20 Episode results for "Delaney"

Dissecting a debate moment: Sanders, Warren and... Delaney?

POLITICO's Pulse Check

10:09 min | 1 year ago

Dissecting a debate moment: Sanders, Warren and... Delaney?

"Hey it's Dan diamond and while pulse check was scheduled to be off this week the democratic debates are back and after night one of this week's debates I sat down for a guest appearance on Politico's Lourdes cast with host Scott Bland to deconstruct one key moment an early battle that pitted Senators Bernie Sanders was with Warren Against John John Delaney over Medicare expansion a really framed the whole evening healthcare has become divisive in the primary and Democrats are increasingly turning on each other sometimes with Chirp Jabs. The Bernie Sanders campaign manager went after former H._H._S.. Secretary Kathleen civilians this week after she had positive words for Senator Kamla Harris's his new health plan so we are expecting this to continue. If you like what you hear nerd cast every week is tracking the twenty twenty political campaign so be sure to subscribe subscribe wherever you get your podcast pulse check will be back with a regular episode next week. Hello NERD casters. This is Scott Bland. Your host host and this is a special debate. Show Tuesday night was another Democratic presidential debate round two part one tonight with ten candidates on the stage in Detroit broadcast on C._N._N.. And we are going to take a key moment of the debate play it for you and then we're going to break it down with politico healthcare reporter under Dan diamond author of the political pulse newsletter and the host of the pulse check podcast. Dan Thank you so much for stepping to the sidelines of politicos crowded debate eight nine newsroom to to talk through this. I am thrilled to be here with you. Scott all right. Let's let's get right to it. Here's the moment we picked out the moderators and the candidates jumped right into the biggest policy issues facing Democrats and had twenty twenty the one their voters say the most important to them healthcare and the early exchanges between Bernie Sanders and John Delaney with a little bit of Elizabeth with Warren. We'll we'll bring her. In a little later really set the tone for the whole debate so right after the opening statements C._N._N.'s Jake Tapper turn to Senator Bernie Sanders Senator Sanders. Let's start with you you Right now we have a dysfunctional healthcare system eighty seven million uninsured or underinsured five hundred thousand dollars five hundred thousand Americans every going bankrupt because of medical bills thirty thousand people dying while the healthcare industry makes tens the billions of dollars in profit five minutes away from the John is a country it called Canada they guarantee healthcare every man woman and child as a human rights doc they spend half of what we spent and by the way when you end up in a hospital in Canada you come out with no bill and all so healthcare is a human right not a privilege. I believe I will fight for that. Benji Senator Sanders Congressman Delaney. I'm right about this. We can create a universal healthcare system to give everyone basic healthcare for free and I have a proposal to do it but we don't have to go around and be the party of subtraction and telling half half the country who is private health insurance that they are health insurance is illegal my dad. A union electrician loved the healthcare he got from the I._B.. W he would never want someone to to take that away all right Dan we're going to go back through this thought by thought a little bit but the the big picture here and then I think you're writing about your newsletter morning. This exchange right at the top of the debate just crystallized everything about the the the big policy debate going on in the primary and also that we really I saw the entire debate on Tuesday night. It's clearly a debate that will define the Democratic primary. Although I don't know of John Delaney is going to be the one making it at the end Joe Biden <unk> Buddha judge by step into that role but this idea of how far to go on healthcare the candidates want to expand coverage how they're going to do it. How many people who benefit how expensive it would be the the details remain to be decided first off? We have Bernie Sanders explaining his vision for a Medicare for all healthcare is a human right not a privilege. I believe I will then talk us through this and this has become one of the defining elements of the primary so Bernie Sanders has campaigned for years on this idea of Medicare for all what's interesting is the plan he has is not actually Medicare it would be a souped up version of Medicare currently is and that single payer plan that Lead to negotiating lower prices with drug companies with insurers lower payment for hospitals C._N._n.. was casting a lot of the questions around this in terms of love people under this plan losing the insurance. They have to get on this and now I think Sanders supporters were take issue with that framing right the whole their whole point is that it's it's going to be better but as John Delaney said this is a real concern among some Democrats as well. It's a concern among the voters. Every poll has shown that when given a choice between a single payer plan or a plan where maybe there's a public option on the side where you and me skied if we decide that maybe we we don't want politicos coverage. We want to shop for government plan. People prefer the idea of of some choice the sanders model would put us all in one in government plan. We would all lose the employer coverage. We have that's one hundred seventy one hundred eighty million Americans so there would be some loss upfront but Bernie and his supporters argue is that right now we are at the whims of whatever political editor carry booed off Brown and the political leadership wanted to every year. Maybe they switched to a new insurer. Maybe we lose the doctors doctors that we have a year to year and Sanders and Delaney went back and forth on this about how there's already <hes> health insurance loss or change every year because of people changing changing jobs losing jobs getting new ones on so forth Dan you mentioned this at the beginning but Delaney's prominent role in this debate. It was a little bit surprising he's not he. He's been campaigning campaigning for president for a very long time. Now the former congressman from Maryland few terms. He's been campaigning for a long time not really registering much in the polls but as you said he was standing in a little bit for maybe a couple of the other front runners tonight and where this ideological battle is shaping up John Delaney declared for president declared his campaign two years ago this week I candidate in the field and I think what's interesting about his role is he actually is closer to Bernie Sanders. Then say Joe Biden. John Delaney has a plan that he's calling quote better care and a wit involve a public plan for all Americans under age sixty five you would get universal coverage rich faster than say Joe Biden Joe Biden who wrote out a plan a couple of weeks ago assumes that there will still be millions of Americans uninsured after a number of years so so John Delaney has been a Need now despite that what we saw for most of the debate after this this is this is how the debate kicked off. It was opening statements than we jumped right into healthcare. This was is kind of where where everything was going every question. It seemed like that the moderators were putting forward ended up pitting one of Bernie Sanders or Elizabeth Warren Verses One uh of <hes> Delaney or <hes> governor Steve Bullock Montana or governor former governor. I should say John Hickenlooper of Colorado who who were kind of trying to sound this call about <hes> would they were calling a warning about maybe Democrats promising a little bit too much promising a little bit too much much change <hes> and we could go down the list of policy options but started with health care and that that was kind of the where the the big conflict was at the beginning yeah I think that's right healthcare and the idea of a single payer plan remains this bogeyman I mean you can call it socialism and <unk> data's as tangible as any issue and I'm probably biased as a healthcare reporter but that seems like a tangible way to release show Bernie Sanders in a certain light in the campaign and I think what Elizabeth Warren was getting to a few times was this idea of Republicans taking the attacks that John Delaney my level and using them against Democrats. We are not about trying to take away healthcare from anyone. That's what the Republicans and we the Republican talking points in order to talk with each other about how the best provide. I think that's that's the policy difference that we've been talking about right but what Warren just said there is a big part of her political argument in the political argument that she and Sanders are putting forward as as they continue to occupy you know two of those top four spots that we're seeing in the polls through now <hes> and so big policy question animating the Democratic primary that was animating animating a big section of tonight's debate Dan Diamond. Thank you so much for helping us cut through it Scott. Thank you for letting me know it out with you all right. Thank you so much listeners for tuning into tonight show if you liked it that's great because we've got another one coming up tomorrow. After night. Two of round two of the Democratic Democratic presidential primary debates thanks to jenny comment for producing Dave. Shaw's the executive producer of politico audio. We'll see you right back here tomorrow <music>.

