31 Burst results for "Dell Technologies"

Kaylin Marcotte, founder and CEO of JIGGY

Dell Technologies Podference

04:12 min | 10 months ago

Kaylin Marcotte, founder and CEO of JIGGY

"To a special bonus episode of skimmed from the couch for small business. Week we have a small business founder with us kaelin marco who is the founder and ceo of jigsaw puzzles. She was also our first employees here at the skin. So we are so so excited for this very special episode today kaelin. It is great to talk to you about everything including gygi. We are so proud of you. Thank you for being on the show. Thank you guys. I'm so happy to be here. It is certainly surreal but very excited to be just to kind of level set before japan so we started the skin. Twenty twelve week took in our first funding in the end of two thousand thirteen. So employees started january of two thousand fourteen and in like november kaelin emailed us called amounts that she was a consultant lever talk through her background but she loved the scam and wanted to join us and to know what that would look like and so we met her for coffee at our favorite cafe and we hired her before we had an office before we haven't seen and had no idea what her role would really be or what it would become but she was employee number one. So this is a very very full circle moment for us. So caitlin we're gonna start our interview the way we do all of them. Which is kim your resume for us. I moved to new york from california. Where i'm from to go to barnard college. I studied political science and then my first job was management consulting. I was hired into of these two year rotation all kind of entry level programs about a year and a half into that. I sent a cold email to my favorite newsletter. And you know wasn't quite sure where it would go but wanted to shoot my shot and a week later. We sat down at cafe clooney. And i walked away from that and it was like there is no world in which i'm not a part of this and hopped on board. Join you guys as your employees next three and a half years crazy amazing wild ride rings get bassedas and social amazing experience. That left and spent some time abroad moved to london. I'm started consulting on my own. Such gone freelance projects working with startups and a media. Company is my sister. And i started an organization around single use. Plastic consumptions called project. Plastic is icy k. And it was essentially like whole thirty for classic use so a thirty day curriculum to go plastic free and then i started working on gigi at the same time and launched last year. November twenty nineteen. We love jackie. And we are so proud of you as you talk through this skim. What gygi s yes. So gigi we say we make puzzles worth framing. The idea for it started in my scam days. It was just also around the same time that head space came out. There was starting to be a conversation around. Mindfulness and meditation. And i was looking for what that meant to be in kind of just a way to unwind at the end of the work day and is are doing jigsaw puzzles and found them relaxing and stress relieving. They got me away from my phone and computer. So i fell in love with puzzles. Twenty fifteen but the ones out there were just like thomas kincaid or puppies in a basket and cottage scenes and just really uninspiring our choices. So the idea kind of planted then of elevating and reinventing the puzzle. And then i started really working on it. I wanted to feature the work of emerging artists and help support their work so started creating in licensing are emerging female artists around the world they get a percentage of every sale wanted to reinvent the packaging and presentation and also saw four. What do you do with the puzzle once you're done with it so each gigi comes with puzzle glue and an applicator. So when you're done if you want to keep it and turn it into real real art

Kaelin Jigsaw Marco Barnard College Gigi Caitlin Japan KIM California New York Cold Jackie London Thomas Kincaid
"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

06:40 min | 10 months ago

"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"Kind of what we've tried to do with the steve. I remember when we talked about this on the air you talked about. How proud you are you brother for what he'd done. Yeah i really was. I thought it was great I i am of the that public health and safety and people's lives really matter in all of this and i think that as things open slowly and reopened slowly. I think that the most important thing is making sure that you know we're okay. Everybody wants to push the economy. Everybody wants to get back to work. Everybody wants all the great things that we had before all this. But i don't think any of that happens unless people are healthy and happy and safe and feel confident that they can go out and go to places like cal. Woodley stave enjoyed go into for all those years are going to. The movies are going to a restaurant going out for a drink or whatever. You wanna do In public life. I i think it was great. what michael did. I think it took a lot of stones to do it I cannot imagine the angst that he must have had in closing that store. Well as i told you that day tony That store's been closed for a couple of things over fifty four years holidays and the day of my mother's funeral. That's it for michael. The close down that story completely When the business seemingly going to be up in that realm you know thinking back a liquor business and the business closed. I thought was the right thing to do. And i know is. Employees are roughly thankful that he did michael. I would ask you this. Because i would think that that in small business the most important thing to make people sleep well at night. Is the notion of loyalty that the people who frequent them frequent them for reason not just because the prices are low and not just because of convenience but because there is a connection that you make with your customers. What is your sense of of the loyalty that your customers show for you are. It's been tremendous We've sent out emails. You know like you said in early april and You know late march and Even a few updates while we were closed to let people know and every time we send an email. I get a ton of emails back from people. Just saying we're with you. You know we love you. We can't wait to see you. So many nice messages. It's it's fantastic. And and then as soon as we sent the email out on sunday at noon saying that we were going to reopen and turn on the online ordering. People people responded. We've we've had quite a quite a lot of orders and it's been it's been fantastic. It's the response is gonna amazing. Family businesses are very very interesting. You see it all the time so and so in son so and so and daughter. It's always sort of romanticised. It's a lot harder work than that. Obviously steve you can't be tempted to quit your job and go help out can you. You can't oh my. God tony kidding me shit seriously you know what my brother has deal with day in day out of honestly not only could i not do it i. I have absolutely no interest unless mike career blows up the only time i ever go into cavalry. Woodley is to hang out of what she's read talked to some of the guys i used to work with when i was a kid who are still there and just kind of enjoy my brother's success in the store we drive by and we'd go in whenever we're home We get a chance to go down there Hang out maybe steal temper shooter out of the The refrigerator scouter But you know it other than that. No we we don't. We don't offer those fourteen weeks vacations steven's coming. Yeah so. I don't get you out of here on this. I'll talk to steve directly on this. You not this sunday. But next sunday you're going to be at seminole golf club in juno beach. Florida where the greats by jimmy dunn and sam and jack vitamin belong. And you're going to be helping on a broadcast. An exhibition match and matthew wolf and ricky fowler and dustin johnson and rory mcilroy will be out there. There's going to be live sports. Talk about your anticipation of that. And what you what. You're going to be doing first of all vardaman reeves and done. Those are three first ballot hall of fame. All world human beings You know nbc and the pga tour. They were trying to put this together. for weeks And finally they got all the logistics together. It's gonna be great To be able to have live sports to be able to have world class players Like those four. You talked about Not only competing on live. Tv for people to watch but also competing for charity. All the one is gonna go to covid. Nineteen a couple of big sponsors are involved in it as well and for the world of golf fans not sports but golf fans specifically to see seminole Which is incredible golf course to see that on live television for the first time is going to be special as well but just to get back to work to get back to some type of normalcy. You know two to six o'clock in the afternoon on a sunday in may you're supposed to have live sports but it's the nba playoffs the nhl playoffs pga. Tour event whatever's going on and hopefully we give people who are gonna suffering through no sports at all but they get to watch something And enjoy for four hours. A it should be a lot of fun. I can't wait to this to you a couple of weeks ago tony. I've been home for eight weeks now. I hate myself. I can imagine my family. They can't wait for me to get out of the house. I might go down there a few days early just to get thank you both so very much for being on appreciate it very much. Talk to you about soon. Thank you thank you tony johnny. We'll take a break. I'm tony kornheiser. You're listening to the tony. Kornheiser show as i mentioned earlier. This episode is just one of many podcasts. Included in the small business pod ference presented by dell technologies a podcast conference to get inspiration on topics like fundraising building. Teams are managing business in our current environment from top podcasts. Like against the rules with michael lewis rise with rachel hollis and ear biscuits with retin link for the complete lineup of episodes visit dell technologies pod for instance dot com and. I can't even spell that. That's the longest word i've ever heard of..

michael lewis steve tony kornheiser tony dell tony johnny Woodley seminole golf club nbc Florida seminole mike career steven reeves nba rory mcilroy matthew wolf jimmy dunn nhl
"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

07:18 min | 10 months ago

"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"Was cool. I mean he wanted lawyers and doctors. You were not as you often admit you are not the most devoted student. I don't know that you took any courses at ju university. That prepared you for this. How did you discover that you had a talent for film and video and just describe pretty much what you do all right. Well first things first. This is going to sound like a joke to your regular listeners. But i didn't necessarily have an interest in business as a kid but i always loved numbers and math And and to this day M big numbers and math guy and of course in college that just look like gambling over my head and driving manic city from through university late at night But in adult life. That's that's mad. An interest that naturally became an interest in money. I mean if i had a kid with my interests and and mind i would probably steer him towards career fields. My parents were Were more interested in in my happy. They're like they were like this. Generation's parents be happy. Do what makes happy. And you'll be fine. So i i didn't necessarily get that guidance or or get steered it all toward any specific industry. I went to a liberal arts school. They said just studying and chase what interests you and for me it. It was actually sports more than anything. Which is what got me into sports broadcasting and ultimately to you etcetera as as far as what my company does we are a Full service video production company. Which means we we produce video for clients and have over the years done. She just about anything. You could imagine short of feature film but including music videos and commercial broadcast. A lot of our work is is corporate. Communications sales marketing investor recruitment training video We are on the gsa schedule which means we are a pre approved vendor for the federal government. So we do a fair amount of government. Work as you can imagine living living where we do And and most of most of what. I learned about that i learned on the job. Frankly i mean i. I was a producer in radio and had worked in radio through rate and i hit in fact interns and television as well in college and And that was a producer in radio as well as working for you. I produced the redskins broadcast on that old station w. tm so At the same time my brother was a freelance video producer and we just decided when we both got bored of of the first jobs we had ever had out of college to You know join forces and unfortunately production production is production at the end of the day. Right so me. Neither of us are super technical. I'm not someone who shoots or edits Do direct and right on occasion. I primarily what we're doing is producers is team building is is budget building in managing his client management And is generating work so that you work with your brother. I'm an only child. I don't know how this stuff works. There's gotta be every once in a while conflict right. I mean how is how is the conflict resolved to either of you ever say you know. Maybe i should just go out on my own and leave this thing. No you know people ask me this all the time Probably as well. I don't know that he has the same way but I mean we like dave. And i are three and a half years apart. So there was. There was plenty of conflict Growing up And and really once. He went to school once one of us went away he was. He was older as i said so. We we got a little more friendly And we i mean i can tell you. We've i mean we disagree about stuff but we there's never i don't think either of us. Frankly cares enough to complete it. A bit about anything so We're we're i'm pretty laid back. Personality is as. I'm sure you realize as he and the benefit of of a family business at least for us has been the when you know where your partner comes from and and you share a lot of the same values There's never any questioning about whether someone's carrying their weight or or should i feel guilty about doing something like your show which i do. Which gets me in late to the office. Mo- most days when i participate on the show So i i mean i. That's not a very sexy answer. I realized but i mean the truth is it's it's been pretty harmonious now now. Dave was more classically trained. Dave went to school and studied communications at ithaca college and studied film and his first job was in the video production industry albeit in a in a freelance capacity so You know. I had some some decent on the job training when i came to it but i was. I was still relatively young at the time as with he. I mean we were both in our twenties when this started in the late nineties. So i mean and and you're on the road a lot to do this. I mean you're absent from the show because you have jobs and the rule of of this show always is if you have a job go to your job and come back whenever it's convenient for you but you also do those camping trips with your children and i'm just wondering with everything that you have to do. That must be a little bit hard to balance as travel in your job. Ever been a burden to you in terms of being apparent. My kids will say. I don't believe it's too but they will say i was gone a lot because i was a sports writer. I was gone a lot. You know. I just wonder how that is for you. I definitely Well i like to travel for starters but But i enjoy the work travel less and less the older. I get And it is problematic for me. When i start to miss stuff. I mean kids events and school events and sporting events and what not but You know my kids always say to me that that lucky. Because i don't have a boss and my response is you know. Are you kidding me. I have a hundred bosses. I mean ev. Every client is a boss. So it's The nature of of my business. Now it'll be different for a michael sand who owns retail establishment. But but my business. Gimme my phone and my laptop and i can do it from just about anywhere so the good news is that i have some freedom to to run around and do things and the family trips like you mentioned but the flip side of that is i m never not plugged in. I am never not wired. And i am never not accessible for for clients or or even colleagues to us. She instarem if we're in the middle of a project that means review or something so.

ithaca college producer first things first Dave ju university redskins partner writer
"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

