get by retaliation over president trump's terror if someone make sure our our farmers are hold Democrats like Jim McGovern say the GOP must publicly detail where that money is going on I think transparency is a good thing Democrats say they're not sure the president had the power to okay billions in farm bailouts as a result of his trade battles Jamie as much more from Washington on his blog WSB radio dot.

Arizona San Diego el Paso Texas American Airlines Michelle W. S. B. fort Lauderdale delta Jamie president GOP Jim McGovern trump Washington Congress Michelle Wright Iverson A. B. C. Yuma county Arizona
"delta airlines" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"delta airlines" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"She says Delta Airlines offered to get them as far as Newark, but the rest of her trip, I'm a single mom and checkbook tickets to Europe day, isn't in my budget and collapse of wow air came after buyout talks with Icelandair collapsed earlier this week before leaving Saint Louis. By the way. Wow. Air officials call the gateway city a disappointment. The government says it's cracking down on telemarketers and robocaller. But a new report says Uncle Sam doesn't have much to show for it. That report says the FCC has fide violators. Well, over two hundred million dollars since two thousand fifteen but the Wall Street Journal says it's only collected about seven thousand dollars the fines of total one and a half billion dollars since two thousand four but less than ten percent of that money has come in. The FCC says the Justice department is actually responsible for collecting those fines and can settle or drop cases. Justice has no comment. Peter King CBS news, the flooding along the Missouri. River is leading governor Mike Parsons to call for some better flood control strategies parson released an editor Oriel yesterday where he called for many things including an expansion of the Lewis and Clark reservoir parson also called for lower, Missouri. River tributaries to have more flood control reservoirs parson urged the army corps of engineers. Make sure levee districts that others are consulted as repairs get underway. Police have a mystery on their hands in South County after a hiker discovers human remains in a quarry Saint Louis county. Police say the body of a woman was found just after twelve thirty yesterday afternoon in MacQuarie on paulie road police are awaiting autopsy results, but have classified the death as suspicious so the second time since the first of this year and Illinois state trooper is dead after someone crashed into a traffic stop. It is the fifteenth time a trooper has been struck in same period trooper Brooke Jones story was inspecting a truck on the side of the road. When another truck smashed into the scene, Brendan Kelly. The former Saint Clair state's attorney now running the state police says troopers are both sad and angry..

FCC parson Saint Clair state Saint Louis Missouri Delta Airlines Wall Street Journal Saint Louis county Brendan Kelly army corps of engineers Icelandair Brooke Jones Newark paulie road Europe Clark reservoir Peter King South County Mike Parsons
"delta airlines" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"delta airlines" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Obviously today, we will discuss the swearing in of our new governor. Governor elect Brian Kemp. I was on CBS forty six news this morning. Talking about the inauguration. And what this means in the overall political narrative in the state of Georgia. We will get into that later during the program. Right now. Ladies and gentlemen, I have an exclusive story. That I believe is important for everyone to hear and judge for themselves. As I said before the break. A Japanese Muslim woman by the name of Kiko Farrakhan. Works as a security officer for Delta Airlines. She actually works the main gate security. She has been suspended pending an investigation in the studio. I have a key co-founder con. Thank you for being with us. Thank you. And also, I have her husband, captain, Khalid Farrakhan. Thank you, brother. Thank you both for being here. Let me begin with the incident that took place. On January fourth. You went to work, MRs Farrakhan, and what happened. ES? I was called in fifth-floor our ten twenty building. And I met two unknown people. Dan, went into the Loom I gone through one hour. Interrogation. A what a one hour interrogation. Yes. About one hour. Yeah. Okay. How long have you been working delta about nine months? And the entire time. You worked at delta. You have been a security officer the officer Ben made you went through a pretty rigorous background check. Yes. I did. Okay. And how long did it take you to go through the background check? After you applied for delta. Background check. Sink. A leak about a week the leak. Okay. So as you are working at delta. Did they know you were a Muslim woman? Yes. Okay. Let me ask your husband. He's in the studio. He's been affected by this as well. Mr. fire con. How did they know? She was a Muslim woman. From the application. And first and foremost. As well as her her name. In her mannerisms are style of dress her head coverings every day without a fail. Never come outside without a here covered. Think this should be a sufficient enough. Okay. On January fourth you come in. They escort you upstairs through the fifth floor. Yes. They question you about what about? You access to. Apres manual be seventy seven five seven airplane manual beasts seven five seven. Yes. Okay. What is that rain detail? An airplane detail. Why were you researching an airplane detail was I was interested in direct of airplane you interested in the structure of an airplane? Okay. And I'm repeating what you're saying. Because I wanna make sure people understand we know that English is natural. I language now want to make sure people. Understand the point you're getting across. So you went. Researched this particular plane and once again named the plane for me. Civil five seven. If there's something special about the b seven five seven why were you researching that play because? The the the museum. They have be simple five seven at the delta museum. They have a b seven five seven. Okay. All right. So how long were you researching display? How many days did you go online to research online to research? About. Two. About two months. So roughly too much. Researching this one plane, and you were looking at details of this particular plane. Okay. And you were looking to possibly becoming a flight attendant for delta is that correct? Yes. Does this plane or the research of this plane? How does that help you in that pursuit? That's it. If you're not airplane Bill if anything happened becoming frightened anything happened. Have norwich. Somebody asked can answer the question. So this was in preparation for any type of test questions that you may get if you apply to become an Arab ended up happening. You were questioned on January fourth. Do you believe that you will possibly under surveillance or they were looking at your online activity before then?.

