9 Burst results for "Delores Albarracin"

"delores albarracin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"delores albarracin" Discussed on KCRW

"That testing need to be fixed by the autumn, but the government didn't listen. They pretended that wasn't a problem. They didn't act quickly enough. Now the testing system isn't working just when we need it. And I gotta tell you, Steve, this is a critique you here across the country. Most people I know are stunned that after all these months, the government has not been able to build a testing system that will meet demand. NPR London correspondent Frank Langfitt. Thanks so much. You're very welcome, Steve. There are rumors that have gone viral on Twitter and Facebook that left wing activists started the fires the wildfires in Oregon. Those rumors are false. But so far these companies have failed to stop misinformation, some of the dangerous from spreading Facebook. I should note is a financial supporter of NPR. And here's our Shannon Bond. Cameron Hill and his family were fleeing fires in Clackamas County, south of Portland, and they'd heard some disturbing rumors. I heard that several activists in custody Down and Eugene starting actually seeing starting fires. That's Hill talking with Oregon Public Broadcasting's Monica Sama, Goa thes. Arson claims were not true, but they were lighting up social media. The rumor was the fires had been set by anti fascist activists known as antifa, or Black Lives matter. Protestors The rumors cause so much disruption, local police departments took to Facebook and Twitter to beg people to stop spreading them. They said there was no evidence that any political or activist groups were behind the fires. Tim Fox is a captain with the Oregon State Police. You know, all these rumors and things that are going around are tough because we have to find people to respond to him to investigate him to check him out. Part of the reason these claims spread so widely on Facebook is that the world's biggest social network rewards engagement post that get lots of shares comments and likes get shown. Two more people quickly amplifying their reach. As the fire rumors proliferated. Facebook did put warnings on some post its fact checkers found false and after the FBI put out a statement debunking the rumors, Facebook began removing post entirely. But by then the rumors have been circulating for several days. And what that did to us is That they're waiting too long. Karen Corn Blue and her research team at the German Marshall Fund found these rumors spreading in private Facebook groups, some with hundreds of thousands of members. And the claims were being amplified by social media accounts known to spread false information like followers of Q and on a baseless conspiracy theory. Facebook spokesman says the company acts aggressively to stop misinformation. But what happened in Oregon shows that once this kind of hoax start spreading, it's really hard to stamp out When you think of the psychology of misinformation, you know, you can think of something my molding play. Delores Albarracin is a psychology professor at the University of Illinois. And when you have self clay, you can print anything you want onto it. Once it dries out. Now that's it. Your printer shape is set so well fact checks and removing posts can help the Realtor challenge is stopping harmful hoaxes from going viral in the first place. And some experts have a new idea about how to hit pause on social media is powerful amplification engine Aaron Simpson at the left leaning Center for American Progress, says Thie. Inspiration is the stock market. So if the SNP drops really suddenly we've had these specials in place for a lot of years now that the market will stop, and that will automatically trigger like review. Those automatic triggers are called circuit breakers, Simpson says. That's what social Media needs a circuit breaker to stop the viral spread that platforms are designed to encourage So when a controversial topic is gaining steam, Facebook or Twitter could limit its reach while reviewing disputed information. A system like this can maybe make it harder for stuff to go Viral instead of the status quo, which is a set of Facebook business products make it easier to go viral. The idea is even getting traction inside Facebook, it says. It's testing this kind.

Facebook Twitter Steve Oregon Cameron Hill Oregon State Police Tim Fox NPR NPR London Arson Shannon Bond Portland Clackamas County Oregon Public Broadcasting Frank Langfitt Aaron Simpson
"delores albarracin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"delores albarracin" Discussed on KCRW