08:03 min | 10 months ago

"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"Previously on the tony kornheiser show. I think the real answer is when he comes to town usually once or twice a year performance warner but when he comes to town he spent a lot of time. Mom and i think that's the main priority when fear and then he hits back off to do whatever he has to think. He doesn't have a lot. But i will ask again. Can you just also say busy will say he's just not that came out. That's what i think it is but you could also say to him. Tony suggests put your mom in the car. It's okay i'll try the tony kornheiser show is on now. All righty then. This is our third podcast this week. Which makes me happy. Because i'm working makes me happy that my son is here and is socially distanced away by six feet on my uncle. Benny's table that makes me happy This is going to be a special show today and we will get to that in a little while. I just wanted to do a brief open because two things have happened overnight that i consider big deals one is that larry hogan the governor of maryland was apparently shamed and beaten down by twenty five hundred dollars a year mayor in ocean city maryland. Who said really big boy. i'm gonna open the boardwalk. I'm gonna open the beaches. What are you gonna do about it. And larry hogan did nothing about it and instead did something really good which is open the golf courses and open the tennis courts throughout the state of maryland. So as of seven o'clock this morning courses were open. Columbia will be opening tomorrow. Which makes me very happy. Although really all i really want to do is go to the driving range and hit for about fifteen minutes and that will that will be thrilling. The second thing. I wanted to say in the open is there is a weather report and this is not a secret weather report. This is not being denied. By the trump administration. This is not fake news. Apparently on mother's day it's going to be cold enough to snow in the northeast is going to get snow. Places like binghamton are going to get snow on mother's day. That's not that unusual for upstate. New york when i pick my daughter up from school after her freshman year on may seventeenth. It snowed three inches. So but but the conditions could actually have snow in inside the beltway in washington. Dc but unlikely but in cook thankfully you'll be able to get your father's day present which is to play golf on mother's day but i'll be able to play on mother's day because nobody else will be out there because it will be in the thirties. It will be in the thirties. So that's interesting so i just wanted to begin now. Did you miss the hail yesterday. I didn't see any hail hale and in our neighborhood. It's hard for a little. While having a hard reboot. Wow hail no. I didn't get that no didn't get that. Did it did it break any of your windows. You could hear it. Wow so no no. I didn't So now let me let me let me say that. This is a special show. I have a special thing to read. That will launch me into what i want to say and bring on gerry bron. This is the copy. I'm tony kornheiser. You're listening to the tony kornheiser show. I'm very proud and honored to present you today. Show which is part of dell technologies. Small business pod. Florence small businesses are grappling with the impact of these uncertain times and looking for resources. Del technologies has assembled an all-star lineup podcasters to create the first ever virtual conference to share advice and inspiration for small businesses. I hope that you find this episode both inspiring and useful as we work together to support. Small businesses dell. Technologies is here to help you through these times from keeping you connected and productive while working remotely with windows and microsoft teams to providing relevant content to help your business to find more participating. Podcasts search dell technologies. small business pod for ins- on radio dot com spotify or apple podcasts. At the end of this episode. Gary braun owns a small business. He's going to be with us. Andrew dana owns a small business. He's going to be with us. And michael sands and through extension steve sands although it's michael who owns a small business now and they're both going to be with us. I own business. I one for two in small businesses. At the moment. I went over one with chatter which was a small business and lost a bunch dough and and we got out and i have as i've said many times. You're absolutely no regrets. Had a great time swum for the fence. Yeah no regrets at all and one of the things that dad did. Owning chatter was accommodate. Something that i hadn't realized was a small business but is a small business. Which is this podcast. As many of you know who've listened for a long period of time. I got out of a radio deal. I didn't renew a radio deal and i- amicably left and started a podcast. And the reason i did that was not because i hated radio because what we do here is a radio show. I mean most of the time when we win. We're in a studio. But because i didn't want to be tied to a specific locale and more importantly i didn't want to be tied to a specific clock. We make our own time on a podcasts. At varies every single day. And there's no such thing as a hard out at eleven fifty five thirty where you have to be off the air. It doesn't work that way. So it's much more accommodating to the way. I like to talk and the people that i like to bring on but it is a small business. We do have to employees where we have three. I'm an employee. Michael is an employee. Nigel employees and then most of the time when people come in our regulars come in pay them as well so it is a small business and it seems to be doing well for which. I'm very grateful in one of the people who is a regular and we're sticking him out of money most of the time now because he doesn't show up physically which is his loss not ours because he shows up. Electronically is gary braun. People have known you for a long time gary. Sometimes we forget that you have a real job where you may go by something other than the nicknames that we have for you. Can you talk about how braun. What braun film and video is who are involved in it and why you did it because your dad was a lawyer write. Your dad worked in a firm. I mean he did not grow. Dad didn't have his own business so when you told him you wanted to do your own business what did he say to you a tony. Come on man you can you can. If if anyone can appreciate you can appreciate his reaction to that because my dad as as you know is from all exactly where you're from limbaugh he. He was also an only child from from limerick new york his his parents both immigrants And he thought it was insanity. I mean it was him thought it was. It was crazy. How are you going to get paid. Yeah remember you're not going to get a weekly paycheck. What are you nuts. Go work for someone. Yeah you're gonna pay for your retirement can have a pension which you know I don't know there was as obvious. But back then. But i mean that's not really a thing anymore with the exception of of jobs like that like law firm job so Yeah that that was not a that was not met with tremendous excitement and i was doing. I was leaving albeit a not a great paying job. I was leaving a steady paying job to do that. I was producer You know for your show as nice can appreciate so By the way that's the people at dell think you're not committed. I just figured this thing was dead when i heard yesterday that golf was on. I figured you and my understanding that the club doesn't opens friday. Explains it so yeah. It was You know my my dad Worked real hard And and had a lot of pressure from his parents to get a good education which he did and it was. He wasn't crazy about about his two sons going outta love. My brothers actually my partner businesses. You know people listening probably do not So yeah. He didn't think that.

tony kornheiser dell Gary braun michael sands golf larry hogan maryland gerry bron Dc binghamton New york ocean city maryland Benny Del technologies Columbia hale washington apple
"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

02:58 min | 10 months ago

"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"Regard as your core principles and you remember fun. Which tells you lebel. Who's her executive producer and has been the executive producer of malcolm show since the beginning. She's someone who came with us. From from the old company Is very important person and establishing our culture but she talks a lot about kindness as a as a principle of the company and It's really it's really true. And i think she's been the kind of guardian of it but it's the way people think about working together and how they help each other and support each other and the ties into i think a bunch of other ethical principles not just about integrity journalistic integrity business integrity But you know Diversity the kind of workplace we want to create the kind of society. We wanna see bottled in the company. So people have a lot of feelings about it. And when you have a young workforce those getting that stuff right and having that all relevant meaningful people to people. is crucial in recruitment and retention. Because you've got not just be a place where people can do interesting work. I think you've got to be a place where people want to work. How do you get across your values to someone who's coming into thinking of working for you. I think they have to. I think that they don't hear from this. I'm hopefully they do hear it from the ceo. But i think people only believe when they hear it from peers and see that peers are having that kind of experience in the place they work and kind of. I can't hide. You can't hide who you are especially as a company. Right is a person so maybe a little bit but as a company you know word will spread and what it's like their values come they they do come through and i think it's especially true with start up companies because they grow up so quickly that they end up being kind of projections of the values and beliefs of the of the founders. And you know. I think that's trick facebook and one way uber another way but it's it's even more true at a smaller business. Everything that you you believe gets reflected in some way in the in the company. Thanks again to jacob weisberg and malcolm glad well of pushkin industries you can hear more of dell small business pod by searching dell technologies small business pot fronts on radio dot com spotify or apple podcasts special. Thanks to emily. Ross dhec carly migliori. Julia barton heather fain and jason gambro. I'm michael lewis..

executive producer malcolm dell facebook carly migliori jacob weisberg Julia barton michael lewis emily ceo jason gambro Ross pushkin industries apple
"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

07:20 min | 10 months ago

"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"In cher drives Seem so essential to long distance. Collaboration in a way they've arrived just in time and it's sort of the moment for those tools we can make our shows and luckily we work with writers of caliber starting with you and malcolm who can use their writing to adapt what they're doing if there's an interview that you were gonna do for your season this year michael and you can't do it. You can write your way out of it That's not a position. A tv producer is usually. I mean if you have physical production that requires people to be in a group in a place. It's just gotta be suspended podcast. We can we can still make it. It's not all been easy but people have been incredibly flexible and nimble about how we're still going to get these shows done with this new challenge. So it's funny. I'm about to. I've got five of my seven episodes for this soon in the second season done. But i've got. I've got one that really did require me. I thought require me to go out onto the road. And i'm not able to do it and you said to me you know you can write your way around this and this weekend. I'm about to find out whether dad. And and i'm kind of wondering if you think that's really true i mean what do you think i what i'm thinking is just generally when you're thrown this kind of This kind of curve ball Look her ball and you hit it that you try to turn it into a strength And you see what you can do it given that given the constraint but but there's apartment thanks in my voice podcast producer saying we need scenes. We need scenes and now you can't really get those scenes D does it. Does it trouble that trouble at all. You think that maybe these could be better this way. Well i i tend to share your view that the constraint provokes creativity and you often end up with something that's better and more interesting than what you would have had otherwise but not always you know. Luckily i think for a number of our shows. We had a lot of the field reporting the interviews under our belt. And so we're more at risk of losing like twenty percent of what we wanted. If we hadn't done any then it's would be harder to make these shows. You'd have to conceive them in a different way of their dependent on vivid scenes. Where the where were you as. The journalist is physically present. Do you think it's going to change the way when this is over and you can go back to doing it the way you think you'll go back to doing it the way you actually learn things that you're gonna you're going to work into your into your routine with my my my big goal in at one of our earliest meetings. We had a retreat very early. On at pushkin we sat down to. What are the principles that we believe in his accompany. Sounds very pretentious. It actually wasn't and my the one. I was encouraging people to accept less and we did was that we should always remember. This should be above all else fun for not having fun. We shouldn't do it. It shouldn't be drudgery so i always think about my big worry when all the lockdown happened was will still be fun if we're all working from home and we can't hang out with this sort of wonderful collection of invest way misfits and weirdos that we have gathered many podcasts. I never myself among them. So i what. I can't hang out with these delightful weirdos anymore. This is not going to be fun. And so i think what's happened is that we've just discovered new ways to hang out. My sense is building a new muscle and that it or that were kind of a a resilience so that you know you can do it knowing you can do it. Another way is enormously freeing as i mentioned earlier. This episode is just one of many podcasts. Included in the small business pod florence presented by dell technologies a podcast conference to get inspiration on topics like fundraising building teams or managing a business in our current environment from top podcasts. Like against the rules with me. Michael lewis rise with rachel hollis and rhett and link from ear biscuits for the complete lineup of episodes visit. Dell technologies pod dot com. Welcome back here's more of my conversation with jacob. Weisberg malcolm glad well from pushing industries michael. I think they're too big impacts. I've been thinking about on. The company wants cultural and one is more sort of substantive around what we may but the cultural point is that a company like ours people are really close and they get very close making creative work together and we just moved into this new office in new york like literally a week before it was closed and we all had to work work from home and be socially isolated or physically isolated. And that was the bummer. I mean we were. This office is really great like everybody was really excited to be there. It's cleaned new. There is really good coffee like we couldn't wait to get to work and see each other in the morning. Those of us who are new york which is most of the staff and suddenly. That's denied to us. Everybody's worried about everybody. Everybody's got a whole new set of problems. People have to figure out how to take care of their kids home school. Their kids worry about their parents. Some people are feeling physical symptoms. Are people getting sick so you have suddenly instead of this. Kind of convening. You're you're separated and worried And the obser- cultural observation. Is that people. Then become really Habituated to and really enjoy in a way the forms of digital connection having zoom meeting once a week. Where everybody's on it. You just see where everybody is. And you see the backdrops and one of our employees sophie. Mckibben is up in up in new hampshire and she you know she calls in from car because that's where she gets the best phone connection you see her in her car and you see people in their apartments. Some of them have kids running in and out of the frame. And it's just. I look forward to that so much. Just seeing everybody. I think other people are having the same feeling and As you know ceo. I feel grateful to these people who've got all the stuff that they're having to deal with in their lives that they weren't expecting But they're doing their best work the same time and i think that's partly because workers refuge in is in a situation like this says you got jacob. I have a question for you. You spent most of your life sympathetic to and surrounded by and being one of them do journalists who never have to take any responsibility for anything and you. You've managed to become pretty naturally like an executive like a person who runs a thing and sounds like you just sounded and like like you could be secretary of the treasury I i'm wondering where you pick this up like are you reading on the sly like in the middle of the night reading these horrible corporate management books are are you. Do you have some little secret source of wisdom you go to. How'd.

Weisberg malcolm new york jacob Dell Michael lewis new hampshire pushkin producer ceo executive Mckibben secretary rhett rachel hollis
"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