Senator Bernie Sanders Senator John Delaney Dan diamond Bernie Sanders Benji Senator Sanders Congress Democrats Sanders Scott Bland Elizabeth Warren John John Delaney Joe Biden Medicare Politico Senator Kamla Harris reporter president
An aerialist on listening to your body's signals | Adie Delaney

TED Talks Daily

06:51 min | 2 d ago

An aerialist on listening to your body's signals | Adie Delaney

"It's ted talks daily. At least you. I really enjoyed today's talk from a circus. Aerialist eighty delaney which she gave a ted women. Twenty twenty delaney is someone who takes risks with her body for a living and to do so. She's had to learn her body really well. These days uses that understanding and her high flying performances in an unconventional way to teach sexual consent. The approach is a fresh way to think about our bodies and the agency. We have over them a quick warning though before we begin this talk contains mature content and may not be suitable for all listeners over my career as an aerialist. I've learned to listen to signs from my body. He's most important job is to keep me alive this visceral sensation. Fear can be part of the fun. Why do you think we go on. Roller coasters watch are movies. Or in my case. Fly through the air but it will only be funding. We have choice in those moments. Those who enjoy horror movies do so when they know they can look away. When i swing through the edge to take the hands of a pot and a high up in a circus tent ultimately i have a choice of releasing if i trust that person to catch me listening to these signs is an incredibly important life skill and not just for renton junkies like me. If we don't know how to listen and respond to are warning signs of fear. We risk being overwhelmed by a fight flight or freeze stress response when teaching circus. I say my students feel the sensations every day and when they do there's a unique opportunity to talk about them to acknowledge and trust those feelings including how to say no and something doesn't feel right. This is a great foundation for communication about bodies elsewhere. The isn't scary awkward. It's normal unexpected. Because the truth is i'm not just teaching circus skills and teaching consent alongside teaching circus. I have the privilege of working with hundreds of young people each year in my role as a sexual harm prevention educator. I hear their stories firsthand annoy from statistics and experience that the majority of survivors no therapies and teenagers experience high rates of intimate partner violence. That is from someone that dating young people want to know how to talk to each other about intimacy. The more i helped teenagers undestand sexual consent. The more i realize learning aerial can help us navigate life on the ground. So let me explain what. I mean by teaching consent through circus. Let's imagine it's your first time on a trapeze. Usual instruction might go something like okay. You're going to hook your legs over the box climbing up the ropes. Pull yourself to sit. And don't like god. This approach is driving. Something forward without fully checking in with the person and is focused on what i want from them. I'm telling them how to move their body and win. Regardless of the comfort or fia this often results in terrified beginners. Who never come back. Meanwhile the way now talk to my students gives a lot more kids. The person ensuring fully informed ready and parts of the conversation. How do you feel about it. Yeah i feel. I could probably do it. Do you want to have a guy that's it. Yes yeah but the inside of your foot. It yes not. How's that feel perfect. Good and i'm going to put your hand on your back there. You go. I'm going to hold onto your like then i'm gonna put my hand here now. Do you feel safe to put your hand on the ball. How's that for you okay. Going forwards and backwards. We got you this type of language like how you feeling. Are you okay with my hand. Here help circus performers succeed. I believe it also reduces the risk of accidents as a result of my students trusting and being able to act on what they feeling at any given moment. This specificity is required later in life. If and when someone wants sexual intimacy but because it's not a normal part of our interactions it can feel so oakwood and people might think it's easier to say less but saying less can lead to ambiguity problems and potentially abuse there is of course no specific script for the language of consent. The tone and words will be unique to you. It's just a slight reframing of our lexicon to inject choice anytime we're interacting with others bodies intimately or otherwise for example using i when i'm talking about what unfeeling and questions more than statements when it involves the other person when discussing intimacy check ins like does that feel good. Do you like that. In addition to leading partner. Know what you need want. Unlike helps us have experiences. We remember fondly and have no regrets about. We need to broaden our understanding of consent and stop thinking of it as a not noun tikkun sent is an active ongoing agreement. Not a checkbooks to be ticked. When talking to young people we have an opportunity to show them what. It's like to communicate with care for another person checking in and respecting them as the authority. On what they're feeling if we normalize consent everywhere by the time someone is ready for sexual experience that will know that they're allowed to ask questions. Stop at anytime and most importantly to enjoy themselves. Children are our future and they will learn to give care in the ways week. If k sexual consent doesn't have to be a mood killer all the talk either like circus and can be joyful. Fun and exciting are intimate experiences. Should not only be safe but as thrilling as flying. Through the thank you.