"That testing need to be fixed by the autumn, but the government didn't listen. They pretended it wasn't a problem. They didn't act quickly enough. Now the testing system isn't working just when we need it. And I got to tell you, Steve, this is a critique you here across the country. Most people I know are stunned that after all these months, the government has not been able to build a testing system that will meet demand. NPR London correspondent Frank Langfitt. Thanks so much. You're very welcome, Steve. There are rumors that have gone viral on Twitter and Facebook that left wing activists started the fires the wildfires in Oregon. Those rumors are false. But so far these companies have failed to stop misinformation, some of the dangerous from spreading Facebook. I should note is a financial supporter of NPR. And here's our Shannon Bond. Cameron Hill and his family were fleeing fires in Clackamas County, south of Portland, and they'd heard some disturbing rumors. I heard that several activists in custody Down and Eugene starting actually seeing starting fires. That's Hill talking with Oregon Public Broadcasting's Monica Sama. Gila thes. Arson claims were not true, but they were lighting up social media. The rumor was the fires had been set by anti fascist activists known as antifa, or Black Lives matter. Protestors Rumors cause so much disruption, local police departments took to Facebook and Twitter to beg people to stop spreading them. They said there was no evidence that any political or activist groups were behind the fires. Tim Fox is a captain with the Oregon State Police. You know, all these rumors and things that are going around are tough because we have to find people to respond to him to investigate him to check him out. Part of the reason these claims spread so widely on Facebook is that the world's biggest social network rewards engagement. Post that get lots of shares comments and likes get shown. Two more people quickly amplifying their reach. As the fire rumors proliferated. Facebook did put warnings on some post its fact checkers found false. And after the FBI put out a statement debunking the rumors. Facebook began removing post entirely, But by then the rumors have been circulating for several days. And what that did to us is That they're waiting too long. Karen Corn Blue and her research team at the German Marshall Fund found these rumors spreading in private Facebook groups, some with hundreds of thousands of members. And the claims were being amplified by social media accounts known to spread false information like followers of Q and on a baseless conspiracy theory. Facebook spokesman says the company acts aggressively to stop misinformation. But what happened in Oregon shows that once this kind of hoax start spreading, it's really hard to stamp out When you think of the psychology of misinformation, you know, you can think of something my molding play. Delores Albarracin is a psychology professor at the University of Illinois. And when you have soft clay, you can print anything you want onto it. Once it dries out how that's it. Your printer shape is sent so well fact checks and removing posts can help the Realtor challenge is stopping harmful hoaxes from going viral in the first place. And some experts have a new idea about how to hit pause on social media is powerful amplification engine Aaron Simpson at the left leaning Center for American Progress, says Thie. Inspiration is the stock market. So if the SNP drops really, suddenly we've had these specials in place for a lot of years. Now that Mark. It'll stop and that will automatically trigger like review. Those automatic triggers are called circuit breakers, Simpson says That's what social media needs a circuit breaker to stop the viral spread that platforms are designed to encourage So when a controversial topic is gaining steam, Facebook or Twitter could limit its reach while reviewing disputed information. A system like this can maybe make it harder for stuff to go Viral instead of the status quo, which is a set of Facebook business products make it easier to go viral. The idea is even getting traction inside Facebook, it says. It's testing this kind of speed bump for viral.

Facebook Twitter Steve Oregon Cameron Hill Oregon State Police Tim Fox NPR NPR London FBI Shannon Bond Arson Portland Clackamas County Oregon Public Broadcasting Frank Langfitt Eugene
"delores albarracin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"delores albarracin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"News. I'm Noelle King. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning today. Boris Johnson, the prime minister of the UK announces new pandemic restrictions. Corona virus numbers in the UK are rising quickly after a summer in which life largely returned to normal. The millions of people affected by this change now include. Of course, NPR's London correspondent Frank Langfitt is on the line, Frank. Hi there. Hey, Good morning, Steve. Have you guys been preparing for this change? Well, we've seen it coming. You know, I think was about a week ago that Boris Johnson said people couldn't meet in groups of more than six and we had a farewell dinner over at a neighbor's house here, where we basically got together. Socially distance. But recognizing that this was the last time that the three couples and the families would be getting together because the rules were changing, and they are going to become stricter, he's going to announce this today. Pubs and restaurants will be closing at 10 PM He's also taken to tell people that if they can work from home they should to avoid the spread, and this is a reversal. He's been trying to get people to go in and stimulate the economy and work in offices in places like London to keep things going. And and this is coming actually, after the government has said these government scientific adviser Steve said that if the government doesn't do anything, we're gonna have 50,000 new cases a day by mid October 200 plus deaths by mid November a day Chris Witty, he was on the TV. He's the chief medical officer for England on the TV yesterday, and this is what he said to the British people. So we have in a bad sense literally turned a corner and I think everybody will realize that at this point the seasons are against us this period of the next six months. I think we have to realize that we have to take this collectively very seriously. Oh, yeah. When he says the seasons are against us, people think that the virus may do worse or do more damage in colder weather That is coming, But I'm just thinking about the restrictions. You just named frankness. Ah Pub Curfew of 10 P.m. make that much of a difference. I don't think so. I was talking to my daughter. This warning Catherine. She actually works at our neighborhood pub and I checked in with her, And she said a curfew would help in the final hour or so. People do drink a lot. They get affectionate. They ignore social distancing, but her pub, which is out here in the suburbs. Last call's at 11 anyway, so you're not really cutting the hours much, and she certainly doesn't think is going to make much of a difference. And nor do a lot of people here in England. Frank, you mentioned that Boris Johnson loosened the restrictions and encouraged people to go back to the office, hoping it would improve the economy did it? It did like this is actually some good news that I think people should hear. Over the last three months. It looks like the economy has actually been growing. Which is great news. I'm I'm thrilled to see this at the same time. It's nowhere near the levels. It was before Cove it hit and one thing I've seen in London. I was spending a lot of time talking to shop owners in London. It's turned the London economy inside out, Steve. So if you go to Piccadilly Circus if you go to Covent Garden, the places that would be teeming with people in a summer full of tourists and things like that. They're largely dead for much of the day, and I was talking to shop owners where Our business is down 70% year on year and they're very worried about the future at the same time, because many white collar workers are staying home in the suburbs, the suburbs and the outer borough of London are doing actually quite well and have recovered. Now, with Boris Johnson telling people not to go in. I'm sure the people have been talking to in London. This is just going toe. Give them a chill and think, How are we going to get through this when we're not going to have more people coming back? Frank, thanks very much for the update, really appreciate it. Happy to do it, Steve. That's NPR's London correspondent Frank Langfitt. There are rumors that have gone viral on Twitter and Facebook that left wing activists started the fires the wildfires in Oregon. Those rumors are false. But so far these companies have failed to stop misinformation, some of the dangerous from spreading Facebook. I should note is a financial supporter of NPR. And here's our Shannon Bond. Cameron Hill and his family were fleeing fires in Clackamas County, south of Portland, and they'd heard some disturbing rumors. Heard that several activists in custody Down and Eugene starting actually seeing starting fires. That's Hill talking with Oregon Public Broadcasting's Monica Sama, Goa These arson claims were not true, but they were lighting up social media. The rumor was the fires had been set by anti fascist activists known as antifa, or Black Lives matter. Protestors The rumors cause so much disruption, local police departments took to Facebook and Twitter to beg people to stop spreading them. They said there was no evidence that any political or activist groups were behind the fires. Tim Fox is a captain with the Oregon State Police. You know, all these rumors and things that are going around are tough because we have to find people to respond to him to investigate him to check him out. Part of the reason these claims spread so widely on Facebook is that the world's biggest social network rewards engagement. Post that get lots of shares comments and likes get shown. Two more people quickly amplifying their reach. As the fire rumors proliferated. Facebook did put warnings on some post its fact checkers found false. And after the FBI put out a statement debunking the rumors, Facebook began removing post entirely, But by then the rumors have been circulating for several days. And what that said to us is That they're waiting too long. Karen Corn Blue and her research team at the German Marshall Fund found these rumors spreading in private Facebook groups, some with hundreds of thousands of members. And the claims were being amplified by social media accounts known to spread false information like followers of Q and on a baseless conspiracy theory. Facebook spokesman says the company acts aggressively to stop misinformation. But what happened in Oregon shows that once this kind of hoax start spreading, it's really hard to stamp out When you think of the psychology of misinformation, you know, you can think of something my molding play. Delores Albarracin is a psychology professor at the University of Illinois. And when you have self clay, you can print anything you want onto it. Once it dries out, though, that's it. Your printer shape is set so well fact checks and removing posts can help the Realtor challenge is stopping harmful hoaxes from going viral in the first place. And some experts have a new idea about how to hit pause on social media is powerful amplification engine. Aaron Simpson at the left leaning Center for American Progress says the inspiration is the stock market. So if the SNP drops really suddenly, we've had these specials in place for you know a lot of years now that the market will stop, and that will automatically trigger like review. Those automatic triggers are called circuit breakers. Simpson says That's what social Media needs a circuit breaker to stop the viral spread that platforms are designed to encourage. So when a controversial topic is gaining steam, Facebook or Twitter could limit its reach while reviewing disputed information. A system like this can maybe make it harder for stuff to go viral. Instead of the status quo, which is a set of Facebook business products make it easier to go viral. The idea is even getting traction.