08:06 min | 10 months ago

"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"Malcolm gladwin jacob weisberg. We've known each other since the nineteen eighties when we were all young writers in the magazine. Business malcolm jacob for now the co founders of pushkin industries. The company that produces against the rules which is now underway by the way pushkin also makes a bunch of other great shows like malcolm zone revisionist history and the happiness lab with dr lori. Santos i've been watching on the sidelines over the past year as malcolm and jacob started the company so i was really happy to have an excuse to ask them all kinds of nosy questions about what they've learned about running a business together and the challenges they face and the challenges right now in our quarantine world will those are unique. You'll get to hear a little bit about that. Here's our conversation. 'cause i don't actually know the story so i would love to know how you decided to start pushing shake right. It was jacobs a star. Well i'd started one podcast company already. Which was panoply which came out of slate but as things evolve panoply turned into a technology company. I thought i was starting mainly a content company and one of the shows we'd started with revisionist history With malcolm that show was doing really well and there were some other shows. I was really interested in doing so was sort of when the earlier company under Ceo i'd hired. Who i thought was making a good decision. Wanted to make a pivot that i said. Hey maybe it's time that document. I started our own company and only do what we wanna do. I was on holiday with my family in. Can't remember where. I was somewhere in your italy in italy and jacob was in some. I think if i can tell that you truly horrible health live the villain said and he said he said that he he summoned. We do something crucial when you talk about says. I drove halfway across italy. Show up in this horrible house but road and then he likes sat outside a little chairs and had coffee and he said i wanna start a company. That's out began. What did you say yes right away. Yeah struck me as well. The backstory about this is that jacob has been. I've known jacob for thirty five years and through for some significant portion of this. I would always say jacob. I don't know why you wanted a journalist. You'd be a really great businessman. if you just. This is what you could make a huge amount of money. We could all get rich. Jacob forgotten but i would always worry that if i when i said that i was insulting him because what he really wanted to be was a writer which was saying was a bad writer and i thought better business fan so i i remember you saying this thirty years ago And so. Jake is a wonderful journalist but agreed it. He's they sort of a natural for this sort of thing. He's got the temperament for it. Unlike you your i but you know what we would surprise me the thing take you back even a little further. It surprised me that you to went off on this podcast jag. In the first place. You both had very happy successful careers in the print world. Why did you decide that you wanted to do something different. You know michael. I've gotten the bug really in the early days of podcasting at slate were sort of because of a random connection with an npr show. Slate had been working on. We started making some of the first podcast. Anybody listened to and everybody had slate. All the journalists love doing them and there was this little audience small at first but growing that just love them and the giveaway was that everybody at slade. Who didn't have a podcast wanted podcast. And they were just a joy to do. So you know. I'm a little evangelical about things. I get excited about and i tried to talk malcolm into doing one and i tried to talk you into doing what and i ultimately talk both view into doing it. I talked to at first. And then i think The fact that he was doing it may have helped to persuade you. It was worse than that. You got malcolm to lie to me and say it was easy. You lied but that's all right. We'll have i forgive you so you're too old friends. Go into business together. How's it working out. Like how do you find working with each other. You surprised by anything. You finding things out about each other that you didn't know that you wish you didn't know we'll i. I'm reminded of a Years ago i wrote a piece that was really about my friendship with jacob. It was about the idea that what's called Collective memory which is that. We outsource a lot of the things we know to. Our friends and family and i was reading about this. Because jacob jacob is someone who i respect trust so much that significant parts of my knowledge and cognition are simply outsource to jacob. I was saying i knew longer. Read anything about politics or try and figure out about politics. I simply ask jacob what he thinks and adopt those ideas as my own. That was my position. And i was sort of a joke. But it's actually true. It's just a way better way to live your life to make to point sued experts in your friendship circle and outsource everything to them. Do the same thing with my brother and wine and take a long so this is in business. I've just applied this principle. Which is just let him do all the things that i know. He's better at me. And since that's rattle longlist means my life is very easy so there is that true jacob is there. Are you basically running the business in malcolm's decoration. No i wouldn't say that. I mean i handle more of the day to day as they say but honestly at this point more. The ideas come from malcolm. And that's that's a bit of an adjustment. Because i've always thought of myself as the idea person but i'm like a good idea week person. Malcolm's like a five good idea. Day person and so big part of my job now is just like being. Malcolm's filtered try to talk him out of some of the ideas and then try to figure out how some of the others can can happen But these are ideas for shows. He's our ideas for shows. He's ideas for new businesses. Malcolm a lot of ideas and the typical day is you know about eleven. Am he'll call me and say this is so much fun. We really don't want to get too big too fast. Let's keep it just like it is and i say yes malcolm. I totally agree with that. This is the good part. Let's let's not grow too fast. And then after lunch he'll call me and he all right. I've got three ideas and each of them would involve like adding like ten new staff members. And so we did. If we pursued all of our ideas we'd have six hundred people right now instead of twenty five and That's kind of a tension. It's not attention in that. Malcolm i disagree about. I think we're both pulled in both directions liking having a small business. Where were we know everybody. And it's sort of close like a family and we control everything but then all this opportunity and all these good ideas we wanna to pursue. I'm in these conversations. Are you able to see the possibility of a really big business or do you think it's naturally better as a small business. You've hit on the the hard part you know. I think we see that we do see the opportunity to be big. I mean i don't know when you say really big. I mean it's not. I don't think it's i don't think it's google big. I don't think it's facebook. Big but in the world of podcasting. I think it has the potential to be really pay-setting and dominant But we also want to be really really choosy and have everything we make really represent what we're interested in and the quality level we we've set so far so you know. I think it's just kind of working out of those. Two things will result in the right size. I honestly don't know what the right size is. We're going to get bigger. It's just.

Malcolm gladwin jacob weisberg malcolm jacob jacob malcolm Slate pushkin pushkin industries Ceo italy Santos facebook dr lori google Jake writer michael npr
Michael Lewis in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg

Dell Technologies Podference

03:00 min | 10 months ago

Michael Lewis in Conversation with Malcolm Gladwell and Jacob Weisberg

"I was asked to moderate a panel with two of my oldest friends. Malcolm gladwin jacob weisberg. We've known each other since the nineteen eighties when we were all young writers in the magazine. Business malcolm jacob for now the co founders of pushkin industries. The company that produces against the rules which is now underway by the way pushkin also makes a bunch of other great shows like malcolm zone revisionist history and the happiness lab with dr lori. Santos i've been watching on the sidelines over the past year as malcolm and jacob started the company so i was really happy to have an excuse to ask them all kinds of nosy questions about what they've learned about running a business together and the challenges they face and the challenges right now in our quarantine world will those are unique. You'll get to hear a little bit about that. Here's our conversation. 'cause i don't actually know the story so i would love to know how you decided to start pushing shake right. It was jacobs a star. Well i'd started one podcast company already. Which was panoply which came out of slate but as things evolve panoply turned into a technology company. I thought i was starting mainly a content company and one of the shows we'd started with revisionist history With malcolm that show was doing really well and there were some other shows. I was really interested in doing so was sort of when the earlier company under Ceo i'd hired. Who i thought was making a good decision. Wanted to make a pivot that i said. Hey maybe it's time that document. I started our own company and only do what we wanna do. I was on holiday with my family in. Can't remember where. I was somewhere in your italy in italy and jacob was in some. I think if i can tell that you truly horrible health live the villain said and he said he said that he he summoned. We do something crucial when you talk about says. I drove halfway across italy. Show up in this horrible house but road and then he likes sat outside a little chairs and had coffee and he said i wanna start a company. That's out began. What did you say yes right away. Yeah struck me as well. The backstory about this is that jacob has been. I've known jacob for thirty five years and through for some significant portion of this. I would always say jacob. I don't know why you wanted a journalist. You'd be a really great businessman. if you just. This is what you could make a huge amount of money. We could all get rich. Jacob forgotten but i would always worry that if i when i said that i was insulting him because what he really wanted to be was a writer which was saying was a bad writer and i thought better business fan

Malcolm Gladwin Jacob Weisberg Malcolm Jacob Pushkin Industries Malcolm Zone Dr Lori Jacob Malcolm Pushkin Santos Italy Jacobs
"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

03:44 min | 10 months ago

"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"We were presented with this opportunity. Julian i were really trying to figure out a way to put this in the context of our podcast and had incorporated of small businesses with pop culture and the celebrity content that we talk about and there are a lot of different ways to do this but something that juliana have always been really interested in is organic and at times inorganic celebrity endorsements and the effects that they have on small businesses. So we kind of decided to do. I guess the way that this episode is gonna go down is you know i. We're just gonna talk about some celebrity. Shoutout endorsements that we've seen. And i'm sure wants you guys can relate you just because they're really fun to talk about and then we actually got the chance to speak to some small business owners that have been directly impacted by these celebrity shouts and it was just like so much fun. Wasn't it so much fine like so interesting so informative in really something that i think. We care about a lot so it was so exciting process to be able to do. Yeah i just wanna give a disclaimer. None of the people that we interviewed. You know. we're not getting paid to do this. We're not getting cut of any of the prophets at all from the people that we interviewed. These are just genuinely businesses that we believe in. And you know. We took bits and pieces from each of the different conversation that we thought were the most applicable. And i'm just really excited. I hope you guys enjoy this as much as we did. So i wanna frame this by putting it in this context if you guys remember when kylie jenner did her office tour of kylie cosmetics. She's going around. She gets the part where she showing her refrigerator. And she purposely has videographer make a note to blur out her favorite drink because she said she's like if i showed this it'll be sold out immediately if i it's my favourite which you know if you know nothing about the kardashians sounds really narcissistic. But it's absolutely accurate accurate to the point. Where even though they blurted out it started a whole trend online of trying to figure out what the drink was and people are posting on twitter. And i think even read it saying like it has this label. This color like this is what we can tell from the blurred out images because people especially because blurred out. They wanted to know so badly. Yeah and especially because that was a perfect example of clearly. That wasn't a paid thing like this was really disfavor. Drinking people are by people. I mean like us. Also i think are just obsessed with what celebrities find to be worth. I think we think of people that have all the resources in the world that of course they're gonna choose the best of the best and so i think that's one of the reasons that sometimes we trust their opinions on things that aren't being paid for 'cause it's like oh if it's good enough for them you know i think yeah and i think also a lot of times. When it's a non paid endorsement. We trust so much because we have the mentality of like they could get paid for this and they like it. There's something about them saying in the weight that carries like i could get paid for this but i'm not being paid just genuinely like this so much where you're like okay. If there's something up they're putting out for free and it could be a business opportunity but they don't need it just because they like it so much. I think that carries so much weight for us consumers. I totally agree you know. Also just the power of kylie jenner's just massive in general but one of the things is she. She tweeted saying kylie fact. I eat three packs of pomegranates. Everyday and anytime. She's done towards on her apps. Or if you just see on her story she's always eating pomegranates. And her brand that she pom wonderful and it was reported that sales rose by sixty nine percent after she talked about the brand online is crazy. I like the power that kylie jenner has a think is honestly unparalleled because the opposite end of that would be when she spoke about not linking snapchat anymore tanked. That's exactly what. I was about to say about snapchat wishes. They were pom wonderful

kylie jenner Julian juliana twitter kylie
Celebrity Endorsements and Small Businesses with Julie Kramer and Emma Diamond

Dell Technologies Podference

03:45 min | 10 months ago

Celebrity Endorsements and Small Businesses with Julie Kramer and Emma Diamond

"We were presented with this opportunity. Julian i were really trying to figure out a way to put this in the context of our podcast and had incorporated of small businesses with pop culture and the celebrity content that we talk about and there are a lot of different ways to do this but something that juliana have always been really interested in is organic and at times inorganic celebrity endorsements and the effects that they have on small businesses. So we kind of decided to do. I guess the way that this episode is gonna go down is you know i. We're just gonna talk about some celebrity. Shoutout endorsements that we've seen. And i'm sure wants you guys can relate you just because they're really fun to talk about and then we actually got the chance to speak to some small business owners that have been directly impacted by these celebrity shouts and it was just like so much fun. Wasn't it so much fine like so interesting so informative in really something that i think. We care about a lot so it was so exciting process to be able to do. Yeah i just wanna give a disclaimer. None of the people that we interviewed. You know. we're not getting paid to do this. We're not getting cut of any of the prophets at all from the people that we interviewed. These are just genuinely businesses that we believe in. And you know. We took bits and pieces from each of the different conversation that we thought were the most applicable. And i'm just really excited. I hope you guys enjoy this as much as we did. So i wanna frame this by putting it in this context if you guys remember when kylie jenner did her office tour of kylie cosmetics. She's going around. She gets the part where she showing her refrigerator. And she purposely has videographer make a note to blur out her favorite drink because she said she's like if i showed this it'll be sold out immediately if i it's my favourite which you know if you know nothing about the kardashians sounds really narcissistic. But it's absolutely accurate accurate to the point. Where even though they blurted out it started a whole trend online of trying to figure out what the drink was and people are posting on twitter. And i think even read it saying like it has this label. This color like this is what we can tell from the blurred out images because people especially because blurred out. They wanted to know so badly. Yeah and especially because that was a perfect example of clearly. That wasn't a paid thing like this was really disfavor. Drinking people are by people. I mean like us. Also i think are just obsessed with what celebrities find to be worth. I think we think of people that have all the resources in the world that of course they're gonna choose the best of the best and so i think that's one of the reasons that sometimes we trust their opinions on things that aren't being paid for 'cause it's like oh if it's good enough for them you know i think yeah and i think also a lot of times. When it's a non paid endorsement. We trust so much because we have the mentality of like they could get paid for this and they like it. There's something about them saying in the weight that carries like i could get paid for this but i'm not being paid just genuinely like this so much where you're like okay. If there's something up they're putting out for free and it could be a business opportunity but they don't need it just because they like it so much. I think that carries so much weight for us consumers. I totally agree you know. Also just the power of kylie jenner's just massive in general but one of the things is she. She tweeted saying kylie fact. I eat three packs of pomegranates. Everyday and anytime. She's done towards on her apps. Or if you just see on her story she's always eating pomegranates. And her brand that she pom wonderful and it was reported that sales rose by sixty nine percent after she talked about the brand online is crazy. I like the power that kylie jenner has a think is honestly unparalleled because the opposite end of that would be when she spoke about not linking snapchat anymore tanked. That's exactly what. I was about to say about snapchat wishes. They were pom wonderful

Kylie Jenner Juliana Julian Twitter Kylie
"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

04:32 min | 10 months ago

"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"And you know you go until it's perfect. If it can be a little bit better yeah take that take that every time. Do it every time you know. Yeah how many times do we nudged dialogue around. Well oh we never stop this and yeah. I think we were doing that. We never stopped doing that. We're now to nudging all the time until we have you know scenes that we really love sees it make you feel. Yeah so that make us feel and we hope that it makes her audience. Feel to right and with the guiding principle of like. Let's just get this one percent better and sometimes you luck out and it's ten percent better than you think. Wow we really. We really found it here but But just if every movie make will improve it a little bit. You're eventually going to get there. But our challenges really fixing everything that we noticed that can be improved. And it's about making those moments powerful making it matter and at the same time giving it a feeling of perfect where you come away with is a creative product. They are proud of and the first season aired in even before we were in the running for any awards cadence. Thirteen major podcast network expressed an interest in working with us for the season to season. Two in many ways there are our. Gary kurtz is producing buddy Handle the parts. Where less familiar with the parts they know from the breakout shows like to live and die in the lay and their original series. That's the key that's the key. That's the that's where you want to take off. We know what we don't know and we end up with a complementary relationship that allows our business to keep building in and growing You know because of score we have a successful now spin off podcast. Series that interviews. The top film composers in the world called score. The podcast just interviewed danielle fman where we have a wonderful music sponsor that supports that series in in similar ways and ultimately we get to do what we really love until powerful and inspiring stories for a living to share them with you for free and Pardoned the ads. That's that's a hall of this gets made possible but We now have plans to make several new bio pods and the future plus Our first fiction series that we've been developing epochal of media is a small business that really couldn't have existed five years ago right. It's an emerging field these podcasts. And there's a unique angle of high production value that we have and we also have original score and true stories that have never been told in these ways. We got to this point through hard work and public support through view fans following blockbuster and score on social media and then us building the next thing you learn something new each step of the way and then you apply those lessons and make the next one a little better than the last one and then the next one even better. We turned our passion into action. We overcame the people who doubted us. the haters. the people who turned us down and we get to make things other people will enjoy for a living as perfect as we're capable of making them One percent better every day. And we're finishing the knicks seasonal blockbuster. Now it's the most advanced thing we've ever made the stories intoxicating lee inspiring the sound design. Makes you feel like you're there. The original music is taken to a level. No podcast has ever taken it and in the way that it will support the story. We thank you for coming along with us on this chat through the history of our small business production company epoch left media and blockbuster and the inspiring stories. We can't wait to take you on in the coming years. Your support of course is crucial that any small business and if you wanna be a part of blockbuster this new season Please share it. Great at Support it by buying shirt or bonus features on our website at get blockbuster dot com and get your name in the credits of the new season and be sure to give us a shout out on social media at blockbuster pod on facebook twitter and instagram as we launch into this new season and follow me at match reader for elena bobbitt's and peter bobbitt's. I'm raider thank you so much for listening. Thanks thank you.

