35 Burst results for "Deloitte"

A London diaspora district remembers a queen — ambivalently

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 3 weeks ago

A London diaspora district remembers a queen — ambivalently

"Britain's whose heritage is from one of Britain's former colonies of mixed views on the death of Queen Elizabeth II the queen's death has reopened old wounds in the south hall district in London which is made up of mostly south Asians It's where Deloitte Chaudhry owns a Pakistani restaurant If you read the history and the history of what actually happened in our countries the massacres the atrocities that have been happening under the guidance of her majesty John Paul bass ran the head of south all community alliance says his positive about the future for various ethnicities in Britain Prince Charles is someone who has quite progressive views about culture about the environment about our communities I think quite a supporter of a more multicultural Britain I'm Donna water

Britain Deloitte Chaudhry Queen Elizabeth Ii John Paul Bass South All Community Alliance London Prince Charles Donna
"deloitte" Discussed on AI in Business

AI in Business

01:34 min | 7 months ago

"deloitte" Discussed on AI in Business

"This is Daniel Fiji you're listening to the AI and business podcast and this is our second episode of AI success factors. Those of you who've been with us for a while, you know that this is the show where non technical leaders stay ahead of the AI curve for their career and.

Crime Spree Ravages America

The Trish Regan Show

01:35 min | 9 months ago

Crime Spree Ravages America

"Me turn to another story that's really bugging me right now and that's the crime spree that we are seeing all over America from LA to Philadelphia, enormous amount of crime escalation in Philadelphia in recent days. And in New York City. So first of all, starting in LA, two recent incidents, one was a young woman who was working at a furniture store who was knives to death by a homeless person. The other was a 70 year old nurse out in the LA area. She was just going to work and she was attacked by a homeless person trying to get on the bus. She died. We have another homeless person in New York City, who pushed a young 40 year old woman, an executive at Deloitte, Asian woman, Michelle go right in front of a train and killed her. You know, the homeless thing, we got to get this under control. I'm sorry, you know what, if you're that messed up. The state actually has to take over. The state actually has to lock you up and put you away because you are a danger to society. 96 crimes reported just in the last two weeks on the New York City subway system. That's a 65% increase. I mean, we thought it was bad comrade de Blasio, right? In charge and now Eric Adams is not looking so hot. He actually is trying to tell everybody that the New York City subway system is quote safe. I'm sorry when you have a 65% increase in crimes. You want a woman 40 years old is pushed to her death by a homeless person. It's not safe.

LA New York City Philadelphia Deloitte America De Blasio Michelle Eric Adams
"deloitte" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

05:29 min | 10 months ago

"deloitte" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"To speed the ability to give the message. So give me an example. You mentioned healthcare as part of the government and that basically there isn't going to be or they choose not to have the ability to share information across different parts of the government. Is this the CDC, the center for disease control doesn't want to talk to the ObamaCare administration organization? Like, who's not talking to who? It's even at a smaller level. It would be the equivalent of the department in charge of tobacco cessation doesn't share data that it has about the people that it talks to with another area of CDC, for example. So it's not even CDC to FDA. It's interesting to see. And you mentioned that the regulations is something that a government is going to be looking at here in California. There's been privacy regulations that have basically separated it from the rest of the country. What regulations do you think the government's going to be focusing on in 2022? I think there's been a lot of interesting stories about social media and how people are tracking data and using that to give them more information. I think that will be the first area that the government's going to look at. And really begin to put some regulation in and around. There's just too much public sentiment around the harm that can come from social media. And I think that'll prompt the government to look there first. It's interesting. We talk a lot about social media and how we're able to use data from social media, obviously there's a lot of questions about Facebook specifically, but I'm sure all sorts of social media companies in there capture and usage of data, not only are we seeing the private sector rally against that with Apple creating more privacy concerns, they're also bolstering their own ad network at the same time. But I think that there's also the idea of antitrust. And we've seen a lot of lawsuits from both federal and state governments towards Google and Amazon about their anti competitive practices. Do you see any regulation coming down the pipe for antitrust as it comes to big tech and marketing technology companies? I can tell you there is a lot of voices on either side of that argument. I don't know whether regulation will get pushed through, but I can tell you on antitrust in general, the tone and tenor of the conversation is just increasing. I hear more of it on a daily basis. It's going to be an interesting year here in 2022 and my takeaway from some of your predictions. It sounds like a lot of the challenges that are facing marketers today are also going to be facing the federal and state governments in the sense of adoption of marketing technology, figuring out how to diversify and better segment their customers, but also the departure of data and questions about privacy, also a big concern. RJ, I appreciate you coming on the show and telling us a little bit about what you think is going to happen for marketing and government in 2022. I appreciate it. Thanks so much for having me. I enjoyed it. All right. That wraps up this episode of the martech podcast. Thanks to RJ crook, the principal and chief marketing officer for government and public services at Deloitte for joining us. If you'd like to get in touch with RJ, you could find a link to his LinkedIn profile on our show notes. You can contact him on Twitter where his handle is RJ croak. That's RJ K, RAW IEC, or you could visit his company's website, which is Deloitte dot com. A special thanks to HubSpot for sponsoring this podcast. If you're ready to become more customer centric in your marketing efforts, use the HubSpot CRM platform, which includes their new tools, their payment tools, which integrate native payment links that can be recurring into your tools, your emails, your website, and they've also got great ways for you to collect customer feedback to understand what's happening with your customers in real time to learn more about how the HubSpot CRM can help you build maintain and grow your customer relationships. Go to HubSpot dot com. And a special thanks to blue shift for sponsoring this podcast. If you're interested in learning how to turn your data into personalized customer experiences, head over to blue shift dot com slash Marta to a guide to their successful CDP evaluations. That's blue shift dot com slash Marta to download blue shifts CDP RFP guide. Blue shift. Omnichannel marketing for data driven marketers. Just want more link in our show notes I'd like to tell you about if you didn't have a chance to take notes while you were listening with this podcast. Just head over to Marta pod dot com where we have summaries of all of our episodes and contact information for our guests. You can also subscribe to our weekly newsletter and you can even send us your topic suggestions or your marketing questions, which will answer live on our show. Of course, you can always reach out on social media, our handle is Marc pod, MAR, TEC, HP OD, on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook, or you can contact me directly my handle.

CDC center for disease control ObamaCare administration government RJ crook Deloitte FDA California Amazon Facebook Apple HubSpot Google LinkedIn Twitter Marc pod HP Instagram
"deloitte" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

05:35 min | 10 months ago

"deloitte" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"Seen an erosion of trust in the government over the past period, which makes groups less likely to listen to them. I mean, just look at the vaccine issue as an example where it became politicized and the science wasn't cutting through, but your belief and who you chose to listen to informed a scientific choice. And if the government can speak in the authentic language of different groups more readily than that trust goes up and they're more likely to be able to cut through the noise to get a message out that they want to get out. So 2021 was a year where we actually had a transition not only in president, but obviously the sort of party that has been in power a lot of the policies. When you look back over what happened in 2021, what were some of the big changes that we saw? It's interesting. Watching administrations come and go, the business of the government remains fairly consistent. What I see change from administration to administration is won the messaging out certainly changes to where funding goes and therefore what new programs are able to start sort of shifts. So over this past administration seen a big shift in funding to areas that align with this administration's priorities and therefore new programs are started that can make a difference. For example, there would be a lot more funding in the Environmental Protection Agency, for example, that was receiving lesson during the last administration. So we're seeing a little bit of a different change in terms of what messaging is being sent from the government based on who's running the government. But when it comes down to how that message is being delivered, the marketing of government messages, the usage of data in 2021, we really didn't see major sea changes. I would argue that how the message gets out is fairly consistent. That's part of the bureaucracy of the government, which I think smooths out the changes from administration to administration. I also think that in general, the idea of how the government communicates out, policy changes, new programs, things that they're doing needs to take a more prominent stance. I don't think it's given enough attention as work is being done. It's more of an afterthought as in where the government we're doing this. People will find out. And I find that not always the case. And I think that there's a lot of opportunity to bake in earlier an idea of how we're going to communicate this out. Who we're going to communicate it to, built as part of a new program or offering to really encourage the use of something that the government's trying to do. Sounds like the government has similar challenges to most startups in the sense that often you can build something and then it doesn't matter if you can't get it to the right person at the right place at the right time. It's fascinating to hear about how an organization as large and bureaucratic as the government has some of the same challenges as some of the smaller businesses that we talk about on a regular basis on this podcast. And that wraps up this episode of the martech podcast. Thanks for listening to my conversation with RJ croak. The principal and chief marketing officer for government and public services at Deloitte. In part two of this interview, which will publish tomorrow RJ and I are going to talk about his government tech predictions for 2022. If you can't wait until our next episode and you'd like to learn more about RJ, you can find a link to his LinkedIn profile in our show notes. You can contact him on Twitter where his handle is RJ croak that's RJ, kraw, where you can visit his company's website, which is Deloitte dot com. A special thanks to HubSpot for sponsoring this podcast. If you're ready to become more customer centric in your marketing efforts, use the HubSpot CRM platform, which includes their new tools, their payment tools, which integrate the native payment links that can be recurring into your tools, your emails, your website, and they've also got great ways for you to collect customer feedback to understand what's happening with your customers in real time to learn more about how the HubSpot CRM can help you build maintain and grow your customer relationships. Go to HubSpot dot com. And a special thanks to blue shift for sponsoring this podcast. If you're interested in learning how to turn your data into personalized customer experiences, head over to blue shift dot com slash Marta to a guide to their successful CDP evaluations. That's blue shift dot com slash mar tech to download blue shifts CDP RFP guide. Blue shift. Omnichannel marketing for data driven marketers. Just one more link in our show notes I'd like to tell you about if you didn't have a chance to take notes while you were listening with this podcast, just head over to Marta pod dot com where we have summaries of all of our episodes and contact information for our guests. You can also subscribe to our weekly newsletter and you can even send us your topic suggestions or your marketing questions, which will answer live on our show. Of course, you can always reach out on social media, our handle is martech pod, MAR, TEC, HPD, on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook, or you can contact me directly my handle is benjy shap benj SAP. And if you haven't subscribed yet and you want a daily stream of marketing and technology knowledge in your podcast feed, we're gonna publish an episode every day this year, so hit the subscribe button in your podcast app and we'll be back in your feed tomorrow morning. All right, that's it for today, but until next time my.

RJ croak government Deloitte Environmental Protection Agenc HubSpot LinkedIn Twitter benjy shap benj Instagram SAP Facebook
"deloitte" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"In fast company that many building leases have clauses in them that stipulate the hvac systems have to run no matter what the occupancy levels and so that some executives in organizations trying to negotiate their way out of that and what came to my mind. Was these new technologies and new systems. That really kind of make those clauses obsolete because they're those new technologies are designed to do the opposite to manage the electricity in the energy in the water usage in these buildings or any facility so that you can maintain this the the building and the system is running properly. Because you can't just turn everything off while also using less when you don't need so much right so that's really interesting. I also heard. David turk before at a hearing in congress before he was head of the international energy agency. Say that the pandemic was the biggest hit to the energy sector since world war. Two and you kind of alluded to that when you said it was the largest decline in seventy five years so it sounds like there are lessons that they're absorbing but that coupled with you mentioned the espn investors. You've got the climate activists you know at exxon who just pushed for more climate related people on the board and a faster more aggressive pivot to clean energy. So you're getting it from all sides right. You're getting the push from the investors in. You're getting frankly push from the economy and the technologies kyw never there so they don't really have that as an excuse. Where do they see their role. I mean are they being pushed by their employees also on these issues. Talk about some of the other stakeholders in this. Es g. picture is so. I think an stakeholders as it relates to their employees talent model is an interesting thing to discuss. And so what we would say. Is that the komen situation. The pandemic change the narrative it relates to employment. And so there has been you know is a sector oil and gas has been very cyclical a history of being very cyclical. This really motivated in deloitte. Actually calls it the great compression coveted nineteen in what we quaint. As the great depression actually accentuated some of these hiring challenges and then accelerated. I think the focus on the future of energy and you know where where they are going to drive not only from a product standpoint right but from a solution for a partnership standpoint from an ecosystem standpoint just to keep on the talent thing for moment and then i can make some of the others. It is interesting because working from home opened the door for new opportunities for talent. And i would say there's a recruiting dimension to this and there is a retention dimension to this all hindle them narrative Into the industry was dealing with a looming works for a shortage challenge. Right which is the anticipated retirements on. The horizon were released significant and at the same time. It was an industry right. That was really looking for ways. To recruit the millennials into the industry. And so i think what automation did to change the nature of the opportunity within the industry and to recruit from new markets had a really interesting impact. And so what we're seeing as they did Markets in los angeles and chicago in philadelphia opened up through the remote work through the operations are the automation through the opportunities to drive through analytics and digital. And say you lost the pressure. Right in weight hit traditionally been cities that hit released source the talent for oil gas and energy overall i touched on this with analytics that the pandemic really accelerated this need for itchy. You advanced knows around that. I think it also probably the just interject for a second and probably also to be. Frank changed the branding because now it's not just about oil and gas..