delaney renton fia
Delaney Childs

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

42:23 min | 9 months ago

Delaney Childs

"Thank you for listening to this. Podcast one production now available on spotify apple podcasts. Podcast one dot com in anywhere else. You podcasts this podcast is brought to you by shop. I and moved to bean and damn handsome grooming cal and smile twice and a million other businesses see all the way shop via supporting independence at shop dot com slash independence gyco go to GEICO DOT COM and in fifteen minutes. You could be saving fifteen percent or more on car insurance extra money in your pocket. It just may be the most rewarding to do you do today ship. Finding a date is more fun if you do it with friends. Download ship the APP that lets you swipe with friends. That's S. H. I. P. Search for ship dating in the APP store to start swiping today. cores these days. Everything is go. Go go nonstop. Hustle has taken over. And it's kind of a lot the pace everything is wearing you down. Take a moment pause. Refresh yourself and when you choose to turn off reach for the one beer. That's made to Chill Hulu. Who has the reality? Tv that you love so start your free trial today. At Hulu DOT COM and macari recurring makes it fast and easy for anyone to sell and earn some extra cash. You take a few picks to add a description set a price and boom. You're item is listed so if you have things you don't use Selam ship them get paid checkout macari on the APP stores or on macari Dot Com. This podcast is brought to you. By chiappa FI 'EM UKHABIN and damn handsome grooming co and smile twice and a million other businesses. Why so many may be asking yourself. Well it's because we're sponsored by shop and they do everything they can to support independent businesses on their platform so they included them in this sponsorship. Pretty Law shop is an all in one commerce solution designed to start grow and SCALEA business on your terms. They do everything they can to support independent businesses. And I can truly tell you from personal experience because an independent business by the name of do edit is one of the businesses that shop. Thi- is supports. So if you've ever gone to purchase a scratchy headband or Brett from do or gone and so many other sites that are powered by shoplift by. Then you know what I'm talking about Chapa. Fi is your true business partner with twenty four seven customer support. Just because you're independent doesn't mean you're alone love that when you shop on shopper fight your supporting independent businesses like mine and I think that's pretty awesome seal. The way shop is supporting independence at shop. Affi- dot com slash independence. Shafie is supporting independence. Not podcast one presents off the vine with Caitlin Briscoe take one is creating a space. Girls can feel empowered to be themselves and get ready for of last topics on soldier to die and wine. Get ready to shake things up. Here's Caitlyn that's kind of how I roll on these podcasts. Because I like to do it from anywhere and if I'm going to do it from a hotel room on the bed it's Shit's going to go wrong you know. I can't just have it go smoothly. If I'M GONNA throw it together in a hotel room number it wouldn't be authentic. So anyways K welcomed a great therapy. I'm your host Kaitlyn Bristowe and I need some therapy this morning. My Gosh okay. So we're in New York. I'm with my girlfriend Bailey. Ola and we are in a pretty decent hotel room size wise for New York. And so we've got Delaney here and first of all your name. Delaney child is such a power name. I am Big Name Guy. I like wait. What's your name but no Clayton? Sorry your full name. Yeah Clayton winner. I just people's names this is. This is literally such good material because people have always told me my whole life that my name is like you know like you said like a power name though. Yeah Oh that sounds like you're going to be like famous or like. Yeah like that. And his last name is winner to me is like I don't want that last name. This is her boyfriend. She's talking whatever links such as savage. But you don't you don't like downgrade your name. My name like flows really nicely. Delaney child's gasoline we winter like a Hollywood like an old Hollywood Glamour. Like me okay wait. I have a thought on this. Feel like people's names are their identity and when you get married. I'm all for the tradition and the romance of taking somebody's last name but I also think that's such a thing of the past where now it's like. You are Delaney child's. Yeah that's become Clayton child literally. I suggested that because I said to that I can pretty much guarantee if we had a child and we gave the option which last name it would want. It would want child's right people. Call him not him personally but they mistake it for Weiner all the like that was it. Yeah I was GonNa say people always called you Clayton Weiner. Yeah so like Weiner so the kid would want my name anyways and I'm like why does the girl always like have to sacrifice her name. Why can't the boy be like I'll do this for you to like? Why does it have to be that way? Why don't we put the seat up after we saw? Everybody has been wondering. That's the million dollar question. Why don't we do that for the guys? That don't know we're not GONNA do that. Jason leaves the sometimes. He's usually pretty good lately. He's been lazy but the one time I fell in I will let him live it down. I had to get in the shower. Like six in the morning because talking about dramatic situations. Bailey's taking off her bandage from our it drip this morning. I survived. I haven't had a seizure yet. Oh my gosh she tells me afterwards we got okay so we got IV drips. Which by the way I thought we were getting hooked up and it was so expensive. I totally would. I looked at the price I was like. Oh Shit okay so I hope it works but you know we're like a little bit hung over and we're trying to get these. Iv drips done. I tell he's having a panic. A mini panic attack. And then she tells me after that you when you got needles when you're younger you would have seizures okay. So Real Big Meister. My younger self could see me now. Really proud of you anyways. Okay Yeah just stay sitting for so doing. You're here in New York with your boyfriend event and you live in. La Yes okay. So how would people know you because you've got a pretty good presence online here? I did some creep in and you see how do people like. How did you grow your your audience for like because some people you know are on a show or how did you do it? Honestly just posting like every day consistently yeah and just posting valuable content. I mean what I thought was valuable. So beauty lifestyle Really just like creating content around that and then I've made it like a really big part of my brand to be positive on everything just to have like a lot of positives so I feel like that has a lot of people in too because you know some people might not even be there for fashion or something. But they'll just message me and be like I love you. Know your little notes about positively or like turning day around or something like that so I feel like that has something to do with it. Do Okay I need a little bit of this in my life. Jason Calls me a pessimist which I don't think I am because I don't think I would be where I am if I had. A negative attitude was a pessimist. I'm I'm a big MANIFESTER WORD. Manifest or yeah. It sounded weird but I could. I could be a little more positive in my days. So how do you turn your days around? If you're 'cause you must get negative or down. So how do you? How do you turn around literally the easiest and best thing to turn your day around or be positive just to show gratitude? Yeah so literally like every little thing you can be grateful for and if you're having a bad day or a bad moment or something you can remind yourself that you can use both your legs and not you should be grateful for that or you can go get a hug from someone who you care about and just soak it in for thirty seconds and be grateful that you have that person in your life you can look at the sky and be like. I am so fortunate that I can see the sky and people can't see that or you can go taste things and be like. I'm so fortunate that I can taste things and I have food like you can find gratitude and everything and as soon as you focus on that it. Switches a flip flip? The switch always do something like that I did and it just attitude around and injured around and then the more you focus on the things. You're grateful for you will tracked more than like manifesting. Yeah Bailey just got the five minute journal and so we're doing that this morning and it is just like you were saying about the five minute journal where you write things down and seen that and writing it down just changes your day right off the Bat. Because you're just waking up in like what am. I grateful for today car and you start seeing that car everywhere. Like when you're more intentional with your thoughts their powerful so you can actually kind of control your brain a little bit more. I agree with that. That's really cool question for you. Do you own or rent your own home. I'm sure you do and I bet it can be really hard work in you. Know what's easy bundling policies with GEICO GEICO makes it easy to bundle your homeowner's or renter's insurance along with your auto policy and it's a good thing too because you already have so much to do around your home go to Geico Dot Com. Get a quote and see how much you could save. It's GEICO easy. Visit GEICO DOT com. Today that's GEICO DOT com. You're talking Freudian slip. I always do when I'm talking about my dogs getting there now. I have to think about how it flea and tick medication. Which give them anymore more because that caused them to have