delta Khalid Farrakhan officer Delta Airlines Brian Kemp delta museum CBS Georgia co-founder norwich Dan the museum Ben one hour nine months two months
"delta airlines" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"delta airlines" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Twenty two is time. Delta Airlines says it will vigorously oppose a federal lawsuit filed by a passenger who alleges she was sexually assaulted during her flight CBS's, Jamie. You kiss reports Delaney Lou had just fallen asleep on her delta flight in June. When she says the man sitting next to her place his hand down her pants and exposed himself very violating. That's how I felt like it's just a piece of me. Lou a Twenty-three-year-old clothing designer says she ran crying to the flight attendants in the back of the cabin. I was taking and I'm like this guy. I don't know him. He's a stranger like he can help me. She said to me, we're gonna make a report don't worry. We got you. You're going to be safe straight words from her mouth Lewis moved to another seat. She says she was the first passenger allowed off the plane when it landed at Los Angeles where she was met by delta customer service representatives. I said, where's the please? I'm like, are you guys still haven't called the police that was like what is wrong with you guys? So from your vantage point, he just walked off the plane and. Yeah. Lou also says he was visibly drunk when he boarded the plane in Minneapolis but flight attendants still served him alcohol. I'm like dang here is like so much alcohol. Much is he gonna drink? How many drinks do you think he had? There was about six to eight Lou filed a federal lawsuit in Tennessee, claiming delta was negligent by over serving the passenger delta knew or should have known. It's actions could lead to harm to a passenger, including a sexual assault. Do you feel that the flight attendants didn't believe you to be honest that didn't even run they're my head? I just think that they just didn't do their job. A delta spokesman told CBS this morning customer safety is top priority. And it does not tolerate the harassment or assault of passengers, but the airline disputes lose version of events. Jamie Yuccas Costanza, California WW chain news time, twelve twenty four..