Facebook London Steve Inskeep Boris Johnson Frank Langfitt Twitter NPR England UK Oregon Noelle King Piccadilly Circus prime minister Aaron Simpson Chris Witty Oregon State Police Tim Fox Catherine
"delores albarracin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"delores albarracin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning today. Boris Johnson, the prime minister of the UK announces new pandemic restrictions. Corona virus numbers in the UK are rising quickly after a summer in which life largely returned to normal. The millions of people affected by this change now include. Of course, NPR's London correspondent Frank Langfitt is on the line, Frank. Hi there. Hey, Good morning, Steve. Have you guys been preparing for this change? Well, we've seen it coming. You know, I think was about a week ago that Boris Johnson said people couldn't meet in groups of more than six and we had a farewell dinner over at a neighbor's house here, where we basically got together. Socially distance. But recognizing that this was the last time the three couples and the families would be getting together because the rules were changing, and they are going to become stricter, he's going to announce this today. Pubs and restaurants will be closing at 10 PM He's also taken to tell people that if they can work from home, they should avoid the spread. And this is a reversal. He's been trying to get people to go in and stimulate the economy and work in offices in places like London to keep things going. And and this is coming actually, after the government has said these government scientific adviser Steve said that if the government doesn't do anything, we're gonna have 50,000 new cases a day by mid October 200 plus deaths by mid November a day. Chris Witty. He was on the TV. He's the chief medical officer for England on the TV yesterday, and this is what he said to the British people. So we have in a bad sense, literally turned a corner. I think everybody will realize that at this point the seasons are against us this period of the next six months. I think we have to realize that we have to take this collectively very seriously. Oh, yeah. When he says the seasons are against us, people think that the virus may do worse or do more damage in colder weather That is coming, But I'm just thinking about the restrictions. You just named frankness. Ah Pub Curfew of 10 P.m. make that much of a difference. I don't think so. I was talking to my daughter. This warning Catherine. She actually works at our neighborhood pub and I checked in with her, And she said a curfew would help in the final hour or so. People do drink a lot. They get affectionate. They ignore social distancing, but her pub, which is out here in the suburbs. Last call's at 11 anyway, so you're not really cutting the hours much, and she certainly doesn't think it's going to make much of a difference. And nor do a lot of people here in England. Frank, you mentioned that Boris Johnson loosened the restrictions and encouraged people to go back to the office, hoping it would improve the economy did it? It did like this is actually some good news that I think people should hear. Over the last three months. It looks like the economy has actually been growing. Which is great news. I'm I'm thrilled to see this at the same time. It's nowhere near the levels. It was before Cove it hit and one thing I've seen in London. I've spending a lot of time talking to shop owners in London. It's turned the London economy inside out, Steve. So if you go to Piccadilly Circus if you go to Covent Garden, the places that would be teeming with people in a summer full of tourists and things like that. They're largely dead for much of the day, and I was talking to shop owners where Your business is down 70% year on year and they're very worried about the future at the same time because many white collar workers are staying home in the suburbs, the suburbs and the outer borough of London are doing actually quite well and have recovered. Now, with Boris Johnson telling people not to go in. I'm sure the people have been talking to in London. This is just going toe. Give them a chill and think, How are we going to get through this when we're not going to have more people coming back? Frank, thanks very much for the update, really appreciate it. Happy to do it, Steve. That's NPR's London correspondent Frank Langfitt. There are rumors that have gone viral on Twitter and Facebook that left wing activists started the fires the wildfires in Oregon. Those rumors are false. But so far these companies have failed to stop misinformation, some of the dangerous from spreading Facebook. I should note is a financial supporter of NPR. And here's our Shannon Bond. Cameron Hill and his family were fleeing fires in Clackamas County, south of Portland, and they'd heard some disturbing rumors. Heard that several activists in custody Down and Eugene starting actually seeing starting fires. That's Hill talking with Oregon Public Broadcasting's Monica Sama, Gila These arson claims were not true, but they were lighting up social media. The rumor was the fires had been set by anti fascist activists known as antifa, or Black Lives matter. Protestors Rumors cause so much disruption, local police departments took to Facebook and Twitter to beg people to stop spreading them. They said there was no evidence that any political or activist groups were behind the fires. Tim Fox is a captain with the Oregon State Police. You know, all these rumors and things that are going around are tough because we have to find people to respond to him to investigate him to check him out. Part of the reason these claims spread so widely on Facebook is that the world's biggest social network rewards engagement. Post that get lots of shares comments and likes get shown. Two more people quickly amplifying their reach. As the fire rumors proliferated. Facebook did put warnings on some post its fact checkers found false. And after the FBI put out a statement debunking the rumors. Facebook began removing post entirely, But by then the rumors have been circulating for several days. And what that did to us is That they're waiting too long. Karen Corn Blue and her research team at the German Marshall Fund found these rumors spreading in private Facebook groups, some with hundreds of thousands of members. And the claims were being amplified by social media accounts known to spread false information like followers of Q and on a baseless conspiracy theory. Facebook spokesman says the company acts aggressively to stop misinformation. But what happened in Oregon shows that once this kind of hoax start spreading, it's really hard to stamp out When you think of the psychology of misinformation, you know, you can think of something my molding play. Delores Albarracin is a psychology professor at the University of Illinois. And when you have soft clay, you can print anything you want onto it. Once it dries out, though, that's it. Your printer shape is set so well fact checks.