knicks blockbuster Gary kurtz danielle fman elena bobbitt facebook peter bobbitt instagram twitter
"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

06:35 min | 10 months ago

"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"They ended up with twentieth century. Fox yeah and it was. Gary who believed in it and with gary came twentieth century fox and then it was his wife. Marcia saving him yet right. In the edit process it was john williams stepping up and like making something. That's never been done before a space opera. Yep his friend steven spielberg and everyone. I mean i remember that scene in the in the chinese restaurant right it was a terrible screening For friends and family All these people around george. Lucas decided to just embrace his vision. They went to this chinese restaurant. They painted a bart. They said here the problems with this exactly and they took it apart like a puzzle and they reassembled it and all george needed was some nudging into the right direction. I mean the vision was there. Right right He just needed the right support. And i guess that's also really important this. Don't forget about the having the support team in place. People that they might not be one hundred percent creatively involved but they have to be involved in in helping navigate us sometimes in their own way of understanding right right their own way of reading the maps and that brings us to the third challenge which has make perfect so the sounds like an impossible goal but the key is in how we define perfection. It doesn't mean everything in steven spielberg's first big movie jaws of george lucas's dri movie star wars going to be the best. It just means everything is going to be as good as he can possibly make it. The key is years of preparation and planning working out. All the kings as what every writer does what about the little things. Stevens struggled to build an industry around his shark for jaws to make it perfect. They had three of them the mechanical sharks then when the time came to film them none of them work. And how are we going to have a movie about a shark with no shark that we can actually shoot. Yeah and i mean. Their solution was His solution i guess was. It was actually john. Williams is a shark. The sharpen the music for the shark. ended up being the shark right so the theme is the shark and we actually see The shark itself various scarcely in this and intern for jurors lucas. It was also about reinventing everything. From the technical aspects of filmmaking right it was so storytelling but he was doing it in a different way with the special effects that haven't been done before and season one week. I the story how he wanted to create that robotic arm that naturally. It was expensive camera right. Yeah i mean nobody. Nobody put a camera on a robotic arm for a movie before on a scale like this right and he suddenly wanted to do. Tranche runs for the movie star. Wars with this robotic off like. That's not been done before. And so hundred shots have never been done before. How do you agree. How greenlee a movie as the studio and you say yeah. Let's do this. No one senate before. Here's a budget. He's not sure how to do it yet. Give us money right. The point of having the right parkas because maybe the other studio if they agree to make this me would have said no to this completely. Shut it down right. Yeah it's worked out the way. It should have yes but it's not as easy right because it's very easy for everyone. Say oh yeah. This is a great success story but we also have to like brace for impact in a way Because for george he completely ran over budget and not a small over budget but like a massive balloon over budget. It backfired on him. Big time Because he basically kind of had a heart attack didn't have a heart attack but had a heart attack and he was just pushing it so hard. No matter what i mean essentially people start turning against you. Also you start making more enemies you you become aggressive. He put his own money his own wealth his relationship with his friends family. Right even with this wife on the line He was all in right. He was all in and he knew at that point. He saw that what he was creating. That was worth it. That vision was starting to take shape of something material and he knew he had to push through it just the best possible version that he could have made at that point. And i'm sure there's regrets and things could have been done differently of course but they're always and season ties into this Story of of the entrepreneurial struggle to and you know again will. We'll have a trailer out soon. So be sure to subscribe to blockbuster on all your favorite podcast app but our Lead character encounters obstacle after obstacle and doesn't understand why the ideas are failing and the only way out is to try to know dig deeper. Fight your way out with the tools that you have and if you don't have the tools you make them yeah you know you've you've got to either find them or make them and And anything less than perfect will ever be. Good enough roy You know in the case of Epoca media and what. We're doing in podcast. Now that means you know. I've always thought it's improving by one percent every time each time. Just just get a little bit better and then that one percent you know compounds if you know anything about how the math of that works and it's you know after two months of one percent every day you know. The podcast is is two hundred percent. Then you know it's twice as good as what it was When it was first written on paper and now we've made it even better and then if we're doing something to eight months you know like we think didn't about nine months for season one of blockbuster you know that's a thousand percent ten times better than we originally had it And you know. In some key filmmakers cases this goes on for years of just trying to punch it up a little bit by bit by bit and their aim is really just to try to reach something. That's unattainable that idea of perfection. Oh yeah.

steven spielberg george lucas john williams george Gary Fox Marcia senate intern Stevens Epoca media writer
"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

07:52 min | 10 months ago

"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"Saying. It's a bad idea. Actually just want to point out that we were much further than developing story reporting. Yeah i think we actually were like like heavy post production. So you know just pulled off this like you know. It has mini series but it is pretty big as far as production and postproduction goes and it's very time consuming so we'll put all of this money into it all of those resources all this work hours and then what we're hearing is like well you know we don't understand what this format as you know. What is the narrative bio pod. How does the model. It's so different and so unique like we don't know what to do with us. We don't know how it's gonna fit into our existing slate and things like this and that's pretty much the moment that comes right before the break through like for us look back. It's the western union saying they're not interested in this new device. That's a little bit different. We don't understand how it works and everything like that. It's like okay. That's perfectly fine But all that would change for our upcoming season two which is great news because we were surprised in a way also overwhelmed by how this whole series blew up when it was released apple featured us and then we got glowing reviews from forbes the verge hollywood reporter gizmodo and like it's just one after the other one after the other and all over the world which was also in saying that we we do these young interviews in different languages and using google. Translate to answer these questions that we could barely understand and our series one. One of the biggest honors added weeks podcasts of the award which was just first of all. I don't even creative podcast. Best creative podcast. Thanks our listeners. Because without you guys yeah but he would know about it spreading the word. Yeah yeah thank you for the love so a lot of things happened that if we would have said back then well we guess you're right networks. This doesn't fit the standard. While i guess that's it right but we decided to push through right and it turned out to be the best decision we could have made and i think like in in our case. I don't know what it was. Was it too late to turn back at that point because you know the series were almost completed. I remember a week where they were pitching a network after network after network for the whole week. Pretty much. I don't know how many we pitched but it was a lot. And every single one said Yeah you know we don't know and an ultimately it was a no from every single one and you know were their thoughts like oh maybe we completely miss the mark on. This may be you know. Maybe no one needs this Maybe we were wrong. you know thoughts like this did creep up with an expensive mistake if we did. Yeah and wanted expensive mistake of her burning through cash to try to make something new exactly but then at the same time like we would listen to the episodes as they were being completed and to me personally. It was like goosebumps every single time. And i was like if i like. It makes me feel this way i am. I gonna make other people feel this way. So as we started working on season two we went back and spoke to several podcasts companies. Who now wanted to work with us. Because at this point we had something under our belts. We proved the concept so to say in the first time people didn't know what it was and what to do with it but this time they looked to did they were able to listen to the whole thing. They saw the response we had from the audience. And they're look okay. I think we know what we can do with this. So but the hurdle was the same for any small business. That's trying to break in. When people didn't believe in us we had to prove ourselves and the vision paid off so sometimes sometimes people are not going to believe in you. It may be 'financiers. It may be your partners. It's maybe even actually your family and friends that also happens But vision pays off especially a well executed one. And if you believe that this is something that's going to bring something good into the world that a lot of people may need Persevere so the parallels george lucas biggest struggle in star wars Then an eight million dollar movie is obvious here to like to sure our story. Just george lucas. She's like they're as much the same thing. I interpret ner can relate to his chuckle because yes well. It's such a pure example. Yeah it was a story. That georgia has producer. Gary kurtz tried to sell a lot of different to a lot of different studios yup the star wars and they all passed up that also none of them understood the format and once they found a financier twentieth century fox. In this case there were a lot of critics the executives all but one ala junior turned on the project when george fell behind schedule and got sick and started floating out the idea of replacing him as director. He pushed through right that. Yeah there was a point. Of course when george was convinced this was all going to be a failure. His still was doing his best to make this project. Everything could be and he never gave up on this but imagine that you are creating something and you know the higher ups come in and they say oh you know. We think he can't actually finish this. So we're going to replace you and especially keeps it. Seems like it's getting worse and worse and worse to it keeps leading. You keep thinking okay. Well i'm gonna keep working through this and then it's even worse the next day the next week and then a month later and then you know have a heart attack or thank you do. At least like how bad can things get right because we had to pivot at one point right right because we assume this is the way it's going to go and turned out. No that's not how it was meant to be. We had to pivot. And that was the problem that w- we have to realize enterpreneurs that there's a point in time where you just have to pivot. You never wanna give up on what the vision is. If you think it's a winning vision but you you definitely need to adapt as things come and go. There is a balance also like if you have a vision and your project cost you know ten million dollars and you only have one hundred dollars to your name. Maybe we re evaluate do family in peril. That's why it didn't the series didn't star. Leonardo di caprio exactly so there has to be a balanced. You have to you know way your chances before you embark on such an endeavor but yeah star. Worst could not have reveal revolutionize the world of george lucas had given in right. But you're you also agree that the inspiration also kicks him again for us on season two right. Oh absolutely where it's we know. This is working and The lessons that we learned before we did blockbuster and then the lessons we learned on blockbusters season. One where applying all those and. It's just like turbo charging the whole project subtly. I mean okay so george. Lucas is kind of like the inventor. Alexander bell right. He just needed help and support to build the product business. The process that he wanted to achieve this vision someone to back him up in the whole thing and we're not talking about necessarily financially back him up although of course that's part of the whole thing but for george lucas. I think that was. Gary kurtz right twentieth century fox definitely in the first trying to get you know legs in the first place. Have some studio interested. What do you think universal no. What do you think paramount know. What do you think all of these eventually..

george lucas Gary kurtz Leonardo di caprio apple google Alexander bell hollywood georgia reporter producer director
"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

08:21 min | 10 months ago

"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"To get a slightly different product out of it and changing the process is a very difficult thing especially when you're working in teams of people write these inventions took years to catch on because they didn't have the complementary roles help them grow right right. So you know example to edison's light bulb. Edison is responsible for you know the first commercially viable lightbulb. And this kind of new model of this is doing mentioned. It was met with criticism. It was people thought it was stupid. Gimmick terraces oil lamp way. This is ridiculous. You have a little film it involved and you know what's wrong with the oil lamp and it took years before that idea caught on And the reason was the idea. Itself wasn't good enough to revolutionize it it had to come with other things. Oh yeah and something that. I'm as a sound person. Much more close to is the telephone itself. I mean in a way. The telephone was the kind of beginning of of sound transmission in a way as we know it. And so alexander. Graham bell patented it in eighteen seventy six. He went out trying to sell his invention but every body laughed him out like they did not understand why you would want to do that. And his company called western union. They said it was too complex for an average person to us and that it wasn't a tool but a quote unquote toy. We're gonna keep doing telegraphs. Yeah they said yeah. Great solicitude telegraphs. Right and so he went to the biggest to the big boys in the big said absolutely now so bellefield but instead of that being the end of history right or the end of the story of the telephone He started his own company with the financial support of his father in law and a friend thomas sanders who was a leather merchant and who actually had experienced in one thing. That bell wasn't the best which was managing the small business right so he partnered up with someone who complemented what bell did in a way that would make this endeavor the telephone more feasible and so together. They scaled this operation up. They began leasing out telephones which they service themselves to right. Because bureau centrally giving this device to people they can operate it but sometimes they break and everything so they also service them and it right course. It took years but eventually bell telephone company and the technology went on to really revolutionized communication over the next century as we know it. Oh yeah and it not only became a revolution of its own but everything that we do nowadays whether it's the cell phone you're holding right or the internet year using there's a very high chance it's running over regular phone lines. I mean it'd be the backbone of our civilization all communication everything that we're using right now during you know these. These corona virus has been enabled as a result of this of this partnership of two people right And so just looking at the big picture bells idea was amazing and he had passion for this. He knew what he was doing in eighteen. Seventy six but that wasn't good enough because he didn't have the partners. He didn't have the support that he needed to make this An actual feasible product. Right this guy. Thomas anders correct leather merchant correct. So he's the guy who knew how to run a business and passion became action. A vision became an executed reality and that brings us to the next stage for many enterpreneurs. Yes using the haters to your advantage. The the second challenge here because once you get in to actually creating something you're going to be challenged and you know when we first started out filming interviews for score that the documentary the feature documentary you know. I didn't know anyone who is a film composer. Of course the first question. Everybody and ender agent has when you email them or you call them. They say who else is participating and no one wants to be in it if nobody else is Is in it yet. And so there's always this question of like. How do you get that that. I kind of critical mass to be able to actually say oh well we have you know. Abcd that are all part of this and then that hopefully makes it a lot easier because people trust okay. If they're in it then this must be this must be legit. It was extraordinarily difficult to get the first interviews because our answer was no one yet but we hope to get you know such and such and then we have this laundry list of composers that we were hoping to to get access to Who are way too busy to to sit down with us based on just some cold call to their offices and we had some people refuse it i i. I remember one composer Who who shall not be named now but a very very famous composer. Who james noon howard. No no it's not him but someone who Who got it back. We have to come to sell. It was someone who just said. I'm just not that interested. How do you overcome that. That's where this action comes in. Our plan on score was to interview all of the people at the edge of this industry. I so we would start with the agents and managers and executives who could comment on film music history and evolution and hopefully lead us to one or two. You know real composers that we could interview after that and that strategy worked. We shot over Fifty interviews and all and it ended up being more than we needed and almost everyone made it into the final film but it was that action plan that was the key to the whole documentary and it led us to this realization. That everyone who doubted us Along the way. And you always think when you hear that there's always the the self-doubt of you know in my nuts for trying to do this because people are literally telling me no. Because i just don't wanna and you know how do you rebound from that and And then at the end of this it's so satisfying if you're able to kind of power your way through that And will your way to to an end product. And now a lot of these people. We had reached out to a really impressed that we pulled it off and we ended up inviting many of them to to the premiere screening also including some that. We never actually ended up interviewing But they were then very supportive which was which was great so with blockbuster season one you know. We approached several podcasts networks. And it's a different relationship with you know. A scripted podcast. And it's a very new thing too so there. I don't know that there's necessarily a you know one right way to do this. But we approach several people early on We'd never made a podcast before a scripted. Podcast and we knew we could probably figure it out but we need the right partners. Who believed in us and We approached several of the major podcast. Network's all of them had some issue with you. Know our our style of storytelling. Or you know certain certain things that we were doing away that they were unfamiliar with You know if you think of podcasts. A lot of people still think of it as something that you you know record talking about movies in your garage or a true crime story or something you know along. Those lines and most companies have unscripted departments and then they have fiction departments and we were not fiction but also we weren't really documentary either. This wasn't us interviewing people about steven. Spielberg this was us doing all of the research to be able to put together a story and tell it in kind of the most immersive inorganic way that we could. We could again that bio-pic model but none of these podcasts. Networks really knew how to do this one executive. I remember at a major network said to us. We just weren't feeling the format of the show. We don't we don't think it'll work so here. We are several months into developing the story of steven. Spielberg george lucas. That we really like we find so kind of magical an inspirational and all of the people in this industry are.