David turk international energy agency exxon espn congress deloitte depression philadelphia los angeles chicago Frank
"deloitte" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Lynette Lewis of Every Nation NYC Talks About Her 9/11 Close Call

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:38 min | 1 year ago

Lynette Lewis of Every Nation NYC Talks About Her 9/11 Close Call

"Running lynette. Just tell my audience if they don't you know aren't familiar with you. What what. what is your ministry ron. What is your story lynette. What are you because because both of you are really active but a lot of people listening program might not know you sure. Well as you mentioned. Eric we've been friends for a long time and i had had it in my heart to move to new york city when it was getting it in my late thirties. And so i got a transfer with my job. Worked for deloitte and touche big big consulting accounting firm found myself in new york city only knew one person and she happened to be a mutual friend of yours and mine and over the course of the next couple of years Made friends with you and others and we were doing life together and then nine eleven happened. I should have been in the middle of the whole thing that morning. I went to work in those buildings every morning. This is the stuff i forget. I literally forgot. This is a huge story. And i completely forgot that you were supposed to be there that day. Yes yes and what's amazing to me is. I woke up that morning with laryngitis. Total aaron jarvis leading a meeting I was in marketing for the firm. meetings that led for my total of eight years being with the firm. And it's the only meeting in eight years. And i did these meetings all the time that they didn't have space in the world financial center to have the meeting. I tried for months to schedule it and finally a month or two before the partner i worked with said. Let's just go to hartford connecticut. We'll get we'll get an office up there and it was strange to me why we couldn't do it where we always did it But on the morning of nine eleven. I woke up with total aaron jarvis. I'm leading the meeting. And i'm thinking maybe i just won't go but the car service came at five thirty and i decided i'm going anyway so i got in that car. Service drove three hours in the car. Service up to hartford connecticut in the meeting leading the meeting at eight thirty when the phones began to ring at about eight forty five and like the rest of the world We found out what was going on. And i still remember so clearly what it felt like as we left the conference room and walk down to the other smaller room where there was a television What it felt like to be in a room with people who had loved ones and family members in those towers and seeing the one tower missing and then seen both towers missing and you know that the whole world was in shock. And i'm sitting there thinking by the grayson hand of god. I'm not there right now and Yeah it was. It was just now you are a speaker you both in ministry together do a lot of speaking. If people wanna find you where do they go lynette. Lewis dot

Aaron Jarvis New York City Lynette Deloitte Laryngitis Hartford Eric Connecticut Grayson Lewis
"deloitte" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"deloitte" Discussed on The Playbook

"When i first started talking about these things It everybody kind of laughed at me and called me. Woo and you know like do you really have the business acumen david. You know you're talking about you. Know all types of yoga and you know personal commitment to things and two thousand fifteen. They made you the cheap wellbeing officer at deloitte and i just wanted to share that. Because that's a great vision. This is a long time ago when it comes to the wellness phase. you know. it's cool to be beginning today but if anybody was beginning even three years ago You know they're looking at you a little bit you know. Why would you do that plant based eating. You know what was the commitment from deloitte in. Was it related to your own personal journey with wellness. Yeah it absolutely was in so about seven years ago. So twenty fourteen. And i've been with delight for twenty years Started been here quite a long time. Not always as you said in a in a wellness or wellbeing role. But about seven years ago i found myself completely. Burnt out which you know Kind of is what many would think when it comes to those senior marketing person at deloitte. Exactly i mean and that was at a time. Burn out is you know is talked about i. I hear about it daily. Now you know but that was at a time when people weren't talking about these things in show. I was burning out. I didn't know really what was going on. I knew that there was something going on with me But it wasn't something that was talked about. And and when i looked around and a high-performance environment we're really good at showing up regardless of what else is going on in our life in so i processed it is like. Wow there's something wrong with me. Like i can't. I'm not good enough to be here. I can't cut it for whatever reason everybody else seems to be able to to have it together but but i can't and so i just kept powering through and pushing through and.

deloitte Woo david
"deloitte" Discussed on Ad Chatter

Ad Chatter

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Ad Chatter

"Advertising versus the in store experience And kind of help them drive a about forty percent lower cost per acquisition. So again it. It not only made the work more effective but it helped them with that return on the investment for their their cfo. That might have been asking questions can. Can you speak a little bit more to these metrics that you just Spoke of under brand worth because Things like sheriff culture How do you go about measuring something like that. Yeah so That's a that's a great question so the first thing we think about at deloitte is that we believe that brand is a financial asset not just a marketing asset and so everything we measure in bran and is to try to kind of prove the efficiency of its ability to drive growth And so this unique sort of data set in brand were helps us essentially set out. What is the sort of role that brand can drive in growth and then these four metrics So brand worth measures four things that we historically have seen. The most successful brands have And before i jump into them a one of sort of note that they're not all equal in every single category some categories. One of these is the most important and the other three may not matter versus other categories may be all four are equal. So that's something that we can also dig into in brand worth ultimately helps creatives make more impactful and meaningful work in the world. So the four sort of metrics for brand worth. The first is called values alignment and that really measures whether an audience feels organization kind of shares their values and motivates them to engage. So you see a lot of Sort of charitable organizations. Do really really well here. But you don't have to be charitable or two app that you just have to be kind of like a purpose driven brand The second network is called experience satisfaction and this measure is whether the products and experiences leave the audience satisfied and wanting more and some of the questions around that are was the purchase. Easy is it enjoyable Onus so we don't get the experience faction once you're an owner but actually the experience of buying or even engaging with it before you're.

deloitte
"deloitte" Discussed on Ad Chatter

Ad Chatter

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Ad Chatter

"But sometimes they're even bigger than that so we're able to bring in expertise from all of the possible areas that deloitte really gets involved in And i think another kind of benefit is not to get too much into the weeds but unlike sort of traditional holding and companies. We don't really have different pnl's and so if. I want to bring in an expert in human capital technology to speak with my cmo about some kind of random issue that they've been thinking through. I don't have to make seventeen different calls. I can just shoot an email to the expert in that sector and ask if they wouldn't mind joining a conversation and so it allows me as the strategist to be a heck of a lot more informed and a lot more useful to my clients and then because of that translates from my perspective into better breeze our creative team is feel like they know what the real problem is that they're solving And we also aren't just making ads anymore. We're actually making creative solutions to those business problems. What i like in what you're saying. What the offering is is that. You're able to pretty much seamlessly move into operations and to me. That's where Brand promise sort of the. The rubber hits the road on that and what a have found personally. Is that when. I try to cross that bridge You know for my creative silo. There's just the what you talking to me about my Businesses back into operations four hired you to sell some more product or something and it's so obvious that this all goes together So i made uncomfortable. By the fact that the consultants in the room Are able to argue that and and possibly deliver that where we can't because to me. That is where we are today whether you're in a firm like deloitte digital or some other farm small firm that's got to be part of the discussion and it just seems like it's a difficult discussion to have because it's not what the clients are often coming to us the creative people for it's really interesting One of the things..

deloitte deloitte digital
What Skilled Creative Is - Brandon Kaplan CEO of Skilled Creative Discusses the Rise of Voice in Media and Commerce - Voicebot Podcast Ep 216 - burst 03

The Voicebot Podcast

02:20 min | 1 year ago

What Skilled Creative Is - Brandon Kaplan CEO of Skilled Creative Discusses the Rise of Voice in Media and Commerce - Voicebot Podcast Ep 216 - burst 03

"Were a voice agency You know we call ourselves a full service voice agency because we we help our clients with education and strategy and creative and technical production and audio production creative production go to market strategy maintenance analytics partnership management so if an organization is interested in invoices a channel or a user interface than were or there. Were we kind of look at ourselves. Like a accenture or deloitte for us as touch point And started the company as as an innovation company working in a bunch of different technologies. And then we we. We pivoted to really hyper focusing on voice. You know probably three years ago And then you know. We've we've further kind of whittled down into a few different categories. We certainly work with a number of cpg clients because we we see a big growth in invoice commerce as many others do but we've also really doubled down on on and so that's why we've had the chance to work with meredith corporation the nba and potter more and warner music group and warnermedia. Hbo max and a number of different media companies. Because if you look at you know how people engage with voice a lot of it is media and entertainment and we talked to our clients a lot where we say you think about computers in nineteen ninety-seven think about mobile phones in two thousand seven people didn't get a smartphone in two thousand seven and then throw it out they just got the next one and it kept on permeating their house in their lives more and more and more so as soon as somebody adds voice device to their house. It's likely some small outliers gonna say that was that was weird and they and they turn it off and plug it but most people are going to be offloading more and more of their daily utility to those devices. So we say listen. If you know media and entertainment has really been at the forefront of every major digital We'll see voice any different so music and entertainment and streaming and games and news and and all of that we think voices a a really powerful user interface for

Accenture Deloitte Warner Music Group HBO NBA Meredith Corporation
Covid-19 Vaccine Misinformation Spread on Social Media

P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

01:45 min | 1 year ago

Covid-19 Vaccine Misinformation Spread on Social Media

"Sarah frier. She's a bloomberg technology reporter. Who has been doing a deep dive into the misinformation spreading across social media specifically facebook in regards to vaccines stare. You have interviewed for example one woman who doesn't believe in vaccine induced herd immunity. She get this from facebook. He gets messed brown from instagram. And course by facebook what happens here is people fall into the personalization facebook and instagram. Provide them if you start looking into. This woman. started out looking into holistic medicine alternative treatments. She felt Bullied by her doctors ring a cancer treatment and was looking for another way to stay healthy. Not only she's getting this information about vaccines not really information at all. It during her wrong and a lot of the people who are telling her. Oh you just need to take this holistic healing method or detox in this method or You'd try these techniques. They're selling supplements. They're selling essential oil. They're selling Wellness retreat so. She's she's not really getting vitim. It information from doctors and we're seeing that happen a lot on facebook. It's more about the fear on the kind of messages that spread on. Facebook are the ones that that make people comments and share That's what tells the news feed algorithm that. It's a serious post that more people should see and so these lies about the vaccine particularly lies that are targeting women which we can talk about in a second are are just unable to tamp down by the company

Facebook Sarah Frier Instagram Bloomberg Brown Cancer
Aligning Your Money & Values With Kathleen McQuiggan of Artemis Advisors

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

03:35 min | 1 year ago

Aligning Your Money & Values With Kathleen McQuiggan of Artemis Advisors

"Women are known for spending their money focused on helping others and the community as well as making more money. Men tend to just focus it on making more money. Women have always been values based investors. I remember this. When i worked at bear stearns and american express deloitte by the way i did campaigns on women and well women have always been values based investors and now the rest of the world is catching on it's called. Espn investing for environment society and governance focused investing basically designed around the un development sustainable development goals or the sdg in fact the sec the securities and exchange commission now has its first head of es g an investing is outperforming other strategies including even in this economy. So how does it work. I'd like you to meet cathleen mcguigan. She is a wealth advisor at artists financial group and a woman. Who's been in my world about these issues for several years. Previously she was in the packs. World investing as head of global women's investing and ran global women's index fund and prior to that. She spent thirteen years at goldman sachs welcomed green catches radio kathleen. Thank you for joining us. Finally thanks for having me and it's great. It's great to finally have this conversation. I appreciate it. So let's start with defining some terms so that people are were were were not losing people define investing for people who aren't familiar with it and talk about the power. Sure angie investing. And i i should do the disclaimer. I feel like you know the financial services industry we use so much jargon acronyms and you know i think sometimes people just get overwhelmed by not understanding some of the inside lingo and you know. I think it's important that people realize that you said earlier right you. Your money is power and women need more of both and sustainable investing which is how we refer to it at artists. And i think this is an emerging sort of language. It isn't bit of alphabet soup. But if you think of sustainable investing what back in the seventies was known as socially responsible investing what is sometimes being referred to now as impact investing. You these things are starting to mean different things. But i'll use sustainable and responsible investing is kind of a general framework for explaining how in the investment process in addition to looking at the traditional financial. Metrics that most organizations would use in making investment decisions sustainable and responsible investing ads. On what i say as an additional layer and it adds on looking at a accompanies in mental. Which is the social. Which is the ass and governance. Which is the g so these. E s g factors as are commonly referred to to be incorporated in the overall investment process or Analysis environmental social and governance factors are additional things that get analyzed and looked at for people to make decisions as to where they want place their buddy so i think of this and i tried to explain it to people as think of it as adding more of the things that were looking at to decide what is good company that we may or may not want a purchase or use an additional set of factors in analyzing investments.