Facebook London Steve Inskeep Boris Johnson Frank Langfitt NPR NPR News Oregon England UK Twitter Chris Witty Noelle King prime minister Piccadilly Circus Oregon State Police German Marshall Fund Tim Fox medical officer
"delores albarracin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"delores albarracin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A weekly report from NPR News. Louie Garcia Navarro. Let's say it's 2021 scientists have developed a vaccine for covert 19. It's been approved and widely marketed. Can they convince people to actually get vaccinated? A Gallup poll last month found that more than one in three Americans would not get an FDA approved Corona virus vaccine even for free psychology Professor Dolores Albarracin studies behavior and medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champagne. She spoke with all things considered co host Audie Cornish about why some people are still skeptical of vaccines. We know that it can take years to develop and distribute a safe vaccine to everyone. And then, of course, just this week, the pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca announced it was hitting pause on its trial to investigate and unexplained illness in one of its participants, So there are people who are concerned about potential long term side effects. We were worried about this process being rushed. Does that boost people's doubts, and is that wrong? Well, I think it's completely normal, and we should all be looking at side effects or any pharmaceutical product that we consume right. Among those who hesitate 60% fierce side effects 37%. I'm not afraid but into something and will work And then you have trained percent or stone Two posers. So the anti Vax group and that's a small group. So for their folks were fearing side of facts. I think news think when you're referring to are going to be extremely implants still and they connect with Some pre strong and persuasive narratives about Big pharma and we have data even want my own day that we're colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania showing that exposure to social media earlier on actually predict vaccination intentions in the domain of full later on, so there's pretty good data that those groups are not trivial. Wait, So help me understand this Essentially if someone sees anti vaccination social media posts that can actually influence their own decision about whether or not to accept a vaccine. Yes, it's similar to that. So he surveyed 3000 participants over one year following the flu season till months. So when we have service what is going on Twitter? What misinformation about vaccines is being distributed and where So when you look in that, and then you look at whoever lives in the county that has that kind of big for my conspiracy, misinformation circulating on Twitter. Are less likely to get the flu shot a few months later. Except That they're not affected if they have discussions in really life, So if they can discuss this information with friends, family their physicians, then they're less persuaded by the misinformation, but otherwise the misinformation they encounter regionally affect them. What does all this mean for the public information campaign? How should authorities. Public health officials go about trying to convince people to embrace the vaccines should one come along? So this travesty In my view should be to communicate a norm clearly. So you need to tell people that everybody wants it. We all like it. We must have it so something quite different from what we saw with wearing masks where there was a lot more. Hesitation in the messaging right on DH contradictions, Silver months. So clear norm. You also need to be, of course, correcting for misinformation systematically every day through health education in schools and work. Everywhere. I'm seeing an explosion of misinformation and what the whole has referred to as an infant Emmick. And if we don't eradicate, it won't make evade difficult to end the coffin. 19 pandemic That's Audie Corner, speaking to psychology professor Delores Albarracin. A new survey measuring the financial pain of the pandemic found that nearly half of American households have suffered serious financial loss is that's according to a recent poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Harvard's Th Chan School of Public Health in the country's four largest cities, The situation is even worse, especially for Latinos and black Americans. 50 to 80% of those households. Report serious financial problems. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports on the findings. The pandemic is creating serious financial problems, job loss, depleted savings or possible eviction. That's despite hundreds of billions in government stimulus and other support. The survey shows economic stress running higher in the country's four largest cities New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and Houston. Latino and black families were substantially more likely to face serious economic distress compared to white counterparts. Robert Blendon is a professor of health policy and political analysis at Harvard. And co author of the survey. He says the results show the personal financial challenges run deeper and broader than previously understood. I would've expected that a ll. The aid that was coming from various sources would have narrowed, not eliminated the differences by race and ethnicity. The survey conducted this summer also found more distress among households making less than $100,000 a year. It suggests a lack of funds creating knock on effects trouble paying for food or medical care, which in turn led to serious health consequences. The surveys implications could mean everything from a bigger drag on the economy to the nation's mental health outlook, and Lenin says the prognosis is grim. At the time of the survey, the federal government was offering $600 a week in additional benefits for the unemployed that was not renewed after July. It's going to get worse because there is nothing for the people we survey Who learnt under $100,000, a year on Arctic communities are not working full time to fall back on. Cynthia Macklin is 66 lives alone in downtown Chicago. Her 45 year career in medical administration ended eight years ago when she got chronic lung disease. Her disability led to major depression, none of which have been treated during the pandemic. I have not seen my pulmonary duck, just listen to my lungs to check my oxygen levels. The psychiatrist. I have seen him about four months. Not primary doctor. I have a scene hurts. All these things have impact. The battery recently died on Mac Lin's truck, which she relies on to get groceries in medicine. The $1200 federal stimulus check She received help pay for it, she says, but that money is now long gone. This would be the first month that I'm not gonna be able to pay what I owe my landlord's email yesterday asking will connect to Macklin says she's lost eight friends and relatives to covet 19, including her ex husband, the father of her two daughters. Above all, Macklin says, coping alone is lonely. I try so hard not to cry. I'm just just speaking to you has opened things up, and that's what happened so hard. I have nine grandkids and great great tears that would love to see them. But In the NPR pool, One in five people said family.