Graham bell edison Spielberg Thomas anders thomas sanders executive steven james george lucas
"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

07:40 min | 10 months ago

"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"Time. Their strengths and weaknesses and what makes them tick. And what are they nervous about. And all of these things which you don't often see in you know a summary of someone's past our pitch and it's still a lot of our marketing materials for what blockbuster would be was. Let's make a movie for your ears and if we did it right. People would come away with Vivid visual images of the scenes that we were creating purely with sound design. You know there's no images anywhere it it's impossible for an audio platform but what. We've seen a lot from the way people react to this. They say when. I saw that scene about something and we say when you saw it and they saw a well when i heard it. And he's okay then it's working and that's a really cool thing so we were trying to actually paint pictures with sound before we jump into that. I kind of entrepreneurial challenge. I just want to kind of trace back. The origin for the idea of blockbuster was when we were working on score film. Music documentary. peter. You'll remember because you went through this not nearly as many times as i did put a lot of times. We have like a twelve minutes stretch of of John williams scores and these kind of moments throughout his early career. When he was john williams. Is i kind of establishing himself. And he just he explodes into all of these super iconic scores you know jaws and then star wars and close encounters and then. Et and superman and all of these other And then indiana jones. You know it's like all of these super famous Scores that just give you goosebumps. You're on the edgy. It's roller coaster ride for twelve minutes of the movie that we we put together and you know a lot of times you start to hate what you've created after you see it too many times and you say oh. This is terrible. I can't you know but what we found is that it's a really fun. Ride through score and There's this clip of williams and steven spielberg and they're explaining. The jaws theme and john says i told stephen here's the theme to At stephen goes. I thought he was joking and And like that was a really interesting little nugget into their relationship. Because john williams was not the the name that we now know him as at the time he had done movies but none of them. That had voted to the level of jaws would and You know at the time. Stephen who's really young stephen was in his twenties. He hadn't yet made a name for himself but But he was a soundtrack nerd. He'd collected john williams scores for years. So stephen took john williams to lunch and this didn't make it into the series but john was a little older and he mentioned in an interview. Actually that steven didn't really know how to pour the wine and It might have been his first time and he thought it was kind of kind of cute. Stephen was trying to impress him and bring him onto a project. And at the same time. I started hearing about george lucas and how he supported stephen on jaws and then their friendship as george was trying to make star wars. It needs music. And who do we call in. How about you know. Just john williams guy. He's your guy so we've grown up in this world were spielberg and lucas. Her icons and to the point that there are cultural movements based on what they've built you know stranger things. Basically e t. It's the nostalgia kind of second wave of a lot of things from the eighties but people don't really think of spielberg and lucas as once-struggling struggling filmmakers they were trying to build things too and they were taking on a lot of responsibility is very entrepreneurial slightly different model but they are the captains of this ship and they have this budget and they have this vision and they have to execute and they have to get the right people to help support that in that and absence and i think it's also something to do with the specifics of the film industry where This by know me. I says the nine to five job now season two of blockbuster going to advance a few of these things which we can't quite talk about just yet so be sure to subscribe and all of that good stuff but the really powerful thing to me in in doing a lot of the research was they had to fight for it and it's all about building this vision. They're building their own kind of unique business here and just like small businesses. A lot of films will lose money. Most films lose money and And it's all about fighting for that. That shot at actually being a success. And if i can john what happens with jaws as they finally get and just like a movie. You have to be passionate about the story. You're telling it's the same thing that applies to business right where You can't make a business out of something. You're not interested in right. People go into a business. Start there into renault. You'll enterpreneurial journey. Because they're passionate about some idea because they see a problem they find a solution to it and they're like i think i can make money on this and movies are the same thing in those guys. I coined the term blockbuster right right. It's their own category of movies which nobody thought whatever happened right. You're crazy exactly so our first challenge in making blockbuster. The podcast was figuring out how to take that idea that spark that peter talked about earlier and turn it into something that other people would care about and would appreciate and could potentially make some money at least make it's money back And really we were just trying to make something that was as good as it could possibly be as good as we could possibly make it and You know we were looking at something like seventy five grand to make all of All of the podcast from scratch and You know that talks actors. That's the recording equipment storage to. That's the expertise studio rentals right and all of the voices delude groups and then there's the legal and production and you know the other elements there that a lot of people Don't think about the insurance. All of these things have to be part of this. All of that had to be built from scratch so we had to develop that business plan and we were talking about starting a new genre of scripted content. Basically i mean no one has done this kind of bio-pic model so it was somewhere between. Maybe an immersive audio book and movie but we had to find a little bit of that space. Because we didn't really there wasn't a model for this yet and that's when we faced our first challenge which is really trying to turn passion into action and this seems like an obvious point but it's the part that very broadly separates the creatives From the business people so because the world is full of people with great ideas of inventors that come up with some great product right but they are unsure of how they actually materialized that into something more and something tangible and real something they can actually make money on and you know make a living off of yup. that's because inventors live in there of what could be rather than what is there are people who can do both but it often takes years of training and experience to get there right. We see this reflected also in film where you have working relationships between the director like george. Lucas the creative part of wars and producer. Gary kurtz the businessperson this lens blur over time and with experience just like the business world but you need those complementary roles to connect a radical intangible concept. You've dreamed up and are so passionate about into a specific action can take in the real world. Oh ya endures. Lucas case that interpreting aerial side is.

john williams stephen george lucas steven spielberg peter indiana Gary kurtz renault director producer
"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

07:55 min | 10 months ago

"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"Small business What you'll hear from us is our perspective on. What was the first spark of that idea what we struggled with and how we had to figure out how to innovate with that struggle in mind and finally how we've grown that concept that spark with all the issues that we saw how we've grown that into an actual business and the truth is at the end of the day. We're really privileged to be working on something that is so much fun. Like immersive storytelling. Yeah how amazing is that. Yeah so sit back. Relax and enjoy and we hope you'll take some of these lessons that we've learned in the process of making podcasts. And maybe you'll be able to apply to apply these To your own passion project. So let's do a quick background on on each of us on this call. I'll start by telling you a little bit about peter who is the first person that i met I think probably a few days before elaine. He's one of the most prolific young sound designers in hollywood. Since i've known him he's gone from doing little documentaries and short films at film school. Hey i'd to To enormous movies like Last year's midway from director roland emmerich and of course score fill music documentary. Yeah he works on so many Films from universal pictures and disney things and other major studio projects sept tv shows including Modern family He's won awards he's been nominated for a lot more and creatively. Peter is part innovator and part execution which will be important as we kind of detail. Some of the ingredients that go into the recipe of of kind of building a small business. And he's from poland. Yes yes. I am from poland but really the approach for every single project every single movie every single story i tell is to approach it as interpreter as a business venture and to manage it with that mindset in what i do there's always an aspect A goal of making an exciting fun. You can hear that in blockbuster when george. Lucas is holding up the phone while john williams is playing star wars thing and we traveled the phone line to spielberg listening on the other end but the other aspect is just trying to support the story. Tell tell with sound and sometimes there won't be narration or dialogue and we start drawing places events or feelings sound but we try to build those pieces in a way. That's not confusing or disorienting. It might be the way someone walks right because we walk in different ways. We're excited or how. George fumbles with paper and penguin he's coming up with the names of all the characters of star wars And so we hear those hesitations in the pencil right those little things but they're never undermining or god forbid eclipsing the story With something distracting or confusing just because it sounds cool. The story has to come first But to get there. Right we also need to physically creatively produce. It and that brings me to elena bobbitt's transition my wife But also the producer of blockbuster season one and the upcoming season two as well as all the other projects that we've got in development. Oh the top secret Elena background is. She's a film producer. just like me we met at. Usc produced several feature films that have went on to either film festivals. Or you can watch them on. Vod annalena grew up in moscow. Just like me. She came here to the us to work in film. And but prior to working in film and podcast right now. She was a journalist. So she also like me had to transition into this new world into this new career path So there's also a bit of this enterpreneurial twisting and bending that we had to do and you both met at the School of cinematic arts. And peter has days of audio recordings of theo which has been maniacally recorded. And i'm sure that will make their way into films on tv shows soon. Maybe even blockbuster at some point I already rigged up microphones permanently next to his bed so they keep drilled into the chris yet they're permanently screwed on there so he can't rip them off. You know basically our main philosophies to try and treat podcasts treat film productions their stories and if we can make them compelling and with super high production value will really believe they'll stand out and leslie trader the narrator blockbuster would he's also the writer and director of the series. He wasn't investigative journalist for about ten years with cbs and nbc. He produced major undercover and hidden camera investigations and took uncomplicated stories that successfully reversed corruption and return millions of dollars to people fighting for the little guy. Did you get like a percentage of it. No you know. That's that's the thing is you don't They don't ever give you reward. I always loved digging into documents. And and even a lot of people find it boring but the data and a lot of that kind of useful information people might not have access to and put it together into something. That's actually useful. And that actually make sense in. That came through in a lot of the news reports that i worked on some of the investigative stuff and it's also kind of one of the biggest limitations in the news world is. Each story is kind of a formula. It has to be self contained and digestible and then has to kind of fit the corporate news Environment it kinda just has to hit certain points and you never really get that death so that was something that i was really looking to do a little bit more. And what led to quitting my job in news and deciding to go try to fund the documentary a feature documentary and i really wanted to see documentary on the art of film composing because we all know these iconic tunes for james bond and indiana jones and pirates of the caribbean but no one ever made that documentary and So that led to me basically quitting my job and this first big risk that i took which was unwise. Probably pouring my own money and credit cards into making this documentary film. I started researching camera equipment. And you know all of these things that i needed to buy. Or what i could rent or what i needed to know how to use or what i needed to try to recruit someone else for and what they do it for free and all of these other pieces that that kind of started to come together you actually had some technical experience and experience you know telling stories as a journalist. Yes so so. It was an extension of some of the basic building blocks of those skills. Yeah yeah and there was just just. I wouldn't say. I was confident in any way but yeah i mean the main key thing that i was trying to get to was. Why couldn't something that's journalistic feel like it's a little bit more immersive even if it comes to something like film music because really kind of at its core is think we feel the music more than we we you know kind of actively listen to it. It's an emotional kind of thing. So i'll i'll fast forward because the film took a couple of years to put together and we ended up selling it into We sold it to a distributor and it meant that my little epoch media became the production company so we could take the leftover resources from the film That we had just used in start to create other things with it. Yeah the microphones that we have and a lot of the other. I'm i'm going gonna stop you there because again. It's interesting to me actually. As you're telling me the story again you made a diagonal move. Yes it wasn't that you made you transitioned into a brand new industry and you had to learn all the basics from scratch again. You're taking the lessons that you.

peter george poland director elena bobbitt producer disney roland emmerich School of cinematic arts Usc us hollywood john williams elaine moscow cbs Lucas james bond caribbean chris
"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

01:38 min | 10 months ago

"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"This is what filmmaking is all about so that economic uncertainty is a big factor anytime. You're starting a business and especially now in for a lot of businesses that already exists. They're working through these things so really in this episode. We want to talk about three things. The first of these is our own kind of journey as a creative team building and organizing creating investing in the future that we were trying to build when we were first. Starting on blockbuster. There is no such thing as kind of a true drama series yet so kind.