a seizure by the way I always call it flat teeth. Look at team can you? So THAT'S A. It's called a Freudian slip. So I've got a joke for you. Are you ready for it? Okay so this guy is talking to his friend and they've been married for years and he's like Oh man i. I had the most embarrassing Freudian slip other day and the goes like what does that. He's like you know when you say one thing but you mean something else like I went to the airport and I asked for two pickets to tits Berg and and the guy like oh. I think I had a Freudian slip. The other day I was having dinner with with with my wife and I meant to say honey. Could you pass the butter but I said bitch you ruined my life? That's my joke de that one Jokes Classic Yeah. That just came to my mind. That's that's that's the kind of stuff that goes on in my brain not not positively like looking at the sky and thinking about how we see. I'm like what's a good joke to go with this moment. I'm grateful for your left. Your okay well thank you. That's very nice. Yeah anyways okay so you are big into Bravo TV here. Yes so Chris Harrison or Andy Cohen. Heasley it's so funny because Bailey was like you should have any coin on your podcast. I was like I wouldn't even know what to talk about because I don't think I've ever watched an episode of anything on Bravo. Sell me on it. We'll Julie Real housewives is that I just like I watch pretty much everything on Bravo and I just like no shade to Chris Harrison. But like the way that. Andy does everything delivers things and like I just am so drawn to his personality whereas like this is my first season watching the bachelor so maybe I need some time but totally just like burst into the microphone. My Gosh. I'm sorry if anybody heard that okay. Yeah you need some time. This is a tough season attached to Chris Harrison at all so attached to Chris Harris. Yeah like a call him. If I have a fight with Jason I wish I go okay but but what is it about Bravo is it okay. I'm honestly so clueless. Is it just real housewives or other shows? Oh no so there's real housewives and then there's more I don't know how to explain. Oh wait vander pump. That's yeah all right so those are more just like the baseline the pass. Okay best known for for sure. Yeah and then but it's just like I don't know it's just literally the only things that we watch in our house is Bravo and ESPN Y- okay. You've never watched the news. We will never watch the news and like Bravo and espn makes me feel like I'm in the loop with the world because like on watch what happens. Live with Andy Cohen. He does like a little bit of like. I don't even want to call it news but like something really big happens like the talk about that and Like ESPN does a little bit of current events too. I feel like enough that we're like in the no but all of the rest of the content is just like happy and light hearted and like fluffy pretty much and it makes me feel good like do it makes you feel good. Yeah I put on the news yesterday than almost had a panic attack so I but then do you travel a lot for work and stuff. So what do you think with the corona virus? Will you stop traveling or you to live? Your Life. I'm gonNA live my life. Yeah I was wondering 'cause we can't remember the question from last night. I've looked at Bailey last night. We were at the Knicks game and I said Bailey. That is a great podcast question. Don't let me forget it. And she went I will not I will not forget and this damn cushion that we wanted to ask both. It was such a good one to anyways. Okay so yeah. It was more of a question like do. Would you still live your life if it was something along those lines so I was thinking about because I almost didn't come to New York thinking about like somebody told me? Don't even get on a plane or don't do this or you're gonNA have to like stay in your house for thirty days in a couple of weeks so stock up on food and I'm like damn scared when I hear that stuff. I know I mean. It's hard not to acting irrationally. When everyone around you is acting irrationally. Like we're not actually that freaked out but all the hand sanitizer in medicine and a bunch of food is sold out in La. And so we're like okay. We might as well get some stuff. Hand sanitizer on Amazon is one hundred dollars right now. I'm not kidding. A pack of four is four hundred. No packet twelve is four hundred dollars for hands. Yeah and that's a bargain. I realize I ordered it. I am that person I am numbers. No it's so funny. I never believed in hand sanitizer from the Knicks game. We're GONNA result because they had like chicken wings at the game and like wet wipes like sanitizer things. We're like Ooh Stugotz. Let's sell these on the street fighter. What's you know what I'm a business woman? Okay that's my little side hustle now selling selling hand sanitizers on the street. All right love can be frustrating. If you've watched the season of the bachelor you know what I'm talking about whether you're shipping Peter Pan Abi or an or Ashley Pe- you know the cow from night. One honestly mafia part of the season. We all know that love isn't easy. That's why I decided to focus my attention on finding some of my friends love. No not through the bachelor through ship ship. Is the dating APP that lets you play matchmaker for your friends. So even when you're feeling powerless watching the BACHELORETTE contestants make decisions. That you don't agree with you. Could at least help your friends make better ones Jason. I have been swiping on potential suitors for one of my friends Claire not clear the Bachelorette and let me tell you. Our taste is totally different. Which makes the APP even more fun. Jason Claritin I could not disagree more when it comes to finding her man. Claire Super Picky when it comes to choosing a guy swipe right on whereas I'm like if they're hot. Let's swipe rate see what happens. We also have an amazing group chat going in the APP where we give each other our best pickup lines which are not always that great but hey it's good fun so if you're also super frustrated with the way this bachelor season turned out. Turn your attention to where it matters. Most your friends and find them someone on ship worthy of the final rose. Finding a date is more fun if you do it with friends. Download ship the APP. That's leading you swipe with friends that's F H IP search for ship dating in the APP store to start swiping today. So you're watching bachelor for your first. This is your first season watching. Yes tell me your thoughts. I don't like what don't you like about it. 'cause I obviously Bravo. Tv like that also. Is it's dramatic right. Yeah Yeah so what? Don't you like about bachelor? Whoa first of all the production is way different. Like a really the production quality. I never realized On Bravo. Yeah in my opinion really good like I don't know how to explain it or what tools. They use exactly. I mean we're kind of familiar with it from doing like noise like music. Oh I see okay. So there's no there's not enough depth for you it's it's not pretty well in my opinion and I feel like I'm watching a soap opera. Yeah and I don't watch soap operas. I've never been into that so I'm so maybe you don't like the love stories. Yeah I mean I don't like love I mean I don't believe like anything. Anyone things are on the shows yeah. It's it's tough season to start on just for that reason exactly but I would I would encourage you to watch next season because bachelorette claire. She's thirty eight years old. She knows she wants. She's a she's well spoken. I think it's going to be good season. Okay so maybe start there. Yeah so we'll maybe you're are you a romantic person okay. So you and your boyfriend's right here so I should involve conversation but you guys have been together for how long I think social. Yeah Oh that's so nice longtime. How did you guys meet? We were neighbors in college and we were both always having parties at our house so we were always at each other's parties and hanging out. We were like the Party people in College. Really Yeah We. We don't really drink at all anymore. We're not sober. But we just don't really drink. Yeah and we were literally like the two most out of control people and really. What's what what switched for you to just health reasons or just didn't feel like doing your system. Yeah Yeah we just grew out of it like we had different goals and we couldn't really reach those goals that way and just like after you turn. Yeah Yeah after you turn twenty one. I swear the hangover his like. Are you kidding me? Thirty four this. I'm an anomaly. I don't really get hung over and today was today was a little bit different just because I didn't drink any water yesterday. I hate water water bottle. Yeah what's your water bottle? Okay what is it down time and it has. It's sixty four ounces controlled like that. No it's not it's not controlled by motivating it makes you like one race yourself like really. Yeah I used to drink like four ounces of water a day and now sometimes I drink two of those bottles a day which is like a gallon fodder. I just it Pena so inconvenient to me I agree. Yeah like like I if I don't have to go about. I don't want to like all wait till I'm GonNa pee my pants but if I drink all that water that I just had this time now. Yeah Pena's showing me inconvenient. Yeah Okay Well. You'RE GONNA get into drinking water and Bravo TV. That's what I'm going to take away from this. Podcast today You guys okay. So you're you guys have been together for six years. Do you guys both do content creating yes so we work together fulltime. How that on the relationship you along well though I could tell. Yeah we spend so much time together. earlier this week or last week. I had to go to a photo shoot and he actually wasn't coming and we're going to be a part for like eight