Cynthia Macklin NPR Twitter flu NPR News professor Audie Cornish Harvard Louie Garcia Navarro Chicago FDA Urbana Champagne Dolores Albarracin University of Illinois AstraZeneca University of Pennsylvania
"delores albarracin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"delores albarracin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Corona virus vaccine even for free. Psychology professor Delores Albarracin studies behavior and medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champagne. She spoke with our co host, Audie Cornish earlier today about why some people are skeptical of vaccines. We know that it can take years to develop and distributed safe vaccine to everyone. And then, of course, just this week, the pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca announced that it was hitting pause on its trial to investigate and unexplained illness and one of its participants. So there are people who are concerned about potential long term side effects that who are worried about this process being rushed. Does that boost people's doubts? And is that wrong? Well, I think it's completely normal, and we should all be looking at side effects or any pharmaceutical product that we consume right. Among those who hesitate 60% fierce side effects 37%. I'm not afraid but into something and will work. And then he had trained per cent who are stone two posers. So the anti Vax group, and that's a small group. So for their folks were fearing side of facts. I think news like the one you're referring to are going to be extremely implants so and they connect with Some pre strong and persuasive narratives and big pharma and we have data. Even my want my own data with colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania, showing that exposure to social media earlier on actually predict vaccination intentions in the domain of full later on, so there's pretty good data that those groups are not trivial. Wait, So help me understand this Essentially if someone sees anti vaccination social media posts that can actually influence their own decision about whether or not to accept a vaccine. Yes, it's similar to that. So he surveyed 3000 participants over one year following the flu season till months. So when we observe is what's going on Twitter. What misinformation about vaccines is being distributed and where So when you look in that, and then you look at whoever lives in a county that has that kind of big pharma conspiracy in this information circulating on Twitter. Are less likely to get the flu shot a few months later. Except That they're not affected if they have discussions in really life, So if they can discuss this information with friends, family their physicians, then they're less persuaded by the misinformation, but otherwise the misinformation they encounter regionally affect them. What does all this mean for the public information campaign? How should authorities. Public health officials go about trying to convince people to embrace the vaccines should one come along? So this travesty In my view should be to communicate a norm clearly. So you need to tell people that everybody wants it. We all like it. We must have it so something quite different from what we saw with wearing masks where there was a lot more. Hesitation in the messaging right and contradictions over months. So clear norm. You also need to be, of course, correcting for misinformation systematically every day through health education in schools and work. Everywhere. I'm seeing an explosion of misinformation and what the whole has referred to as an infant Emmick, and if we don't eradicate it won't make invade difficult to end that coffin 19 pandemic. That was the Laura's overseen. She's a professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champagne. Thank you for speaking with us. Thank you. China's military appears to have successfully tested a new spacecraft. Last week's mission was shrouded in secrecy. But as NPR's Jeff Bromfield reports, there are some clues about what China sent into space and why. Last Friday, a Chinese rocket took off carrying a mysterious payload. A terse statement on state media said it was quote a reusable experimental spacecraft. But they didn't give a launch time. They don't have any more details. No riel official footage of the Lord's Jonathan Mcd, Alison astronomer, Earthy Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian who specializes in tracking satellites and spacecraft orbiting the Earth. When he plotted the course of China's new craft, he found that it passed over a secretive military facility. An area called Luke Nure, where China once tested its nuclear weapons. There's an air base there, which has AH big runway that's aligned exactly in the direction ofthe the orbit of the space craft. On Sunday, China announced its new spacecraft heads landed Sure enough fuzzy satellite images snapped by a commercial company called Planet. Seemed to show activity on the.