Delaney Lou Delta Airlines Jamie Yuccas Costanza Lewis CBS assault Los Angeles harassment Tennessee California Minneapolis Twenty-three-year
"delta airlines" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"delta airlines" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Delta Airlines flights in the United States for a while Tuesday evening. Delta says it was an IT issue. That's been fixed now, but there was a ground stop that halted all. Delta Airlines flights in the United States for about two hours Tuesday evening. He says he's innocent till there's no physical evidence linking him to the crime. But tonight, Troy Clark is scheduled to receive a lethal injection in Texas for the murder of his roommate twenty year old Christina amused in the spring of nineteen ninety eight she was drowned in a bathtub or body stuffed in a barrel filled with cement and then dumped in a remote location at his sentencing. Clarke had taunted the jurors to give him the death penalty. Then Thursday evening, Texas plans to put Daniel Acker to death. For the strangulation and beating death of his girlfriend in the spring of two thousand the Texas parole board has declined to intervene in either of the scheduled executions, which would be the ninth and tenth in Texas this year for the third time this year. The Federal Reserve is expected to raise interest rates today is the central Bank response to rising inflation and robust hiring by employers. Policymakers are expected to increase short-term interest rates by a quarter-point lifting them to a range of two to two and a quarter percent, which would be their highest level in a decade. The fed has been rolling back policies aimed at stimulating the economy and the aftermath of the financial crisis raising rates seven times since two thousand fifteen and pencilling in two more rate hikes for this year. Fed officials have gradually raise rates to prevent the economy from overheating or growing too fast and causing prices to spike. Hillary barsky, Fox News despite that Asian stocks are closing Wednesday mostly higher. Dow futures are up ahead more than twenty points. This a day after the Dow. Gained eighty six points in baseball. The Houston Astros have clinched the American League western division title. Actually, the did it for them losing to the Seattle Mariners. I'm.

Texas Delta United States Houston Astros Federal Reserve Clarke Hillary barsky Christina Daniel Acker Troy Clark Seattle Mariners baseball Fox News murder American League twenty year two hours
"delta airlines" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"delta airlines" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Delta Airlines flights in the United States for a while Tuesday evening. Delta says it was an IT issue. That's been fixed now, but there was a ground stop that halted all. Delta Airlines flights in the United States for about two hours Tuesday evening. He says he's innocent till there's no physical evidence linking him to the crime. But tonight Troy Clark scheduled to receive a lethal injection in Texas for the murder of his room may twenty year old Christina amuse in the spring of nineteen ninety eight she was drowned in a bathtub or body stuffed in a barrel filled with cement and then dumped in a remote location at his sentencing. Clarke had taunted the jurors to give him the death penalty. Then Thursday evening, Texas plans to put Daniel Acker to death for the strangulation at beating death of his girlfriend in the spring of two thousand the Texas parole board has declined to intervene and either of the scheduled executions, which would be and tenth in Texas this year for the third time this year. The Federal Reserve is expected to raise interest rates today. The central Bank response to rising inflation and robust hiring by employers. Policymakers are expected to increase short-term interest rates by a quarter-point lifting them to a range of two to two and a quarter percent, which would be their highest level in a decade. The fed has been rolling back policies aimed at stimulating the economy and the aftermath of the financial crisis raising rates seven times since two thousand and fifteen and pencilling in two more rate hikes for this year. That officials have gradually raise rates to prevent the economy from overheating or growing too fast and causing prices to spike. Hillary barsky, Fox News despite that Asian stocks are closing Wednesday mostly higher. Dow futures are up ahead more than twenty points. This a day after the Dow gained eighty six points in baseball. The Houston Astros have clinched the American League western division, title, actually, the they did it for them losing to the Seattle Mariners. I'm Jack Callaghan..

Delta Texas United States Houston Astros Federal Reserve Clarke Hillary barsky Jack Callaghan Troy Clark Daniel Acker baseball murder Fox News Seattle Mariners American League western divisi twenty year
"delta airlines" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"delta airlines" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"It at delta airlines to try to get what i want how did that go well i will say that busy phillips ended up getting a refund she ended up finding a flight that they could all get on at two thirty in the morning after all of that ordeal so eventually it all worked out after throwing her energy around now i wanna tell you calling i want to mention that delta airlines handled this publicly however a spokesperson for delta airlines said that the issue occurred this whole debacle occurred because busy phillips booked her child's flight under two separate itineraries therefore delta airlines was operating under the assumption that these two parties were not related to each other at all so they were re booking these people as two separate eighteen arabia's linked together so what i'm saying is that busy phillips was throwing her beatty e around everywhere dragon delta under the bus on social media when this could have been handled a little more quietly and in fact it was an error on her part that all of this happened in the first place this is where okay so i just generally speaking i am cautious of the act of using social media as a means to air your personal grievances with any company you know and i've been guilty of it certainly when i've been disappointed with something but for the most part for example if you are in the midst of a reschedule on your delta flight the place to take that up is that the delta counter your on the phone to adults at agent but to go and i don't know whether or not she did that or if this all was settled over twitter this timmy is such a sign of the times but i will also fault many companies for being far more responsive over social media.