American Express Deloitte Cathleen Mcguigan SEC Bear Stearns Espn Goldman Sachs UN Kathleen Angie
"deloitte" Discussed on Spanish Proptech

Spanish Proptech

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Spanish Proptech

"Yes so joe but music democratic Dawn that is visiting as soon stems in video. Linguists cheer took Yours mrs even throw a had. The it may have Work but i've done with the minimum when they vessels on. Big nostradamus is iraq mobile trump. soon it Macy's knows Forget don't go so easy quiz. Give us those Statue you're thomas. This annual fatigue Almost possible is losing since majority analyzing places. Get on this program. mitigate any the asking seeking mantle Seem races he had a put on. Nbc evening costas for lucky notes Lefter than it here today. Our a yarded General vm Honestly readers may give it s not illegals. Don't hinch the was was anita. Admitted nearly didn't have winter grass. Just specificity obama put on fast ingraham. Batum listening to is possibly by sharing The when one of those Massive onus bathrobe you either discipline. He heating bill. Here's an ankle. Sanford this graph gone. Let the gunnery The fasting splitting the even money to keep up with their who is not so confident as conference does not getting swept Mita increments are suing natan into his law. Kim's recently. The like this okay. Someone's aggressive was fascist drums and go working Data allow mr sudafed We didn't make it will see the number mindy nosotros. The plan was i sat in by law. It costs dead. The this is not Cancelling greece Locate without the eat gamal generals. I certainly to influence your own Atmos closers a mosaic says. Aloe dispatch selected So it's always yes he is elected arctic is lesson jessica. The past medical regular in they need a sponsor bottom seattle video. Gambling is important to get all trying. What places on secret. Seattle was completely committed. Siegler is your who's basically sequel was those macy's entities in of hormones in senior. ls bitterness. with that. As a i will not of course with north massey's decided as you might even in castle day not the sort of workplace but of the reinforcer whole tracy but only to family. Mikey i do think for gay. If you're not making one thrive mykonos seignorage saying that does is november. Mozambique megan etait Federal komo does system will blasio's humanity. Jaguar dot org thing we don't want to pursue Leaving those At the mondays Dispatches florida's in a moment to sally give me But they'll assail which are someone's identity video of women in those always or made by the form of liberalism the former home eleven suicide They located in a big win Jesse i told me seat thursday. Lovely experience Eject panicky mississippi Los behavioral admits. It doesn't what i brought most thrilled. J was at the end. amer supposedly is they. They will soon expansions indiana independent up on the job out. I keep them into Fashions gone up as champions Better for his kidney stone. Sinatra is important cower says from beaver dam was put jaas on those moments after he said Don't compress union family. He began my own kids. If you didn't get in less bitter this not. I like you said. Don't send your team. Kentucky taylor seen as a janitor in english kentucky said jar you on the fort i can satellite data in in in a lotta Own a thorough high in sando k islander. he's from is is jay ksi admitted unnecessary. Accessible at sears. Or the went. What i want out the names given beside us Scammers is was it he sandra does she added up. Bitter normal renters obama's la land much address that allows again is not meant. Did i adjust almost have landed with the phantom and we in and when money not get okay. Missile when password added the familiar yellow workplace solutions e get his tugging deleted at For almost in in but gaskets that must be gundel Misdemeanor thala mcwethy's processor that recently that he can relate you gotta get dillard's debris recommend dina yosemite we.

Sinatra thursday natan jessica today Siegler Kentucky thomas jay ksi Mikey indiana thala mcwethy Kim Seattle Dawn Batum obama november iraq Mozambique
"deloitte" Discussed on Spanish Proptech

Spanish Proptech

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Spanish Proptech

"That premium associated with sanguine internet. Jackie not not not seeing. Okay did investigation the digitimes been fielded. Swipe unite get locked up as kinetic. Commune does Talk so little seemingly Seattle backfield there. He is louie. The name of the huddle over accuracy jemma beauty reds multifamily Thousand you submit be seattle nicholas landlords who Normally this in a moment. The bottoms seven remote magnetism knows most Inlaws law zobeir nominated meantime kalomo solely in the guy is kicking jonah. You've been in Plan do that as is writing to seattle paddock project. Fi mindy unpredictable. Kate guan yu's lasting Another name did what E a bit was why all this is passing. Dunaway's mosaic doses. By in the news. Said i could see in goma. Bahamas was the name. Anti city gambler predict that in momentum. Parliament this in case it is yes damsel taking next who ended up half those get him england's interest. I don't read the king. Cuando dorsey soda us. Who noticed your get does hundred into the into the movie any given Biking process plus ignited. I'm the nasal in a stout. Handle must Explicit camping sequel. It also l it is in math natio- noses stab you in the bloomberg later. Federal government get medals as the commute in. Is it concert on. This is going to join us. Because actually the host on his was happy to the lack of action that is a dealer in camino dot com use pretty evenly and don't sue damaskinos I'll say is this. What game what it is. But i listening physique been for one another in does his own constrained Matter him a stock brown mccain does project to the jazz money to seal to predict now die. Keep kicking Will come by digging in vienna days game. America's seattle guinness applebaum They can switch it. It'll give family members. You'll see what's the story of standard just taking giving citizen. Denise is he the in florida since. Yana keep up adults. You have to change. They don't locate us knows tavern. Joevin quinta important is a good feet sweater and does Again those newest least put in the lobby and they're giving yet it was almost threatened That debate for he on his lessons issue. There is a kendall sweating gye is done. Mass mass flex seniors in as if that is similar. Yoke recognizes You'll halla Ended mostly three meters long other sport gate. What in visor in america gotta In his drop waste mutual so innocent e kid on you can't throw hottest is up. He was a gilchrist Struck detroit real estate if you're not Been inculcated in regional nina in the end of his trip family dribbling. Federal hoist Only informatica. You'll get your Day app putting just director. Easter by la la la la la la winter tuning the in combat. The either look at you didn't look at that gomo gape by the style. Noah may have done the mess is potato is highly other Money coming gaunter off his conduct in a lot. This season finale michigan cucumber lopate. History that commodore in his house does a limited as merkel. When latte this'll wherever you need to assume is that where he is. In cousy this lewinsky participants feature in black america Loomis another predict leper magazine for ten. mask we are not in the he is likely lupulosa. You gotta be set. Associatively that elective Project giving progress on adelina Academic for sierra get okay in the end the record Stories in stri novella by to predict forgave particular Jack jack mobile a. She jumped in the but in my indicate.

florida america Jackie Kate guan Denise Bahamas three meters America Seattle ten england la la la la la Yana goma camino dot com Noah Thousand seattle Dunaway Joevin quinta
The Top 15 Little-Known Secrets On How To Improve Your Focus

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

04:31 min | 1 year ago

The Top 15 Little-Known Secrets On How To Improve Your Focus

"If you don't know who i am. I am a author journalist and founder and executive director of the flow research collective. We study peak human performance where research a training organization on the research side. We work with scientists at ucla at stanford companies like deloitte energetics. Like that on the training side we work with everyday from the us special forces through executives in fortune. Five hundred companies essentially google etc microsoft. All the way up to the general public and focus on is kikkoman performance. What does it take to be your best when it matters. Most what does it take to level up your game like never before and most of my career has been spent studying peak performers. What i thought i was going to do today. Vision asked me to speak a little about my work on flow. Which will get to some of. You might be familiar with and a little bit about focus. And what i thought i would do is talk about fifteen things that peak performers know about focus and attention or routinely do surrounding focus attention and flow that most of us miss and this is something that is fairly common that i've noticed over peak performance. Meaning if you want to train people up in flow for example take repeat performers and regular people. Everybody can learn the flow stuff that works fine but afterwards peak performance can sustain it and most everybody else drop back towards baseline over time and a lot of that is peak performers to a lot of stuff through unconsciously along the way a lot of focus that the rest of us missed. So i thought i would talk about these things. We're going to start out with more general ideas about peak performance and get very very focused on focus as we move along so i wanna start with a really obvious statement but you see it very very consistently in all people formats which is a realization. That life is never going to be anything more or less than what you choose to make it. I like to talk about this. And i like to say there are only a couple things. We know absolutely for sure that we absolutely certain about the first is that we get one shot at this life. We know that for sure. Maybe we'll get more. Maybe we don't. We know for sure that we got one shot at this life. We also know we're going to spend about a third of it asleep. Which tells us that the only real question is what we do with the remaining two-thirds right. That's the only question that matters. And what p performers had figured out is that there's no magic pill nothing spectacular is ever gonna happen from them. I was just talking to andrew. Ubuntu neuroscientist at stanford and we do a lot of work with and heap says ever people former learn the same lesson. It is always crawl walk. Run there's no shortcuts. there's no way to get faster. You were going to crawl. Then you're going to walk then you're going to run over and over and over again. This brings us to the second thing which is building on the first. there are no shortcuts. There are no hacks in fact when we talk about p. performance after twenty five years of studying the neurobiology the science what goes on in the brain and the body when people perform their best can tell you. There are no shortcuts. There is quite simply getting your biology to work for you rather than against you. That is everything we mean by peak performance a different way. We sort of talk about this at the floor. Research collective as we like to say personality doesn't scale biology scales in other words. If you're in a looking through the kind of self improvement space at any level if somebody is trying to teach you what worked for them. They figured something out. This works may let me teach it to you. It's going to work for you. They're light they're absolutely lying. In fact that's a really great way to rue lives. I can guarantee one of the other truce peak performance. We don't like to say out loud is what works for me is almost guaranteed not to work for you. Personality doesn't scale why there are foundational things that have a lot to do with p. performance where you are on the introversion extroversion scale for example. How active are your dopamine receptors. Things like that. They are genetically coded for and laid down environmentally in. A lot of them are locked up before we ever become adults.

Deloitte Energetics Stanford Ucla Microsoft Google United States Andrew
"deloitte" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"On the show. Got ashley reichheld. She's a principal at deloitte on the show today. We talk about the twenty twenty one global marketing trends report and they identified seven trends. That will speak to a high level but then dig into a couple of particular seven trends that they identified were purpose agility human experience trust participation fusion and talent and now we go into quite a bit of depth on trust in particular is a area that ashley herself has helped to develop for deloitte as well as a new metric that we spent some time talking about then. We also hit talent as well. So i hope you enjoy this conversation with ashley. Reichheld ashley. welcome to the show. Thanks so much for having me. I'm really excited to be here. I love the start off with something personal anecdote if you will. And i've heard that you've lived in over forty countries is that true. And what have you taken away from. All those experiences well lived and worked. Yes because in some of those places. It was a week or two versus many months. But i have lived or visited at least every continent except antarctica. And you learn a lot of things you learn how to say. Thank you a lot of languages. You'll learn how to drive on other sides of the roads. Mostly though i think he learned a lot about empathy and cultural difference one of the last countries i was in was ustralia. And when i first got there i couldn't understand why there were signs over the bathroom. Saying don't stand on the toilet seats. Consuming made her that. I understood that. That was just real cultural difference with chinese visitors. Who were the primary visiting population and sitting on its seat is considered dirty. So you don't you stand on it. Yeah little nuances like that. I can imagine a three for loop from time to time. But you know they make life more fulfilling and if you take the time to figure out why they're so different you you just do a really good job of improving understanding and that's that's important. Yeah definitely let's let's talk business. We want to talk a little bit about this report. That deloitte has released the twenty twenty one global marketing trends report. What drove the report in went into it. Well this is our second annual report. But this one was really characterized by the challenges of twenty twenty and that level of uncertainty that we're seeing has really impacted all of us in some way myself my mom of three old trends and well. I thought i was a master at balancing working kids. I've learned a whole new set of work from home. Sales gotta really speedy mute. Button trigger finger pilot fisher price toys under my desk that bear testimony and this year. We really use the study to kind of help explorer and break down some of that uncertainty. We use subject matter expertise. We voices smithfield and two overarching surveys. From consumers up twenty five hundred and executives up just about four hundred of them to help break down that uncertainty in the report a believe it's unified seven trends overall and you go In detail on each of them. But can you tell me kinda just at a high level. Were the the major trends seven themselves are purpose agility human experience trust participation fusion and talent and i think in general agility trust talent participation are fairly straightforward largely those companies without. Do you trust them to do with the say they're gonna do. They have the talent to do it. Do they nibble participation with their stakeholders in the customers. The ones i usually get questions about not understanding are the other three so purpose and that's a company that knows what they exist and therefore can make choices a little bit more rapidly. That sense of purpose helps them particularly in times of uncertainty. Actually because they can they can make tough decisions right away. The second human experience and i often get asked. Hey so white you just call that. What is call it. A spur ends called employee experience. I'm sure we'll talk about this. But the reason we call it human experiences because you don't wake up as customer employees. You wake up as a human being. And if we want to elevate experience we have to understand you as a human and then fusion of course which is that art of bringing together new business partnerships early in the report. You identify this drop in confidence across the c. suite. And just curious. What do you feel drove that drop and this is the second time i've seen this question i guess from deloitte is working with the loye. The cmo team within delay and the cmo club on some prior research. We looked at confidence. Drop or confidence levels. I should say of cmo's in general and while this most recent snapshot shows the drop in confidence. I'm kind of pleased that cmo's aren't last on the list now. A small bright spot in the foreseeable ceelo's but tell us a little bit about this dropping confidence. Well at the start of our chat. I talked about this notion of uncertainty that feeling and basically the research suggests that c. suites are humans to and no exception to that rule so on a percentage basis. Cmos aren't last but they are second to last Within a percentage point of and you actually see the biggest declines with. Cio's an nco's. And i think really what you're seeing is that lots of executives have gone into survival mode and you see them by the way prioritizing things like improved efficiency and productivity over more human centric initiatives in that that instinct is is very common but unfortunately it does run counter to some consumer expectations. When we did this research. We learned that as times. Get tougher consumers. Expect more connection. Not less said consumers are really looking for companies to step up and you have c. suite executives who are uncertain and lacking confidence today. And not really sure the world is heading and it's making it very difficult environment. Operate them in these uncertain times to us over over used phrase currently but one of the other two data points stuck out. I think is a sign of the times potentially i'm gonna stay kotei stats and then we can discuss what we think they mean but fifty eight percent of respondents could recall at least one brand that quickly pivoted to better respond to their needs and eighty two percent said this led to them doing more business with that brand. Seems that these factors kind of together talk about one the agility that you've you mentioned before is one of the trends to this human experience component like are we actually delivering what people really want and value and purpose. I think alignment potentially of those two things like what's going on in the world and what do people really need am i. Do you think. I'm interpreting that right just based on the data and what the trends that you're seeing i do although. I think i'd argue that. The each of the trends has an impact there. If you think about an organization's ability to co create with people so fusion for example if your co creating with people rapidly you're able to respond to create address needs more rapidly if you're encouraging participation from your customers than your doing a good job or hopefully a better job at least of hearing what it is. They need to be able to adopt if customers trust. You more likely to tell you what they need a believe you when it comes out and then of course talent is critical. All these things without talent. You can't do any of them right right. Yeah it's amazing to me. I mean i talked to a number of businesses. That i'm sure you do to the ones that are at times. Come paralyzed right. When there's a massive change going on in the world or within their market they don't have those sensory since is the right word but data sources that help them understand whether their customers telling them whether it's stated that they're looking at it does start to Highlight the flaws in your business. If you aren't seeing the signs on the wall and starting to make your move dc that as well across many different businesses. I do and i actually think. The challenge is not just having the data but the ability to interpret it. An act on those two things together and the really hard part is human. Beings aren't rational creatures. Who are the some of our experiences and those experiences shape what we value value shape our motions at all by the way ninety five percent of our choices according to hp are made based on subconscious decisions so often human beings can't really tell you what it is. They think they need you kind of observe and watch so companies companies. I think have a hard time doing that. Sometimes thinking that you can take mountains of data and turn those statistics into people when a reality.