China Audie Cornish professor flu Twitter Urbana Champagne University of Illinois Alison astronomer AstraZeneca Delores Albarracin University of Pennsylvania Vax Luke Nure Harvard Earthy Center
"delores albarracin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"delores albarracin" Discussed on KCRW

"Much of generations. E will vote for the first time in November, and they've got plenty to say they're the most diverse and digitally connected generation in the US As the general election nears, you're going to hear from three young voters about the issues that matter most to them. That's coming up in the six o'clock hour, also coming up in the six o'clock hour. It's greater L A. You're going to meet Manuel Villanueva. He's a labor organizer with the nonprofit restaurant Opportunities Center. Since the pandemic began, he's been on a mission to help restaurant workers. He's been fielding calls from out of work cooks, dishwashers and bar hands, who Don't have anyone else to turn to. That's coming up on greater Elliot 6 30 Right here on K C, R w checking your roads Pasadena to 10 Bandits Here in Monterey Boulevard Still have this overturned car, blocking the carpal and left lanes flow traffic now from Mountain Street in Agoura Hills, one of one South bound past Chesbro Road. Gotta crash blocking the two left lanes there and you're going to find traffic slow coming away from about Canaan. Use. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Sasha Pfeifer. Let's say it's 2021. Scientists have already developed and marketed a vaccine for Coben 19. Now they face a new problem convincing people to actually get vaccinated with it. A Gallup poll last month found that more than one in three Americans would not get an FDA approved Corona virus vaccine even for free. Psychology professor Delores Albarracin studies behavior and medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champagne. She spoke with our co host, Audie Cornish earlier today about why some people are skeptical of vaccines. We know that it can take years to develop and distribute a safe vaccine to everyone. And then, of course, just this week, the pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca announced that it was hitting pause on its trial to investigate and unexplained illness and one of its participants. So there are people who are concerned about potential long term side effects that who are worried about this process being rushed. Does that boost people's doubts? And is that wrong? Well, I think it's completely normal, and we should all be looking at side effects for any pharmaceutical product that we consume right. Among those who hesitate 60% fierce side effects 37%. I'm not afraid, but I just don't think it will work. And then you have trained per cent who are stone two posers. So the anti Vax group that's a small group. So for their folks who are fearing side of facts. I think news like the one you're referring to are going to be extremely influential, and they connect with Some pre strong and persuasive in narratives about Big pharma and we have data. Even I want my own data with colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania, showing that exposure to social media earlier on actually predict vaccination intentions in the domain of full later on, so there's pretty good data that those groups are not trivial. Wait, So help me understand this Essentially if someone sees anti vaccination social media posts that can actually influence their own decision about whether or not to accept a vaccine. Yes, it's similar to that. So he surveyed 3000 participants over one year following the flu season till months. So when we observe is what is going on Twitter. What misinformation amount vaccines is being distributed and where So when you look in that, and then you look at whoever lives in the county that has that kind of big pharma conspiracy in this information circulating on Twitter. Are less likely to get the full shot a few months later. Except Dad. They're not affected if they have discussions in really life, so if they can discuss this information with friends, family their physicians, then they're less persuaded by the misinformation, but otherwise the misinformation they encounter regionally affect them. What does all this mean for the public information campaign? How should authorities. Public health officials go about trying to convince people to embrace the vaccines should one come along? So this travesty In my view should be to communicate a norm clearly. So you need to tell people that everybody wants it. We all like it. We must have it. So something quite different from what we saw with wearing masks were there was a lot more hesitation in the messaging, right and contradictions, Silver months. So clear norm. You also need to be, of course, correcting for misinformation systematically every day through health education in schools and work. Everywhere. I'm seeing an explosion of misinformation and what the whole has referred to as an infant Emmick, and if we don't eradicate it won't make evade difficult to end that coffin 19 pandemic. That was the Laura's other scene. She's a professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champagne. Thank you for speaking with us. Thank you. China's military appears to have successfully tested a new spacecraft. Last week's mission was shrouded in secrecy. But as NPR's Jeff from field reports, there are some clues about what China sent into space and why. Last Friday, a Chinese rocket took off carrying a mysterious payload. A terse statement on state media said it was quote A reusable experimental spacecraft, but they didn't give a launch time. They don't have any more details. No riel official footage of the Lord's Jonathan Mcd, Alison astronomer, Earthy Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian who specializes in tracking satellites and spacecraft orbiting the Earth. When he plotted the course of China's new craft, he found that it passed over a secretive military facility. An area called Loop Nure, where China once tested its nuclear weapons. There's an air base there, which has AH big runway that's aligned exactly in the direction ofthe the orbit of the space craft. On Sunday, China announced its new spacecraft heads landed. Sure enough fuzzy satellite images napped by a commercial company called Planet. Seemed to show activity on the giant runway right at the moment, the landing would have occurred. McDowell says that the evidence is circumstantial, but he believes China has just tested a space plane. Think of it. It's a little space shuttle a craft with wings probably too small to carry people that took off on a rocket and coasted back to Earth. The information of all hands together now that this wass A test of something probably a space plane that made a winged reentry on landed on the runway at Lop nor the US Air Force has a similar spacecraft called the X 37 B. It's been launched in since 2010. So if that's what China tested, why now it's a great question. We're not even really sure why the United States military is pursuing a space plane like it's been doing for the last Decade or so. Brian Weeden Studies face security issues with the Secure World Foundation. The U. S X 37 B program remains highly classified. Weeden says he believes it's being used to test new sensors and systems for the military. Think about if you're building a brand new satellite, and you've got a lot of fancy new technology that's never been in space before. That's potentially risky. But if you can apply some of that technology in space, let's say in the payload bay of a reusable space plane that could allow you to get a better feel for how about react. McDowell says that space planes which travel many times, the speed of sound, could also potentially helped with the development of so called hyper sonic weapons..

