35 Burst results for "Deloitte"

Covid-19 Vaccine Misinformation Spread on Social Media

P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

01:45 min | 2 weeks ago

Covid-19 Vaccine Misinformation Spread on Social Media

"Sarah frier. She's a bloomberg technology reporter. Who has been doing a deep dive into the misinformation spreading across social media specifically facebook in regards to vaccines stare. You have interviewed for example one woman who doesn't believe in vaccine induced herd immunity. She get this from facebook. He gets messed brown from instagram. And course by facebook what happens here is people fall into the personalization facebook and instagram. Provide them if you start looking into. This woman. started out looking into holistic medicine alternative treatments. She felt Bullied by her doctors ring a cancer treatment and was looking for another way to stay healthy. Not only she's getting this information about vaccines not really information at all. It during her wrong and a lot of the people who are telling her. Oh you just need to take this holistic healing method or detox in this method or You'd try these techniques. They're selling supplements. They're selling essential oil. They're selling Wellness retreat so. She's she's not really getting vitim. It information from doctors and we're seeing that happen a lot on facebook. It's more about the fear on the kind of messages that spread on. Facebook are the ones that that make people comments and share That's what tells the news feed algorithm that. It's a serious post that more people should see and so these lies about the vaccine particularly lies that are targeting women which we can talk about in a second are are just unable to tamp down by the company

Facebook Sarah Frier Instagram Bloomberg Brown Cancer
Aligning Your Money & Values With Kathleen McQuiggan of Artemis Advisors

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

03:35 min | Last month

Aligning Your Money & Values With Kathleen McQuiggan of Artemis Advisors

"Women are known for spending their money focused on helping others and the community as well as making more money. Men tend to just focus it on making more money. Women have always been values based investors. I remember this. When i worked at bear stearns and american express deloitte by the way i did campaigns on women and well women have always been values based investors and now the rest of the world is catching on it's called. Espn investing for environment society and governance focused investing basically designed around the un development sustainable development goals or the sdg in fact the sec the securities and exchange commission now has its first head of es g an investing is outperforming other strategies including even in this economy. So how does it work. I'd like you to meet cathleen mcguigan. She is a wealth advisor at artists financial group and a woman. Who's been in my world about these issues for several years. Previously she was in the packs. World investing as head of global women's investing and ran global women's index fund and prior to that. She spent thirteen years at goldman sachs welcomed green catches radio kathleen. Thank you for joining us. Finally thanks for having me and it's great. It's great to finally have this conversation. I appreciate it. So let's start with defining some terms so that people are were were were not losing people define investing for people who aren't familiar with it and talk about the power. Sure angie investing. And i i should do the disclaimer. I feel like you know the financial services industry we use so much jargon acronyms and you know i think sometimes people just get overwhelmed by not understanding some of the inside lingo and you know. I think it's important that people realize that you said earlier right you. Your money is power and women need more of both and sustainable investing which is how we refer to it at artists. And i think this is an emerging sort of language. It isn't bit of alphabet soup. But if you think of sustainable investing what back in the seventies was known as socially responsible investing what is sometimes being referred to now as impact investing. You these things are starting to mean different things. But i'll use sustainable and responsible investing is kind of a general framework for explaining how in the investment process in addition to looking at the traditional financial. Metrics that most organizations would use in making investment decisions sustainable and responsible investing ads. On what i say as an additional layer and it adds on looking at a accompanies in mental. Which is the social. Which is the ass and governance. Which is the g so these. E s g factors as are commonly referred to to be incorporated in the overall investment process or Analysis environmental social and governance factors are additional things that get analyzed and looked at for people to make decisions as to where they want place their buddy so i think of this and i tried to explain it to people as think of it as adding more of the things that were looking at to decide what is good company that we may or may not want a purchase or use an additional set of factors in analyzing investments.

American Express Deloitte Cathleen Mcguigan SEC Bear Stearns Espn Goldman Sachs UN Kathleen Angie
The Top 15 Little-Known Secrets On How To Improve Your Focus

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

04:31 min | 2 months ago

The Top 15 Little-Known Secrets On How To Improve Your Focus

"If you don't know who i am. I am a author journalist and founder and executive director of the flow research collective. We study peak human performance where research a training organization on the research side. We work with scientists at ucla at stanford companies like deloitte energetics. Like that on the training side we work with everyday from the us special forces through executives in fortune. Five hundred companies essentially google etc microsoft. All the way up to the general public and focus on is kikkoman performance. What does it take to be your best when it matters. Most what does it take to level up your game like never before and most of my career has been spent studying peak performers. What i thought i was going to do today. Vision asked me to speak a little about my work on flow. Which will get to some of. You might be familiar with and a little bit about focus. And what i thought i would do is talk about fifteen things that peak performers know about focus and attention or routinely do surrounding focus attention and flow that most of us miss and this is something that is fairly common that i've noticed over peak performance. Meaning if you want to train people up in flow for example take repeat performers and regular people. Everybody can learn the flow stuff that works fine but afterwards peak performance can sustain it and most everybody else drop back towards baseline over time and a lot of that is peak performers to a lot of stuff through unconsciously along the way a lot of focus that the rest of us missed. So i thought i would talk about these things. We're going to start out with more general ideas about peak performance and get very very focused on focus as we move along so i wanna start with a really obvious statement but you see it very very consistently in all people formats which is a realization. That life is never going to be anything more or less than what you choose to make it. I like to talk about this. And i like to say there are only a couple things. We know absolutely for sure that we absolutely certain about the first is that we get one shot at this life. We know that for sure. Maybe we'll get more. Maybe we don't. We know for sure that we got one shot at this life. We also know we're going to spend about a third of it asleep. Which tells us that the only real question is what we do with the remaining two-thirds right. That's the only question that matters. And what p performers had figured out is that there's no magic pill nothing spectacular is ever gonna happen from them. I was just talking to andrew. Ubuntu neuroscientist at stanford and we do a lot of work with and heap says ever people former learn the same lesson. It is always crawl walk. Run there's no shortcuts. there's no way to get faster. You were going to crawl. Then you're going to walk then you're going to run over and over and over again. This brings us to the second thing which is building on the first. there are no shortcuts. There are no hacks in fact when we talk about p. performance after twenty five years of studying the neurobiology the science what goes on in the brain and the body when people perform their best can tell you. There are no shortcuts. There is quite simply getting your biology to work for you rather than against you. That is everything we mean by peak performance a different way. We sort of talk about this at the floor. Research collective as we like to say personality doesn't scale biology scales in other words. If you're in a looking through the kind of self improvement space at any level if somebody is trying to teach you what worked for them. They figured something out. This works may let me teach it to you. It's going to work for you. They're light they're absolutely lying. In fact that's a really great way to rue lives. I can guarantee one of the other truce peak performance. We don't like to say out loud is what works for me is almost guaranteed not to work for you. Personality doesn't scale why there are foundational things that have a lot to do with p. performance where you are on the introversion extroversion scale for example. How active are your dopamine receptors. Things like that. They are genetically coded for and laid down environmentally in. A lot of them are locked up before we ever become adults.

Deloitte Energetics Stanford Ucla Microsoft Google United States Andrew
2021 Global Marketing Trends with Deloitte's Ashley Reichheld

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

05:03 min | 3 months ago

2021 Global Marketing Trends with Deloitte's Ashley Reichheld

"Let's let's talk business. We want to talk a little bit about this report. That deloitte has released the twenty twenty one global marketing trends report. What drove the report in went into it. Well this is our second annual report. But this one was really characterized by the challenges of twenty twenty and that level of uncertainty that we're seeing has really impacted all of us in some way myself my mom of three old trends and well. I thought i was a master at balancing working kids. I've learned a whole new set of work from home. Sales gotta really speedy mute. Button trigger finger pilot fisher price toys under my desk that bear testimony and this year. We really use the study to kind of help explorer and break down some of that uncertainty. We use subject matter expertise. We voices smithfield and two overarching surveys. From consumers up twenty five hundred and executives up just about four hundred of them to help break down that uncertainty in the report a believe it's unified seven trends overall and you go In detail on each of them. But can you tell me kinda just at a high level. Were the the major trends seven themselves are purpose agility human experience trust participation fusion and talent and i think in general agility trust talent participation are fairly straightforward largely those companies without. Do you trust them to do with the say they're gonna do. They have the talent to do it. Do they nibble participation with their stakeholders in the customers. The ones i usually get questions about not understanding are the other three so purpose and that's a company that knows what they exist and therefore can make choices a little bit more rapidly. That sense of purpose helps them particularly in times of uncertainty. Actually because they can they can make tough decisions right away. The second human experience and i often get asked. Hey so white you just call that. What is call it. A spur ends called employee experience. I'm sure we'll talk about this. But the reason we call it human experiences because you don't wake up as customer employees. You wake up as a human being. And if we want to elevate experience we have to understand you as a human and then fusion of course which is that art of bringing together new business partnerships early in the report. You identify this drop in confidence across the c. suite. And just curious. What do you feel drove that drop and this is the second time i've seen this question i guess from deloitte is working with the loye. The cmo team within delay and the cmo club on some prior research. We looked at confidence. Drop or confidence levels. I should say of cmo's in general and while this most recent snapshot shows the drop in confidence. I'm kind of pleased that cmo's aren't last on the list now. A small bright spot in the foreseeable ceelo's but tell us a little bit about this dropping confidence. Well at the start of our chat. I talked about this notion of uncertainty that feeling and basically the research suggests that c. suites are humans to and no exception to that rule so on a percentage basis. Cmos aren't last but they are second to last Within a percentage point of and you actually see the biggest declines with. Cio's an nco's. And i think really what you're seeing is that lots of executives have gone into survival mode and you see them by the way prioritizing things like improved efficiency and productivity over more human centric initiatives in that that instinct is is very common but unfortunately it does run counter to some consumer expectations. When we did this research. We learned that as times. Get tougher consumers. Expect more connection. Not less said consumers are really looking for companies to step up and you have c. suite executives who are uncertain and lacking confidence today. And not really sure the world is heading and it's making it very difficult environment. Operate them in these uncertain times to us over over used phrase currently but one of the other two data points stuck out. I think is a sign of the times potentially i'm gonna stay kotei stats and then we can discuss what we think they mean but fifty eight percent of respondents could recall at least one brand that quickly pivoted to better respond to their needs and eighty two percent said this led to them doing more business with that brand. Seems that these factors kind of together talk about one the agility that you've you mentioned before is one of the trends to this human experience component like are we actually delivering what people really want and value and purpose. I think alignment potentially of those two things like what's going on in the world and what do people really need am i. Do you think. I'm interpreting that right just based on the data and what the trends that you're seeing i do although. I think i'd argue that. The each of the trends has an impact there. If you think about an organization's ability to co create with people so fusion for example if your co creating with people rapidly you're able to respond to create address needs more rapidly if you're encouraging participation from your customers than your doing a good job or hopefully a better job at least of hearing what it is. They need to be able to adopt if customers trust. You more likely to tell you what they need a believe you when it comes out and then of course talent is critical. All these things without talent. You can't do any of them

Deloitte Cmo Club Fisher Price CIO
Jessica Burlingame:How To Revitalize Your Work-From-Home Team