hours or something and we had realized the night before. I was like okay. What are you going to do in round than like wow? We're not going to be together all Dan Mike. When is the last time we weren't together for more than four hours and we were like Like eight or nine months ago really. Yeah Yeah really like. We don't even do that on purpose but literally every single day for like nine months straight. We have not been apart for more than four hour. Okay so tell me about your personalities because you okay. You're obviously positive person. You both seem very laid back but like motivated. Because for me I am. I'm I've laid back but I am easily irritated you could say but for me. It's like too. I think a lot of relationships out there. If you're spending that much time with somebody like people get on your nerves. I have me Sonia as soon as I hear Jason Chewing. I need to get out of the room. It's do you have that. No but he's Oh. I don't have a very dramatic about chewing in general just like the way you. Here's no manner. Oh okay. You're barbaric. I mean he's a boy okay. He is like very minimal manners. So we're working on. Do you guys have a relationship like advice? You should do a podcast relationship advice. Maybe okay. So what what would be your biggest piece of advice to couples out there? I would say find someone that you're compatible with. Because I feel like so many people try to make things fit that don't fit and they're like it's GONNA work out. We can make this work whatever. But it's like if it doesn't work it doesn't work you try to force it and you should find someone who has like the same goals and beliefs and values as you and it's going to be a lot easier to stick together for a long time then being like. Oh well maybe one day WHO WANNA get married so I'll work on an or right. You know maybe one day he'll change his attitude and stop being like an angry person. Or what are you actually already group with and go with that say. I think I've found that I feel like Jason. I are very compatible. You wouldn't think so when you first met us. But now when people know the the two of us. I think we're very compatible. But we spend a lot of time together and we traveled together and we kind of same thing like we do the same kinds of things for work and I literally like I. I'm the kind of person that really needs my own space but then as soon as I have it. I'm like you like I'll be like I need time. I'd it's based on. I go away and then like an hour later. I'm like sue. Would he do that? We spend all of our time on the phone apart. It's so funny. But that's it's like you you. Do you need somebody compatible that? You're just it feels like a best friend exactly all right so life. Today is kind of a lot it forces us to always be on and seriously what is going on lately. I mentioned to Jason and our podcast the other day that mercury must be in retrograde or something but every now and then it's important to just stop crack open a mountain cold coors light and chill so when you choose to turn off. Choose the one beer that's made to chill coors light so much of the time. I feel like I had to be at my best and go go go but sometimes especially right now all of us need to take a moment to chill and just turn off for a second right now. We have no choice. So whether that's yourself whether that's with your friends or your significant other some of the ways I like to chill are watching net flicks going on a walk but my favorite way to chill is simple cracking open a coors light and lesbian us. I had to crack more than one during the bachelor finale last week. If you know you know there's one bureau there that's literally made chill and that scores light the mountains on the bottles and cans even turn blue when your beer is cold so that way you always know when it's time to chill. Coors light is brewed. Three step cold process cold logger. Cold filtered and cold packaged born in the rocky mountains of Colorado in nineteen seventy eight coors light is refreshing crisp. Only one hundred and two calories. That's why coors light is the one I choose what I need a moment of chill so when you want arrest reach for the beer that's made to chill celebrate responsibly. And Coors Brewing company Golden Colorado. We'll be back with more off the vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe all right. Everybody if you like my show then you know you're gonNA love the Lady Gang podcasts. On podcast one. Join your favorite trio of Hollywood ladies. Kelty night BECCA. Tobin and Jack Vanak on their weekly raw look of all things pop culture with some amazing guests. Upcoming episodes include pop superstar should twain real housewife. Nina leaks and bachelor. Nick Vile Checkout Lady Gang every week on Apple podcast podcast one now back off the vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe. Need to find billy boy dog right now totally get the dog thing but are you on any. Md NAPS couple you. Oh Yeah last night we. This is so funny okay. So last night. Bailey's on wisdom called Iraq. And so we're on the air it. I'm looking at okay. I'll start at the beginning very long story short when I was on the Bachelorette one of the guys on my season and made it to final to his. Name'S NICK EVERYBODY. Listening knows and he you we were at the bar and he showed up as a match for her like he was upstairs and any lives area and he lives in. La The way. I'm like Caitlin up to keep. He was at the bar and we ended up having a drink with him and it was so funny. Because we're friends now and everything but it was just so funny. I was like cool. You're on the dating appier. Says you're right here. Bailey was like elsewhere on that. Hey I didn't mind so funny though. Like what a random is your husband. Are you married boyfriend boyfriend? Is He from your season. No no he's from the same show. I keep it in the family I always wear. I wouldn't date a bachelor person. But then you meet Jason. You'll you'll understand why but ye so I got engaged on Bachelorette and we were together for three and a half years which is not a short amount of time and then we broke up. I had Jason on my podcast. And then that's how we met. Yeah yes pretty cute. I love hearing how people meet. And that's like what I meet anybody whose parents like. I love hearing love stories very inspiring to because it makes you realize like all these different situations that you could meet the love of your life like it doesn't have to be some crazy romantic scenario. No that's I always say on the podcast and like I was saying to Bailey. It's so crazy you could literally meet your person in boxing today when we go like new. Just never know how you're going to meet somebody so true you could meet them all sweaty and gross. And then it's going to be Greg Candy and I saw the. I don't think that's where I'm GonNa meet him because I'm probably going to be hyperventilating on the floor. But that's how mouth-to-mouth you'll have you'll have to say the other freaks me out Damsel in distress. Yeah but that it's true. It's just while you just have to be open to it and ready for it and you could literally meet somebody in an hour tomorrow or in two years. That could be a person you just never know how. How exciting is that? I don't know if people can hear my stomach right now but there's some weird shit going on in there. Is that the issue. Oh that's I'm digesting. Oh my gosh. What does that feel like that? Okay I want to talk about how healthy you are because it's very inspiring to me. So you guys again you. You're not sober but you don't really drink. Is that health reasons or do we kind of brushed on it but is that you just grew out of it. And you're like I'd rather treat my body like yeah I mean. It's just like the idea that every day I would choose to feel one hundred percent if I could and I know if I drink alcohol I will definitely feel something less than one hundred percent. Yep kind of just like why? Don't you conscious decision like that? Is Way more like feeling one hundred percent? The next day is way more valuable to me than like feeling a little buzzed or something right before. So that's a good aptitude. How yeah teach me your ways And and you try and eat plant based but not completely right so everything in our house is Vegan. We Cook Vegan one hundred percent of the but sometimes when we're out we fish just because it's convenience. Yeah 'cause we were just talking before we were. Oh Gosh we haven't even talked about. Do we talk about the craziness of how we got to this? Podcast yet did we. I'm already I'm already blanking on how we started this pockets. Do we talk about how your boyfriend rant? We're happy just like a hell of a time getting this podcast together. Because I'm an idiot and forgot my card to go in the podcast. Podcast Clayton was. We got us a card. That was twice. It didn't work anyways. Yeah this is classic Kalem Right here all right so Mr Chris Harrison was telling me about this crazy party Hulu through in Beverly Hills with all the biggest reality TV stars from like every show and now I have to watch the commercials to see what happened like everyone else. I don't usually get foam but in this case I have extreme here. Luckily for you Hulu has the reality. Tv that you love so start your free trial today at Hulu Dot Com. So I am a big fan of oat milk. I have it in my coffee every day. I love it I love. It was cereal. I just love in your saying now. There's something bad in it Wa- so the brand that's really popular and it's really good. Oh Lee apparently highs canola oil and everyone's been talking about and how you should replace it with What's the Brand Ma L. A. Mall? Now that's how I say milk anyways. But why's canola oil is bad for you. I don't know a ton on it but like when you Google it. It's kind of hard. You know the information