"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

07:51 min | 10 months ago

"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"Hi i'm matt schrader creator and narrator of blockbuster here with the series designer peter bobby producer elena guy. Yes they're married. The last name isn't just a coincidence. In fact You just welcomed to the family theo. Congratulations yeah this is a special release that we're doing Gathered here today remotely through The magic of all of these different software tools and We're here to tell you a little bit about our story. Which is being highlighted by the dell technologies. Small business pod france. Think of that as a tedtalk from creatives in the podcast space. But before any of that. We want to give you a little update on the upcoming season. Two of blockbuster. If you've been following us on social media at blockbuster pod you'll see we've been received so warmly by press like forbes the verge gizmodo we've been honored to win best creative podcasts. Abic podcast of the year awards and are in the running. Now for the peabody's the webbie's new york festival radio awards and several others. So we're really really excited. It's not something with thought about much one. We started this series last year but quite the motivational boost for us as we were recording actors season. Two things for getting the word out about blockbuster it has really worked and so fulfilling to hear from people saying they listened. The ugly cried at certain scenes. We're so honored to be able to make these kinds of things that people will appreciate and care about as much as we do. Yeah and we've been hard at work on season. Two as some of you might have noticed on our social media and although like everyone else we've been hit by the coronavirus thing. Well we've managed to adapt like also all of you. So we brand new remote workflow and we managed to finish all of our recordings in that fashion And the great news is we finally have a release date and we're set release in june and yeah so we have a lot to share so first of all just like last season is going to be incredibly immersive. It's to- are. We giving spoilers here peter not to watch but it is going to be immersive. Good go ahead. We can give away a little. It's going to be slightly different story but we're going to be as big and as bold as before and of course like last time it's researched to the tiniest possible detail Were asked true as it gets to real life and again it's a bio pod its bio pic podcast as the verge call dust bio pa origin of that is still kind of up in the air but we think elena invented. Elena thinks that there are contenders. And we're also going to be a bit longer we're going to have ten episodes instead of six and we're going to be a bit more expansive because this time around we have over seventy five characters so law So many yeah. It's been so much to juggle but we're We think we're going to pull it off. Yeah i mean. It was a really long recording process but we managed and everything turned out to be really amazing especially considering what's happening around us and itself contained this season in some very delicate ways connects to season one. But you won't need to understand season one to Listen to season. Two and just like susan one. It's an incredibly powerful story. So obviously i know some of the some of the sound design. That i've heard well we won't play it up too much because expectations are always the anyhow but but it sounds so cool. Can't wait to share it Yeah so there's still a couple of things that we have to do And unfortunately corona viruses kind of throwing a wrench in the whole process. We have to loop group Which is when we get a bunch of actors in one room to be are mid ground background very specific to some of the scenes that were shooting unfortunately because of coronavirus. We can't put more than one person in a room. So we're trying to figure out if we wait if we do this remotely But one thing we can tell you is. We're all ready so proud of this one. That will we can't wait to show it to you guys. And what is this season about well. There's going to be trailer coming out soon. So i'm not sure if we can stay to stay tuned state. Maybe it'll be Coming out around the corner follow our social most social media buster and listen and detail to this episode. because we'll keep on dropping small spoilers. We can promise so about this episode. It's a weird time for small business like ours probably like yours to and we've had to adapt and solve problems like recording together. I mean right. Now we're in three separate locations and we're recording ourselves and we're having a dialogue. We see each other. We can hear each other But remotely To have to figure out how to interact how to collaborate as efficiently as before and the truth is it's not easy because we're dealing with creative ideas storytelling. We're we're talking about emotions and yep it's much more difficult to talk about those things when you don't feel the person next to you in the room so we wanted to share with you guys. A bit of our journey of how we went about starting this production company that specializes in storytelling and all those stages that we went through so if you a follow us and please do subscribe to blockbuster on all of your podcast listening apps. But you'll see that. The of the series is epic cliff media. I think now it says epic originals and as some of our listeners may know that's My company that i started in two thousand fifteen when i left my job as a investigative journalist i was with cbs. At the time I put my own savings and credit cards and a lot more into camera and audio equipment to start filming a documentary and that was a film About the world's most well known film. Composers like khan zimmer. John williams of course Danny elfin like fifty others that we ended up interviewing and that film was called score a film music documentary. It's where i met peter Where i met. Elena and peter and i worked together on that film. He did the sound for it. He won awards for the sound for it. And its success led to a spin off interview. Show that we've been doing for the last three years called score the pod counties that interviews a lot of these composers working on modern things and it's a cool kind of you know peek behind the curtain and then all let us to this idea for blockbuster which is a scripted narrative miniseries that put kind of my journalism background and And peter's extraordinary sound design together into the same kind of product that we could It hadn't been done before this idea of that. That word again bio pod. So that's kind of the short of it. The challenges like with any creative project are how to build something. Sustainable that can keep you employed and and keep the creativity flowing so specifically what we're pushing into. Is this idea of high end. Kind of immersive audio. That's done almost at a level that you would see on a feature film the storytelling skills. Yeah and that's what. This episode is about the risks of taken to build what we have from scratch with our own sweat and blood. This episode is also part of a broader serious and small business success from dell which is supporting hundreds of small businesses in the wake of the coronavirus lockdowns. We do want to recognize and acknowledge sulfur. This as a lot of advertisers have pulled out of podcast. Youtube canonica certainty. Here dealt technologies has been incredible in supporting and highlighting the small business pod for in serious talks. We're really applaud them for their commitment to supporting small businesses and trying times especially those like ours in entertainment which are completely shut down because you cannot work with actors and beyond sets and have a lot of people together and.

peter bobby elena guy dell matt schrader coronavirus lockdowns york producer Youtube peabody forbes susan khan zimmer John williams cbs Danny elfin
"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

02:02 min | 10 months ago

"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"We wanted to share with you guys. A bit of our journey of how we went about starting this production company that specializes in storytelling and all those stages that we went through so if you a follow us and please do subscribe to blockbuster on all of your podcast listening apps. But you'll see that. The of the series is epic cliff media. I think now it says epic originals and as some of our listeners may know <hes> that's <hes>. My company that i started in two thousand fifteen when i left my job as a investigative journalist i was with cbs. At the time <hes>. I put my own savings and credit cards and a lot more into camera and audio equipment to start filming a documentary and that was a film <hes>. About the world's most well known film. Composers like khan zimmer. John williams of course <hes>. Danny elfin like fifty others that we ended up interviewing and that film was called score a film music documentary. It's where i met peter <hes>. Where i met. Elena and peter and i worked together on that film. He did the sound for it. He won awards for the sound for it. And its success led to a spin off interview. Show that we've been doing for the last three years called score the pod counties that interviews a lot of these composers working on modern things and it's a cool kind of you know peek behind the curtain and then all let us to this idea for blockbuster which is a scripted narrative miniseries that put kind of my journalism background and <hes>. And peter's extraordinary sound design together into the same kind of product that we could <hes>. It hadn't been done before this idea of that. That word again bio pod. So that's kind of the short of it. The challenges like with any creative project are how to build something. Sustainable that can keep you employed and and keep the creativity flowing so specifically what we're pushing into. Is this idea of high end. Kind of immersive audio. That's done almost at a level that you would see on a feature film the storytelling skills.

peter bobby elena guy dell matt schrader coronavirus lockdowns york producer Youtube peabody forbes susan khan zimmer John williams cbs Danny elfin
The Genesis of The Miniseries Podcast "Blockbuster"

Dell Technologies Podference

02:02 min | 10 months ago

The Genesis of The Miniseries Podcast "Blockbuster"

"We wanted to share with you guys. A bit of our journey of how we went about starting this production company that specializes in storytelling and all those stages that we went through so if you a follow us and please do subscribe to blockbuster on all of your podcast listening apps. But you'll see that. The of the series is epic cliff media. I think now it says epic originals and as some of our listeners may know that's My company that i started in two thousand fifteen when i left my job as a investigative journalist i was with cbs. At the time I put my own savings and credit cards and a lot more into camera and audio equipment to start filming a documentary and that was a film About the world's most well known film. Composers like khan zimmer. John williams of course Danny elfin like fifty others that we ended up interviewing and that film was called score a film music documentary. It's where i met peter Where i met. Elena and peter and i worked together on that film. He did the sound for it. He won awards for the sound for it. And its success led to a spin off interview. Show that we've been doing for the last three years called score the pod counties that interviews a lot of these composers working on modern things and it's a cool kind of you know peek behind the curtain and then all let us to this idea for blockbuster which is a scripted narrative miniseries that put kind of my journalism background and And peter's extraordinary sound design together into the same kind of product that we could It hadn't been done before this idea of that. That word again bio pod. So that's kind of the short of it. The challenges like with any creative project are how to build something. Sustainable that can keep you employed and and keep the creativity flowing so specifically what we're pushing into. Is this idea of high end. Kind of immersive audio. That's done almost at a level that you would see on a feature film the storytelling skills.

Khan Zimmer Danny Elfin Peter John Williams CBS Sound Elena Blockbuster
"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

Dell Technologies Podference

03:47 min | 10 months ago

"dell technologies" Discussed on Dell Technologies Podference

"First real lesson that we learned beyond those <hes>. That i think is sort of the operating principle that got us off the ground as a business is. We had to find the intersection or the nexus. If you wanna use a word like that of our ability and our opportunity yeah. I mean we we. We don't need to rehash how we got from point. A. to point b. to point c. from being engineers to working for crew and then working hosting a television show called online nation. We shared all of that in episode one of our lost years series. You can go back and watch that wanna know how to how we got from point. A. to point b. to point c. But if point see is we were hosting this show online nation and it got cancelled and we were flying out to la to shoot it and then we find ourselves back in our little basement where we were making videos back at square one making videos again but we had no no income anymore. We just had the money that we made off of that show and we were living of that while we figured out what it was we were going to do. We had to develop an entirely new business plan and there was no important to note. No one was making money on youtube directly. There was no youtube partner programs. So you couldn't just make a video and nc money role in so really. There was no such thing as a professional youtuber. So it's a really interesting idea that we were like we're going to have a career because we were like. Let's make this youtube thing fulltime. Thank but yet no one was making it a career but again we were like what two things exist here. We know that we can write a funny song. We can make a funny music video. We'd had success with that. The facebook song had gone really big and the second piece of the puzzle was is we knew that there were businesses out there who wanted people to know about them. So as like okay. Can we put those two things together. Can we put our ability to write a funny song with a company that wants to advertise and put that on youtube and it was really just an open question at the time and there weren't a lot of big companies that were sponsoring videos. I think there was some of that. It's not like we came up with the idea out of absolutely nothing out of thin air but they're they're definitely they're definitely weren't big companies invest a lot of money in this platform where no one understood youtube or digital video that well but it. It seemed like our best play because the thing that we wanted to make is the thing that we could also sell or at least sell ad space in and we thought we could do a good job of making it an an an integration so that it made sense that the ad was part of it. It wasn't like a lot of videos today where you could you know. You'll be blogging or doing whatever you're doing in your video and then you could insert an ad in the middle and people would understand. And here's a coupon code and nears you know here's what here's to him. Sponsor is kind of thing so we wanted to do something that was. That was thoughtful that we can be proud of but also make money and feed our kids because we already had kids at the time that if you want if you want to really be driven to succeed at business have children have children. I have children i. They tend to be hungry and demanding. And you come home to. And you're like man i gotta get after it.

youtube facebook la nc partner
How Mythical Entertainment First Married Advertising and YouTube

Dell Technologies Podference

03:47 min | 10 months ago

How Mythical Entertainment First Married Advertising and YouTube

"First real lesson that we learned beyond those That i think is sort of the operating principle that got us off the ground as a business is. We had to find the intersection or the nexus. If you wanna use a word like that of our ability and our opportunity yeah. I mean we we. We don't need to rehash how we got from point. A. to point b. to point c. from being engineers to working for crew and then working hosting a television show called online nation. We shared all of that in episode one of our lost years series. You can go back and watch that wanna know how to how we got from point. A. to point b. to point c. But if point see is we were hosting this show online nation and it got cancelled and we were flying out to la to shoot it and then we find ourselves back in our little basement where we were making videos back at square one making videos again but we had no no income anymore. We just had the money that we made off of that show and we were living of that while we figured out what it was we were going to do. We had to develop an entirely new business plan and there was no important to note. No one was making money on youtube directly. There was no youtube partner programs. So you couldn't just make a video and nc money role in so really. There was no such thing as a professional youtuber. So it's a really interesting idea that we were like we're going to have a career because we were like. Let's make this youtube thing fulltime. Thank but yet no one was making it a career but again we were like what two things exist here. We know that we can write a funny song. We can make a funny music video. We'd had success with that. The facebook song had gone really big and the second piece of the puzzle was is we knew that there were businesses out there who wanted people to know about them. So as like okay. Can we put those two things together. Can we put our ability to write a funny song with a company that wants to advertise and put that on youtube and it was really just an open question at the time and there weren't a lot of big companies that were sponsoring videos. I think there was some of that. It's not like we came up with the idea out of absolutely nothing out of thin air but they're they're definitely they're definitely weren't big companies invest a lot of money in this platform where no one understood youtube or digital video that well but it. It seemed like our best play because the thing that we wanted to make is the thing that we could also sell or at least sell ad space in and we thought we could do a good job of making it an an an integration so that it made sense that the ad was part of it. It wasn't like a lot of videos today where you could you know. You'll be blogging or doing whatever you're doing in your video and then you could insert an ad in the middle and people would understand. And here's a coupon code and nears you know here's what here's to him. Sponsor is kind of thing so we wanted to do something that was. That was thoughtful that we can be proud of but also make money and feed our kids because we already had kids at the time that if you want if you want to really be driven to succeed at business have children have children. I have children i. They tend to be hungry and demanding. And you come home to. And you're like man i gotta get after it.