The $100 MBA Show

07:11 min | 3 months ago

Jessica Burlingame:How To Revitalize Your Work-From-Home Team

"Hi everybody. i'm jessica burlingame with agathon advisors. Thanks so much for joining me today. I'll be offering you for stealth moves to revitalize your work from home team whether you lead a team of two of ten or one hundred or if you are your own all star team of one. Let's dive right in first. Let's talk about why. A few stealth moves might serve you right now. Lots of us are facing unprecedented demands to work and to lead from home which can be exhausting but we still need to deliver maybe at a higher level than ever and maybe with less support and we need all the vitality and energy. We can get to make that happen. These four stealth moves may offer you. Andrew people some of the support. You need through this time. You may find as we go through this lesson today. That you're making some of these moves already. In that case today may give you some ideas to elevate your existing power moves into straight up superpower moves. because let's face it. We probably all need our inner superhero more than ever these days. And yes i do believe. We all have an inner superhero. So let's dive into each stealth move. One by one stealth move number. One is to say whoops in public. That's right you say whoops you made a mistake you own it and you move forward you make this move under many circumstances maybe even say to yourself from time to time you might be saying to me. Now hold up a minute. Don't look weak. If i admit that i messed up. Isn't it better to try and fix a problem before anybody notices or just a power through it and hope for the best. Maybe but the superpower stealth move is to say whoops in public and then to keep going. Don't hide a mistake but don't let it crush or unduly phase you either now. Let's be clear here as deloitte leaders. Jeff tough and stephen goldbach put it in. A wonderful book called detonate celebrating. Failure can be an excuse for mediocrity. That's not what we're talking about with stealth move number one. What we are talking about is acknowledging and moving on from inevitable recoverable. Mistakes to get you and your team back on track to your best work together a sap. What are some other benefits of stealth move number one saying whoops well at some point. One hundred percent of humans are going to make a mistake if you can model the trust in yourself and your teammates to say whoops and then keep moving towards a solution you might free up a whole lot of time and energy and he might also reinforce that you and your team are in this together. Even when you're physically report to recap superpower stealth move number one is to say whoops and then move on. Let's all move on now to stealth move number two which is to say. I don't know you heard it. Superpower stealth move of saying. I don't know you might make this move. When you're feeling question from a client that you can't answer right away you might be stumped as you look to fix a mistake or resolve an issue and you know confronting real uncertainties within your business as you. Listen you might be saying back to in your mind. Wait a minute don't i. Don if i admit i don't know something or underprepared isn't it better to guess right away and hope i'm proved right in the long term but the superpower stealth move here is not just to admit in public that you don't know something but also that you're working on it and or you'll find somebody who does know and or you are open to others input and knowledge as you seek the answer that will serve your team. What are some other payoffs to this stealth move. Chances are that over the course of a career or probably even day. You'll need some information that you won't have exactly when you need it being honest about that inevitable moment when it happens can liberate you and your team from scrambling to save face in the short term and from any damage control. That approach require later on. Bonus points for stealth move number. Two one of your teammates might actually know that thing that you don't and this stealth move of admitting you don't know then gets you quickly to an answer. And even more importantly perhaps gives that teammate a chance to shine revitalizing their day for sure and hopefully yours with ripple effects for the rest of the team as well to recap stealth move number two is to say. I don't know and move on as we move onto stealth move number three. Consider the superpower of saying thank you. Maybe your teammate came through with an answer you didn't have maybe your assistant saved you from scheduling fumble. Maybe your client shared feedback. That helped you up your own game. You might be saying to me. Now hang on. I say thank you all the time. How's that a stealth move first off. If you're already saying thanks frequently you are ahead of the game. Thank you second from that base. You might consider how to superpower your thank used by making them as personal as specific as possible. a simple thank. You might give the hearer a general sense of being appreciated and some positive feelings but a personal specific. Thank you can offer meaningful data about the exact value that you recognize in any teammates specific action or contribution. It might also help. Establish a valuable team of recognizing and celebrating your value to each other as you continue your data day. What are some other payoffs stealth move number three saying thank you. Well we all want to be seen for who we are at our best. That's what marcus books. And ashley goodall share in a beautiful book called nine lies about work. A freethinking leaders guide to the real world now as a leader. You might give great attention to the feedback that you offer your people saying thank. You is a little different. It's offering attention recognition. Maybe even gratitude. And how could that not give your teammate a lift it might just lift you up two

Jessica Burlingame Agathon Advisors Jeff Tough Stephen Goldbach Andrew DON Ashley Goodall Marcus
SolarWinds hackers breached US Treasury officials’ email accounts

Cyber Security Headlines

02:52 min | 4 months ago

SolarWinds hackers breached US Treasury officials’ email accounts

"Attackers stage. A dry run get solar winds in october. Two thousand nineteen. Yahoo news is sources. Say the operators of the attack conducted a test of the campaign five months before the supply chain attack began in earnest. This test sent files without back. Doors through signed updates to orion seemingly detest they would actually be delivered and detected and updated. Faq by solar winds indicates that this was the first modification to its updates. It was aware of in related. News and analysis by the wall street journal farsight security and risk iq identified twenty four organizations that installed solar ones orion platform with militias backdoors installed including cisco intel invidia. Vm-ware belkin kent state university the california department of state hospitals and deloitte nso group spyware reportedly used against journalists a new report from security researchers at citizen lab at the university of toronto details. How government operatives used the pegasus spyware from nso group to attack the phones of thirty-six journalists producers and executives at al jazeera as well as journalist at el arab tv in london the attack was carried out using the click kismet exploit chain and i message that worked against phones running. Iowa's thirteen dot five dot one or earlier. Apple said at pets vulnerabilities seemingly with iowa's fourteen. Cia agents exposed with stolen data. A new report in foreign policy looks at the impact of data stolen by state-backed groups and other ap tease round twenty thirteen. The cia began to notice that undercover operatives in africa and europe began to be rapidly identified by chinese operatives. This marked a period where the us intelligence community noted a general professionalization of china's intelligence operations building infrastructure to process that data. They were already collecting both officially and illicitly as well as general rooting out of corruption that previously led to deep penetration into the chinese government. In the early two thousands china began tracking flights and passenger lists it also when after biometric data at airports like at bangkok this information was correlated with data gathered on an attack at the office of personnel management in two thousand twelve which leaked personal data from twenty one point five million people that data could be analyzed to figure out who was a us agent pair that information with travel data and you could figure out who from china those agents met with and with the background data indicating who might be approached at becoming sa asset europol. The european commission launch a new decryption platform. This platform was lodged in collaboration with the european commission's joint research center designed to aid authorities in decrypt information that is obtained lawfully in criminal investigations and managed by your oppose european cybercrime centre functionally. This platform will use in-house expertise with both software and hardware tools to provide effective assistance to national member. state investigations. National police forces from member states can now send lawfully obtained evidence to europol for decryption.

Belkin Kent State University California Department Of State Citizen Lab Nso Group El Arab Tv NSO CIA The Wall Street Journal University Of Toronto Al Jazeera Yahoo Intel China Cisco Iowa London Office Of Personnel Management Apple Africa
In Pennsylvania, Fracking and Renewables Compete for the Future

Marketplace

02:00 min | 6 months ago

In Pennsylvania, Fracking and Renewables Compete for the Future

"Year's presidential election. As I am sure you've heard It's It's also also one one of of the the key key states states for for the the fracking fracking industry industry up up and and down down the the ballot. ballot. As As I'm I'm sure sure you you have have also also heard heard Fracking Fracking for for gas gas has has long long been been thought thought of of as as a a bridge to get us to wherever the cost of wind and solar Has made those renewables as cheap as gas and his marketplaces. Scott Song reports. A couple of new studies suggest that time may already be here. It just gets cheaper and cheaper to make solar panels and wind turbines, says analyst Marlene Metical at Deloitte. The actual cost of the components are declining, but also the efficiency. Of the technology is increasing, so the wind turbines are now becoming larger and larger, and as a result, solar and wind are now the cheapest ways to add power generation in most of the world, says a report from Bloomberg New Energy Finance. Another report from the investment bank, Lazard says building and maintaining the solar or wind farm costs as much as keeping an existing gas plant running, all of which threatens the market for natural gas. Nico Sappho said. The Center for Strategic and International Studies, says pressure's mounting for folks in the gas business. This may be an industry that could be shrinking in 10 15 20 years so How can I be sure that my project is the one that survives? So it puts you in that mindset rather than a mindset where everything is growing their space for everyone. A typical natural gas power plant last 20 years or so bye, then wind and solar will be thriving. So some gas plants will have to shut down early, predicts Sue Tierney at the analysis group consultancy. You would expect to see disclosure statements by companies that there will be much slower utilization rates or a truncated life that's being discussed in a lot of places. Because of that, Tierney thinks a lot of money invested in the natural gas business won't be made back. I'm Scott Tongue for

Sue Tierney Center For Strategic And Inter Scott Tongue Nico Sappho Scott Song Bloomberg New Energy Finance Lazard Deloitte Marlene Metical Analyst
Orders for big-ticket US manufactured goods jumped 11.2%

Marketplace

01:33 min | 8 months ago

Orders for big-ticket US manufactured goods jumped 11.2%

"Look at orders orders for for durable durable goods goods to to get get get a a a read read read read on on on on how how how how willing willing willing willing people people people people are are are are to to to to spend spend spend spend on on on on big big big big ticket ticket ticket ticket items items items items that that that that last last last last a a a a few few few few years years years years like like like like refrigerators, refrigerators, refrigerators, refrigerators, office office office office equipment equipment equipment equipment and and and and last last last month month month cars. cars. cars. Eric Gordon teaches at the University of Michigan's Ross School of Business. I think there was pent up demand in autos, people had been putting it off for a number of months. And the carmakers are offering very strong deals, and the uptick wasn't driven. Just buy cars. Shipments of business machinery were also up for about the level of capital good shipments. That we were at before the pandemic. Daniel Bachman is an economic forecaster for Deloitte and that I consider to be very positive because it does suggest that US businesses at this point I believe that it's worth it. For them to continue investing, which is good news, at least in the manufacturing sector. Abdu Ingi teaches economics at New York University, he says Manufacturing, though, isn't the big concern right now, because he's not a sector that's hurting. We know they're spending on services has lunch, which is being led by a large drop on restaurants and recreation, mainly And that's because of the pandemic. Here's Bachman at Deloitte again. It'll be very hard for the economy to really start recovering until we have a solution to the health problems. But you'll probably still hear politicians talking about a V shaped recovery right up until Election Day in Washington. I'm

Daniel Bachman Deloitte Abdu Ingi Eric Gordon Forecaster Ross School Of Business University Of Michigan Washington New York University Manufacturing
How Some Companies Survive, Even Thrive, in COVID-19 Crisis

Snacks Daily

01:13 min | 8 months ago

How Some Companies Survive, Even Thrive, in COVID-19 Crisis

"Company that survives covid nineteen is probably better off today than they were before Kovac's knackers since the pandemic started, it is a battle of retail attrition out there this is crucial to understand because it's transformed our economy in profound ways. Insane numbers here smackers get this eighty thousand small businesses have permanently closed from March, I July fifth according to Yeah and if you just look at the shopping and retail industry twenty, six thousand businesses that used to compete with best buy where open on. March first but are closed today and the wild thing is that the devastation to small and medium businesses across America is actually this huge boon to the big corporations case in point consulting company Deloitte recently surveyed the CEO's of one hundred large American corporations. Yes. Sixty percent of them are more confident. In their company's growth today than they were before covert and we're still amid pandemic. How could that possibly be that? CEO's are more confident post cove it than they were before when things were seemingly really basically covert has improved the business outlook for America's biggest corporations simply because it's smalls, corporations are gone sad but critical not to forget that