fats. And then there's like those other like it's probably whatever the bath translates the bad one. Yes and it's a highly processed oil and like I said when you Google it's not that easy to find information for whatever reason right key. Here's the thing every here. It's something different right every year. Something is good for you. Something's bad for you. Everything changes all the time and I find it so hard to keep up with health and what you should and shouldn't be eating and so I don't eat meat but I still eat fish. I daresay I'm off and on but I'm just like what next what's going to be the next bad thing that we're all eating and taking it like it's a CBD nobody's done all the studies on CBD. We don't know how bad it is for you but I'm inhaling it like a mother I'm the Guinea Pig I. I'm like sure when at the time it makes me feel good and I like CBD Edibles. Sure love it but it's like how we're not doing our research on that it's just you never know what's going to be make small adjustments where you can and just know that like. I know that alcohol is not good for me. I continue to do this to myself. It's part of my brand. I have a wine label. I have to drink but I genuinely enjoy wine water to balance your water. You'll be good. Will you send me one? Yeah your thing. Oh No pan thing but it's like a just like post it on my story for like a couple of weeks and now like so. Many people have bought it and like everyone audience is. We're all just being this water bottle. Okay Yeah Oh. Wow we are opposites and I am with that okay so walk us through like day the life of your guys like because I mean you're the term always made me laugh of content creating but that's what it is but I always laugh because I don't think I'm a content creator immediate on instagram. But like what are you guys do you and your day from like when you get up to. Where do you go to bed for content creating document everything like do you like what you eat? And Are you always on your stories? Just basically giving us giving the people what they want. Yeah I mean I try. It's just like so hard to balance everything you know because you're trying to shoot photographs instagram. Which takes up a lot of time. And then we're trying to do videos and blogs for Youtube which is a ton of time and then their stories that you're trying to keep up on instagram. And then I started going on tig talk. Yeah I'm trying to make Ted talks and it's like so many things all the time that sometimes you can only like focus on one and keep one afloat. So it's like maybe. I'll spend time shooting my instagram contents. Don't story that much or you know. I'm on the blog all day so I don't get my instagram content. On what Dr So. It's kind of like all over the place but it's constant. Yeah and what do people get when they come to your page like like beauty? What do you talk about beauty? Doodoo hair make up everything. Yeah I mostly do fashion okay. My audience really likes like easy affordable. Fashions I try to do a lot of that And just like styling tips and stuff. I where like a lot of edgy closed. But sometimes I feel like being super girly and just doing something that And then do hair makeup and lifestyle stuff like travel or home decor gang a local. Yeah wow gosh. I just the people who I've had a lot of those Like you know living with London. She's in Nashville. So promptly or happily gray gray. Yeah like I always so mind blown by how dedicated you guys are to this work because a lot of people think it's so fun and easy and like you want to be an influence or when. I grow up but it's so much work so much work and do you find that. It's hard to be in the moment when you're doing those things because you're constantly having to be on. Yeah but I just find it like you seem to be pretty real do you. Do you find that you're on instagram. Or something like you. You're having to be honored. You feel like it's pretty natural thing for you. Yeah I mean like the way that my content is branded especially like stories and stuff. It is pretty like natural and casual so that is not as much on like it still works to record yourself cooking your dinner rather than just cook your dinner but when you're laid back not like overproduced about it. It's a lot easier than you know. You have to get all these equipment this filter and everything is perfect blah. Yeah So it's it's somewhere in the middle and say. Yeah I just. I am so as you can tell lazy that I'm like that it's like I like to just take a picture on my phone and uploaded like I'm like the whole presets big and it's so much work on it really is but that's how that's how you build your business but for me. I'm like I don't think people like when I do that like I think they're like Oh that's not you. Yeah you know like I've got lucky in that way like my brand is kind of like no shits goose super casual. Yeah you're getting out there. Hey is your home like mine. Just cluttered with stuff that you don't use anymore close shoes. You don't wear taking up valuable closet. Space old phones hiding in a drawer. The gift you're weird aunt gave you last Christmas. Come on people. You know what I'm talking about. Well I want to tell you about an APP that you can use to sell this stuff. Macari make selling the stuff that you no longer use super fast and super easy. That's why it's called the selling up and it really couldn't be simpler. You take a few pictures of your stuff at a description and boom goes the dynamite. Your item is listed them once. It sold macari emails. You a shipping label and you just stick it on and send it off. No awkward meet UPS with strangers. No hassles the APP has over five hundred thousand reviews on the APP store with an average of four point. Eight star ratings. So why not give it a try? You could sell everything from fashion to electron ix toys to sporting goods over one hundred and fifty thousand items get listed every single day which is pretty crazy. So don't let that stuff you don't us go to waste sell it ship it and get paid. Macari you can find your car on the APP stores or unrecorded Dot Com M. E. R. C. A. R. I. Macari the selling APP and on most of my podcasts. I Do Confessions. Make someone tell me something. That's really embarrassing. That they need to get off their past so does anything come to mind like most embarrassing moment of your life okay. Bailey has won. This is embarrassing but So I went. I was going to the bathroom and I sat and didn't realize that because okay so when I go to the bathroom I put my toilet like laid down because I have this weird thing about the germs. Like when you flush toilet going to everything about them but I was so like space cadet and didn't live up you buy toilet. That must've been such a process to clean up questions about this. So when you sat down. Did you not feel that? You just decided to keep going. How fogged my brain wise? I I think I had just woken up because I was so out of it. That's so funny. I forgot to pull down my underwear not too long ago and plead with underwear on. Yeah that's a lot of cancer in the body suit and you're like Oh wait shit. Yeah yes retrigger trip green anything for you. I mean I just haven't really bad at geography and saying. Oh just you know every day every week. Some sort of like geography related thing comes up and have no idea like where status or if it's a state or a city or Canadian I'd forgive you but you're American American right. Yeah yeah that's so funny. I did the same thing I bought a piece of art in. Where was I yeah? We're well I was in Asheville Asheville North Carolina and I bought a piece of art. And you get to put a pin. Where now his art is in the state and there's pins everywhere and you get to put a pin in and like I live in Nashville and I was like in Nevada like ooh. That's how bad I am. That's what I'm also Canadian. So you tell you. Tell me where Saskatoon is. I think it's by Vancouver. Try though because if you did that it'd be very impressed. Yes see Americans don't know Canadian geography at all. Americans don't know anything about can Americans. Yeah usually but I don't even know anything about America. So that's what's your background like word era where you're like. Yeah Oh European mostly yeah. You Look European and A little bit of native Americans really. Yes so core you get haters not really Because my pages like so much about positively I like that kind of deters people. Yeah but on the rare occasion I do I really try to treat them with kindness and never let it get to me because obviously it's like some unhappy person somewhere so I don't WanNa be means them back but youtube is like a whole different. Youtube has the meanest viewers and people end up on your stuff who are not attached to you or following you are connected to you at all this land on one video and the Oh. I hate this girl. You're like Oh you know what that's the thing they don't know you so they're just saying that because it is more like take the view. Okay so where can people find you on instagram? All of the things that you do. I'm on Instagram Youtube and Tick Tock Delaney child's and then on my blog is the style seat dot com. Okay Amazing Well. Thank you so much for coming to my hotel room and having this thrown together podcast on the bed with me because yeah it was fun. It was a good way to start our day. And you know what I'm going to go into my day with gratitude and positively by Water and Bravo Bravo Bravo and thank you to your lovely boyfriend. Clayton for for helping us with everything and getting US waters and thank you for being Michael Hose. Nope not having a seizure not yet. Oh God let's go boxing. Thanks for listening to off the vine with Kaitlyn bristowe get new episodes every Tuesday. It's police deeply on podcast. One Dot com the podcast one APP and prescribe on Apple podcasts TV.