Youtube LA Facebook
Streaming Storage Reimagined

Big Data Beard

06:44 min | 11 months ago

Streaming Storage Reimagined

"This Corey Menton and we are back with another season of the big. Dig Up Your podcast and we're GONNA kick it off in style this time with a little conversation around streaming storage reimagined and have that conversation today. I'm joined by two folks from Dell Technologies. Amy Nannies is the product. Marketing Manager Adult Technologies and Flavio. Jakarta is the senior distinguished engineer. Adele Technologies Aiming Flavio. Welcome to the show. Amy How are you surviving in this crazy corona virus work from home migration and doing surprisingly well? I think I was made for this kind of living. What's funny I had a conversation yesterday and I somebody said its worst nightmare for an extrovert. Because we don't get to get out and socialize but it's also works nightmare for an introvert because you really don't get a lot of downtime because there's so many people in the house potentially for those of those kids and wives and families and all this stuff so it's everybody's struggling a little bit flabbier. How are you doing in this time? I'm pretty good pretty good. It has been on. It has been nice intelligent at the same time. Nice from the perspective that We spend a lot of time with family together like I. I believe we have never done before. So that's nice but telling him. Part is not being which you step outside me here stain. We have full lockdown. Now can we go tight for groceries and all that stuff from that perspective is challenging but You know we. We were coping very well. So we'll good well. I hope everybody else's stand out there. Hope our audience sustained safe and hopefully this conversation with episode. We'll give you something to enjoy in the lockdown. That's happening so many places around the world. Now business hasn't stopped. People are still out there. Working trying to derive value from data and one of the conversations kind of macro themes that has been really popular over the last two years. If you will is this concept of analytics on streams so I want to set the table Amy would you favor and help us understand? What exactly do people mean when they talk about streams sure yes so extreme as just a continuous data feed? That's in constant motion. So there's no beginning there's no end. Typically we have a time stamp on our data feed so this is different because it's always flowing Today a lot of our data naturally comes in this form you know everyone has a organizations are beginning to utilize drones and security cameras. So we're seeing this information produced all the time interesting now. This constant stream of data a guessing is kind of important you just mentioned a few Kenna interest in areas security and surveillance and those kind of things why streaming getting so much press. These days is becoming really critical for modern analytics. Yeah so you know. It's important for us to be able to consume it store it and analyze it in real time as it's coming in because we get the most value from this data as it's coming in A good example is when we're shopping online so we get to the cart and we have suggested purchases if the computer behind that was to look at that data. Historically we'd be getting it a week from now and that wouldn't be as valuable Or something like traffic lights. We can look at how busy they are and change the timing in between them if we can get that information as it's coming in so the ability to analyze information as it's coming in is hugely valuable in almost every industry. Yeah so get into that real time. Capability is so challenging. I imagine you know there's a lot organizations and a lot of technology is being built and developed to handle executive that problem so far beyond cures from your perspective. What are the challenges that this stream type data bring to maybe those traditional analytics platforms that organizations have spent the last five ten years deploying right so following up on a on what amy said if you're continuously generating data in you can imagine applications where you have a large number of these data sources? So she she used an online shopping example right. But you can also think of food servers Sensors edge applications in general. You can have many of those and all of those producing this flows of data continuously so this year diggity unnecessary to ingest this data and make available downstream. So if you're talking about applications that we want you tell that street rates went to processing data as soon as possible so ingesting that making available news is challenged by itself. Now if you think about the characteristics of of the Stream flows they need their unbounded right so as you mentioned the arm-banded so they have They have a beginning. They begin at some point by there is no no no. There's there isn't necessarily an end end. Not even that alone. You can have fluctuations in the in the workload so that the flow. You're getting my change in my few censors at some point or more sensors oranmore service fiercer results although this cannot can fluctuate and and the the your plan which accommodate those changes and in addition to that you don't want you don't want to have duplicates miss events or or or have problems with the with the streaming away that doesn't reflect what application expects a consistencies and other is another important property. All that's with the with the application wanting to deliver results with low latency so he's taking that data processing yet and delivering results as possible. And finally the the the aspect of reacting facet changes. So if you are in this in the situation that you are taking the state alive processing live and delivering results as fast as possible. System must also be able to accommodate changes to too many thanks to the work as I mentioned on. That could be faults in the system needs to watch to react to those. Maybe replicate In my need to increase the the D'Amato resources dedicated to a critical application. So all those make a beauty a platform like this very challenging.

Amy Nannies Flavio Corey Menton Dell Technologies Marketing Manager Adult Techno Jakarta Adele Technologies Distinguished Engineer Kenna D'amato Executive
An Esports Tournament for Hackers?

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:39 min | 1 year ago

An Esports Tournament for Hackers?

"Better faster greener super micro resource-saving server and storage systems with intel zeon scalable processors reduce the cost and environmental impact of your enterprise infrastructure learn more at super micro dot com. I'm charlie turner in new york and this is tech news briefing from the wall street journal e. sports in which professional video game players compete against each other are growing in popularity. Some observers think east sports will soon can have a cybersecurity league where teams compete to hack each other systems will have the story in a moment. I hear some tech headlines dell's technology suave quarterly profit bolstered by a large tax benefit and record revenue at the division selling everything from laptops to computer workstations dell thursday reported a higher adjusted profit of two fifteen per share beating analysts projections of a dollar fifty. A share sources say china is studying technology companies companies reliance on american suppliers. It's an apparent attempt to assess their ability to withstand further trade tensions even as beijing prepares to roll out a retaliatory blacklist backlist of foreign businesses chinese official last week reiterated plans to release in the near future. An unreliable entity list of foreign businesses and individuals is that would face restrictions in their dealings with chinese counterparts. The list is an apparent planned response to washington's attempts to shut out telecommunications giant walkway technologies the survey of domestic companies as part of china's longer term goal of weaning itself off dependence on u._s. Technology divide widens between the world's two largest economies. Mace apple is launching a new product repair program in the u._s. In which outside vendors can repair apple products using the same parts and tools as the company's authorized service providers apple thursday businesses need to have an apple certified technician to apply for the company's repair program firms. The qualify can buy diagnostic equipment whitman parts and tools at the same price paid by the companies more than five thousand authorized service providers worldwide apple plans eventually to expand the program outside the u._s. After having piloted the program with businesses in north america europe and asia over the past year separately apple says it plans to host a september tenth event at the steve steve jobs theater on its corporate campus where it's widely expected to unveil products including three new iphone models better faster greener owner super micro resource-saving server and storage systems with intel zeon scalable processors reduce the cost and environmental impact of your enterprise infrastructure picture learn more at super micro dot com millions of people watch e sports in which professional video game players compete in tournaments midst of halo and call of duty. Some experts say viewers could one day be watching cybersecurity teams compete to hack one another systems could this broadened the appeal of sports among in youth and also perhaps lure them to work in the cyber security industry which is sorely in need of talent. Let's talk with wall street. Journal reporter james rundle who's part of the journals pro cybersecurity security team james. It sounds like a good idea creating an e sports category for cyber security <hes> essentially to kill two birds with one stone boosting interest in both e. sports and the overall industry yes essentially so cybersecurity has a pretty severe recruitment problem right now <hes> hundreds of thousands of vacancies in the u._s. alone millions worldwide worldwide so that areas if you can broaden the appeal attract youth through sports on maybe can help plug that gap well. The question is how interested would viewers really c._b._s. Watching sports contestants patch systems isn't this kind of a laborious process. It's a bit like watching paint dry so <hes> yeah that's the problem. You know you're watching people at the movies glorify radio watching people do the homework every competes as a there are some efforts underway to change this one gentleman who spoke to jason taylor. That's not a proof of concept where it would visualize the action going on in a game four months <hes> piece of put together something the unreal engine <hes> and it was pretty successful. There have already been cyber sports cyber sports competitions having their in the form of capture the flag contests and they're. They're more coming up on it. You talk about that yes so there was one recently in august called wicked six which pitted sixteenths from different colleges across the u._s. against each other raising money for charity. <hes> it was a bit of a test i think just to see if it could work and that kind of format with a live audience and it seemed to go pretty well that they're gonna get next year. <hes> catch the fly contest. Do you happen at most conferences throughout the world <hes> specifically defcon a blackout the the biggest ones <hes> but this is one of the first times that it's really had all the trappings of an sportswoman is a big one is scheduled to take place in the fall season featuring thousands of students discovering. What two months yes. This is the national cyber league. It's a very interesting program. That's been run since two thousand twelve. <hes> gentle daniel manson at the u. The polytechnic pomona runs it and essentially it allows high school and college students to compete individually and in teams against each other of the course of two seasons they in the spring and the full semesters and <hes> it's been pretty successful gordon <hes> just under thousand plays in two thousand twelve to around hopefully six thousand and they're they're different brackets hard medium easy. Yeah you can appeal to anybody with the super experience the security or whether a complete novus <hes> look at the practice with others of the ability types going up against prepackaged essentially couldn't student player's leverage their game experiences kind of a replacement for you know on the job bob experience when applying for cyber security position exactly yeah i mean there's a lot of people node jobs quite tough to get in specialized industries having experience already even the entry of ones and so what the n._c. L. does which is really interesting. Is they provide a scouting report for every player shows their strengths their weaknesses how did throw season <hes> and quite a few of them have polly so you're actually bringing this job interviews and getting crazy industry as a result well how many job openings are currently in the cyber security field. I imagine in their thousands of them in the u._s. There's about three hundred fifteen thousand but presence <hes> worldwide the nearly three million <hes> which is astronomical the problem being of course it's such a specialized industry can take up to ten years to train. Someone's be effective in this so you have a massive massive on ramp to what you're getting into a huge <hes> need people in the wall street journal pro cyber-security reporter james rendel. Thanks for joining us. Thank you and that's tech news briefing. I'm charlie turner in new york for the wall street journal.

Apple Wall Street Journal Intel Charlie Turner China New York Dell Reporter Beijing James Rendel Washington Journal Jason Taylor James Rundle North America Official Daniel Manson
Inside the Field: WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play

The Golf Podcast

04:06 min | 2 years ago

Inside the Field: WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play

"So another golf tournament is in the book southbound championship Paul Casey your winter. We are now on the world golf championship. Dell technologies match-play event of what you and I have both been I'd say critical of just the format. I think the round Robin of the next three days is a complete waste of time. And they're trying to change it to include thirty two guys and the player said, nah. Let's here's something. I've gotta say about vow Spar last week. All right. The winning score was eight under par. Innisbrook Copperhead course, does not get enough credit for how awesome it is. Well, yes, and no, I think it got a little bit of do last year. Because Tigers in it. So everybody was watching it. So people that weren't familiar with the snake pit and everything goes on. You're like, oh, that's a decent little track. But yes by large. I would say you're correct. Yes. Because that golf course again is a golf course that is not huge. Now. It's not a big giant, golf, makers course, exactly. And you throw a live just a little bit of wind in there. It's not like it was blowing. Like it does at the Honda where blows thirty miles an hour. And guys just hate that golf course. This is a golf course. That guy's really like 'cause it forces you to hit golf shots, and I'll tell you you watching Paul Casey. There's a reason that guy is always in contention at the masters. Funny that you say that because there were plenty of guys Jason day who said that they were playing in his Brooke because it reminds them the most of agus, correct? So now, it just reminds them of Augusta has not even close to the speed, no or the length or even the width of Augusta. But the shot making that you have to hit their and surprising enough for Florida. Some of the elevations changes are similar. Yeah. And so in that's that's the beauty. That course in that tournament. That's why always when I'm in one of these pick 'em leagues. There's a, you know daily fantasy when you look at some of these guys for the masters, Paul Casey, no matter, what is one of my guys because the value you get outta him. But at the second shot course Innisbrook set can shot course, Augusta's a second. Shot. Course your drive is. Here's the thing about saying. It's a second shot course though Augusta. Yes. Because so I did a thing. I was asking guys. So I got seven seven guys or eight guys. And I asked them, you know, for here's your holes. Here's your holes. Here's your host. Give me the most important was the key to this whole and not one dude was like what you have to be on this side. And every guy started with you have to hit the fairway you have to hit the fairway, and I thought to myself as long as we've been hearing about how much of a second shot. Golf course Augusta is because of where you have to hit the green every guy that I spoke to which were all masters champions, every single one of them every single masters champion said the same thing you have to hit the fairway you do. But if you have any chance like you're not gonna accidents birdie a hole in Augusta, and it's not going to happen. Your second shot of where you land it because those gray. Raines I'd say maybe the eighteen holes two of them have greens where there's flat areas. Maybe. Yeah. So you have zero chance of scoring at. That course, if you don't land your second shot in the right area of the green to put yourself in a position to make the putt now Augusta's not hard to hit. If you don't hit the fairway at Augusta. You're not screwed. It's not accept on fifteen yet as one whole day. That's right fifteen. You gotta hit the right, so yeah. Because in your popping it out for to your punching up for three you're laying. You're you're giving away scoring hole or not doesn't really matter on them.