CEO America Kovac Deloitte
Understanding How And Why Your Market Makes Decisions

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

04:25 min | 8 months ago

Understanding How And Why Your Market Makes Decisions

"We all know that knowledge is power of course, data about Customer Habits and Consumer Habits is power as well more than ever. When we shift in business, it's key to understand how and why your market makes decisions. So Jonathan Silver he is the founder and CEO of affinity solutions. Now, affinity is the authoritative source for truth for news outlets not for profits research firms and businesses in the US and the only source for purchase insights that can be analyzed by demographic geographic lifestyle segment and political affiliation affinities mission is to. Transform data insights into experiences that improve people's lives. Jonathan I'm excited to have you here and talk to our Nice Guy. Community. Welcome to the show Ed. Great to meet you doug thanks for having me on I. AM happy that I'm happy to have you here and you know a guy that wrote a book called Nice Guys Finish First. I was completely attracted to the the data for good. So tell me a little bit about what data for good is and how that might affect those that might be listening to our show today. Sure so It's great to be on and I wanted to Start by saying a little bit more about sort of the vision of affinity solutions which for me, we've been running the business now for about Fifteen years, but we've had much more clarity of vision crystallize over the last year, which is. To. Use data to improve people's lives and You alluded to kind of what our business is about. But we have detail purchase behavior on about one hundred, million consumers ninety million in the US A- ten million in other countries. we have that data by the way because we run a kind of loyalty program, we dented that we provide to over three thousand banks the reward customers when shop at. We tell depot wallgreens. So data for good is an extension of the vision of. Using data to improve people's lives that we launched during the coronavirus. During this crisis and we we started by giving away some of our data to scientists to academics researchers. Some. Not for profits to help government agencies with policy making and it was Kinda shocking to me that government entities how much they fly blind. They don't have the information on how their towns cities. Counties are doing. Early and I was like well, their sales tax I mean why? Why wouldn't they get that quickly but apparently, even sales tax information takes a couple of months for a for them to get information. So data data for good was first about helping government policymakers by giving them the information they need to navigate their own decisions, but then it quickly expanded on to provide businesses visibility they need themselves to navigate this crisis and so. you know insights on. What customers are doing outside of businesses own four walls. That's been our mantra for for a long time that's always been important. But it's become absolutely critical during Cova. This sort of outside in view of consumer behavior has become essential especially now because you know during particularly in the march, April. But even even now, you know where there's been a hole punched in their own data that the businesses were looking at you know the purchases in their own stores. On. Their own websites because people just stop coming in coming in a lot less. So businesses have been flying completely blind kind of like A. analogy is like a fighter pilot flying between two Kanye walls that instrumentation So right now, we're delivering through partnerships with companies like Deloitte, accenture and bane and McKinsey weekly updates to businesses to help them navigate. We're also providing the press in our website affinity solutions, dot COM and weekly updates on what's happening in the economy to call it a business recovery scorecard. which looks at bellwether categories like. Grocery and and home delivery and. You know as people come out of their homes So it'll be interesting. You know that data, which is for the good of not for profit scientists. It's for the good of businesses for the good of consumers We're going to be looking very closely at how consumer behavior will change permanently. As a result of this crisis, we're seeing a lot more purchases on the web. So data for good is really about providing that level of insight to a broader community.

Jonathan Silver United States Cova Doug Deloitte Kanye Mckinsey Accenture
Commit to Learning from the Greats on a Daily Basis With Erynn Bell

Daily Sales Tips

02:33 min | 9 months ago

Commit to Learning from the Greats on a Daily Basis With Erynn Bell

"Today's tip comes from Erin Bell. Aaron is the director of enterprise sales at degrade with ten years in both beat B. and B. Two C. sales she's lived all over the country and the world proving herself to be a go getter and a risk taker, a committed lifelong learner. She's always looking for ways to learn from others. But today we get to learn from her here. She is some of the best sales people. I. Now are the ones that are voracious in their everyday learning, foul thought leaders and organizations within the industries that you work with read listen and watch what they are. Talking. About daily for me, I go straight to the McKenzie's and Deloitte to the world. I'm constantly trolling through their websites searching not only for my prospects being mentioned but also what they are writing about in general about business, the markets what is going on in the world remember learning is not a journey with a start an end it is continuous. If you get your quote unquote reading at Baths in, you will actually train your brain to start to think in this way, you will also build up your confidence as well. You will begin to have conversations that matter and are informed. You will build up your authentic expertise and reputation as a thought leader with your prospects. Then start incorporating these nuggets of wisdom whether they be articles, blog posts, podcasts, whatever it may be into your outbound prospecting. Don't have an ask straightaway connected back to your research on the pain points at that prospect is experiencing start making some deposits. Especially if your ideal buyer is at the executive level, this will help to confirm with them that it is worth it to spend some time with you. An example of this might be I noticed in your company's ten report that you mentioned X. Y. Zad were strategic global business objectives into twenty twenty one as Mackenzie said in this Article Doing Avian. See are of the utmost importance in order to achieve x lines at or. Here's a staggering staff, Marie sent Deloitte Study Dot Dot dot but remember make sure their sources you're calling from are credible and carry a fair bit of weight in your industry or the industry of your buyer by elevating your own reading and worldview you level yourself up as a sales person. You do not need to know everything but being voracious in your own learning and awareness of the world will help you to level up as a salesperson exponentially

Erin Bell Deloitte X. Y. Zad Aaron Baths Director Mckenzie Marie Executive Mackenzie
Recovery Strategy: Inside Look at Furniture Shoppers After COVID-19

Our SKUD View

06:38 min | 11 months ago

Recovery Strategy: Inside Look at Furniture Shoppers After COVID-19

"Welcome back to another episode of our skewed view. I N Emily and I'm your host. Today Chris will be back in a couple of weeks promise but until then we have another very special guest today. A returning champion on the podcast. We have got Keith Johns with us. Thanks for coming fatally so today we are going to get right into the details because we heard a lot of people some great questions after our first podcast and we want to answer those. So today we're going to talk about the two types of consumers that are coming out of this pandemic. We've been watching some trends in talking to a lot of retailers and things are a little bit different. So we're GONNA get into the details today with you First couple of housekeeping notes. We are going to start recording these on a weekly basis to give you guys as much information about recovery in strategic planning as you are asking for so if you have something you are looking specifically please send us an e mail at marketing at migrating dot com and we will take those requests and schedule a podcast about it so now already to get into the detail so keith. Let's talk a little bit about these two types of consumer. We've got two basic people where we've got people who are willing to come into the store after the covid nineteen impact and then people were still pretty cautious. So what do retailers need to know about the new type of consumer that's emerging from the quarantine so sitting outside this weekend thing about this topic and you know how best to bring some value to the conversation in enjoying Mother's Day belatedly. Great Mother's Day and took care of their mom And you know what we're watching here is something we haven't seen happen in one hundred years. It's the interplay between personal safety and economic concerns and then how is that affecting consumer spending behavior? So it's important. I think that d not only talks about what's going on at the retailer level the furniture industry level. But also we take a look higher up so I paged through Some research from Pricewaterhouse Coopers and Deloitte just to see what kind of questions they were asking wondering. When are consumers going to to come back out? What's IT GONNA look like when they do come back out? What behaviors are GONNA revert? Can we cannot any of the actually being just like they were before hand. Or which ones are you going to change? I think I think we're aware that a lot of them are going to change significantly and they're probably going to stay changed. Thought it was interesting. The Deloitte Research. It said that sixty four percent of the folks they surveyed which are international not just the North American international sixty four percent. Their decision making is still driven by concerns about family health. So folks aren't thinking about which store to go to the cells the best furniture really big decisions here if I go out if I take someone with me. How does that affect the health of my family? That's a big deal question. And you've got sixty four percent of people thinking about that now. This is changing every week and this research was a couple of weeks old sure. In addition it said forty two percent of those surveyed or thinking about delaying large purchases. Now not all furniture purchases are necessarily large but but they can't be and Only one in three right now are comfortable going to a store one in five to have something to compare it to are willing to fly which is probably perceived a slightly more risky given the the concentration of people so that's the framework that our industry is operating in and there's there's certainly Unique parts industry but broad that we all. We need to be aware that that's the kind of thinking that people are having to go through. And how do I adapt and plan for that? And that's where you know. At an industry level microbes is talking about the willing customer versus the cautious customer. And it sounds like emily. That's what you'd like to hear more about a rated Ivan Yellows. Divan this great okay. Great so the willing customer personas are changing. We've talked about this in various Micro d media. you're still going after people from a certain geographic area or a certain age who have a certain income level. Maybe even a certain propensity to spend. You know you've got your your persona within those personas. Do not have folks that are willing folks that are cautious as far as venturing out in this new new environment. We have the willing folks are going to want to come to your store. They're they're not. They're not gonNA stay sheltered in place as significantly as they had before but they are tightening down there shopping strategy. I think I mentioned this. Emily in the last podcast where there was the trend years ago. Was that Google search. Allowed you to shrink down the number of stores That you were going to go to made you more effective and efficient sop chopper. Spending all day going to furniture stores like you might have in the past. That's going to tighten down even more Maybe they had gone two three four five stores before they're gonNA target one or two stores. They're willing to go to the stores. Liquor spent a lot of time on those websites maybe even reacting with the staff the chat or email there. It's almost it's precision shopping right. They're going to look for the one place. They WanNa go where they can get what they need. Here's a shortcut product proximity in preparation. Those are the three PS to keep in mind to attract the willing Consumer Shopper. Do you have the right product? Are you close enough to them? They're going to go to a store but they're going to stay closer to home than they might have in the past and do you have a way to prepare for them to come visit you. Can they make an appointment with you? Have you shared with them? Your plans for what their experience will be like. As far as cutting us as far as how they'll walk into the store how the deal with your staff. How can they be assured? Even though they're willing consumers they're happy to go to your store. They still want their still that sixty four percent. That are very concerned about their health. How can you reassure them that? Your storage safety shop at so you're going to address the the willing side of the consumer the new consumer will call it a post cove. It

Emily Keith Johns Pricewaterhouse Coopers Chris Deloitte Research Ivan Yellows Deloitte Google
Inside the US Soccer Equal Pay Fight