delta airlines phillips arabia twitter timmy
"delta airlines" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"delta airlines" Discussed on AP News

"For location delta airlines says it's banning pit bull type dogs on their planes because of growing safety concerns after several employees were bitten the airline says passengers can no longer bring pit bulls on board as service or support animals there's been backlash on social media over the ban delta says the bands in enhancement to its policy on animals in passenger areas the airline also says as of july tenth it a limit pass singers to a single emotional support animal per flight capsized weasel like animal is under threat for marijuana cultivation and california officials wanted listed as danger the humboldt martin a relative of minks and daughters faces extinction according to a report by the state department of fish and wildlife trapping isn't allowed any more in california but the martin's habitat is threatened by wildfires logging road construction pot grows and climate change the report says conservation groups in april filed a petition asking oregon officials to ban trapping of humboldt martin's democrats and republicans appear to agree on at least one issue ap's mike kemp and reports the poll shows that neither party things president should pardon themselves who says there's nothing but political division in washington a new poll from the associated press center for public affairs research shows eighty five percent of those responding think it would be wrong for presidents to pardon themselves if they're charged with a crime and seventy six percent sent in congress should take steps to remove a president if he or she does so the pull this not specifically named president trump but several respondents including some trump supporters say their feelings would not change when applied to the current president i'm mike hampton hi i'm megan.

delta airlines california martin mike kemp president washington congress trump mike hampton marijuana oregon eighty five percent seventy six percent
"delta airlines" Discussed on The Morning Toast

The Morning Toast

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"delta airlines" Discussed on The Morning Toast

"We'll edit it out and if you guests great and if not you know we're not saying just in case it doesn't happen so we didn't lead you on or anything yeah it was just like tell you where we're at but i just think everyone should be here on june thirteenth that's just own thing i just think it'd be really interesting for your guest to be here angie thirteen if you want to okay we've got the big june thirteenth two big day for big plans yet okay our sixth story is really fucking sad delta airlines another dog died checked cargo once another dog took off on a commercial airliner and when the plane landed the dog was dead alejandro the pomeranian was in the cargo hold of a delta airlines does that mean below the yet check dogs delta still does yes that originated in phoenix i was supposed to land new jersey with a stopover in detroit that's landed in motor city it was a commodity stop when the plane landed in motor city were told the eightyearold palm was alive but it was discovered he died during the process of transferring him to the connecting flight so far the cause of death has not been determined delta tells tmz it's conducting a thorough investigation to find out what occurred to ensure it doesn't happen again the airline says it's working with all hunter's family to support them and is offered a free necropsy to have hundred evaluated the dog was owned by an unmarried couple that was relocating to new york this is so much but the dog is so small why was it checked widened they carry on i'm not gonna blame anyone but here this is a question not blame game when when that united dog died in the overhead it's because someone forced that dog into an overhead bin where dog is not supposed to be i don't i didn't think that airline still did cargo check.

angie delta airlines phoenix detroit hunter new york
"delta airlines" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"delta airlines" Discussed on Channel 955