deloitte ashley reichheld Reichheld ashley ashley cmo club antarctica fisher price Cio hp
2021 Global Marketing Trends with Deloitte's Ashley Reichheld

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

05:03 min | 1 year ago

2021 Global Marketing Trends with Deloitte's Ashley Reichheld

"Let's let's talk business. We want to talk a little bit about this report. That deloitte has released the twenty twenty one global marketing trends report. What drove the report in went into it. Well this is our second annual report. But this one was really characterized by the challenges of twenty twenty and that level of uncertainty that we're seeing has really impacted all of us in some way myself my mom of three old trends and well. I thought i was a master at balancing working kids. I've learned a whole new set of work from home. Sales gotta really speedy mute. Button trigger finger pilot fisher price toys under my desk that bear testimony and this year. We really use the study to kind of help explorer and break down some of that uncertainty. We use subject matter expertise. We voices smithfield and two overarching surveys. From consumers up twenty five hundred and executives up just about four hundred of them to help break down that uncertainty in the report a believe it's unified seven trends overall and you go In detail on each of them. But can you tell me kinda just at a high level. Were the the major trends seven themselves are purpose agility human experience trust participation fusion and talent and i think in general agility trust talent participation are fairly straightforward largely those companies without. Do you trust them to do with the say they're gonna do. They have the talent to do it. Do they nibble participation with their stakeholders in the customers. The ones i usually get questions about not understanding are the other three so purpose and that's a company that knows what they exist and therefore can make choices a little bit more rapidly. That sense of purpose helps them particularly in times of uncertainty. Actually because they can they can make tough decisions right away. The second human experience and i often get asked. Hey so white you just call that. What is call it. A spur ends called employee experience. I'm sure we'll talk about this. But the reason we call it human experiences because you don't wake up as customer employees. You wake up as a human being. And if we want to elevate experience we have to understand you as a human and then fusion of course which is that art of bringing together new business partnerships early in the report. You identify this drop in confidence across the c. suite. And just curious. What do you feel drove that drop and this is the second time i've seen this question i guess from deloitte is working with the loye. The cmo team within delay and the cmo club on some prior research. We looked at confidence. Drop or confidence levels. I should say of cmo's in general and while this most recent snapshot shows the drop in confidence. I'm kind of pleased that cmo's aren't last on the list now. A small bright spot in the foreseeable ceelo's but tell us a little bit about this dropping confidence. Well at the start of our chat. I talked about this notion of uncertainty that feeling and basically the research suggests that c. suites are humans to and no exception to that rule so on a percentage basis. Cmos aren't last but they are second to last Within a percentage point of and you actually see the biggest declines with. Cio's an nco's. And i think really what you're seeing is that lots of executives have gone into survival mode and you see them by the way prioritizing things like improved efficiency and productivity over more human centric initiatives in that that instinct is is very common but unfortunately it does run counter to some consumer expectations. When we did this research. We learned that as times. Get tougher consumers. Expect more connection. Not less said consumers are really looking for companies to step up and you have c. suite executives who are uncertain and lacking confidence today. And not really sure the world is heading and it's making it very difficult environment. Operate them in these uncertain times to us over over used phrase currently but one of the other two data points stuck out. I think is a sign of the times potentially i'm gonna stay kotei stats and then we can discuss what we think they mean but fifty eight percent of respondents could recall at least one brand that quickly pivoted to better respond to their needs and eighty two percent said this led to them doing more business with that brand. Seems that these factors kind of together talk about one the agility that you've you mentioned before is one of the trends to this human experience component like are we actually delivering what people really want and value and purpose. I think alignment potentially of those two things like what's going on in the world and what do people really need am i. Do you think. I'm interpreting that right just based on the data and what the trends that you're seeing i do although. I think i'd argue that. The each of the trends has an impact there. If you think about an organization's ability to co create with people so fusion for example if your co creating with people rapidly you're able to respond to create address needs more rapidly if you're encouraging participation from your customers than your doing a good job or hopefully a better job at least of hearing what it is. They need to be able to adopt if customers trust. You more likely to tell you what they need a believe you when it comes out and then of course talent is critical. All these things without talent. You can't do any of them

Deloitte Cmo Club Fisher Price CIO
Jessica Burlingame:How To Revitalize Your Work-From-Home Team

The $100 MBA Show

07:11 min | 1 year ago

Jessica Burlingame:How To Revitalize Your Work-From-Home Team

"Hi everybody. i'm jessica burlingame with agathon advisors. Thanks so much for joining me today. I'll be offering you for stealth moves to revitalize your work from home team whether you lead a team of two of ten or one hundred or if you are your own all star team of one. Let's dive right in first. Let's talk about why. A few stealth moves might serve you right now. Lots of us are facing unprecedented demands to work and to lead from home which can be exhausting but we still need to deliver maybe at a higher level than ever and maybe with less support and we need all the vitality and energy. We can get to make that happen. These four stealth moves may offer you. Andrew people some of the support. You need through this time. You may find as we go through this lesson today. That you're making some of these moves already. In that case today may give you some ideas to elevate your existing power moves into straight up superpower moves. because let's face it. We probably all need our inner superhero more than ever these days. And yes i do believe. We all have an inner superhero. So let's dive into each stealth move. One by one stealth move number. One is to say whoops in public. That's right you say whoops you made a mistake you own it and you move forward you make this move under many circumstances maybe even say to yourself from time to time you might be saying to me. Now hold up a minute. Don't look weak. If i admit that i messed up. Isn't it better to try and fix a problem before anybody notices or just a power through it and hope for the best. Maybe but the superpower stealth move is to say whoops in public and then to keep going. Don't hide a mistake but don't let it crush or unduly phase you either now. Let's be clear here as deloitte leaders. Jeff tough and stephen goldbach put it in. A wonderful book called detonate celebrating. Failure can be an excuse for mediocrity. That's not what we're talking about with stealth move number one. What we are talking about is acknowledging and moving on from inevitable recoverable. Mistakes to get you and your team back on track to your best work together a sap. What are some other benefits of stealth move number one saying whoops well at some point. One hundred percent of humans are going to make a mistake if you can model the trust in yourself and your teammates to say whoops and then keep moving towards a solution you might free up a whole lot of time and energy and he might also reinforce that you and your team are in this together. Even when you're physically report to recap superpower stealth move number one is to say whoops and then move on. Let's all move on now to stealth move number two which is to say. I don't know you heard it. Superpower stealth move of saying. I don't know you might make this move. When you're feeling question from a client that you can't answer right away you might be stumped as you look to fix a mistake or resolve an issue and you know confronting real uncertainties within your business as you. Listen you might be saying back to in your mind. Wait a minute don't i. Don if i admit i don't know something or underprepared isn't it better to guess right away and hope i'm proved right in the long term but the superpower stealth move here is not just to admit in public that you don't know something but also that you're working on it and or you'll find somebody who does know and or you are open to others input and knowledge as you seek the answer that will serve your team. What are some other payoffs to this stealth move. Chances are that over the course of a career or probably even day. You'll need some information that you won't have exactly when you need it being honest about that inevitable moment when it happens can liberate you and your team from scrambling to save face in the short term and from any damage control. That approach require later on. Bonus points for stealth move number. Two one of your teammates might actually know that thing that you don't and this stealth move of admitting you don't know then gets you quickly to an answer. And even more importantly perhaps gives that teammate a chance to shine revitalizing their day for sure and hopefully yours with ripple effects for the rest of the team as well to recap stealth move number two is to say. I don't know and move on as we move onto stealth move number three. Consider the superpower of saying thank you. Maybe your teammate came through with an answer you didn't have maybe your assistant saved you from scheduling fumble. Maybe your client shared feedback. That helped you up your own game. You might be saying to me. Now hang on. I say thank you all the time. How's that a stealth move first off. If you're already saying thanks frequently you are ahead of the game. Thank you second from that base. You might consider how to superpower your thank used by making them as personal as specific as possible. a simple thank. You might give the hearer a general sense of being appreciated and some positive feelings but a personal specific. Thank you can offer meaningful data about the exact value that you recognize in any teammates specific action or contribution. It might also help. Establish a valuable team of recognizing and celebrating your value to each other as you continue your data day. What are some other payoffs stealth move number three saying thank you. Well we all want to be seen for who we are at our best. That's what marcus books. And ashley goodall share in a beautiful book called nine lies about work. A freethinking leaders guide to the real world now as a leader. You might give great attention to the feedback that you offer your people saying thank. You is a little different. It's offering attention recognition. Maybe even gratitude. And how could that not give your teammate a lift it might just lift you up two

Jessica Burlingame Agathon Advisors Jeff Tough Stephen Goldbach Andrew DON Ashley Goodall Marcus
SolarWinds hackers breached US Treasury officials’ email accounts

Cyber Security Headlines

02:52 min | 1 year ago

SolarWinds hackers breached US Treasury officials’ email accounts

"Attackers stage. A dry run get solar winds in october. Two thousand nineteen. Yahoo news is sources. Say the operators of the attack conducted a test of the campaign five months before the supply chain attack began in earnest. This test sent files without back. Doors through signed updates to orion seemingly detest they would actually be delivered and detected and updated. Faq by solar winds indicates that this was the first modification to its updates. It was aware of in related. News and analysis by the wall street journal farsight security and risk iq identified twenty four organizations that installed solar ones orion platform with militias backdoors installed including cisco intel invidia. Vm-ware belkin kent state university the california department of state hospitals and deloitte nso group spyware reportedly used against journalists a new report from security researchers at citizen lab at the university of toronto details. How government operatives used the pegasus spyware from nso group to attack the phones of thirty-six journalists producers and executives at al jazeera as well as journalist at el arab tv in london the attack was carried out using the click kismet exploit chain and i message that worked against phones running. Iowa's thirteen dot five dot one or earlier. Apple said at pets vulnerabilities seemingly with iowa's fourteen. Cia agents exposed with stolen data. A new report in foreign policy looks at the impact of data stolen by state-backed groups and other ap tease round twenty thirteen. The cia began to notice that undercover operatives in africa and europe began to be rapidly identified by chinese operatives. This marked a period where the us intelligence community noted a general professionalization of china's intelligence operations building infrastructure to process that data. They were already collecting both officially and illicitly as well as general rooting out of corruption that previously led to deep penetration into the chinese government. In the early two thousands china began tracking flights and passenger lists it also when after biometric data at airports like at bangkok this information was correlated with data gathered on an attack at the office of personnel management in two thousand twelve which leaked personal data from twenty one point five million people that data could be analyzed to figure out who was a us agent pair that information with travel data and you could figure out who from china those agents met with and with the background data indicating who might be approached at becoming sa asset europol. The european commission launch a new decryption platform. This platform was lodged in collaboration with the european commission's joint research center designed to aid authorities in decrypt information that is obtained lawfully in criminal investigations and managed by your oppose european cybercrime centre functionally. This platform will use in-house expertise with both software and hardware tools to provide effective assistance to national member. state investigations. National police forces from member states can now send lawfully obtained evidence to europol for decryption.