Augusta Golf Paul Casey Innisbrook Vow Spar Dell Technologies Tigers Jason Day Florida Raines Brooke Three Days
Dell shareholders back return to the public market

FT News

06:31 min | 2 years ago

Dell shareholders back return to the public market

"We're taking a look at sales returned to the public markets in two thousand thirteen the computer company quit the NASDAQ in a controversial twenty four billion dollar buyout. But now five years later and after a fierce fight among some key shareholders. Michael Dell's technology company is set to listen to the new York Stock Exchange are US editor of the lex column. Sajida in that talks to Amy keen about what's bringing the company back to the public market. And why some shareholders resisted the deal? So G starts with what prompted Michael Dell to take his company private just a few years ago. So dull, obviously, it was the famous stop. He c- maker Michael Dell started the company in the eighties. When he was a college student and his dorm room at Texas. It was hot company for a really long time. But say ten years ago, you know, the PC became much less important smartphones were here, the the iphone and the like, and so he ended up spending like fifteen billion dollars between twenty ten and twenty twelve trying to turn delicacy off company, a much broader tech company, the market hated that. It's down shares like twenty five percent between twenty ten and twenty twelve and around the same time he had met this guy. Egon Durban who was a private equity investor to firm called Silverlake, which is a Silicon Valley based buy out firm, which is quite prominent both in Silicon Valley and in Wall Street and doing these buyouts, and they happen to be neighbors in a Wii. And so they had the idea that they could take Dell private buy out the public shareholders, and then reinvent this company and private so through the course of twenty thirteen the announced the deal and. By the end twenty thirteen they were able to tail private at a twenty four billion dollar valuation is very controversial a bunch of shareholders protested because they thought Michael Dell was a CEO, and he knew things that no one else did. And if he's buying why should we selling? But ultimately, they're all able to push the deal through and Dell became a private company in late. Twentieth. Thirteen and so if you fast forward five years Dell is going to be coming back to the public markets. What's changed? What happened over this period? Yeah. So the whole plan was to turn around and reinvent the company, which they did very dramatically Silverlake is a private equity firm. And so they have investors who are pension funds, and sovereign wealth funds and endowments who after five seven ten years want their money back. So it's natural for companies that go private like delta to relist again. And so what they've done in the last five years is that they really did till it turn del into this like one stop shop for corporate IT department. So they bought most prominently EMC, which is a tech data vendor for sixty seven billion dollars. They offload. A divisions that didn't fit anymore, and they've turned into this company that really can go up against Cisco HP and IBM and companies like that Sajid in order for Dow to have the backing to list again this time in the new York Stock Exchange, they company needed shareholder support. Can you walk us through what led to the vote that took place on Tuesday places start with that as we have to go back to the EMC deal, which happened 2016 EMC was a sixty seven billion dollar company. Dell was big it was perhaps thirty forty billion. Maybe at the time twenty five something like that. So it was private. So we don't actually know what the valuation was. But the point is he was much bigger. And so two by all of EMC offered their shareholders to things that gave them twenty three dollars per share in cash and the gave them a piece of paper called tracking stock to track. Another company called VM ware VM where was majority owned by EMC was also listed. So eighty percent of this company that was listed was owned by EMC Dell couldn't afford to buy all that for cash. And so they said, you know, what will give you this piece? The paper called tracking stock in VM ware, and it will reflect our interest in this company VM ware, and it should trade roughly in line with with VM ware. And so this piece of tracking stock which was publicly listed or traded called deviant t was created UNC shareholders got it. And for the last two years. It has traded has gone up quite a bit. The problem is it's always triggered a sharp discount to the pure VM ware stock big del wanted to go public again. And so the way to do that was not a traditional IPO where they just go out and sell shares of Delon people by that in like an under written offering what they wanted to do was take Dell shares a private and then swap it with Devi shareholders who would get the new Dell paper and through that transaction. Dell would again be public company. The problem was how do you actually value DVD, and that has been the fight for the last six months, let's say it's been particularly contentious who are some of the key sort of people fighting. It's interesting TV. Mt. Is like this weird security. VM ware is hard to understand. So not survey. Rising Lee its biggest investors have been hedge fund. So most prominently call icon had a big stake Elliott, the very high profile hedge fund that gets in these kind of fights. Was there a bunch of other kind of brand name twins were involved in the Soza a fight really between for the last six months to throughout the terms of this reverse merger IPO between these big hedge funds, and then Silverlake sedans had the benefit over these last few years of not having to answer to the public markets not having to release quarterly earnings. How's it looking like, it's gonna trait? That's a great question. So part of the fight that's gone on with this VM ware. Tracking stock called Devi MTA has been there's really two issues around it one VM ware. Let's say one hundred and fifty dollars per share company. The tracking stock has traded say around one hundred or one hundred and five so thirty forty percent discount. So the whole of that tracking stock one want to be made whole sort of get a value that approaches at one fifty the other half of the fight in the more complicated. Fight is a big portion of this. Deal is in this del stock which is suddenly going to be public. How much is that worth since it's private there's a big disagreement on how much that is worth. The delta worth quite a bit. The hedge funds have been skeptical. And so that was really the core kind of fight that just got resolved a came up with a clever mechanism to sort that out. But if you look at the actual numbers, and where Dell's going to trade at least initially the Cordell business businesses, not going to trade at a very high multiple. And so Michael Dell who was frustrated five years ago about his valuation is probably going to be frustrated now again, and so the question is do shareholders publisher holders now mutual funds, and the like do they kind of Dopp his vision on how Dell is going to really compete in this new IT market that they've been remade. And they're right up there with Cisco, and Microsoft, and the others or is this going to be thought of as a slow growth business that has this corporate governance problem with private equity firm who still there and Michael Dell who have super voting shares? We're going to take advantage of us. So the real question is now. Hey, the public. They got this deal done our daily at the benefit of the doubt or not. All All right. right. Thank Thank you. you.

Dell Michael Dell EMC Vm Ware Silverlake Cisco Lex Column AMY Silicon Valley York York Stock Exchange Texas
2018 Dell Technologies Championship leaderboard, takeaways: Bryson DeChambeau makes statement

WBZ Midday News

01:22 min | 2 years ago

2018 Dell Technologies Championship leaderboard, takeaways: Bryson DeChambeau makes statement

"Chris, Beaumont, is in the ticket dot? Com, sports studio on the road today at Boston in Norton for the final round of the Dell technologies golf championship Chris what's going on out there well I'll, tell you there are plenty of big names on the, front page of the leaderboard Sherry and a number of low scores being posted here in. Norton Phil Mickelson cooled off a bit on his back nine but buried a birdie putt. On eighteen to finish with. The day's best eight. Under par he's now vaulted all the way up to six place at ten under for the tournament Tiger Woods is up there he's played five holes, he's two under par back. To minus nine Jordan speed is just beginning his rounded where we, McElroy begins the day just three shots off the lead but they're all chasing little-known Abraham answer ranked. Eighty seventh in points standings coming into this week but after a sixty six under sixty five yesterday he described how he kept his nerves in check And his, composure under the pressure of the FedEx Cup playoffs drawing back from experiences really had saw that year This year and has some instances where I've been playing pair wisdom really good players that have been doing this for a long time and learn from them and just learn from my mistakes of what I've done, before answer will tee, off at one forty five paired with Bryson to Shambo who won last week's. Northern Trust

Phil Mickelson Bryson Tiger Woods Chris Boston Yankees Thorndike Patriots Beaumont Norton Sherry Northern Trust Abraham Texas Dell Seattle Houston Atlanta Baltimore
Inside Tiger Woods' return to competitive golf and his 2018 season

WBZ Afternoon News

01:13 min | 2 years ago

Inside Tiger Woods' return to competitive golf and his 2018 season

"Macher Hearn. From bulls by Andrews WBZ news. Time five thirty five local golfers are buzzing today on the news that Tiger Woods. Is coming back to Massachusetts for attorney moment that means something to him so. As we learned today Tiger Woods is coming back to the bay state for the first time in five years one of golf's greatest will compete, at TPC Boston and Norton at the Dell technology championships it event, that woods helped get started back in the early odds and, took the title and in two thousand and six Steve works at fresh pond golf course, in Cambridge was there, with his wife the day tiger won the day. MRs. Steve picked up golf and he was, good he he got him into golf we actually bought our clubs and she. Played and what does she. Like best, about Tigers game this. You, gotta how you can explain that on. The radio but. It's the fist pump pump she just gets excited and, so do. Golf fans worldwide this season. To record numbers as the tiger comeback tour continues coming. Soon to a golf course. Near us Chris. Pharma WBZ NewsRadio ten thirty Jeff Brown's, market wrap coming up in just about two minutes on the campus visits are over the late night arguing about Applications done yes finally arrived in the mail and. Now the logo on the sweatshirt. Appears at the top of the Bill and. The final gap between budgeted.

Tiger Woods Golf Andrews Wbz Mrs. Steve Macher Hearn Tigers Massachusetts Dell Boston Attorney Jeff Brown Chris Cambridge Two Minutes Five Years
Bloomberg, Tracy Jonky and Tracy WBZ discussed on WBZ Midday News

WBZ Midday News

03:44 min | 2 years ago

Bloomberg, Tracy Jonky and Tracy WBZ discussed on WBZ Midday News

"Once again to check Wall Street with Tracy jonky at Bloomberg good afternoon Tracy Good afternoon art investors clear path to trade with China for big. Industrial companies at. Least Boeing three and Caterpillar and United. Technologies are. At. The top of the Dow's gain. Is up one hundred forty three points about half a percent to. Twenty five thousand four forty nine NASDAQ's up forty nine points SAP's up sixteen and. The Bloomberg WBZ New England index is rising almost one percent they're talking about resuming trade talks Bloomberg news reports the US and Chinese officials are looking for. Ways to re-engage in negotiations. Trade tensions may have held back spending. On, pricey durable goods like appliances in June but consumer spending on services rebounded and the Commerce Department reports consumer spending overall increased in June by four tenths percent that was. Fueled by incomes that grew to. Match business reports, dating, thirty eight past the hour I'm Tracy jonky. Bloomberg business. On WBZ NewsRadio ten thirty thank you Tracy WBZ news time is two ten. And here, we We go again Facebook says it has found dozens of. New fake accounts and pages that, are trying to influence this year's midterm elections Facebook says it is disabled thirty to Facebook and Instagram accounts company officials said they have not been able to link those accounts to Russia US intelligence officials have said Russian agents try to influence the outcome of. The two thousand. Sixteen presidential election President Trump tweets. That three d. plastic guns being sold to the public doesn't seem to make much sense. So he's looking into it nine states are suing, the Trump administration over its decision, to allow a Texas company to publish downloadable blueprints for a three d. printed gun it takes effect tomorrow CBS's Tony dokoupil says opponents worry that a plastic gun is undetectable by metal detectors doesn't have a serial. Number and requires. No background checks incredibly controversial because on. One side. You. Have people saying this is an, invitation to criminals A. Terrorist, bad people of every stripe and on the other side of the conversation you have second amendment absolutist saying this is. Our guarantee that no one will ever be able to curtail. The second amendment in this country it is our right Senator Ed Markey is. Among the Democrats responding to, the president's, tweet about allowing designs for three d printed guns to be posted, online No MR, president it doesn't make any sense and it doesn't make any sense the yard Justice department. And your State Department agreed. To make three d guns available to the public Massachusetts congressman Seth Moulton and Rhode Island's David Cecil Leany are introducing a Bill today that. Would ban the three. D. printing of plastic, firearms WBZ news time is to eleven and. It's time now for sports Tiger Woods is going to play in the Dell technologies championship over Labor Day, weekend that TPC Boston, in Norton that's according to a Globe report a formal announcement is. Expected today and now with more on sports WBZ's Adam Kaufman in, the ticket dot com sports studio the MLB leading Red Sox try for their fifth straight win tonight when they host. The Phillies, at seven but they'll need. Some help from struggling south Padre Pomeranz to, get them there the left is, just one in four with a six ninety one ERA and he's allowed at least four runs each of. His last four games in fact bomber ends is given up twenty one runs his last twenty one innings drew this is in the wake of a seventeen. Win season what's. Going on having a month or whatever on the deal you know coming back and, threw the ball pretty well you know three eighty seven pitches and may two bad, pitches, but,.

Bloomberg Tracy Jonky Tracy Wbz Facebook President Trump Phillies Adam Kaufman United States Tracy Good Boeing Commerce Department Senator Ed Markey Padre Pomeranz State Department China Texas Tiger Woods
Tesla, Dell and Eighty Percent discussed on Wintrust Business Lunch with Steve Bertrand

Wintrust Business Lunch with Steve Bertrand

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

Tesla, Dell and Eighty Percent discussed on Wintrust Business Lunch with Steve Bertrand

"And a week after several delays and then reaffirmed its positive cash flow and prophet forecast for the rest of the year tesla also said it expects to increase production to six thousand per week by late august indicating that it is overcoming the production issues that plagued the company for several months a move by dell today dell technologies maker of the dell computer said he would buy the tracking stock a b m where incorporated in a cash and stock deal taking a step closer to a return to the public market and ending amongst long review of its business del which owns eighty percent of vm ware issued the cranking stock in two thousand sixteen and they did that to.

Tesla Dell Eighty Percent
Bloomberg, Walmart and Michael Dell discussed on Bloomberg Surveillance

Bloomberg Surveillance

01:03 min | 2 years ago

Bloomberg, Walmart and Michael Dell discussed on Bloomberg Surveillance

"Bloomberg radio bloomberg the world is listing this is a bloomberg market minute walmart expects to record a noncash net loss of about four and a half billion dollars in the second quarter this is from selling a majority stake in its brazilian unit to advent international walmart will retain a twenty percent stake in its brazil unit upon completion of the transaction dell technologies reports a solid firstquarter revenue climbed nineteen percent and adjusted earnings rose thirty three percent ceo michael dell has been considering strategic options for the computer and server maker such as a combination with software affiliate vmware or an ipo for dell bayer is just days away from transforming itself into the world's biggest maker of seeds and agricultural chemicals saying it plan is to close its purchase of monsanto on thursday it's the third in a series of industry megadeals following dow chemicals merger with dupont and china national chemicals takeover of syngenta s and p futures up nine points gina cervetti bloomberg radio.

Bloomberg Walmart Michael Dell Vmware Monsanto Dupont Brazil Dell CEO Syngenta S Gina Cervetti Thirty Three Percent Nineteen Percent Billion Dollars Twenty Percent