ESPN Daily

05:28 min | 1 year ago

Inside the US Soccer Equal Pay Fight

"Foudy is a soccer commentator for ESPN and was a member of the US women's national team from nineteen eighty seven to two thousand four. She also hosts a podcast laughter permitted so Julie. It's been a chaotic few days. I use the word chaotic relatively now for American soccer late last week the president of the US Soccer Federation. Carlos Cordeiro resigned. What was the chain of events that brought that about? We need a couple of days and a lot of wind for that. Actually I think we have that actually right now we do. It all started obviously with the lawsuit that the women filed last March for gender discrimination and then there was a brief that really triggered this avalanche. That was released last week. There central argument was women are inherently inferior to men to this from the US defense quote. The job of a men's national team player requires a higher level of skill based on speed and strength and does the job of a women's national team player. He response was immediate federation saying that Biological Sciences. The reason why men should make more money than the women. You've got to be kidding. Me Arrogance and ignorance here is outstanding. It's mind blowing. This woman are the best at what they do in the world in the world. How how can they be compensated? What then transpired was we were in the middle of our coverage of the she believes up which is an annual tournament that the women play and it was their last game of the tournament and my play by play. Guy Actually looks at me Sebastian. Salazar points to his phone and puts his finger up like hold on. I need to read. Something just been handed a statement from USF President Carlos Cordeiro and he proceeds to read this apology on air from Carlos. Cordeiro apologize for the offensive pain caused by language in this week's court filing which did not reflect the values of our federation or a tremendous admiration of our women's national team women's National Cordeiro saying I hadn't properly read the brief. I apologize for what's in there. We're firing our legal team and hiring late them and walk INS. I literally had to take about a five second pause and gather myself because my head was about to implode these players are getting deposed all the time they're being asked questions like you lose the fifteen year olds though right so you're inferior rights so you know this is happening. You have to know that the players are feeling it is well known was buying it and to give us the statement on air. I thought was a terrible idea for me to react to it. I don't get how you ever get to this position where you're okay with letting your legal team run all these depositions in that manner and making that that central tentpole of your arguments and the very next day. Carlos Cordeiro resigned as President Julia. Why do you think the backlash resulted so quickly in Cordero's resignation? I think the sponsors helped I think. They saw the reaction from some of their biggest partners. Coca Deloitte Volkswagen. The statements they put out. Were words like we're disgusted by this. We would never associate with an organization that thinks this way yet. We stand by the Women. If you're US soccer they feel like they're on the brink of something in in a very negative way and so they knew they had to do something quickly. Obviously this moment puts the players in a bit of a weird spot. Where in the midst of all this? They're playing event wearing the shield for us soccer's actively trying to undercut their standing as highly skilled athletes. How did they react honestly? Who was so proud of how they handled it. Us and Japan have on the world soccer's biggest stage and today they meet with the two thousand twenty. She believes title on the line. We've been given a heads up that they were gonNA wear their jerseys inside out. The warmup jerseys wrestler wearing their warm up uniforms inside out. We're told this is in response to the latest legal filings by the US federation. Usually they take that photo with just the starting eleven before you start a game. And you're in your jerseys. They kept their warm up jerseys on and they had the team stand in solidarity. They knew they had to play but they also wanted to be clear. Like this is not okay. We don't stand for what their argument they're making. They always have the. Us Women's national team proved their worth on the field. Three to one over Japan. They are she believes cup. Champions on air right after as we've seen all over social media her response was spot on like I want every little girl to know that you're not lesser than a boy

President Carlos Cordeiro United States Soccer Us Soccer Federation Us Federation Foudy Japan President Trump Julie Espn Deloitte Volkswagen USF Biological Sciences Salazar Cordero President Julia
How Orbita is using Voice an AI to change the healthcare experience

Future Ear Radio

03:46 min | 1 year ago

How Orbita is using Voice an AI to change the healthcare experience

"Joint today by Nick White of orbiter nick tells a little bit about who you are and what you do. Thanks they have great to be on my. My Name's Nick Wide. As you said I just joined open a recently in the roll off executive vice president patient kiss solutions and in that role look at product that we've gone cold over assists which is a vertical solution? Dove on top of the the over platform focusing on care for patients is and nurses and recently joined the team from Deloitte are being a consultant for many years focusing on How we help people go to disk judge to optimize the way they working every day and thinking about the use of conversational? I cognitive science technology. Oh Jeez and own alterations in terms of the future works of isolated individuals such as nurses or other individuals. They just don't sit behind a desk everyday totally totally so you know. I really wanted to bring Nick on today Because I think that you know as we are seeing with voice assistance in general. You know you're sort of seeing seen this new evolution where they're moving outside of the home and they're moving into new settings and healthcare is one of the settings that I find to be really intriguing. I think there's a whole lot of opportunity. Eighteen eighty in a wide variety of ways in which voice assistance can be layered into that new setting and so You know the first time I got exposed STA to orbital was an exa conferences ago I met nature or and I saw him speak in and I kinda got exposed to orbit a little bit and so before we really dive into orbit assist. which I know is really sort of like your your baby Can you tell us a little bit about the whole idea of orbiter. Yeah No Otas a fascinating organization. I what they have built at. Its Haas is a platform which allows you to do conversational. Management's using a low code on oak coded Borrowers Managing that conversation. That you WANNA have redid customized And then serving that up via any of the platforms be that Google or Alexa Chat bots web chat or even run analog sards art and that platform allows you to to have really rich management affect compensation and the direction that you want to take your shoes. When you're indecisive is new so so that is a platform was really fabulous when I looked at it at a t knows working group in it and then on top of that we're over it is gone on is starting to think about the vertical platforms that sit really nicely on top of that so I wanted to the spectrum with thinking about search engine optimization nations of voice thinking about voice I how do you win somebody is asking natural language processing question how you present the right answer to them it gives them the information they need and then direct them through a flow so getting your brand to position zero is really important in the voice spots yet yeah no I totally agree with that go on the second vehicle is the assist one ano? We're going to get into that mall. But that's really focused around. How do we use voice in clinical goal setting to support Eisenson noces in communicating with each other And providing that rich information transfer between them. We'll get more into that and then we're really focused on Myron is journey management once. You've left the health environment the hospital environments and you headed harms. How do we support you in sums of opened hearings in sunset Johnny managements as you continued to Move through your journey.

Nick Nick White Nick Wide Deloitte Executive Vice President Myron Google Eisenson Consultant
"deloitte" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

11:39 min | 1 year ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"What is your profitability of your product lines in these geographies and it was a very very difficult question to answer? Took down ten weeks to arrive at an answer that maybe was competent. Oakland so I I I think honestly what it really boils down to is. It boils down to organization like starts with personal organization. Right of of keeping track of everything and I think companies. It's very hard to do that as you. You're setting up a company. It's very easy to let that fall to the wayside and be like how to catch up with it later and then ten years later still beer big organization but now you have way more people and it just completely think about like simple simple SAS platforms forms like notion notion could completely change the internal operations of a company. It's changed operations and no one uses things. SNOWING USES SILICON VALLEY TYPE project management and have have you seen any O.. F. S. company used a Silicon Valley type project management software. Like an Asana. Saana a Trello a base camp notion something along those lines that is Jira. I mean that's but that's for developers more so episode. The answer is no. I haven't seen it. Ebbing used effectively to actually run a cooperation. No and it says blows mine. It's interesting I mean. These are enterprise products right. I just I strongly believe you cannot effectively run really any organization that's doing anything meaningful over ten people without having something to track it because then you have nothing to measure against. There's so many things like notion for example has become it's become a project management software Russian sponsors for this might have an affiliate or something. I don't no no you know it's become our our internal Wiki so if you have questions about things like if you set up a website where is it hosted. What is the user day one is the log and things like that that get out of hand? Dan especially with SAS tools right so imagine a company like Haliburton. Imagine how many things that people are paying for it in the information that you have to keep track of and all the information and and notes and stuff that engineers have taken over the years it just gets lost when somebody gets fired. One in you know there's an election I don't WanNa poo on you know do solutions because I think i. I think there's incredible value there but when you get right down to it the things the oilfield services companies right now need to start with our actually. There's there's things they need to do before that. So back that your question about your enorthfield Sir. Your wireline company year like twenty other wire on companies. What would you do to make? Sure your positive cash will the one well so one you get victor. Henry Heinz the founder of the Heinz Ketchup Company said to do a common thing uncommonly well leads to success you can either decide. You're going to be the lunacy. Meanest wireline Arlen company lowest cost structure. You're going to do a better than anybody else. And you're going to be able to get paid premium prices for it or the the other thing is so you can look at adjacency which is okay if if we are not going to get the growth we want a lot of the oilfield service companies right now. If you're looking at potential growth rates in the industry you you know six to eight percent growth. That's probably about what you're going to get in most of the oilfield parts of the industry and your of your stock price reflects to the people people think you're getting twelve percent growth and you're only working in oil and gas I and at some point there's going to be a correction of that and in in it's GonNa Happen. It's GonNa hurt your your shareholder elder value stock price and leadership is going to be held accountable. So if you so you have to really sit down and have very good focus on what are the markets were in where. Where are we playing? Why are we these pieces of the portfolio and are we going to get the kind of growth that are other owners expect our investors expect out of it because you're not looking hard at your portfolio and saying where do we play and then you know where we playing and then how do we have the right and ability to win in those markets? If you haven't because there's a lot of people are like well we're wireline coming. We're always while income. But why should we ever consider doing anything else. But to your point if there's an adjacency where they have skills that can logically move into kind of an adjacent market and Ireland may may not be a great example. So like you know if there's a company that's working in you know let's call it Subsea robotics right or robot. You know robotic said that well sites right and they ask you know all right. Were really really good at robotics. You know what Jason Industries or what adjacent markets markets are very close that we use our skills in that potentially might have higher growth rates in the future. And do we do we double down on those investments. It's writing you have to make some tough strategic decisions about. Do we stay exactly what we've always been doing or do we look for Jason seized. We look for new revenue streams in our data in our information. Do we try and monetize our assets different different way or even get rid of our assets in like literally is you know right now. You know if you're if you're having trouble L. getting good cash flow at of an a high cost asset fleet. You know one when I take that whole fleet and sell it to somebody basically say art we sell it and lease it back but you guys are. You're a company that's GONNA run only this asset class for us and you can run it well and then we can you know get massively reduced. The organization revenue deal with. And so there's there's a lot of you have to start with the intrinsic questions because I said all the all the low hanging fruit of mostly said the people running these companies know what they're doing. They've done the dentist while all. They've pulled all the levers that they've always pulled and they pretty much pull them as hard as they can. All that's left is looking at fundamental operating model structures and portfolio choices and making some very difficult decisions about how you create your operating model and then doing it in the context of the tools that are available able to us. But no you know and I've been on a lot of different software products. Lot assist degration project. No no software has ever solved business problem right. It's it's the the model and the people in the process and yes. The technology enables it but it is you know you can have the best tools enrolled if nobody uses it. I mean that's always been you the biggest trouble struggles to get engaged. It's hard to get engagement for new company. It's even especially when you're merging different work styles and experiences in ages and demographics ethics and whatnot. And so it's hard to get everybody kind of buy into something that you gotTa have humming the fundamentals of the business model. Have to be right. Yeah I think rice energy did it. Well and I've said this many times TMZ but they instituted the right policies in their polly's policies centered around. You're not even in policies but they didn't send any e mails at all their communication took place within the platform that they built. It managed everything and so nothing done unless you communicated with the executives and managers through the platform and so it kind of just reinforced that type of engagement engagement and as a result they built one of the most efficient organizations that I had ever seen in salesforce. Things are absolutely going back to your comment about Heinz signs. That's I feel like this. You know the theory of doing a better job and charging premium just doesn't work in oil and gas I mean is just fundamentally not built that way these are one hundred thousand dollar jobs all affects jobs that are awarded to the lowest bidder. Right to be honest when it comes to a job they I don't give a shit. They only give a shit about job performance. When you leave a tool down hole or you know something of that nature but like you could own fess company and it doesn't matter how hard hard you work? You Got Different Risk Exposures. You know having the best people that's a hard game to play because guess what office hands bounce around and so oh they're gonna if someone someone down the street painted dollar more an hour they're going for that dollar an hour socially now the total headcount in the gas industry is actually now below where it wasn't who does is not. What's the total headcount on the number off top of my head? But it's below its blower. Wasn't Laura cut like there's already less people according to the bureau labor statistics in gas asked now than there wasn't two thousand nine already cut and you know as you guys know. It's very hard to get new talent in. We allow talent has been going out the door. We got a lot of very experienced. Grahams people have retired and taking their knowledge with them and you know I think he has talked about some of the previous podcast. We're GONNA have a lot of problems with people who are having to relearn things not just because we've we haven't captured that knowledge and capture the knowledge. Oh we lost. We lost the tribe knowledge. Yes so what are you seeing. You know one y'all's clients. That's I'm sure you deal with a lot of big office. The haliburton some bridges of the world are any of the smaller. Os has companies out in the permian or they engaging guys like Deloitte or do they. Are they still just fighting fighting the good fight by themselves. Well so one you know the in this is something where you know. Big Consulting is definitely elite. The the price point makes it hard for small organizations to to stomach it. Unless you've got like a private equity firm who who kind of an and I've had this happen where you uh-huh private equity firm says we are hiring you go in and do it but when you get right down to it. There's there's a certain size and organization you have to be at before really really big consultant circuit help you or even be feasible with your budgets right and then there's also you know we we in consulting so consulting is being impacted did as much especially on gas consulting has being impacted as much as anybody else by this because we've had to come up with a very very new ways commercially to engage with our customers customers around incentive structures value-based deals. I mean these are not the days you know. There's there's a lot of heartburn in the industry now about paying reversal. Caught the big strategy consultant rains. And we really have had to get very very especially on gas very good about communicating. Here's the value you. Here's why it's worth it to to use us for this. Here's what you're going to get out of it and here's why and it's not. It's not like telling you company. You couldn't do this right. It's not saying you know yes given enough time you yours. You get a lot of smart people. They're all engineers probably figured this out on your own. The reason you use people like us. This is an accelerator or so that you don't have to relearn everything from the ground up and so but we've we've had to bring a lot of creativity and commercial models to ensure ensure that we're very clearly communicating. Here's the value of creating. And here's why it's useful to have US around. There's some interesting variables that go into this too. I was talking with with one of the big service companies. And they're telling me that they had sold their pressure pumping service or the unit out in West Texas and like it was just too hard to compete with the small guys. They were going going to church with the clients and getting their business just off of personal relationships and for us we just couldn't we couldn't compete with them. Not even on a on a cost basis assist but from those Mont the mom and pops though there than the problem with a small companies as they still are when you don't have scale it's very very hard to get the kind of cost efficiencies that big companies yet exact so it's you still even though like. I said that that will work for awhile. But if you want to build a sustainable table organization in a cost truck for the Lao you have positive cash flow and sustain it. It's very very you gotta be really really lucky yet or a really really good but it it kind of makes it. I mean it'd be blunted pen in the ASS for different companies right because you've got if you're a big company you have the skill to be able to drive down your costs so you can be competitive competitive but then you got this little mom and pop company. That's you know going to Church of old Joe and they get the work and so you've got you've got the skill to perform it on a cost basis. But then you've got this problem where you're not getting the work because of this relationship and then like this service company you end up selling your your pressure pumping unit and then all of a sudden the small guy..