Belkin Kent State University California Department Of State Citizen Lab Nso Group El Arab Tv NSO CIA The Wall Street Journal University Of Toronto Al Jazeera Yahoo Intel China Cisco Iowa London Office Of Personnel Management Apple Africa
In Pennsylvania, Fracking and Renewables Compete for the Future

Marketplace

02:00 min | 2 years ago

In Pennsylvania, Fracking and Renewables Compete for the Future

"Year's presidential election. As I am sure you've heard It's It's also also one one of of the the key key states states for for the the fracking fracking industry industry up up and and down down the the ballot. ballot. As As I'm I'm sure sure you you have have also also heard heard Fracking Fracking for for gas gas has has long long been been thought thought of of as as a a bridge to get us to wherever the cost of wind and solar Has made those renewables as cheap as gas and his marketplaces. Scott Song reports. A couple of new studies suggest that time may already be here. It just gets cheaper and cheaper to make solar panels and wind turbines, says analyst Marlene Metical at Deloitte. The actual cost of the components are declining, but also the efficiency. Of the technology is increasing, so the wind turbines are now becoming larger and larger, and as a result, solar and wind are now the cheapest ways to add power generation in most of the world, says a report from Bloomberg New Energy Finance. Another report from the investment bank, Lazard says building and maintaining the solar or wind farm costs as much as keeping an existing gas plant running, all of which threatens the market for natural gas. Nico Sappho said. The Center for Strategic and International Studies, says pressure's mounting for folks in the gas business. This may be an industry that could be shrinking in 10 15 20 years so How can I be sure that my project is the one that survives? So it puts you in that mindset rather than a mindset where everything is growing their space for everyone. A typical natural gas power plant last 20 years or so bye, then wind and solar will be thriving. So some gas plants will have to shut down early, predicts Sue Tierney at the analysis group consultancy. You would expect to see disclosure statements by companies that there will be much slower utilization rates or a truncated life that's being discussed in a lot of places. Because of that, Tierney thinks a lot of money invested in the natural gas business won't be made back. I'm Scott Tongue for

Sue Tierney Center For Strategic And Inter Scott Tongue Nico Sappho Scott Song Bloomberg New Energy Finance Lazard Deloitte Marlene Metical Analyst
Orders for big-ticket US manufactured goods jumped 11.2%

Marketplace

01:33 min | 2 years ago

Orders for big-ticket US manufactured goods jumped 11.2%

"Look at orders orders for for durable durable goods goods to to get get get a a a read read read read on on on on how how how how willing willing willing willing people people people people are are are are to to to to spend spend spend spend on on on on big big big big ticket ticket ticket ticket items items items items that that that that last last last last a a a a few few few few years years years years like like like like refrigerators, refrigerators, refrigerators, refrigerators, office office office office equipment equipment equipment equipment and and and and last last last month month month cars. cars. cars. Eric Gordon teaches at the University of Michigan's Ross School of Business. I think there was pent up demand in autos, people had been putting it off for a number of months. And the carmakers are offering very strong deals, and the uptick wasn't driven. Just buy cars. Shipments of business machinery were also up for about the level of capital good shipments. That we were at before the pandemic. Daniel Bachman is an economic forecaster for Deloitte and that I consider to be very positive because it does suggest that US businesses at this point I believe that it's worth it. For them to continue investing, which is good news, at least in the manufacturing sector. Abdu Ingi teaches economics at New York University, he says Manufacturing, though, isn't the big concern right now, because he's not a sector that's hurting. We know they're spending on services has lunch, which is being led by a large drop on restaurants and recreation, mainly And that's because of the pandemic. Here's Bachman at Deloitte again. It'll be very hard for the economy to really start recovering until we have a solution to the health problems. But you'll probably still hear politicians talking about a V shaped recovery right up until Election Day in Washington. I'm

Daniel Bachman Deloitte Abdu Ingi Eric Gordon Forecaster Ross School Of Business University Of Michigan Washington New York University Manufacturing
How Some Companies Survive, Even Thrive, in COVID-19 Crisis

Snacks Daily

01:13 min | 2 years ago

How Some Companies Survive, Even Thrive, in COVID-19 Crisis

"Company that survives covid nineteen is probably better off today than they were before Kovac's knackers since the pandemic started, it is a battle of retail attrition out there this is crucial to understand because it's transformed our economy in profound ways. Insane numbers here smackers get this eighty thousand small businesses have permanently closed from March, I July fifth according to Yeah and if you just look at the shopping and retail industry twenty, six thousand businesses that used to compete with best buy where open on. March first but are closed today and the wild thing is that the devastation to small and medium businesses across America is actually this huge boon to the big corporations case in point consulting company Deloitte recently surveyed the CEO's of one hundred large American corporations. Yes. Sixty percent of them are more confident. In their company's growth today than they were before covert and we're still amid pandemic. How could that possibly be that? CEO's are more confident post cove it than they were before when things were seemingly really basically covert has improved the business outlook for America's biggest corporations simply because it's smalls, corporations are gone sad but critical not to forget that

CEO America Kovac Deloitte
Understanding How And Why Your Market Makes Decisions

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

04:25 min | 2 years ago

Understanding How And Why Your Market Makes Decisions

"We all know that knowledge is power of course, data about Customer Habits and Consumer Habits is power as well more than ever. When we shift in business, it's key to understand how and why your market makes decisions. So Jonathan Silver he is the founder and CEO of affinity solutions. Now, affinity is the authoritative source for truth for news outlets not for profits research firms and businesses in the US and the only source for purchase insights that can be analyzed by demographic geographic lifestyle segment and political affiliation affinities mission is to. Transform data insights into experiences that improve people's lives. Jonathan I'm excited to have you here and talk to our Nice Guy. Community. Welcome to the show Ed. Great to meet you doug thanks for having me on I. AM happy that I'm happy to have you here and you know a guy that wrote a book called Nice Guys Finish First. I was completely attracted to the the data for good. So tell me a little bit about what data for good is and how that might affect those that might be listening to our show today. Sure so It's great to be on and I wanted to Start by saying a little bit more about sort of the vision of affinity solutions which for me, we've been running the business now for about Fifteen years, but we've had much more clarity of vision crystallize over the last year, which is. To. Use data to improve people's lives and You alluded to kind of what our business is about. But we have detail purchase behavior on about one hundred, million consumers ninety million in the US A- ten million in other countries. we have that data by the way because we run a kind of loyalty program, we dented that we provide to over three thousand banks the reward customers when shop at. We tell depot wallgreens. So data for good is an extension of the vision of. Using data to improve people's lives that we launched during the coronavirus. During this crisis and we we started by giving away some of our data to scientists to academics researchers. Some. Not for profits to help government agencies with policy making and it was Kinda shocking to me that government entities how much they fly blind. They don't have the information on how their towns cities. Counties are doing. Early and I was like well, their sales tax I mean why? Why wouldn't they get that quickly but apparently, even sales tax information takes a couple of months for a for them to get information. So data data for good was first about helping government policymakers by giving them the information they need to navigate their own decisions, but then it quickly expanded on to provide businesses visibility they need themselves to navigate this crisis and so. you know insights on. What customers are doing outside of businesses own four walls. That's been our mantra for for a long time that's always been important. But it's become absolutely critical during Cova. This sort of outside in view of consumer behavior has become essential especially now because you know during particularly in the march, April. But even even now, you know where there's been a hole punched in their own data that the businesses were looking at you know the purchases in their own stores. On. Their own websites because people just stop coming in coming in a lot less. So businesses have been flying completely blind kind of like A. analogy is like a fighter pilot flying between two Kanye walls that instrumentation So right now, we're delivering through partnerships with companies like Deloitte, accenture and bane and McKinsey weekly updates to businesses to help them navigate. We're also providing the press in our website affinity solutions, dot COM and weekly updates on what's happening in the economy to call it a business recovery scorecard. which looks at bellwether categories like. Grocery and and home delivery and. You know as people come out of their homes So it'll be interesting. You know that data, which is for the good of not for profit scientists. It's for the good of businesses for the good of consumers We're going to be looking very closely at how consumer behavior will change permanently. As a result of this crisis, we're seeing a lot more purchases on the web. So data for good is really about providing that level of insight to a broader community.

Jonathan Silver United States Cova Doug Deloitte Kanye Mckinsey Accenture
Commit to Learning from the Greats on a Daily Basis With Erynn Bell

Daily Sales Tips

02:33 min | 2 years ago

Commit to Learning from the Greats on a Daily Basis With Erynn Bell

"Today's tip comes from Erin Bell. Aaron is the director of enterprise sales at degrade with ten years in both beat B. and B. Two C. sales she's lived all over the country and the world proving herself to be a go getter and a risk taker, a committed lifelong learner. She's always looking for ways to learn from others. But today we get to learn from her here. She is some of the best sales people. I. Now are the ones that are voracious in their everyday learning, foul thought leaders and organizations within the industries that you work with read listen and watch what they are. Talking. About daily for me, I go straight to the McKenzie's and Deloitte to the world. I'm constantly trolling through their websites searching not only for my prospects being mentioned but also what they are writing about in general about business, the markets what is going on in the world remember learning is not a journey with a start an end it is continuous. If you get your quote unquote reading at Baths in, you will actually train your brain to start to think in this way, you will also build up your confidence as well. You will begin to have conversations that matter and are informed. You will build up your authentic expertise and reputation as a thought leader with your prospects. Then start incorporating these nuggets of wisdom whether they be articles, blog posts, podcasts, whatever it may be into your outbound prospecting. Don't have an ask straightaway connected back to your research on the pain points at that prospect is experiencing start making some deposits. Especially if your ideal buyer is at the executive level, this will help to confirm with them that it is worth it to spend some time with you. An example of this might be I noticed in your company's ten report that you mentioned X. Y. Zad were strategic global business objectives into twenty twenty one as Mackenzie said in this Article Doing Avian. See are of the utmost importance in order to achieve x lines at or. Here's a staggering staff, Marie sent Deloitte Study Dot Dot dot but remember make sure their sources you're calling from are credible and carry a fair bit of weight in your industry or the industry of your buyer by elevating your own reading and worldview you level yourself up as a sales person. You do not need to know everything but being voracious in your own learning and awareness of the world will help you to level up as a salesperson exponentially

Erin Bell Deloitte X. Y. Zad Aaron Baths Director Mckenzie Marie Executive Mackenzie
"deloitte" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

Psychologists Off The Clock

16:56 min | 2 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

"It. You have You know. Kids who are experiencing and he sort he'd be relations emotional seized. Issues. That adds to the burden and it's also hard to. These things are not talk about because here's. Shows. Some good at this is supposed to. I was Deloitte this job right? So how can I earn outcome? And admitting that is something that is a challenge. So in one respect at. Delighted this research being done because. It's going to normalize that experience. Normalize that. Yes, it is really hard to be and is. Now. Tell a little bit more about that. How do you think it is contributing to parental burnout? Bristle experience or Maybe both I mean. We I'll actually tell the listeners. We are both joking when we first signed on that. This. We're not interested in this out of nowhere right now. We're like we. The. Stress and to be apparent in the midst of this is. It's not just theoretical like we live it. No, it's hard. I think there are a.