China United States Urbana Champagne University of Illinois McDowell professor Twitter Pasadena Manuel Villanueva Agoura Hills restaurant Opportunities Cente Brian Weeden Audie Cornish Canaan flu AstraZeneca University of Pennsylvania US Air Force FDA
"delores albarracin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"delores albarracin" Discussed on KCRW

"Appears to have successfully tested a new spacecraft. Last week's mission was shrouded in secrecy. But as NPR's Jeff from field reports, there are some clues about what China sent into space and why. Last Friday, a Chinese rocket took off carrying a mysterious payload. A terse statement on state media said it was quote A reusable experimental spacecraft, but they didn't give a launch time. They don't have any more details. No riel official footage of the Lord's Jonathan Mcd, Alison astronomer, Earthy Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian who specializes in tracking satellites and spacecraft orbiting the Earth. When he plotted the course of China's new craft, he found that it passed over a secretive military facility. An area called Loop Nure, where China once tested its nuclear weapons. There's an air base there, which has AH big runway that's aligned exactly in the direction ofthe the orbit of the space craft. On Sunday, China announced its new spacecraft head landed sure enough fuzzy satellite images snapped by a commercial company called Planet. Seemed to show activity on the giant runway right at the moment, the landing would have occurred. McDowell says that the evidence is circumstantial, but he believes China has just tested a space plane. Think of it. It's a little space shuttle a craft with wings probably too small to carry people that took off on a rocket and coasted back to Earth. The information of all hands together now that this wass A test of something probably a space plane that made a winged reentry on landed on the runway at Lop nor the US Air Force has a similar spacecraft called the X 37 B. It's been launched in since 2010. So if that's what China tested, why now it's a great question. We're not even really sure why the United States military is pursuing a space plane like it's been doing for the last Decade or so. Brian Weeden Studies face security issues with the Secure World Foundation. The U. S X 37 B program remains highly classified. Weeden says he believes it's being used to test new sensors and systems for the military. Think about if you're building a brand new satellite, and you've got a lot of fancy new technology that's never been in space before. That's potentially risky. But if you can apply some of that technology in space, let's say in the payload bay of a reusable space plane that could allow you to get a better feel for how about react. McDowell says that space planes which travel many times, the speed of sound, could also potentially helped with the development of so called hyper sonic weapons. Uh, honestly, he thinks China could just be copying the US if the Americans have one of those. That must be a good reason for it. So we better get one, too. The landing of the space plane or whatever it was, is just the latest success for China. McDowell says that recently completed its own satellite navigation system, it has a robotic missions going to Mars and several probes on the moon. China's firing on all thrusters in space on just really increasing its level of involvement on capabilities, and I think that this is just one more reflection of that Jeff from feel. NPR NEWS Washington

China McDowell NPR Urbana Champagne University of Illinois professor flu Twitter Audie Cornish FDA Elsa Chang Delores Albarracin AstraZeneca University of Pennsylvania US Air Force Brian Weeden United States Sasha Pfeifer
"delores albarracin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"delores albarracin" Discussed on KCRW