Henry Heinz Haliburton F. S. company Arlen company Oakland Heinz Ketchup Company Ebbing Big Consulting Ireland Subsea robotics West Texas Jason Industries Dan Jason Deloitte polly
Big Shopping days ahead

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Big Shopping days ahead

"Well people will shop online and in store more consumers are starting to spend their money on experiences over material things right size is a retail consultant at Deloitte almost six hundred dollars is expected to be spent on entertaining outside the home and kind of the overall experience of how the seasons but if you're heading to the stores plan ahead there's gonna be a lot of deals out there to be had and they give consumers spent a little bit of time before they go out or before they go online and have an understanding of the bills are looking for I think they could find actually after

Consultant Deloitte Six Hundred Dollars
What we talk about when we talk about jobs

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:38 min | 1 year ago

What we talk about when we talk about jobs

"We introduced you earlier. This week to a group called the Institute for Supply Management Management IFM for short literally people who do all things supply chain for a living we were talking about their manufacturing index how busy American manufacturing and factories these are not all that busy and getting less so it turns out was the macro economically troubling upshot today. It's their service sector survey. We want to talk about the non-manufacturing manufacturing side of this economy still growing but at a much slower pace than anybody had thought so to get us going on this Thursday marketplace's Marielle Sagarra has the service service sector primer accountants lawyers Baristas Uber Drivers math tutors. What are they all have in common their part of the services sector and radio reporters quarters? I'm a creator. I'm out here toiling away cranking out radio pieces but apparently I'm in the services sector to produce a good or a structure. You're right you produce service so that's the difference that's Gad Lebanon Chief Economist for North America at the Conference Board also a service sector the job if you make car parts you're in manufacturing. If you're a farmer you're in agriculture but as a rule of thumb if you don't produce a physical thing you're part of the services sector of the economy about eighty percent of American workers fall into this category it wasn't always this way one hundred years ago the majority of Workers Hello Greek culture or manufacturing and now those with Sharon significantly and that's how it usually goes Danny Bachman the US second omic forecaster at Deloitte says as a country's economy develops it tends to shift towards services one reason that manufacturing become more more productive. There's better technology and that makes a lot of manufacturing jobs obsolete. We just need fewer people to produce the same amount of manufactured goods up by the way the exact same thing happened with agriculture. Meanwhile as people who live in this developing economy get wealthier they start to demand more services like banking king in healthcare. Now the services sector is not an island when there's a downturn in manufacturing say workers an auto factory get laid off. They may be less likely to spend money on services like restaurants and travel. I'm Maryelle Sagarra for marketplace so continuing with the theme here that is in its manufacturing services services indexes Kimberly Adams story for us yesterday about what seemed like as of yesterday the possibility that we're just in for a long slow period of economic economic met that a recession might just never come. It'll just be slow but perhaps we were too hasty because maybe what's happening. Is that the slow hello is speeding up. Marketplace's Sabrina sure explains the Institute for Supply Management in their survey. They ask companies questions including just basic stuff a flight. How's business best at the moment. Eric Harrison is CEO of the Jay Renee Group an importer and wholesaler of shoes which puts him in one of the sectors actors covered by ISM's non-manufacturing index. He is worried his business is going to get hammered by the next round of tariffs so he's not investing in new technology not hiring new people as much as he normally would just trying to play closer to the best which on Portuguese were a lot of our customers are doing as well so it has kind of ripple effect. That's the story behind the numbers I assume survey of non-manufacturers was the weakest in two years a common theme and the comments businesses are worried about trade and that's been true for manufacturers for a while the big takeaway here is that it is not just them anymore. Sam Coffin is a senior economist at UBS looks as if from today's Today's data that the manufacturing weaknesses spreading into the rest of the economy take for example accommodation and food services hotels big importers of furniture furniture. That's tariff. This is Anthony Nevis. He helps run. ISM's non-manufacturing survey and there's food products that they're starting to see increases on stuff coming in from MM. China higher priced imports could seep into more of the economy. Ian Shepherdson is chief economist at Pantheon macroeconomics will probably have good to go up which retailers but it also hurts everybody else who's selling things you can see him is because people are less cash to spend on discretionary services like entertainment and leisure activity so so it seems to be scaring everyone for now. It's possible that the US economy might just be slowing down to a creep but these numbers are assigned that maybe it is worse than that in New York. I'm sure for

Eric Harrison Supply Management Management I Gad Lebanon Chief Economist Fo United States ISM Marielle Sagarra Institute For Supply Managemen Ian Shepherdson Chief Economist Anthony Nevis Maryelle Sagarra Deloitte Conference Board Senior Economist China Danny Bachman Pantheon Macroeconomics Sabrina
How to Be a Millennial Whisperer