Bailey Jason Clayton Weiner Bravo Geico Dot Com New York Kaitlyn Bristowe Delaney apple Hulu Mr Chris Harrison Youtube coors Andy Cohen boxing Bravo GEICO Caitlin Briscoe Nashville
#159 Solo episode- One of my key Mental Models "Gaps in Judgement"

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

13:21 min | 1 year ago

#159 Solo episode- One of my key Mental Models "Gaps in Judgement"

"Lady Lady with Sean Delaney on this solo episodes Sean covers one of his mental models which is gaps in judgment if you want got there we got you got you got to bear with Sean Delaney saying I don't know is one of the hardest things we can do we don't WanNa look wrong to seem stupid or let someone down if we never said I don't know would we ever learn not listening to the unknown and only focusing on what you know you'd miss miss all the wisdom others CR- impart on US curiosity them down to written breakdowns of each individual episodes they cover health and wellness startups in entrepreneurship leadership innovation and critical thinking fire that's the mission behind the most amazing tasting protein bar brand taking the nutrition industry by storm that brand their NC Tico if you WANNA enjoy and receive ten percent off your entire order had to catalina crunch dot com that's catalina cat stack do yourself a favor had debt NC TICO DOT com and use code WG Y T for twenty percents off your order do you guys I mean of course we could read books articles listen to podcasts but what about all the human and environmental interactions we have imagine going into each conversation complete episodes you need to check out podcast notes dot org what podcast notes does is they take the most popular and best podcasts around and distills spark of it the burning desire to find out why things work why they don't how we can improve have more fun explore the unknown imagined the astronauts dairy free and one hundred percent plant based don't forget about that tumor as well to help fight inflammation and boost immunity this your favorite childhood serious but had to give them up because all the sugar meat Catalina crunch the world's first Kito Friendly Z.. Seventeen with type one diabetes he set out to satisfy his chocolate craving and created his own this low carb zero sugar. Cereal will pick-up these amazing bars jam with ten grams of Collagen protein they only have two to three net carbs no added sugar and loaded with high quality how're you through the day with ten grams of plant based protein six grams of fiber to fill you up and also gluten free grain free I find them at understanding them at lessening the surface area from the unknown to the known what you don't know tends to be just as important as what if curiosity plus ego deflation plus identifying gaps in judgment that equates the skill acquisition it's a simple formula and ct oil for the healthy fats coconuts whether you're busy running the kids around bacteria do activity a professional athlete or just someone looking for great tasting convenience rose sugar cereal in delicious dark chocolate cinnamon toast maple waffle and honey Graham when the founder of Catalina crunch was diagnosed at age al I N A crunch Dot Com and use code WG Y T ten for ten percent off I just finished snacking on can even find the breakdown of some guy there podcast episodes at podcast notes Dot Org I highly recommend guys checking them out making Change Trans we do know not being able to identify the unknown as difficult difficult because of the necessity to acquire new knowledge and because the effect on the EGO and they make the most delicious Kito friendly all natural collagen protein bars if you're obsessed with a quality food going into your body like ion then head out but one that so few people employ because of the difficulties but those change makers the disrupters the innovators the NASA astronauts who say some of the dark chocolate and it was delicious you guys need to head out and pick some up today gaps in judgment we all have them but how do we become better at I d intas at NASA before relying on the moon do you think they were sitting around saying they know it all know they were being curious and saying imagine what this could be better imagine those are the people who can look in the mirror and admit what they don't know when we're too consumed with protecting our ego we miss it with startups like in life when new opportunities present themselves it's hard to step back and see the bigger picture but that's something we must do amongst that on the beauty of our ability to wonder wonder how to tackle global challenges or something simple how to lose five pounds how to improve your relationships with family member how to start that a business you've dreamed up without understanding what we don't know we will never be able to discover what we're capable of I was recently with startups right in front of them right in front of them but behind a thin little curtain imagine until someone removes that curtain it solution in new knowledge remain fast paced world of the startup it was Reid Hoffman founder of linked to new said starting a company is like throwing yourself off the cliff and assembling an airplane on the way down Joe who's finding early success and the company's trajectory is starting to accelerate towards exponential growth it's a hectic time for them it certainly an exciting time in the asked why it's such simple elegant question why will this said CEO goes into greater detail about the skills required to take this company to the next level in the ploys role why their lack of experience wouldn't allow them to complete those tasks in the company's industry they thought you needed an industry expert buzney since they didn't fit the prototypical mole or have the specific titled The CEO Quincy Through to the bigger picture that maybe that person then we discussed what said employees strengths were we peel back the curtain a little more it turns out actually this employee has been absolute rock this results in a band aid solution not empowering those around them without the empowerment employees aren't able to explore their own gaps in judgment they developed I understand once I fill in my gap I can teach those around me that leads the others having their gaps filled if they're willing to identify those the X. need an a plus performance with key costumer employee X. was your person this employee was able to take any challenge or task thrown at them and run with it opposite of what it takes to succeed in the kerm world it's the people who can identify gaps in judgment who develop impact create leading learn Einstein advancement is stagnant explorer gaps identified them drop the EGO ask why have dogged persistence in your pursuit has gaps remember you must identify your own gaps it's not easy but it's an essential skill to have were here today because of some of those big questions in Rockefeller Ford Wall Jobs Musk bazo saying I don't know how to do this I'm willing to experiment and fail to continue to pursue until you in this the best way you can support the show is giving us a review rating it sharing it with your friends and also sharing on social it could be groomed for the position they needed they were the best solution at the start but the CEO didn't think they were going to be a long term solution so I casts around and distills them down to written breakdowns of each individual episodes they cover health and wellness startups in entrepreneurship leadership in it came down to empowering this person and that person's unique ability to know their own gaps in judgment and fill those gaps in CEO's creates in didn't until a person is willing to accept that they don't know the gap we discovered was not understanding the true talent in the people already working for their and based don't forget about that tumor as well to help fight inflammation and boost immunity if you WANNA enjoy and receive ten percents off your entire and share your new knowledge with others keep the positive feedback loop going until next time. Momentum breeds momentum if you guys are like me and love listen to podcast tasting protein bar brand taking the nutrition industry by storm that brand MCAT Co and they make the most delicious Kito friendly all order had to catalina crunch dot com that's Catalina C. A. T. A. L. I N. A. Crunch Dot Com cinnamon toast maple waffle and honey Graham when the founder of Catalina crunch was diagnosed at age seventeen with type one diabetes he set out they give cycle in the life of the company the CEO can identify their gaps in judgment they ended up only sticking to what they know were easy fixes in the return big picture there are the gaps the countless gaps what the CEO was able to cover in our conversation with that they had some gaps some serious gaps gaps that were starring everything they've done for this company to date need help figuring out the call boom employee X. issues getting other employees motivated boom call intro song checkout just in great the man behind it I can't thank you guys enough for listening looking forward to you tuning in next time I can't tell you how much I appreciate it looking forward to you guys listening to another episode making change transpire that's the mission behind the most amazing that fixed mindset they stay inside the box and they turn into non creative machines well that would be great for an employee in the Ford Factory Nineteen thirties but it's the embrace protein six grams of fiber to fill you up and is also gluten free grain free dairy free and one hundred percent plan been asked in the past imagine imagine what it would be like in three hundred years of people weren't asking those hard questions that identifying those gaps without questioning natural collagen protein bars if you're obsessed with the quality of food going into your body like I am then head out and pick up these amazing bars jam with ten grams ask but don't always have time to listen to the complete episodes you need to check out podcast notes dot org what podcast notes does is they take the most popular and best pie whether you're busy running the kids around from activity do activity a professional athlete or just someone looking for great tasting convenience stack do yourself a favor had debt MC satisfy his chocolate craving and create a zone this low carb zero sugar cereal willpower you through the day with ten grams of plan you guys made it to the end of another episode of what got you there hope you guys enjoyed it I really do appreciate you taking the time to listen to all the way through if you found value collagen protein they only have two three net carbs no added sugar and loaded with high quality MC tee oil for the healthy fats from coconuts not co Dot Com and use code WG Y T for twenty percents off your order do you guys miss your favorite childhood cereals but had to give them up all the sugar meat Catalina crunch the world's first Kito

Sean Delaney inflammation US NC ten grams one hundred percent ten percent six grams three hundred years five pounds
#169 Solo Episode- Become an Idea Generating Machine!