"50 from NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Sasha Pfeifer. Let's say it's 2021. Scientists have already developed and marketed a vaccine for Coben 19. Now they face a new problem convincing people to actually get vaccinated with it. A Gallup poll last month found that more than one in three Americans would not get an FDA approved Corona virus vaccine even for free. Psychology professor Delores Albarracin studies behavior and medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champagne. She spoke with our co host, Audie Cornish earlier today about why some people are skeptical of vaccines. We know that it can take years to develop and distribute a safe vaccine to everyone. And then, of course, just this week, the pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca announced that it was hitting pause on its trial to investigate and unexplained illness in one of its participants. So there are people who are concerned about potential long term side effects that who are worried about this process being rushed. Does that boost people's doubts? And is that wrong? Well, I think it's completely normal, and we should all be looking at side effects for any pharmaceutical product that we consume right. Among those who hesitate 60% fierce side effects 37%. I'm not afraid, but to some think it will work. And then you have trained per cent who are pissed on two posers. So the anti Vax group and that's a small group. So for their folks who are fearing side of facts. I think news like the one you're referring to are going to be extremely influential, and they connect with Some pre strong and persuasive in narratives about Big pharma. And we have data even want my own day that with colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania showing that exposure to social media earlier on actually predict vaccination intentions in the domain, a fool later on, so there's pretty good data that those groups are not trivial. Wait, So help me understand this Essentially if someone sees anti vaccination social media posts that can actually influence their own decision about whether or not to accept a vaccine. Yes, it's similar to that. So he surveyed 3000 participants over one year following the flu season till months. So when we observe is what is going on Twitter. What misinformation amount vaccines is being distributed and where So when you look in that, and then you look at whoever lives in the county that has that kind of big pharma conspiracy in this information circulating on Twitter. Are less likely to get the flu shot a few months later. Except Dad. They're not affected if they have discussions in really life, so if they can discuss this information with friends, family their physicians, then they're less persuaded by the misinformation, but otherwise the misinformation they encounter regionally affect them. What does all this mean for the public information campaign? How should authorities. Public health officials go about trying to convince people to embrace the vaccines should one come along? So this travesty In my view should be to communicate a norm clearly. So you need to tell people that everybody wants it. We all like it. We must have it. So something quite different from what we saw with wearing masks were there was a lot more hesitation in the messaging, right and contradictions, Silver months. So clear norm. You also need to be, of course, correcting for misinformation systematically every day through health education in schools and work. Everywhere. I'm seeing an explosion of misinformation and what the whole has referred to as an infant Emmick, and if we don't eradicate it won't make invade difficult to end a coffin 19 pandemic. That was the Laura's other scene. She's a professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champagne. Thank you for speaking with us. Thank you. China's military appears to have successfully tested a new spacecraft. Last week's mission was shrouded in secrecy. But as NPR's Jeff from field reports, there are some clues about what China sent into space and why. Last Friday, a Chinese rocket took off carrying a mysterious payload. A terse statement on state media said it was quote A reusable experimental spacecraft, but they didn't give a launch time. They don't have any more details. No riel official footage of the Lord's Jonathan Mcd, Alison astronomer, Earthy Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian who specializes in tracking satellites and spacecraft orbiting the Earth. When he plotted the course of China's new craft, he found that it passed over a secretive military facility. An area called Loop Nure, where China once tested its nuclear weapons. There's an air base there, which has AH big runway that's aligned exactly in the direction ofthe the orbit of the space craft. On Sunday, China announced its new spacecraft head landed sure enough fuzzy satellite images snapped by a commercial company called Planet. Seemed to show activity on the giant runway right at the moment, the landing would have occurred. McDowell says that the evidence is circumstantial, but he believes China has just tested a space plane. Think of it. It's a little space shuttle a craft with wings probably too small to carry people that took off on a rocket and coasted back to Earth. The information of all hands together now that this wass A test of something probably a space plane that made a winged reentry on landed on the runway at Lop nor the US Air Force has a similar spacecraft called the X 37 B. It's been launched in since 2010. So if that's what China tested, why now it's a great question. We're not even really sure why the United States military is pursuing a space plane like it's been doing for the last Decade or so. Brian Weeden Studies face security issues with the Secure World Foundation. The U. S X 37 B program remains highly classified. Weeden says he believes it's being used to test new sensors and systems for the military. Think about if you're building a brand new satellite, and you've got a lot of fancy new technology that's never been in space before. That's potentially risky. But if you can apply some of that technology in space, let's say in the payload bay of a reusable space plane that could allow you to get a better feel for how about react. McDowell says that space planes which travel many times, the speed of sound, could also potentially helped with the development of so called hyper sonic weapons. Uh, honestly, he thinks China could just be copying the US if the Americans have one of those. That must be a good reason for it. So we better get one, too. The landing of the space plane or whatever it was, is just the latest success for China. McDowell says that recently completed its own satellite navigation system, it has a robotic missions going to Mars and several probes on the moon. China's firing on all thrusters in space on just really increasing its level of involvement on capabilities,.

China McDowell NPR Urbana Champagne University of Illinois professor flu Twitter Audie Cornish FDA Elsa Chang Delores Albarracin AstraZeneca University of Pennsylvania US Air Force Brian Weeden United States Sasha Pfeifer