The LEADx Show

13:38 min | 1 year ago

How to Be a Millennial Whisperer

"To how to become a millennial whisper. What makes millennials so misunderstood in workplace. Today you're going to learn what they're looking for from leaders and what makes them different from the rest of the workforce and walk away with tactics tactics that you can begin implementing today to boost productivity and decreased turnover our next host was one of the first marketers to work with startups like facebook and he's built his career courier surrounded by millennials will becoming one of the most sought out leaders in the digital marketing space. He's a partner at the advertising agency twenty two squared where he successfully attracts motivates debates and whispers to millennials every day. Please welcome chris. Welcome everyone. I'm super excited to share all about my book. The millennial whisper are which has it published about eight weeks ago. Maybe a little bit more. We've sold about thirty five thousand copies and i feel like it's just now starting to really take off and you know one of the main drivers behind the book itself was what i call my passion disorder and it was about four years ago. Oh that was sitting next to my brother and i was passionately talking about something and he turns to me and he goes chris. Has anyone ever told you you have a passion disorder order and i turned back door <unk>. Is that a good thing or a bad thing. He said it's a good thing you gotta embrace that and as you look at kind of all of our passions evolve with life and why i wrote this book is around my newfound passion which hit me about two and a half years ago which is idea eddie of how do we bring more empathy and connection into our worlds and why not start with organizations in which we end up spending nine hours a day day the other thing that i encourage to anyone that i work with as i say life needs to be a ruthless pursuit of passions and i think one of the things that you'll find with my book. The millennial whisper is it really is around. How can we as leaders better bring this next generation along but also allow them to tap into their passions now the book itself <hes> it's been great because we are bestseller and we'll be in every single airport in june and it's just now starting to take off. It's been translated into spanish and portuguese and other languages but you know the main thing around and the book itself of what i wanna make sure comes through is i want to change the workplace with this book and the one of the key metrics that i changed within myself which i'm very upfront with all my people about is growing up in that agency i played all the different roles and i was about three years ago kind of the don draper flying all over the globe wining and dining and and on the outside i looked great but on the inside i was struggling because i had lost sight of what where my roots were and <hes> so you know my book actually starts with how i change one key metric for myself and that was my metric of success and and i went from changing that metric my success metric used to be beating my brothers the game of life and it evolved to very much much evolve to how can i have the most impact on others in a day and to judge on a daily basis versus a quarterly or yearly basis and so that's how i started the book and if you actually break it down there eight key chapters that really walk through the elements of <hes> <hes>. How can we be better leaders for this next generation and you can see on the cover here all of the negatives that i feel like that they've been served left. It's been a massive disservice to this generation and you know if you actually go into google you can see that auto populated you put an millennials are and you quickly see all of these negatives and it was funny so when i first started talking about this idea of the book it was an executive retreat in north georgia with the average about fifty five years old. You're sitting around the fire air and i introduced myself. I said you know i don't know what i'd do. I used to be kind of head of business development. I was the social media guy and now i'm more of the servant leader you're with a group of thirty millennials beneath me that i'm leading and coaching and i've kind of turned into the millennial whisper and i went on and shared shared my story and sat down at the fire and tommy breedlove who is leading. This whole trip turned to me egos. You'd better write that book like what book he goes. The millennia whisper and i said all right well i'm very a._d._d. I don't know how to write a book. Here's like let me let me help you with a few resources sources etc and that was about eighteen months ago and one of the big things that i started talking about around the fire. Was that that same group said so. What are some of the things you do like. How do you manage this next generation. I started talking about some of the tactics that i do and they go. Oh you do what and a lot of those ideas are in my book and the way that i wrote the book is that you know we talk about. It's all based with data but we then talk about stories from small business all the way to large business and everything in between and then we have tactical takeaways and one of the big things isn't i start are off. Many pieces of this book is that google is one of the best resources to look at all of the negative things that are being said about millennials and yeah it is millennials are entitled needy. Killing cats is one of the ones that comes up and these are the most search for items that are coming up automatically on twitter and if you just go to gifting you look at the gifts. I think this is a good example of how this generation is perceived and one thing that i talk a lot of people about is we've got to stop using millennials a synonym inexperience and instead start adapting our ways to actually not not only accommodate this generation but to bring or corporations and companies along to be better corporations and companies and one of my favorite quotes from a friend avenue point and he said millennials aren't the problem they just expose the problem and so a lot of these aspects of the book is <music>. Some people will come to me and say. I think that this is just a book about leadership. Let's say as it is in essence percents in its core it is about leadership and it's about a generation that seventy one million strong that is a huge generation. We're talking about right now. In the marketplace thirty seven year olds all the way down to twenty three year olds that is a vast population of of people and if you think about some of the contributing factors into what makes these this generation different than ones before there's no better at our place to look then their college career. If you look at the millennials they had beepers. I remember i mean i'm right on the cost so i'm thirty eight right and so if you look at my college i didn't even have facebook until the day the year after i graduated from college allege hide a beeper if that at my senior year of college you juxtapose that to the younger millennials that were given basically an iphone with snapchat snapchat on it at age thirteen. That's a huge difference in the generations. One thing i said out in the book is that as we look at this generation we've got breaking get into two different generations one older millennials which i call the oregon trail millennials because you know what i'm talking about you have actually played played oregon trail at some point in your upbringing and that the younger millennials i call them snapchat millennials because they're given up phone with <hes> at thirteen and they have conversed mostly within their social circles via snapchat so one that thing variable that makes them very different is technology acknowledging the other one is when the recession either them or their parents so the older millennials were actually in the workplace by the time the recession hit so they were forced to learn new ways to adapt and be entrepreneurial the younger millennials saw their parents lose their jobs so what that's actually he created is a generation that is looking more for security and more for a place to hang their hat and an increased emphasis emphasis on purpose which will talk a little bit more about so one thing is break them into to the other thing to consider is that regardless of what generation russian urine regardless of your an extra boomer a millennial or agenda z. We can attest to this idea of what i call the pinterest station dacian of generation and not always generation. It's affecting all of us and there's no better place to turn than the first day of school every year and on the first day of school goal you look at your feeds and it's pictures like this right abigail first day of kindergarten the teacher's name these perfectsmiles cure the the hairs absolutely perfect and it's exhausting. It's absolutely exhausting and not only that but i also use the example on my daughter's fourth birthday. This is a few years ago. It was the night before ten thirty we we got the kids down wrapped presents and my wife if gave me her phone with append pinterest picture of this saran wrap contraption that wrapped around their door the war with over one hundred balloons as she opened the door. It would all come in and i say now three balloons. This is exhausting testing. We can keep leaving living our lives this way and one thing that i encourage all of my employees that work with me is you gotta stop comparing your insides other people's outsides because this is the case and stop putting yourself under such ridiculous pressure and we'll talk a little bit more about what that means but a lot of my book is really about how do you keep millennials fired up and if you look at what they're looking for from their organizations it's not ah different than previous generations in terms of the first thing they're looking for. They're looking for money and benefits so make sure that you don't lose sight of that the other thing that they're looking for for as a positive work culture flexibility and opportunities for continuous learning this is according to the deloitte millennials survey last year and so you look at things like positive work our culture. The last thing we need to be doing is going and buying a bunch of ping pong tables in kegs because our culture sucks instead. We should work work on the core of that culture and that's why in the back of my book i say throw away the kegs of ping pong tables and the participation trophies in the trash because culture really starts with good leadership so one other thing that i talk about is that i had turned me and say chris. I've got a fulltime. Barista got got a cereal bar but my people still aren't happy and i said yeah because the problems exist at the core and if you look at culture you look at what makes that the wait is. It's really a byproduct of great leadership. Great cultures are byproduct of great leadership and you look at what this generation is looking for within their leaders. It's inspirational operational leadership autonomy transparency and constant feedback so the first one is a really interesting one right inspirational leadership. A lot of leaders think they're inspirational on. If you ask bob who leads let's say thirty millennials a bob. Are you inspirational bottles at yeah they light up and anytime i talked to them you know i'm super br inspirational then you ask to people on bob's team. Hey is bob inspirational. Their first question is bob gonna find out as bob's not gonna find out okay no he's not inspirational ease the opposite of inspirational and that's also i have created the millennial leadership assessment which actually actually assesses from a three hundred sixty view some of these key leadership qualities that this next generation is looking for another one that i think think is important to talk about his autonomy transparency and i talked about autonomy within structure which basically means this generation a a lot of us. I know i can attest to this hate. Being micromanage and so- autonomy is really important piece but also this need for transparency and i think people people automatically think that transparency just means that they either need to cry in front of their people or they have to show all of their financial results and what transparency he really is reflected of is this need for connection and one of the contentious things i say in the book is that everyone should follow their people on social media so when it comes monday you can actually ashley connect with people hey meg. That concert looked epoch like well.

BOB Facebook Google Pinterest Oregon Partner Twitter Don Draper Head Of Business Development Tommy Breedlove Abigail Chris Executive North Georgia Thirty Seven Year Twenty Three Year Fifty Five Years
Investors Hit the Brakes on Tesla Enthusiasm

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:04 min | 2 years ago

Investors Hit the Brakes on Tesla Enthusiasm

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Deloitte, a global leader in digital transformation, helping clients apply technologies like cloud an AI to their unique business challenges. Deloitte got com slash look. Again. This is tech news briefing. Im Tanya boost, does reporting from the newsroom in New York, and Tesla's CEO Elon Musk said twenty nineteen would bring an affordable electric, car built in a new China factory, bringing us all one step closer to a mainstream model three electric vehicle, but our investors finally hitting the brakes on such enthusiasm. Sorry, where Tesla's stands so far this year and where it's going after these tech headlines. A new player is about to enter the crowded US wireless market. It will pitch monthly unlimited data that costs half as much as rivals skeptical. Okay, fine. There is a catch. It is eight cable TV company out. Tease USA is ready to launch a mobile service. It's likely to cost between twenty and thirty dollars a phone and this summer. It will join Comcast and charter communications in trying to undercut wireless carriers since cord cutting shows, no signs of stopping anytime, soon, the new service likely to be called out tease mobile will run on Sprint's mobile network, and relies on customers in home wifi and the company's network of hot spots throughout urban markets. The company plans to test the service with its employees in the coming weeks. The Wall Street Journal's Sarah Crouse has more at wsJcom WalMart is hiring a former executive from Amazon and alphabets Google to lead global technology. This creates a new senior role as the world's biggest. Retailer ramps up its efforts to take on Amazon Suresh Kumar will become WalMart's global chief tech officer and chief development officer starting in July. This comes as WalMart becomes an increasingly tech focused company with big efforts in buying up ecommerce startups investing heavily to boost online sales adding more grocery delivery, options, and working to ramp up its digital ad revenue. And if you're an Uber driver looking for extra cash, how about house flipping because real estate firms are now recruiting drivers to help them find derelict properties to buy and sell fast, one option Corey company that hires drivers to identify houses on the roots that the real estate firm can buy and quickly sell for a profit drivers compensation varies by firm from a sales commission to a fee for each productive lead. The Atlanta-based Corey pays drivers up to fifteen hundred dollars peripheral that leads to a purchase and the journal says this new union between temporary workers like ride hailing drivers and property spec. Relation isn't as improbable as it might seem as the institutionalization of how slipping has grown. So has the industry's demand for cheap labor to help it expand even further. Coming up Tesla's, that's high stakes to bring the masses, the first affordable electric car. Our investors still with the program and what the rest of twenty nine thousand nine has in store. Blockchain smart cities, the digital transformation happening now makes the seemingly impossible doable at Deloitte, we help clients harnessed these powerful technologies to improve business and the world Deloitte dot com slash look. Again. Twenty nineteen was poised to be a big year for electric car maker, tesla CEO Elon Musk said the year would bring an affordable electric car built in a new factory in China among other things the future looked bright, the Wall Street. Journal's Tim Higgins explains. He long must the see you thought that twenty nineteen was going to be a banner year for the company on the back of the model three this compact car, that's supposed to remake tusla's a more mainstream automaker with this vision of bringing electrification the electric vehicle to the masses. But then came a dose of reality in the form of de first quarter sales of tesla vehicles plummeted compared to the fourth quarter, and then we saw really a push by tesla to lower the prices of its vehicles and a really dramatic way a multiple occasions which raised the question is there demand for the model three at the previous expectations it has tesla reached the, the ceiling of people willing to spend a lot of? Money for a small car, and that's the question. It's, it's really hanging over Testa as we look ahead to this year. We seen Tesla's shares drop below the two hundred dollar Mark really underscoring the uncertainty in the investors mind about where this company is going, and as is the case with most things. China is a huge symbol of growth in a huge symbol of challenge hassles results for the past year, so China being at second largest market behind the US. This is where a lot of the growth has been coming the challenges is that because tesla makes its vehicles and California, and ships them to China, those vehicles are more expensive because of tariffs. The company has said they expect to deliver between three hundred and sixty thousand and four hundred thousand vehicles this year likely, meaning that they would build many more and the model three is aimed at a more mainstream buyer, they believe they need a factory on the ground to make those vehicles for the customers that they want to sell them to. If you think you've seen this movie before you're probably right. But ultimately, no one is counting. Tesla out just yet least of all tesla it has come close to the end many times and yet you on musk has been able to figure out how to pull it out oftentimes of the last minute, and that's part of the charm of the company, but it's also part of the reason why you see a growing chorus of people who are betting against the company because they questioned whether the company can continue to have those close calls, Wall Street Journal reporter, Tim Higgins, covers all things. Tesla wsJcom wrapping up the tech news briefing for now. I'm Tanya boost does reporting from the newsroom in New York. Thanks for listening.