Deloitte
Recovery Strategy: Inside Look at Furniture Shoppers After COVID-19

Our SKUD View

06:38 min | 2 years ago

Recovery Strategy: Inside Look at Furniture Shoppers After COVID-19

"Welcome back to another episode of our skewed view. I N Emily and I'm your host. Today Chris will be back in a couple of weeks promise but until then we have another very special guest today. A returning champion on the podcast. We have got Keith Johns with us. Thanks for coming fatally so today we are going to get right into the details because we heard a lot of people some great questions after our first podcast and we want to answer those. So today we're going to talk about the two types of consumers that are coming out of this pandemic. We've been watching some trends in talking to a lot of retailers and things are a little bit different. So we're GONNA get into the details today with you First couple of housekeeping notes. We are going to start recording these on a weekly basis to give you guys as much information about recovery in strategic planning as you are asking for so if you have something you are looking specifically please send us an e mail at marketing at migrating dot com and we will take those requests and schedule a podcast about it so now already to get into the detail so keith. Let's talk a little bit about these two types of consumer. We've got two basic people where we've got people who are willing to come into the store after the covid nineteen impact and then people were still pretty cautious. So what do retailers need to know about the new type of consumer that's emerging from the quarantine so sitting outside this weekend thing about this topic and you know how best to bring some value to the conversation in enjoying Mother's Day belatedly. Great Mother's Day and took care of their mom And you know what we're watching here is something we haven't seen happen in one hundred years. It's the interplay between personal safety and economic concerns and then how is that affecting consumer spending behavior? So it's important. I think that d not only talks about what's going on at the retailer level the furniture industry level. But also we take a look higher up so I paged through Some research from Pricewaterhouse Coopers and Deloitte just to see what kind of questions they were asking wondering. When are consumers going to to come back out? What's IT GONNA look like when they do come back out? What behaviors are GONNA revert? Can we cannot any of the actually being just like they were before hand. Or which ones are you going to change? I think I think we're aware that a lot of them are going to change significantly and they're probably going to stay changed. Thought it was interesting. The Deloitte Research. It said that sixty four percent of the folks they surveyed which are international not just the North American international sixty four percent. Their decision making is still driven by concerns about family health. So folks aren't thinking about which store to go to the cells the best furniture really big decisions here if I go out if I take someone with me. How does that affect the health of my family? That's a big deal question. And you've got sixty four percent of people thinking about that now. This is changing every week and this research was a couple of weeks old sure. In addition it said forty two percent of those surveyed or thinking about delaying large purchases. Now not all furniture purchases are necessarily large but but they can't be and Only one in three right now are comfortable going to a store one in five to have something to compare it to are willing to fly which is probably perceived a slightly more risky given the the concentration of people so that's the framework that our industry is operating in and there's there's certainly Unique parts industry but broad that we all. We need to be aware that that's the kind of thinking that people are having to go through. And how do I adapt and plan for that? And that's where you know. At an industry level microbes is talking about the willing customer versus the cautious customer. And it sounds like emily. That's what you'd like to hear more about a rated Ivan Yellows. Divan this great okay. Great so the willing customer personas are changing. We've talked about this in various Micro d media. you're still going after people from a certain geographic area or a certain age who have a certain income level. Maybe even a certain propensity to spend. You know you've got your your persona within those personas. Do not have folks that are willing folks that are cautious as far as venturing out in this new new environment. We have the willing folks are going to want to come to your store. They're they're not. They're not gonNA stay sheltered in place as significantly as they had before but they are tightening down there shopping strategy. I think I mentioned this. Emily in the last podcast where there was the trend years ago. Was that Google search. Allowed you to shrink down the number of stores That you were going to go to made you more effective and efficient sop chopper. Spending all day going to furniture stores like you might have in the past. That's going to tighten down even more Maybe they had gone two three four five stores before they're gonNA target one or two stores. They're willing to go to the stores. Liquor spent a lot of time on those websites maybe even reacting with the staff the chat or email there. It's almost it's precision shopping right. They're going to look for the one place. They WanNa go where they can get what they need. Here's a shortcut product proximity in preparation. Those are the three PS to keep in mind to attract the willing Consumer Shopper. Do you have the right product? Are you close enough to them? They're going to go to a store but they're going to stay closer to home than they might have in the past and do you have a way to prepare for them to come visit you. Can they make an appointment with you? Have you shared with them? Your plans for what their experience will be like. As far as cutting us as far as how they'll walk into the store how the deal with your staff. How can they be assured? Even though they're willing consumers they're happy to go to your store. They still want their still that sixty four percent. That are very concerned about their health. How can you reassure them that? Your storage safety shop at so you're going to address the the willing side of the consumer the new consumer will call it a post cove. It

Emily Keith Johns Pricewaterhouse Coopers Chris Deloitte Research Ivan Yellows Deloitte Google
Inside the US Soccer Equal Pay Fight

ESPN Daily

05:28 min | 2 years ago

Inside the US Soccer Equal Pay Fight

"Foudy is a soccer commentator for ESPN and was a member of the US women's national team from nineteen eighty seven to two thousand four. She also hosts a podcast laughter permitted so Julie. It's been a chaotic few days. I use the word chaotic relatively now for American soccer late last week the president of the US Soccer Federation. Carlos Cordeiro resigned. What was the chain of events that brought that about? We need a couple of days and a lot of wind for that. Actually I think we have that actually right now we do. It all started obviously with the lawsuit that the women filed last March for gender discrimination and then there was a brief that really triggered this avalanche. That was released last week. There central argument was women are inherently inferior to men to this from the US defense quote. The job of a men's national team player requires a higher level of skill based on speed and strength and does the job of a women's national team player. He response was immediate federation saying that Biological Sciences. The reason why men should make more money than the women. You've got to be kidding. Me Arrogance and ignorance here is outstanding. It's mind blowing. This woman are the best at what they do in the world in the world. How how can they be compensated? What then transpired was we were in the middle of our coverage of the she believes up which is an annual tournament that the women play and it was their last game of the tournament and my play by play. Guy Actually looks at me Sebastian. Salazar points to his phone and puts his finger up like hold on. I need to read. Something just been handed a statement from USF President Carlos Cordeiro and he proceeds to read this apology on air from Carlos. Cordeiro apologize for the offensive pain caused by language in this week's court filing which did not reflect the values of our federation or a tremendous admiration of our women's national team women's National Cordeiro saying I hadn't properly read the brief. I apologize for what's in there. We're firing our legal team and hiring late them and walk INS. I literally had to take about a five second pause and gather myself because my head was about to implode these players are getting deposed all the time they're being asked questions like you lose the fifteen year olds though right so you're inferior rights so you know this is happening. You have to know that the players are feeling it is well known was buying it and to give us the statement on air. I thought was a terrible idea for me to react to it. I don't get how you ever get to this position where you're okay with letting your legal team run all these depositions in that manner and making that that central tentpole of your arguments and the very next day. Carlos Cordeiro resigned as President Julia. Why do you think the backlash resulted so quickly in Cordero's resignation? I think the sponsors helped I think. They saw the reaction from some of their biggest partners. Coca Deloitte Volkswagen. The statements they put out. Were words like we're disgusted by this. We would never associate with an organization that thinks this way yet. We stand by the Women. If you're US soccer they feel like they're on the brink of something in in a very negative way and so they knew they had to do something quickly. Obviously this moment puts the players in a bit of a weird spot. Where in the midst of all this? They're playing event wearing the shield for us soccer's actively trying to undercut their standing as highly skilled athletes. How did they react honestly? Who was so proud of how they handled it. Us and Japan have on the world soccer's biggest stage and today they meet with the two thousand twenty. She believes title on the line. We've been given a heads up that they were gonNA wear their jerseys inside out. The warmup jerseys wrestler wearing their warm up uniforms inside out. We're told this is in response to the latest legal filings by the US federation. Usually they take that photo with just the starting eleven before you start a game. And you're in your jerseys. They kept their warm up jerseys on and they had the team stand in solidarity. They knew they had to play but they also wanted to be clear. Like this is not okay. We don't stand for what their argument they're making. They always have the. Us Women's national team proved their worth on the field. Three to one over Japan. They are she believes cup. Champions on air right after as we've seen all over social media her response was spot on like I want every little girl to know that you're not lesser than a boy

President Carlos Cordeiro United States Soccer Us Soccer Federation Us Federation Foudy Japan President Trump Julie Espn Deloitte Volkswagen USF Biological Sciences Salazar Cordero President Julia
"deloitte" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Transform work business and communities at Deloitte dot com slash U. S. slash only see possible and from the listeners who support this NPR station it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm no will king good morning the US capitol building is known as one of the most open places to cover the news in Washington DC reporters can hit up lawmakers in the hallway they can walk with them between meetings they can even interview them in the basement of the capitol but during the impeachment trial that will change reporters will be confined to pence Cerro wire is in our studio she's a congressional correspondent for the LA times and she chairs the standing committee of correspondents which is the group that represents the daily print press on Capitol Hill Good Morning Star learning wire reporters being confined depends what we're told it's a safety issue they want to make sure that senders are knocked down because there's a crush of reporters chasing after them for interviews does that sound like something that might happen who was some fears after the Cavanaugh hearings because they're so much extra attention that there were some an instance of a reporter getting pushed by police officer and some some shopping around a he senator but you know we we've handled ourselves with decorum for the last two centuries and pretty sure we can do it now too and in fact you push to have this overturned what happened what we did get a second plan at least one closer to where offenders and I'll be walking back and forth okay but the the limit is about fifteen minutes before and after the trial and we're not allowed to walk and talk with cinders for thirty minutes before and after the trial in minutes are our if one does pass that's a big deal and so to be restricted during that time that might be our only chance to get certain senators okay reporters also won't be able to bring their equipment into the chamber so no streaming no tweeting no writing no audio recorders I would imagine for radio reporters what is that mean for how people work there and no electronics role has been set in the Senate for a very long time it is something we had hoped to get an exception to for the trial but I wasn't allowed that means that you know if we wanna tender tweeter check in with our bosses are and give Americans breaking news we have to step out of that chamber and then the big difference this time is there's gonna be a magnetometer in the door to the chamber a magnetometer sorry that metal detector essentially okay that's going to be screaming reporters every time they walk in and out of the chamber this is a big change for him two hundred plus years we've been able to walk in and cover the the news of the day without being stopped by police officer and suddenly we're gonna have to go through a metal detector every time we walk in okay I feel like you've been answering this question in each of the questions I asked you but who is losing out here what it what is the thing that you're actually worried about I went to what the American public I mean whether I see with my own eyes doesn't matter but the cameras that are inside the Senate chamber of controlled by the government there are no still photographers allowed within the chamber there needs to be a unbiased on him an unbiased I witness to these events okay this Senate impeachment impeachment trial course does begin today is this now settled the pens it the the magnetometer one place yesterday that the plans are in place and we're still hopeful for change were hopeful that in some things can be worked out to make it easier but we have no guarantee that's going to happen at this point do you worry about the setting a precedent of course everything on in Washington is about precedence when been hearing that for the last two months about the president of the Clinton impeachment trial and I'm afraid what's gonna happen the day after okay and just last question quickly have your editors said to you stay inside the chamber don't come out and call us and and and email us now we're going to be having a rotation but every fifteen minutes we're gonna be walking in and out last name massive disruption okay Cerro wire with the Los Angeles Times thank you so much for coming in thanks for having this is morning edition from NPR.

Deloitte dot NPR
How Orbita is using Voice an AI to change the healthcare experience

Future Ear Radio

03:46 min | 2 years ago

How Orbita is using Voice an AI to change the healthcare experience

"Joint today by Nick White of orbiter nick tells a little bit about who you are and what you do. Thanks they have great to be on my. My Name's Nick Wide. As you said I just joined open a recently in the roll off executive vice president patient kiss solutions and in that role look at product that we've gone cold over assists which is a vertical solution? Dove on top of the the over platform focusing on care for patients is and nurses and recently joined the team from Deloitte are being a consultant for many years focusing on How we help people go to disk judge to optimize the way they working every day and thinking about the use of conversational? I cognitive science technology. Oh Jeez and own alterations in terms of the future works of isolated individuals such as nurses or other individuals. They just don't sit behind a desk everyday totally totally so you know. I really wanted to bring Nick on today Because I think that you know as we are seeing with voice assistance in general. You know you're sort of seeing seen this new evolution where they're moving outside of the home and they're moving into new settings and healthcare is one of the settings that I find to be really intriguing. I think there's a whole lot of opportunity. Eighteen eighty in a wide variety of ways in which voice assistance can be layered into that new setting and so You know the first time I got exposed STA to orbital was an exa conferences ago I met nature or and I saw him speak in and I kinda got exposed to orbit a little bit and so before we really dive into orbit assist. which I know is really sort of like your your baby Can you tell us a little bit about the whole idea of orbiter. Yeah No Otas a fascinating organization. I what they have built at. Its Haas is a platform which allows you to do conversational. Management's using a low code on oak coded Borrowers Managing that conversation. That you WANNA have redid customized And then serving that up via any of the platforms be that Google or Alexa Chat bots web chat or even run analog sards art and that platform allows you to to have really rich management affect compensation and the direction that you want to take your shoes. When you're indecisive is new so so that is a platform was really fabulous when I looked at it at a t knows working group in it and then on top of that we're over it is gone on is starting to think about the vertical platforms that sit really nicely on top of that so I wanted to the spectrum with thinking about search engine optimization nations of voice thinking about voice I how do you win somebody is asking natural language processing question how you present the right answer to them it gives them the information they need and then direct them through a flow so getting your brand to position zero is really important in the voice spots yet yeah no I totally agree with that go on the second vehicle is the assist one ano? We're going to get into that mall. But that's really focused around. How do we use voice in clinical goal setting to support Eisenson noces in communicating with each other And providing that rich information transfer between them. We'll get more into that and then we're really focused on Myron is journey management once. You've left the health environment the hospital environments and you headed harms. How do we support you in sums of opened hearings in sunset Johnny managements as you continued to Move through your journey.