"The dog dying monday all right so this story is one of the biggest stories right now a dog traveling from phoenix to newark on delta airlines died in his crate and a layover in detroit earlier this week and the owner of the dog is now saying that delta airlines is responsible what began as a trip to pick up michael della grassi's dog alejandro ends with a bloody blanket and police being called seeing that blanket there's some kind of foul play happened here that's what you think of michael flew to detroit to pick up his dog this evening after it was found dead on a delta flight but he was met with endless back and forth we would like to see the dog now here we wouldn't want to do that so we can't see the dog we're not allowed to see the dog about way that's his attorney talking so you you're wondering this guy's obviously pretty torn up it is his turn talk they brought the dog out with its belongings and that's when they found elliott honda's blanket with blood wonder what happened to a dog why white in a statement delta says they're conducting a thorough review of the situation to find out more about why this may have occurred and to ensure it doesn't happen again that's what michael wants this to never happen again we gotta get some kind of answers i mean it's this can't happen again to anybody you know like i i've said it before and i'll say it again dogs and any kind of you know animals that they're not just pets that your family we lost a family member gives me explain this to me that the dog what what breed was because it was a little tiny pomer i'm not positive it looks they put small animals like that in heart in the cargo like let's safe to do that and the other thing too was that i don't understand and i it's horrible situation but they say that he and his wife flew out earlier and then they put the dog in there for later to get to meet them and i'm thinking myself.

phoenix delta airlines detroit michael della grassi alejandro attorney elliott honda newark
"delta airlines" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"delta airlines" Discussed on WJR 760

"In order to do so or in my humble opinion entrepreneurial ship is the pursuit of opportunity without regard to resources currently controlled a risk taker of visionary i have had the pleasure of working very closely with some of the best entrepreneurs in the country so allow me to share with you what happened in my business career at a very early stage i let's establish when it started my dream my dream started when i went to central michigan you see i was a c student in the next college athletes played basketball at central michigan never wanting to work a day in my life believing that if i was going to be able to get to the nba i would never have to work again but when reality set in her really wasn't as good as i thought and i realized for the first time that i had the first time in my life that i had to get a job i mean i was in trouble i really didn't have a backup plan so what did i do i went out and got a job a real job i thought i would go out and get the best job in the world so i applied as a flight attendant for delta airlines and i also plied to become a fireman in the city of dearborn michigan well i got the flight attendant job i and that's where it all started for me folks talking to people in first class i got the job as a regular flight attendant then i got myself promoted to work up in first class at first i was really interested in you know being close to the athletes that would fly in first class or the movie stars but then when reality really set me straight i started to get really focused on the businessmen and businesswomen in first class because i could not understand why these people would spend an extra thousand dollars to sit up in first class when they could've sat a few rows back and save the money but then started to talk with them and you know successful people like to share their stories and i realized.

michigan nba delta airlines dearborn thousand dollars
"delta airlines" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"delta airlines" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Package bomb blasts a few miles apart kill a teenager and wounded two women in that city today former fbi agent and abc news bread garrett says investigators are looking for some common threads in the attacks let's say that a low each other but the all to the same church or same social a vip or same health club anything that is a komen thai preps personally but a common thai that would then give you a we potentially as to where the bomber is getting the come names this comes less than two weeks after a similar attack left a man dead in another part of the city creating a trade war will only revert us back in all the progress we've made arizona senator jeff flake addressing congress today saying he's introducing legislation to nullify president trump's tariffs we have bell a better climate for economic growth on both the regulatory side and the tax side if we enter a trade war we risk reversing those gains we have made the president announced last week that the us would impose heavy tariffs on imported steel and aluminum with some countries potentially exempted a cell phone caught fire on a delta airlines flight this morning it was on board delta airlines flight landing from sydney australia when passengers say is cell phone con fire the pilots com the audio from live atc delta tells us he its flight attendants followed training using onboard containment bags putting the smoking phone inside a fire containment bag delta's outfitted every aircraft with the bags passengers say the crew acted calmly and quickly getting the phone in the bag alex stone abc news los angeles time to check your afternoon traffic here's detour day and.

jeff flake congress trump president us australia fbi garrett arizona senator sydney two weeks
"delta airlines" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"delta airlines" Discussed on WLOB