Tesla China Deloitte Elon Musk New York Tim Higgins The Wall Street Journal Walmart United States CEO USA Corey Company Amazon Comcast Corey Suresh Kumar
"deloitte" Discussed on Women at Work

Women at Work

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Women at Work

"Own. Can you listen to what I'm saying? Can you process the discomfort, you can cry? Here's some tissues, but your tears are not going to stop me from sharing my story because you know, there's a great article on the weaponization of white, women's tears. Which I think is something that I encourage white women to read and that actually to me reminds me of Belen and coamo talking about how at that time. Black and white women were raised very differently and how black women often had to be more resilient, but we were prepared for the workforce. Because our parents talked to us, you know, that they're probably going to think you don't belong there. You do belong there. You're brilliant. You're smart you'll have to be twice as good. And that's a trope at this point. I know that people don't think that that is accurate, but I encourage you to look around at the black people who are in your organization. Look at the Asian people. The Asian women who are at your organization. Look at the Muslim women. Look at the LT. Cute women oftentimes from my experience those women are phenomenal. Now, I'm not trying to superhero is not a word. Women of color. But it just speaks to the fact that we often have to work harder to get where we aren't as a result. We are good at what we do. And sometimes better than the white women who are shoulder to shoulder with us. And I know that's offensive. But I want you to really think about that. If you think about I mean, why is it easy to understand that if a fish has to struggle to swim upstream that it may develop muscles that other fish? You don't have to swim up that difficult stream don't have we have had to navigate a landscape which requires that we hone emotional intelligence. We have to be sensitive to cultural signals and organising cues or else. We are the first to be fired. So when you see a woman of color who has made it to the top you need to stop and pause and listen to her, especially when she tells you it's been a struggle. Women at work is brought to you by Deloitte, digital where storyteller strategists makers, builders designers and engineers worked together to help you see what's possible identify. What's valuable and deliver on it? Let them show you how at Deloitte digital dot com..

Deloitte
"deloitte" Discussed on Women at Work

Women at Work

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Women at Work

"They tried to then relieve their husbands of the, you know, the domestic responsibilities, and so that provides husbands with time to pursue other activities at home, and so they can engage leisure time or an outside activities. But it really means that the mothers are going straight from work where they were engaged assuming many hours a day exercising. Whatever get that getting that into during the lunch break, squeezing, whatever time you have and then going home and being full on fulltime parents when they get in the door. And so that's swap responsibility can be absolutely exhausting on somebody. Who's literally never getting a break. And so, you know, it might be a way that women try and minimize some of guilt perhaps that they're experiencing by violating social norms of, you know, being a full-time worker and not necessarily. Being able to encapsulate the ideas of you know, intensive mothering, but it just means for very intensive day. And certainly would be exhausting over time. I'm also I'm curious to know about the different kinds of support that the husband in these situations provide. So your research found that tangible support or practical support made a much bigger difference than emotional support. What's going on there? Yes. And we were surprised to be fair when we found that out, and then we really dug a little bit more into the literature. And so the domestic the childcare in the elder here. Those are those tengible components that women are typically asked to do themselves. And so when their husbands are doing that one they're showing respect for their wives careers for some foremost, they're showing that you know, I'm willing to do this because obviously your career is important to our family. And so I can pick up the slack. But also the things that she physically cannot do. And so if it means that for her work she has to travel, and then she doesn't have to worry about her husband taking care of the kids at home. Then that would show a real de. Construction of instrumental invaluable support that otherwise she would have to outsource or feel quite a bit of pressure to do herself the emotional support side what we found is that women are more likely to find emotional support and a whole host of areas. And so while you know, it's great if a husband wants to be their wife cheerleader. She doesn't need that she can get that from her friends from her colleagues from other people men on the other hand are more likely to look to their wives for the emotional support. If they're having a rough day at the job, they're going to come home and want their wives to support them. But women are able to find that sense of support from other sources, and so we we think that that's why the instrumental support so much more important in our study than the emotional support. Women at work is brought to you by Deloitte, digital a creative digital consultancy. That invites you to look past the obvious to deliver an advantage that uniquely yours across the globe. There helping close the gap between possibility and delivery, see how at Deloitte digital dot com..

Deloitte
"deloitte" Discussed on Women at Work

Women at Work

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Women at Work

"I'm excited for my first line. I'm really going to say it aloud emphatically. Yeah. Women at work is back Monday, September seventeenth. We'll be covering so much in season. Two. You'll hear from experts on women and work. You know, it's funny people like to say that men are from Mars and women are from Venus, but I've found that when it comes to decision making, it's much more like men are from Mars, and women are from a less respected part of Mars. So I think step one is we just need to make sure that we're not framing it as claiming credit is equal to bragging or self promotion or being that colleague we can't stand, but instead just really remembering to take ownership of our work and being willing to show courage and our convictions. If you're not getting the kind of feedback that you think you should be getting and that you are seeking and that you are being bold enough and confident of to ask for then, the next question becomes how long are you going to put up with that? You'll hear stories from women whose careers took unexpected turns when they became. Mothers, and I was kind of choosing a career that I thought could be a little bit more flexible so that when we did have children, I might be able to freelance or do something else. But it ended up being that the career I chose was the career that. Supported our whole family. I had the opportunity to take a year and stay at home as a mother without any of the risks or sacrifices that usually come with that for other women. And as always we'll share our own stories and advice like I have not really messed up ever that bad. I'm kind of constantly worried about the worst thing to happen, but that's maybe that's because it's never really happened. So there's much time you waste doing and how much energy you put in too, worrying about that and then ask yourself, what's the worst that can happen and what if it happens? And then a couple of times that has happened, and I'm still here. I think if the praise is like you had a great year, you're really doing excellent work. That is so vague. It's not helpful at all. So I think you start with what any said. Thank you so much. I'm so relieved to hear that. I'm so glad to hear that. I wanna make sure next year is even better. Are there some specific things you think I should focus on. The other thing that I think is really important here is not to let someone else's urgency beard and say. All right. My work is done. That that's me a long time to learn starting September seventeen. You can expect to hear from us every Monday for the next couple of months. And if you haven't already subscribe to this podcast so that you don't miss any of the stories conversations or practical tips were putting together for you. Women at work is brought to you by Deloitte, digital, a creative digital consultancy that puts diverse minds together to help you achieve your visions. Find them at Deloitte, digital dot com..

Deloitte
"deloitte" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Log quarter onto ameriprise dot com now and you're this is in the the magic know due to an of compounding now i have to add this other anecdote because fortunately my son and hopefully his colleagues from deloitte and touche that's where they were all working at the time learned an extremely important lesson about trading stocks trading stocks especially when you're young and not necessarily informed or your impressionable or you go on the internet and you read about all these people that have gotten rich quick understand this not very many people who brag about their stock performance got rich by picking stocks not very many of them got rich by following some timing strategy or looking at charts or mac ds or whatever most of them got rich by saving by investing for the long run and not pulling out in the tough times so i started this conversation today discussing the impacts of inflation et cetera et cetera and if you want to take advantage of that it's easy to do set up your own barbell have investments that will do well in a deflationary economy have investments that will do well in an inflationary economy stick to your asset allocation do.

deloitte
"deloitte" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Gilbert roland deloitte is real cutty corrado rita hayward these are all movie stars who could green light a movie who headlined movies and i challenge you to give me one name of an american latino not a european not a latinamerican on american latino like the names i just gave you who can headline green light a hollywood mainstream movie so why do you think that is that there aren't any american latinos who have risen to the top in two thousand eighteen well it's a complicated story but certainly the political climate today is a reflection of the deep seated historical emnity that exists in this country toward the people of mexican descent there are sixty million quote latinos in the united states two thirds of them were born in the united states that's forty million those are inherently native american latinos k and they're invisible everybody thinks of us like we're all immigrants k my family came to the united states before the united states existed so are we going to start to see your theaters all over the country i sure hope so that's my plan where's the next opening we have a theater under construction in north las vegas nevada will start construction of our seventh location in dallas texas and then we're moving to phoenix and then to indio california and we're looking at many other communities across the country it's moctezuma esparza who is a filmmaker entrepreneur and activist he runs maya cinemas thank you it's been a pleasure.

Gilbert roland deloitte rita hayward united states las vegas texas indio california moctezuma esparza hollywood nevada dallas phoenix
"deloitte" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on This Week In Google

"To this is to a deloitte and touche survey said they had deleted or avoided certain apps to protect oh there's no to ship the the two that would have won really dating myself on that one you know back when the edison light bulb company was in charge things were better this twenty eight percent of disabled cookies as if that does anything at all twentyseven percent didn't visit her clothes certain websites twenty six percent this is to clean it lie from the respondents twenty six percent say oh yeah i closely read privacy agreements oh my god no way reading pr events and i'm tired that's why you can't trust surveys for stuff like this you really can't well here you want a survey this is going to get us off mary meeker for a minute so i can bring us back though if we need to how many people of or you guys did you reboot your router yes because because they're the there are those people so the fbi we talk we've been talking about this a lot vpn filter is a malware created by fancy bear you may remember them from the hack of the dnc some years ago they are they have infected they fbi estimates half a million consumer routers made by lynxes net gear teepee link micro tick we're this vpn filter and the fbi this week said everybody should reboot because now they had to wait you couldn't reboot before because it when rebooting we just reload the malware but the f b i thinks that they stopped that because they shut down the photo bucket images that were one way the mall where was reloading and they also shut down a website to know all dot com but steve gibson's looked a little deeper into the cisco analysis of vpn filter he said even if you reboot your router your router still beacon ing too the malware servers so this is the talos not cisco the talos report so he says the geeks amongst us would do best to rewrite their firmware no recently.

mary meeker fbi steve gibson deloitte dnc cisco twenty six percent twenty eight percent twentyseven percent
"deloitte" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And i actually really enjoyed my time at deloitte and was my background is i was a cpa for a while i was in the accounting and auditing function within within deloitte for six years so my first six years of my career where there spent i spent an inordinately large amount of time on companies and i think it why translated to my softbank activities it spent i spent a large amount of my time on companies that were heavily transaction orientated so companies like primorac that was buying a lot of data service companies at the time a company like hardcore general at the time that was buying harcourt brace jovanovich neiman marcus and other things so i was i was involved in the assignments that i ended up being on wor very transactional orientation is a lot of acquisitions and they were doing a lot of activity counting skills would come in very handy with that counting skills come in very handy i do find that my background of accounting skills is actually quite helpful with the companies particularly as they scale as they say there's there's there's nothing like that ruins a good story like facts and accountants on some level have facts which is our company's doing versus their plan how much caches left in the bank can we last another year or five years how would we be viewed relative to comparible companies in the marketplace so although for sure you know the venture capital market is a lot of art project not necessarily pure science project i think having the background in accounting actually has been helpful three more podcasts i'm sure they'd be happy to come so the three of them started revolution a number of years ago really to do what at the time they were trying to figure out what was big and what was next for them in their careers after they left the aol situation after that merger and they ultimately created a series of investment funds one of them being revolution growth revolution growth invests in companies that are as the name would suggest that the growth stage coming up we continue our conversation with steve murray of revolution growth discussing venture capital and start is you're listening.

deloitte neiman marcus steve murray softbank aol six years five years
"deloitte" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

"So at what point after college do you begin this new project after college so i graduated may twenty thirteen in what did you study finance okay cool yes i studied finance i minored in accounting entrepreneurship and my first job out of school i was doing consulting for a company called deloitte so i was a business analyst traveling for work mainly working in excel sheets in powerpoint presentations end in january of twenty fourteen so about eight months after i graduated i came up with this idea to meet ten thousand people in one year and i thought i would be everyone for ten minutes at a time and it would be this awesome thing in people with hear about it and i would become an overnight success and somehow that one year would allow me not to work in my twenties and thirties or whatever and it's funny because it was such a naive idea at the time it wasn't coming from a place of authenticity so it kind of just sat in my iphone notes where i i wrote it down and then i left deloitte after year in three months to go to a tech startup based in philly so i'm from the suburbs of philly end for that company i moved into the city in june of twenty fifteen so moved into phillies june twenty fifteen and seeing philly kind of as my campus like a new campus like penn state was to me i kind of revisited the project in september of twenty fifteen because i was reading journal entries to myself just on the transition from deloitte to the start up and.