Nick Nick White Nick Wide Deloitte Executive Vice President Myron Google Eisenson Consultant
"deloitte" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

08:37 min | 3 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"He doesn't have the skill to continue operating like that. And so then you know he disappears or the big service company comes back behind no acquires them later on down the road. But it's kind of of this vicious back and forth between big bigger companies and smaller companies. Seems one I think. There's the implication of that is an in. You know the oilfield has has this the sort of the initial call the wildcat founder mythology digital walk. And you know and that is founded that but at the same point in DC. We were talking in the pre show about sort of the ethics in the environmental and sustainability of it. You know there's a lot of those small companies that have probably probably not made the best decisions for oil and gas and our relationship with society and doing things sustainably and the and so they were able to keep keep their cost structure low because probably some corners being cut and in the end. We as an industry are you know within a generation of of sort of facing an energy transition and and the question will be is do do we as an industry have the moral authority to continue to be gas and renewables industry. Even though you we didn't do an incredible job in the last hundred years being conscious of our communities and the environment or we could have done a better job. And how do we how do we make sure sure that you know yes. Those the you know Joe Joe Joe Guy in West Texas he he makes millions and his kids are set up. That's great but but you know have we as an industry earned the right to continue. You know being part of energy mixture in the future and I think that's that's the that's the counterargument is you know. Yes you'll be threatened by that but I think in the long run you know doing it right and spinning the cost takes to do it. Right has value. Yeah and I think that that's something. We're going to have to demonstrate more and more as we go into the future. That's a great point. Well Alex appreciate you coming on the show man. This is super informative a really early like caring about what's going on with O. S. companies. I think we're in challenging times. Probably going to be in challenging times for the next year so and to see you know what kind of creative solutions people come up with no yourself included. That's going to be. It's GonNa be interesting kind of like you know sitting at the Coliseum in Rome I'm just saying who's GonNa light battle out and survived till the everybody the media keeps saying that it's a shell bust in. Maybe one point though is but I think it's I think from the ashes are going to raise this shield. Two point odes of Phoenix. You know and I think we have to. I often will not going anywhere but I think these trying times just like we saw with you know in in fourteen in all with fifteen sixteen forces people to become innovative and forces us all to develop new skill set. So I I wouldn't be I would be shamed if I didn't I didn't plug so I you know I this year. I decided I wanted to learn more about the land and legal part of this and you know all of the all the stuff around land processes and contracts and all that so when I went to the University of Oklahoma to their their energy masters for Legal Studies and just finishing that up and it was a fascinating program but also you know. Did the machine learning stuff and I think you know the what what we as individuals can do is make sure that you know the leadership that would we're going to bring to the industry and as we all move around and I'm sure you know some point you know all of us are gonna be in different places and you guys when you're when you're running your emp company. Right making making sure that you're you're bringing more of a breadth of experience and Alex not to not down on petroleum. Engineers love him. You know there's a lot of them. They're recovering they're out there but we just need to. We need to bring more breath into our operational leadership roles and you know some people. There's a lot of buzzwords around we don't need a chief digital officer. What it would he gets talk about? But but it's it's bringing a broader perspective to the leadership of the early. I think is going to be important to help us build sustainable pathway absolutely I think I think more more engineers have to become more multi. DISCIPLINARY WRANGLER IS A. There's a question on twitter the other day talking about should rock jocks be running oil companies and should should be the rock jocks or the finance guys and as a wool to pretty binary way to look at it. What if you know the future? We're looking at a mixture of of rock jocks finance guys but also guys understand technology and he happy well Verse Management Team. That's running your EMP's and office no one on. And how do you place those skills on the directors right because then this is so you mentioned in the rice. The rice brothers who are having their their living out the great experiment airmont the collision of the two cultures. Right in Pittsburgh right and so you know but at the same point a lot of the companies encounter you look at measuring team. They're trying they're doing their best. But the board of directors is still just the same group of fifty to sixty per something people with ten years experience in in you know a publicly traded company and there's a lot of resistance to change ingrained in even the boards right in their structures and so not only. How do we bring that to the management team? But how do we encourage you know the board of directors the private equity firms who are funding these companies that you need to bring a broader perspective even even in the supervision and the supervision the leadership. So that you're you're allowing the good ideas that are below to not get tamped down. There's a great pamphlet written in World War. Two about about who. The Germans wrote a pamphlet on how you slowdown bureaucracies. Like literally a pamphlet of how do you disrupt a an enemy by adding bureaucracy to their companies. He's right and it's literally a script of what happens in oilfield services companies and because because of the ways because a lot of leaders leaders have arrived at their place in life and they benefit from the structure and the way things are and there's a lot of ingrained resistance to change you got in. It's not necessarily. It's not always this. You know the people in the C. Suite it's that that next level of upper middle management and the vines that have grown throughout the organization over the years and those they are are very very capable of resisting change and so if you've got that layer and the board of directors even the most Gina Seal in the world is not is GonNa have a real l. hard time affecting change. That is interesting. I think that you know that statement probably covers ninety five or probably even higher percentage the jove oil companies. So I mean if someone wants to reach out to you. Where do they find you at your on the Maintenance Lincoln you know if you if you Google Alex Fleming Deloitte consulting assaulting that's You'll find me and I'm pretty all my email address. Sermon linked in profile. So I have enough digital presidents that you should be able to find the problem I gotta do is Google well how ix Fleming russian-speaking bess so how to bring you right up like I said it's good news about so Alex. Swimming is the is also the name of the doctor who discovered penicillin. I'm in Scotland so it's actually kind of a little bit of a digital digital shield because if you just Google Alex Lemme Alexander Fleming. The the eighteen hundreds doctor comes up. That's one yeah you have to know one other piece of information. So Alex Fleming Navy or Alex lemming worden or Alex Fleming Deloitte Alex Fleming the machine condemning. The guy who doesn't sleep because you know get four children under the age of seven and a wife who's an entrepreneur to and travel days a week but you know we start..

Alex Alexander Fleming Google Alex Fleming Navy Joe Joe Joe Guy O. S. companies founder Fleming University of Oklahoma Rome Alex Lem Phoenix Scotland penicillin twitter Alex lemming worden group of fifty Pittsburgh West Texas
"deloitte" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

11:39 min | 3 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"What is your profitability of your product lines in these geographies and it was a very very difficult question to answer? Took down ten weeks to arrive at an answer that maybe was competent. Oakland so I I I think honestly what it really boils down to is. It boils down to organization like starts with personal organization. Right of of keeping track of everything and I think companies. It's very hard to do that as you. You're setting up a company. It's very easy to let that fall to the wayside and be like how to catch up with it later and then ten years later still beer big organization but now you have way more people and it just completely think about like simple simple SAS platforms forms like notion notion could completely change the internal operations of a company. It's changed operations and no one uses things. SNOWING USES SILICON VALLEY TYPE project management and have have you seen any O.. F. S. company used a Silicon Valley type project management software. Like an Asana. Saana a Trello a base camp notion something along those lines that is Jira. I mean that's but that's for developers more so episode. The answer is no. I haven't seen it. Ebbing used effectively to actually run a cooperation. No and it says blows mine. It's interesting I mean. These are enterprise products right. I just I strongly believe you cannot effectively run really any organization that's doing anything meaningful over ten people without having something to track it because then you have nothing to measure against. There's so many things like notion for example has become it's become a project management software Russian sponsors for this might have an affiliate or something. I don't no no you know it's become our our internal Wiki so if you have questions about things like if you set up a website where is it hosted. What is the user day one is the log and things like that that get out of hand? Dan especially with SAS tools right so imagine a company like Haliburton. Imagine how many things that people are paying for it in the information that you have to keep track of and all the information and and notes and stuff that engineers have taken over the years it just gets lost when somebody gets fired. One in you know there's an election I don't WanNa poo on you know do solutions because I think i. I think there's incredible value there but when you get right down to it the things the oilfield services companies right now need to start with our actually. There's there's things they need to do before that. So back that your question about your enorthfield Sir. Your wireline company year like twenty other wire on companies. What would you do to make? Sure your positive cash will the one well so one you get victor. Henry Heinz the founder of the Heinz Ketchup Company said to do a common thing uncommonly well leads to success you can either decide. You're going to be the lunacy. Meanest wireline Arlen company lowest cost structure. You're going to do a better than anybody else. And you're going to be able to get paid premium prices for it or the the other thing is so you can look at adjacency which is okay if if we are not going to get the growth we want a lot of the oilfield service companies right now. If you're looking at potential growth rates in the industry you you know six to eight percent growth. That's probably about what you're going to get in most of the oilfield parts of the industry and your of your stock price reflects to the people people think you're getting twelve percent growth and you're only working in oil and gas I and at some point there's going to be a correction of that and in in it's GonNa Happen. It's GonNa hurt your your shareholder elder value stock price and leadership is going to be held accountable. So if you so you have to really sit down and have very good focus on what are the markets were in where. Where are we playing? Why are we these pieces of the portfolio and are we going to get the kind of growth that are other owners expect our investors expect out of it because you're not looking hard at your portfolio and saying where do we play and then you know where we playing and then how do we have the right and ability to win in those markets? If you haven't because there's a lot of people are like well we're wireline coming. We're always while income. But why should we ever consider doing anything else. But to your point if there's an adjacency where they have skills that can logically move into kind of an adjacent market and Ireland may may not be a great example. So like you know if there's a company that's working in you know let's call it Subsea robotics right or robot. You know robotic said that well sites right and they ask you know all right. Were really really good at robotics. You know what Jason Industries or what adjacent markets markets are very close that we use our skills in that potentially might have higher growth rates in the future. And do we do we double down on those investments. It's writing you have to make some tough strategic decisions about. Do we stay exactly what we've always been doing or do we look for Jason seized. We look for new revenue streams in our data in our information. Do we try and monetize our assets different different way or even get rid of our assets in like literally is you know right now. You know if you're if you're having trouble L. getting good cash flow at of an a high cost asset fleet. You know one when I take that whole fleet and sell it to somebody basically say art we sell it and lease it back but you guys are. You're a company that's GONNA run only this asset class for us and you can run it well and then we can you know get massively reduced. The organization revenue deal with. And so there's there's a lot of you have to start with the intrinsic questions because I said all the all the low hanging fruit of mostly said the people running these companies know what they're doing. They've done the dentist while all. They've pulled all the levers that they've always pulled and they pretty much pull them as hard as they can. All that's left is looking at fundamental operating model structures and portfolio choices and making some very difficult decisions about how you create your operating model and then doing it in the context of the tools that are available able to us. But no you know and I've been on a lot of different software products. Lot assist degration project. No no software has ever solved business problem right. It's it's the the model and the people in the process and yes. The technology enables it but it is you know you can have the best tools enrolled if nobody uses it. I mean that's always been you the biggest trouble struggles to get engaged. It's hard to get engagement for new company. It's even especially when you're merging different work styles and experiences in ages and demographics ethics and whatnot. And so it's hard to get everybody kind of buy into something that you gotTa have humming the fundamentals of the business model. Have to be right. Yeah I think rice energy did it. Well and I've said this many times TMZ but they instituted the right policies in their polly's policies centered around. You're not even in policies but they didn't send any e mails at all their communication took place within the platform that they built. It managed everything and so nothing done unless you communicated with the executives and managers through the platform and so it kind of just reinforced that type of engagement engagement and as a result they built one of the most efficient organizations that I had ever seen in salesforce. Things are absolutely going back to your comment about Heinz signs. That's I feel like this. You know the theory of doing a better job and charging premium just doesn't work in oil and gas I mean is just fundamentally not built that way these are one hundred thousand dollar jobs all affects jobs that are awarded to the lowest bidder. Right to be honest when it comes to a job they I don't give a shit. They only give a shit about job performance. When you leave a tool down hole or you know something of that nature but like you could own fess company and it doesn't matter how hard hard you work? You Got Different Risk Exposures. You know having the best people that's a hard game to play because guess what office hands bounce around and so oh they're gonna if someone someone down the street painted dollar more an hour they're going for that dollar an hour socially now the total headcount in the gas industry is actually now below where it wasn't who does is not. What's the total headcount on the number off top of my head? But it's below its blower. Wasn't Laura cut like there's already less people according to the bureau labor statistics in gas asked now than there wasn't two thousand nine already cut and you know as you guys know. It's very hard to get new talent in. We allow talent has been going out the door. We got a lot of very experienced. Grahams people have retired and taking their knowledge with them and you know I think he has talked about some of the previous podcast. We're GONNA have a lot of problems with people who are having to relearn things not just because we've we haven't captured that knowledge and capture the knowledge. Oh we lost. We lost the tribe knowledge. Yes so what are you seeing. You know one y'all's clients. That's I'm sure you deal with a lot of big office. The haliburton some bridges of the world are any of the smaller. Os has companies out in the permian or they engaging guys like Deloitte or do they. Are they still just fighting fighting the good fight by themselves. Well so one you know the in this is something where you know. Big Consulting is definitely elite. The the price point makes it hard for small organizations to to stomach it. Unless you've got like a private equity firm who who kind of an and I've had this happen where you uh-huh private equity firm says we are hiring you go in and do it but when you get right down to it. There's there's a certain size and organization you have to be at before really really big consultant circuit help you or even be feasible with your budgets right and then there's also you know we we in consulting so consulting is being impacted did as much especially on gas consulting has being impacted as much as anybody else by this because we've had to come up with a very very new ways commercially to engage with our customers customers around incentive structures value-based deals. I mean these are not the days you know. There's there's a lot of heartburn in the industry now about paying reversal. Caught the big strategy consultant rains. And we really have had to get very very especially on gas very good about communicating. Here's the value you. Here's why it's worth it to to use us for this. Here's what you're going to get out of it and here's why and it's not. It's not like telling you company. You couldn't do this right. It's not saying you know yes given enough time you yours. You get a lot of smart people. They're all engineers probably figured this out on your own. The reason you use people like us. This is an accelerator or so that you don't have to relearn everything from the ground up and so but we've we've had to bring a lot of creativity and commercial models to ensure ensure that we're very clearly communicating. Here's the value of creating. And here's why it's useful to have US around. There's some interesting variables that go into this too. I was talking with with one of the big service companies. And they're telling me that they had sold their pressure pumping service or the unit out in West Texas and like it was just too hard to compete with the small guys. They were going going to church with the clients and getting their business just off of personal relationships and for us we just couldn't we couldn't compete with them. Not even on a on a cost basis assist but from those Mont the mom and pops though there than the problem with a small companies as they still are when you don't have scale it's very very hard to get the kind of cost efficiencies that big companies yet exact so it's you still even though like. I said that that will work for awhile. But if you want to build a sustainable table organization in a cost truck for the Lao you have positive cash flow and sustain it. It's very very you gotta be really really lucky yet or a really really good but it it kind of makes it. I mean it'd be blunted pen in the ASS for different companies right because you've got if you're a big company you have the skill to be able to drive down your costs so you can be competitive competitive but then you got this little mom and pop company. That's you know going to Church of old Joe and they get the work and so you've got you've got the skill to perform it on a cost basis. But then you've got this problem where you're not getting the work because of this relationship and then like this service company you end up selling your your pressure pumping unit and then all of a sudden the small guy..