"Stamp out with this happens i'm a big fan of all evil them okay with that so you know about delta airlines of producer john and they are there they're declared war on the national rifle association there were willing to give up pay forty million dollar tax rebate or jet fuel for the sake of thirteen people who took oath took them up on the nra uh the discount so anyway over the weekend i had to fly i was in the air eight different flights i could not get a direct flight tour i was going all of the travel had been booked before this happen so i was on delta airlines all weekend so john i showed up at laguardia airport and i've got the photos we posted on the instagram i showed up wearing by nra ball gap wow blackball capped gold letters i know i triggered so body but i got smiles it looks wherever i winced i've surprised i made it through tsa checkpoint to be honest with you but you know what i did on the tsa checkpoint this is brilliant i you know i i wish we could pull the security footage from laguardia because you know hey you have to put your bags on the conveyor belt right and a brief aside do you have the do you do you fly lot producer john i i fly pretty often i would you had you had the d had the a prechecking tsa preach i don't because on a flight nadal art you don't need that anymore what you need to do is sign up for clear and what they do they take your fingerprints it and you you they they keep those old file and so you will all you have to do is walk up to the clear stand and put your fingers on the pad and your face pops up there on the screen huts and then they let your walk right old it's the future you don't have to show your id you don't have to you don't have to take your shoes off so if you got smelly feet i'm not say to have smelly feet producer but but if you've got this developing you could keep your shoes on and it's very quick it's very large it's like star trek it's amazing so i'm going up there.

delta airlines nra producer john i laguardia forty million dollar
"delta airlines" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"delta airlines" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"The here is time to changed this is the republican party of today which many people like here is new a governor of georgia who is going after a delta airlines you've ever flown to atlanta instead quarters say headquarter delta which i don't even know what percentage of flights in and out of atlanta delta but a lot do go to hearts villa match you see so many dealt a big giant coming in go down so delta this is this is stupid the delta as a business can do a delta as a business would like to do they i didn't know this until today like many other companies have decided to stop the fn at the marketing programme with the nra um this is giving discounts type thing yeah yeah her the label on a card so how's that not delta's issue you know private business right member than anybody remember that i don't know yet good or bad idea for delta why do we let them work it out here comes the lieutenant governor of georgia casey k goel casey geyo matter katie cason aca giggle i will kill any legislation that benefits delta unless the company changes its position and reinstates its relationship with the nra corporations cannot attack conservatives and expect us not the fight back towards us you over the top fascist lee malone their business oh that's right it doesn't work that way anymore hm corporations cannot attack us conservatives in that expect us not the five back not energetically governor jackass mm lieutenant governor odds you're not some consumer you're the lieutenant governor to threatened them you're not just to cut this save is a customer say i'm not gonna fled delta them let them so what as an individual esa that none of these gone to your own government account and use your government power to try to bully that carpeting what are you call that again and then less government that's the biggest biggest gutted gland while wednesday copaco cocacola whoah biggest gotta.

republican party georgia delta airlines atlanta nra lee malone
"delta airlines" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

CNBC's Fast Money

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"delta airlines" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

"Whereas this year go not just the s but also look at the euro stock index delta is far behind i think there's a lot of room to be made up there that is underperformance relative to where it could be so that's a second point the there's a few other points that i want to get to i don't have time for all him because there's so many good things have happened on the conference called love how excited they were chasm that's costs for average seat bile they talked about nonfuel costs of zero to two percent and a lot closer to zero that's really important and that's what's going to help their margin that's with your help their earned more one more thing they said that the business traveler was not included in their projections that they made for last year which did include the tax code would business travelers going up that is a great margin customer all that having been said delta airlines even though it was up i still own it i still legged reindeer i care and it's tim itim i am a delta holder i liked the company but i was worried today on this call talked about fuel prices being you know roughly seven bucks are than their work bill west investor day and yet they're keeping their top line 46 bucks in in terms of growth intact that doesn't tell you make sense to me also very noisy in terms of changing conventions conventions in terms of eib it going from presentday raza i mean you know some of the stuff was a little too to funky for me well the other findings thinking a little bit of a us some benefit they're on the fuel costs but they also raise the sceptre of maybe being able to add fuel tax surcharges this administration might be open to it other ones have in fact gave me a little bit of comfort all right time to votes a buying or selling cairns pitch for delta steve carr said what he say juror whatever currences delta.

delta delta airlines steve carr cairns two percent