deloitte business analyst phillies philly penn one year eight months three months ten minutes
"deloitte" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Which may not be a bad alternative as as this thing continues to go on and we are able to look back at some point in the future we might think that that would have been a better approach than to continue with the light you know i think some of my concerns or most of my concerns come in with and you've been talking about about this morning is with the way that deloitte is actually taking or the seriousness or lack of seriousness with which deloitte is taking this issue or seemingly you know when i had i made those those calls to have the life fired the their their lobbyists got three three bigwigs from deloitte they flew him in they sat with me and my office and they flew from everywhere from la one from chicago nick sat and they gave me all of these wonderful promises and and examples of how they're gonna fix it and everything else and it never happened and so when when they when they were going to come in for this last year and i was thinking to myself where they gonna fly somebody else from in from chicago no they went all the way to australia and as you pointed out that is one hundred percent psychology wanna one right there you know get bring bring the nice lady with the charming accent one will hater certainly that's part of their their mo at this point i don't think again knowing what i do know and i'm although i've been thrown off oversight i still stay in touch with all the information and still review at all i i don't see how deloitte is in a position to salvage this i really don't can they make it functional it's going to depend on the definition of functionality we've we learned a lot of work arounds and all these other things that they were doing just to get through the day those work arounds are now actually part of.

deloitte chicago nick australia one hundred percent
"deloitte" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Deloitte thanks for being with me thank you joining me now is jammed edessa chair of hillary clinton's twenty sixteen campaign he also worked as counselor to president obama and was chief of staff for president clinton and just not in the washington post called a noth is enough scott pruitt needs to go mr producer you wrote that before the news about the condo deals let's let's start with the condo deal and then work backwards to to what you're right do you think that scans ethically to you of course not i mean i think the more we learn about it the worse it looks i accused him of being in bed with the lobbyists now we know the the lobbyists were renting a bed at a discounted rate you know he was getting a condo at below market rate they cook this thing up to pretend that they were only renting him his bedroom but now we know his daughter actually stayed in the condo as well and it's not bad enough that that that that looks sleazy mr pruitt spent forty thousand of our taxpayer dollars to fly first class to morocco to support the export of natural gas which has nothing to do with but the but the husband of the lobbyists who owns the condo is a lobbyist for the largest gas terminal export or in the united states the only one at the time he went there so the whole thing stinks and more importantly i think pruitt is just done a horrible job protecting the environment and protecting public health the issue i focused on was his decision not to ban over the recommendation of his staff a very dangerous agricultural chemical that crosses brain damage in children so he's just a mess and i think it's time for him to get out of there in and for him to be replaced.

hillary clinton obama president clinton washington post scott pruitt producer morocco united states Deloitte edessa president chief of staff
"deloitte" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"This one year putting it on the call center i mean do you see are we close to fixing this you see we're now on the path where this is fixed i don't know by the end of the year or something my goal is to be in compliance by june thirty do you think that's doable do why because well for two reasons number one i think deloitte is being very responsive to fix the the program problems of software problems they want this fixed just as quickly as anybody else they have an economic interest in getting fixed there's a whole separate discussion going on between the state and the and the deloitte about who pays for the problems i'm not involved in it so that's i have been meeting on a regular basis with deloitte and i i think that schedule that they've laid out in the fixes that they have been working on will work and then secondly i think has been doing everything possible to improve the timeliness given the fact that the computer system still has some some problems hold the problems are less but they still it's still not working quite the way it should work so they've done through a extra hiring through overtime they're they're trying to get the timeliness figures up to what the consent degree requires and and i think they're they're doing what they can do under the circumstances and you touched on the money issue there briefly but i do want to ask you about it you know the governor has successfully recouped millions of dollars from deloitte as you pointed out there is still going to be some talk about paying the bills down the road the state will still have to pay deloitte if the governor comes to you and says deming should we continue to pay the lloyd here on out what would you say well i would say that's really not my call my purpose is to to oversee the state coming into compliance with the consent decree that it entered into about a year ago that's my duty and my responsibility i am not involved in discussions between the state and deloitte over who pays for what it's just not in my bailiwick deloitte isn't even a party to this to this yeah the parties at the state near you in the in the national side so i've been working with deloitte i i have every reason to think that the.

deloitte lloyd deming one year
"deloitte" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"Have your car new trend during the dignity of good gene know if you've already leading right but here's the thing i rigor and a few of these friend of mine as a tesla and i wrote in i thought i was in a rocket ship i mean thing hawks so some pretty good and here's the funny thing they put exhaust by law there's no exhaust i think they just make that deloitte because you expect them reduced pipes know anywhere tonight six case in our number that still has a five four six seven love to hear from you electric cars you'll get there is an inevitability right you know what i'm sorry you can get a pretty good price on some of these will moms these days all these dealership these big engines or murmur my levels things but there are a sign of the sides change and ever they are i would like to say oh yeah isn't one of the criteria before you find the line on your on your electric vehicle wouldn't you like to know each range let's say that you live in cocoa and you working waikiki could you get an electric car not yet well and i don't know i mean art some of them if you have electric or call me up to nine six cage and our that's tonight six five four six seven i'd like to know um how you calculate how much is left to show you battery left right in other words you come to know before you run out of fuel but here's the thing that i wanna know what if you have the electric car and you run out of juice on the freeway whose fault is that now it's your fault you causing a massive traffic jam you might as well just back your wallet up into the find room because we're going to take all your money you make has come get you're in the middle of the free will take all your money oh here's one of the says do these charging stations charge i don't think so on budget is plugin truth who who've to that i know you and me your customers the.

deloitte
"deloitte" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"And isn't the only help that i was getting for the past years this is the first hand everett take my stance like this because of a new computer system 40000 illinois households lost their snap benefits and november nine having food to feed my kids you know i don't have no no stamps right now and they're really sucks i have no butcheries at home right now case workers estimate more than one hundred thousand people who should be getting food stamps are now going without even though they have followed all the rules and filled out the correct paperwork that would be as you went into the grocery store you went shopping you got to the counter and you went to reach and to find your wallet in your wall was missing that's what's happening to people across the state phones are now green off the hook at the illinois hunger coalition hunger hotline people desperate to feed their families i've just never in all my years seen something this dramatic happened to people especially at the holidays while can you believe it the same company deloitte and installed the computer system out of the chicago social services they they ran the first phase put in 2013 and they just kicked the new face in in november and boom problems all over the place the same thing people in line kick get their food stamps going hungry 40000 here hundred thousand there the lloyd deloitte deloitte this is not necessarily bad news for raimondo right this gives her a little political cover should live and telling you i've been telling you all along if that dopey deloitte company that i'm showing now now hold on federal government did tell you not not to push the button governor you pushed it okay that's on you but after that you've been telling us that the loyd deloitte deloitte now look at us the same thing out in chicago deloitte deloitte the loyd i had raimondo on one with cnn was she on the latter week ago about a week ago wednesday ask the governor we said your your your rivals fong morgan trillo they're going to hang this around your neck like a millstone you hip the screwed up computers over at dhs personnel the only good news we're making progress we no longer we got rid of the.

computer system food stamps deloitte social services lloyd deloitte deloitte raimondo loyd deloitte deloitte cnn everett illinois chicago fong morgan dhs
"deloitte" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Ten and save eighty she's she's she's trying to def lee delegate the liability of these two deloitte the contractor the running this thing uh i i can i can feel her pain cheese that that might have been today might have been one of the more qian did unfiltered insured days the cheese had in quite some time because she has become so canned an so filtered and so careful and so stategic and so mercenary in the way she's been communicating she's trying to say look it's not me but i'm the boss and i'm in this contract she didn't say they are in usually does a remember chief you put this deal together i just inherited uh but whatever whatever is the the trans action all biggest mistake maker in the latest oh sorry we have seven thousand unprocessed applications here we get a backlog bigger than we thought we thought it was three when we found out it was seven were like holy crap and now we're not going to give deloitte any money and deloitte by the way i swear to got i said this to the governor in the big devoid press conference on the you hip thing that when she first had at one was that let you remember when it was it was it was the winner the key remember when it was this is the liver tober was it spring with it all came down and in well it was coming down like crazy in the reporting on it was uh was nonstop in in in the complaints on the ear here on various shows was was nonstop and then she had her be pressconference we carried it live because it was so important in profound i can't remember i can't remember what that what women it was february okay and i asked her in that press conference they should are you going to be bring the ceo of deloitte here due to share the accountability into explained the process of cleaning this thing up and she looked at me and she said.

ceo deloitte
"deloitte" Discussed on Beers with Talos

Beers with Talos

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Beers with Talos

"Because from an accurate perspective there's no functional difference between a white hair skin encrypted disc it is useless to the attacker in both circumstances so there they're inzar are achieved either certainly the you're you're right certainly the use of the encryption peace and criminal now we're element definitely muddies the waters so what are the other things that kind of pushed up that list is is we actually put deloitte as supercritical in terms of in is difficult to to correctly gauge emma these events because we don't we don't have all the information and and we understand anything but if you have if you have an understanding of of the kind of organizations to deloitte supports the kind of information that deloitte exchanges because in from those organizations reports as of the last time i looked were the actor had control them an email server at deloitte was able to monitor it and so in terms of knockon effect like what inaccurate could leverage to do feature damage based on news that information that's wiring lloyds the critically um it because the potential to do further harm based on the information that they found is very barrett and in an adequate acts as my top so but i would like to point out real quick before we go to jordan nigel here that uh craig has doomed the outreach team just a few minutes ago thanks to everyone at how security outreach today is the end of our first global team meeting where noone ended up in the ero hashtag winnie mitchell paying attention that why would you do that so i think we should talk about what happened last real quick disappeared understand.

emma deloitte craig winnie mitchell barrett jordan nigel
"deloitte" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"deloitte" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"If you're taking your company public new likely see the show in ipo as offering and of course it is but look again and you'll see the going public getting a formal audit and the ipo reading this process can be about more than an offering or even an obligation it can be an opportunity to gain insight audit an ipo readiness services from deloitte can help growing companies prepare to go public deloitte audit is an opportunity to see further and deeper into your business enganed objective outside perspective from auditors who serve the fortune one thousand see obligation as opportunity deloitte dot com slash us e g see so the back pillow bit towards the sale tell us a little bit about you know your feelings right afterwards i mean like you know you you you were talking about how intense it is to start something how much in certain it is i mean it was a relief was there or did you feel like you kind of you know given her baby away or sold it as it were yet that's that's interesting i mean m life never ends up to coins plan and so i think to be successful as an entrepreneur and not for it seles it destroying you kind of have to take a dispassionate view on things you know doing and emina technology emina is always kind of a second choice out come into voting a billiondollar business earned doing an ipo and this kind of thing but the reality is that that hanging on to business is this a kind of in the right place to sell and move on is probably the worst thing you can do.

deloitte billiondollar