Henry Heinz Haliburton F. S. company Arlen company Oakland Heinz Ketchup Company Ebbing Big Consulting Ireland Subsea robotics West Texas Jason Industries Dan Jason Deloitte polly
"deloitte" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

09:42 min | 3 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"Alex Fleming senior manager of oil and gas operations for Deloitte. Alex they should come on man how you doing. I'm good. Thank you for having me. So if you guys have attended energy TechNet in the past Alex. You're on one of the first panels that we ever. I think was energy tonight one. Yeah I was on the panel with the Guy Hasson Yay forgot about that role into all on his on take a good good panel news coming soon enrolling. Yeah so Alex. I think you've got I mean I remember when I first Alex Lex reach out to me. I looked at Lincoln resumes. This guy seems like he knows everything about everything so I mean. Is that an option. I try not to start the conversation. The Alex and I know that doesn't work. Well for consultants usually threat. I I would say that I have I have in my life. I have been a lifetime learner. Her so I've I've spent a lot of time. Educating myself over over my lifetime in a lot of different things yeah so your your position at Deloitte. If if I'm not mistaken you have right now. Your main focus is hoping oilfield services is that correct. That's correct I've spent most of my my ten years in consulting focused probably half on oil field services and half on the MP companies and even dabbled in a little bit of midstream. He knows some some other associated. Industries Industry's specialty chemicals. But all of them connected to the oil and gas value chain at my time at Deloitte for the last year and a half or so. I've been really deep into the oilfield services work but I've been all over the industry. Yeah I'm actually pretty excited about the sewed 'cause you know recently. We had Dan Pickering on talked about kind of the climate of ENP's and and the state that they're in so it'll be interesting to talk about O.. F. S. side. Obviously we've had some O- of Fast Company's here on the show but we haven't gone into you know there there startups right. We haven't gone into what's it looking like for O.. F. S. and you know I'm shirts It's it's a tough industry or tough game right now but a little bit about let your background how did you how did you get started consulting Deloitte and kind of lead you to where you are today so I grew up. I mean I guess we'll start at the beginning Grew grew up mostly in Colorado Arizona. You know was a wild child so my parents sent me off to boarding school when I was like thirteen. And it's much better when he's a thousand miles away. And so so I like because I've been I was looking at boarding schools and I was like man. We just send your kid off to boarding school and how did you feel front so from being the kid like goes thinking the same thing. That's what I was watching documentary and they were. They sent their kid off to school too and I was like man if my kids a little shit I'm sitting. It was actually my I choice so I did. I did get the option of going local but I went to a pretty cool boarding school. One of one of the New England boarding schools and so I was kind of like the scholarship kid. And you know now when I was kind of funny back back then I I should up my first day and you know you homes get run over by the limo coming from hand to drop the kids off and then Donald trump drops. What's off his daughter? And you know it's Kinda like okay. This is going to be a different place than Colorado but I really sounds like Ivy League school for kids. I think boarding school I think military school i. I think you're GONNA be like you know embarks in a gigantic squad bay and I'm at three o'clock in the morning and they make you run. And then they like those shows where they have the spoiled willed kids and they take him to jail show outlet. That's that's what I imagined but apparently that's not it. It's a lot more like kind of like a little version of college. Generally more expensive so my did boarding school really enjoyed it. You know got out on my own guess is awesome. I don't WanNa go so my you know when and came to the end of boarding school and basically my mom called me up and said Oh by the way you spend all your college money on high school so you have to figure it out on your own good luck and so I did navy. RTC and went to the University of Pennsylvania was a physics in Russian major for reasons. Either probably too long to discuss in the PIE speak Russian. I do speak Russian. Oh shit yet to speak some Russian forest before you leave today. Have you ever have you ever seen the Who is the Russian the comedian? Oh He's not Russian well he not rush and but you bring pressure. Yeah but have you ever seen it and so he goes he. He talks about his time in college. He took a Russian class and he pretty much bullshitted his way through this class and they take a field trip over to Russia. And what are they what do they call them. What was dumber? She ends up getting involved in the Russian Mafia. You need to check it out oak okay. There is one of the funniest standups I've ever seen. Yes it's on his latest ones but the one prior to that all right. You're welcome wildcatters as a piece of gold rush you check it out if you haven't seen it. Sorry I'm pretty fascinated by that so definitely you to speak Russian before the podcast. Put that in the white so in one sentence why did you choose physics and Russian physics. It was just something I was kind of a science geek as a kid and I was always good at it Russian because when I was in fourth grade my mother told me that that learning Spanish was not going to be good enough to differentiate yourself and at that time it was you know this was the early nineties. So everybody's all hot on Japanese and Russian in the cold were standing so you know I was like well. I think I have a better chance of blending in in Russia than I do in Japan. So I'M GONNA go with Russian so choice. Yeah so they ended up. There's got to college. RTC was was a lot of fun and enjoyed it. You know did a did a couple of tours to spend summer you know wondering around San Diego. Summer Submarine Submarine Summer at in a helicopter squadron. At the end of it you know the Navy offers really big signing bonus if you join the submarine force and goes into nuclear power. So I went into the navy nuclear your power pipeline which is kind of like a a year and a half intense master's in nuclear engineering. Finish that and then I went out to Submarine Call Usa San Francisco which I was a nuclear engineer and a combat officer for four years on that submarine at the end of my four year tour which was very interesting and a lot was I had a more interesting in an average first tour on a submarine and at the end of it decided that I'd not WanNa stay in and do my twenty so I got out after five years and had this idea that I wanted to do. Diplomacy clohessy zone to Johns Hopkins to Study International Relations and I discovered that the pay international relations is kind of a travesty. Like give me the you'd have no hope of paying off your student loans. None whatsoever so two questions really quickly. What is it like being on a submarine underwater? I imagined I had an emory last week right okay. I'm super CLAUSTROPHOBIC. I'm sitting there trying to freak out. I would imagine that it would have the same feeling even though it's not super tight space in there or is it like a plan like I'm good flying you definitely. I know you're in a submarine nets. It's small and you. I mean it's one of those things where you do. They do a lot of psychological testing and practical psychological screening for the year ear before you even get to the submarine. So if you're even remotely claustrophobic usually don't even make it to the door of the submarine because they try to filter people out before that. Because as you said it can get a little crossed phobic and if you can't get out and freak out it's no easy way out you're not giving there's now you know mostly well does it when you're underwater. Does it. I feel like about no. It's actually quite stable. Once you get below periscope depth which is about sixty feed me go deeper than that. It's very very staple in this kind of smooth ragged. The only thing you'll notice if you're turning sorry I'm just really curious today. We're GONNA talk about anything if you want to read more about the submarine stuff. I wrote a whole book about it. You can read did you really. Yeah oh well. What's a book called? Were you find it. It's on Amazon. It's called making submarine officer and it's by me by by me making US Submarine Officer by Alex Fling Collins me a note. Let's put that link in the show notes. Everybody out yeah. That's pretty cool. What was your second question Jake yet? A second question for question. I was just going to say that. Fun fact unrelated to Johns Hopkins. She founded it. Oh My F- my family. Did you lie about the dumbest Shit Dude. I'm telling you I'm telling challenge. My family that his genealogy thing and there was a hopkins who came over on the mayflower essentially everyb- all the most of the Hopkins in the. US are actually related to that single one to. You're you're like a daughter of the American. I can revolution pretty much man. Cool just fun this up. So it's full of all kinds of interesting things so okay so you get out. Get Out of the navy. You go to Yup and then when I applied to get in so I decided I needed to have a better starting salary coming out of Grad school and so I applied and got into to get my mba a- at at warden and so I went up to warden and as a veteran you arrive at warden and basically the veterans police signed be like all right. Dude you WANNA pay off your student loans. You'RE GONNA go consulting or banking and so I was like well banking that sounds a lot like being on a submarine so. I think I'm not going to do that. So went down the consulting pathway and you know was was cornered in a room in a recruiting event by partner. He's like you don't know this but you're going to be graded operations consulting. I'm like okay. Then he ended me and other beer and took about three or four four beers before I accepted the job and so I graduated from warden. I majored in finance. Because I didn't want to spend the rest of my life explaining to people why went to wharton and didn't major in finance and then graduated from that and then my first you know typical consulting story first weekend consulting. You know you get the ABSO- stories by getting call on Friday afternoon and you're GonNa go to a city and you've never been to with the team you've never met company you've never heard of so my first week and consulting get a call at five on Friday partner. I've never met so I grant you know. Welcome to the firm going to need you to come down on Monday to Houston and helped me out in Oilfield Services Company..

Deloitte Navy Alex Johns Hopkins Russia Alex Fleming officer Submarine Call Usa San Francis Colorado Alex Lex F. S. partner TechNet Lincoln Donald trump Grad school senior manager University of Pennsylvania emory Ivy League school
"deloitte" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on AP News

"Is a retail consultant at Deloitte almost six hundred dollars is expected to be spent on entertaining outside the home and kind of the overall experience of how the seasons but if you're heading to the stores plan ahead there's gonna be a lot of deals out there to be had and they give consumers spent a little bit of time before they go out or before they go online and have an understanding of the bills are looking for I think they could find actually after orphaned and abandoned kittens are finding new homes through a non profit rescue in Wisconsin the Cadillac ranch rescue in Janesville also helps pregnant moms moms with letters and cats and kittens that need socialization taken kittens from humane shelters around the state and northern Illinois Janesville does that says the nonprofit specializes in kittens that humane societies generally euthanized because they don't have the resources to care for them this year the rescues tripled its reach expects to surpass one thousand kittens and moms are from was from four hundred in twenty eighteen the national dog shows become a thanksgiving television tradition in recent years the annual parade of pooches become one of the more popular shows of thanksgiving week the show is hosted by actor John o'hurley who's joined by the figure skating commentating do Johnny where and Terrel the Penske and others Hurley best known for his time and Seinfeld thirty seven dog ever since she was four and says he's always a better person with a dog in his lap trump the troops in Afghanistan I'm Tim acquired an A. P. news been a president trump makes a surprise visit to Afghanistan his first to that country there's no where I'd rather celebrate this thanksgiving then right here with the toughest strongest best and bravest warriors on the face of the earth trump says there are peace talks going on with the telephone will see if they want to make it is going to be a real deal but we'll see but they want to make a deal and then I want to make a deal because you're doing a great job the president abruptly broke off the negotiations with the Taliban in September after a deadly bombing seven people for adults and three children are dead in the crash of a U. S. registered plane you're Kingston Ontario Canada instigation in the yesterday evening's crash is just now getting under way Chicago Bears knocked off the Detroit Lions on thanksgiving NFL football twenty four twenty the visiting Buffalo Bills beat Dallas twenty six fifteen New Orleans in Atlanta are playing today's third game in New Orleans I'm Tim acquire AP digital news back in a moment.

president NFL Chicago Kingston Ontario Canada A. P. AP Atlanta New Orleans Dallas Detroit Lions Bears Taliban consultant Tim Afghanistan Seinfeld Hurley Penske Terrel