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

08:44 min | 1 year ago

#169 Solo Episode- Become an Idea Generating Machine!

"Today with Sean Delaney. What got you there with Sean Delaney? What cuts down Sean Delaney? Got Hit Solo episode. Sean goes into his strategies. For gra unlocking your ideas and becoming an idea generating machine. I was sitting down with a fellow entrepreneur this week and our conversation drifted towards ideas ideas not just ideas in general but idea generation specifically we discussed how there are those rarefied idea generators who after spending a few hours would seem seem to have all these crazy ideas new businesses or product feedback and those ideas. They seem to never cross your mind and it got US thinking. Why is that the case? He's so are there. These people these ideas savant and the rest of us are just mere mortals. That don't stand a chance at generating such brilliant ideas or is there another answer a more realistic and attainable one. If ideas were just flashes of genius few people possess then this would just end here but that isn't the case. If you're the person who finds find yourself saying I can't ever think of ideas or you're constantly admiring those who do then this episode is for you today. I'm going to go over some of the strategies that work work well for generating new ideas and ones that I use consistently the reason people have a lot of ideas is they try to come up with a lot of ideas remember. Momentum momentum breeds momentum there those that sit on the sideline of idea generation and those that take every opportunity to get on the field. Sorry for the sports analogy. You guys know Oh. I Love Sports. The people who are actively working on ideas tinkering thinking exploring and probing their thoughts are the ones who always have new ways of doing things picture. Your idea generator like muscle. The more you go to the gym and lift weights the more. Your muscles can handle same held to for idea generation the the more you actively work at it the more ideas you will generate. I've really worked hard on myself to come up with ideas and since doing that I've started to actually experience experience a feeling similar to a runners higher flow state around. Ideas invigorates me. When that invigoration happens ideas just seem to flow endlessly? That state takes time though and if you want the to be an idea. Machine were all capable of these tips. I think will really help get you there so I up exercise. This is your idea muscle daily. We can all find a few minutes here and they are exercised this muscle. It could be wall sitting on a train during Commute Waiting for your kids at the bus. Ah Stop or brushing your teeth. It doesn't matter. Just find those few free minutes. You don't need a lot of time and it doesn't require a lot of effort. Just make sure you take take the time a system. I've actually implemented keep myself. Accountable is to come up with ten unique thoughts a day. These could be ideas for business how to improve an existing listing product ways of improving relationships or just a new thought. That could really help a friend some days. It's a struggle to come up with these ten other days. I could fill billig notebook with idea the key. The key is consistency every day without fail. I make this a priority ten unique thoughts. I've discovered I have my best ideas while reading in the morning during this time I control my environment as best I can. Everyone's asleep in my house so I can fully concentrate intrigue and I read a broad range of books from different subjects different authors on different people different biographies different biographies and I always have a pen and paper next me. So the second idea POPs my head boom. I just put it right down on paper to become an idea. Machine always have a notebook or something to write on. How many times have we been out and thought of something only to not write it down and forget it? This could be notes App on your phone Nice Journal or even just writing on the back of a receipt. beat the key is getting it out of your head and onto paper. After a few months and even years it'll be fun to go back and look at all the ideas you had. Who knows? Maybe we'll we'll circle back to an idea you had in the past that will lead to something great. I love doing this. I take my own old journal old notebooks and explore the ideas. I've had throughout the years. The greatest generator of ideas in human history has been the shower now taking showers a metaphor for anything you can do. Your mind is free to roam. That could be walking. doodling meditating receiving massage swimming any activity where you're alert but not distracted. Many times ideas are already in your head you just have to get them. To the space to navigate their way out sparking new ideas can actually be excelled by entering new unfamiliar environments. This could be traveling traveling to a new country or doing something. That's out of your comfort zone. Try Getting out of your comfort zone by signing up for dance lessons discovering the martial art learning how to fly live learning how to paint the possibilities are endless. It's about new experiences though the other times I've had the most ideas are actually after times of distress. Your pain. It's funny. How the breaking kicking overdrive touring these times? When something truly sucks your brain will do everything? It can to think of a better way if it's a pain point for oh you. It's probably been a pain point for someone else right. After the most difficult times in my life or when I've launched new businesses had clear thinking on investments and and improve my overall wellbeing the most so dig into those moments of pain and discomfort and look for a better way another key is your mindset. Think think of yourself as an idea generator if yourself talk keep saying you can never think of any ideas then. There's a good chance you won't know you're capable of coming up with countless bliss ideas but you gotta remember. Don't expect your ideas to be good. It takes thousands of bad ideas to uncover a few good ideas. Yes thank of bad ideas to come up with a few good ones. Many great ideas are just over. Time of terrible ideas. Don't let the fear of the bad ideas is hold you back from uncovering something great. Another tip is new. Ideas require social interaction. Ideas are generated Henrik quicker when you can bounce them off people with unique perspectives. This also provides a feedback loop to help you on your ideas. This is more for business start-ups but it's also an essential component of idea generation in general for this what I try to do is I spend a large portion of my morning and midday isolation. That's when I read discover ever explore my thoughts in the afternoon. That's when I get together with friends family other people who can poke holes and prod. My ideas I I love this concept and it's really important important to get those different perspectives. Another one of my favorite things to do is to read broadly across various different subjects and topics doing these. This gives multiple perspectives on the same topic. It opens your ID. It opens your eyes to arguments. You've never heard and remember reading books. It's an asymmetric risk. So what I mean by that is it might only cost me twenty dollars for a new book but the knowledge and wisdom. I can develop from that that can be incalculable. Fascinating fascinating books have stretched my mind more than anything else remember. Knowledge is compounding their books that when I first opened up I barely took anything away from then. A few years went by and I learned in other disciplines and then all of a sudden it unlocked the knowledge in that old book life presents a never ending option of potential doors to open reading reading. Just supplies. More keys on your key chain to unlock those doors. Think of all the doors. You'll never go through without those keys if you only. You've read books that everyone else's reading you can only think what everyone else is thinking. So don't be afraid to pick a book that could be challenging or involved in topic you'd never explored so you guys have the playbook now it's up to you to start becoming an idea machine to find out more ways to become an idea machine and the ten questions to ideas head. Oh what got you. There dot com remember momentum breeds momentum. You guys made it to the end of another are episode of what got you there. I hope you guys enjoyed it. I really do appreciate you taking the time to listen to all the way through. If you found value in this the best asked way you can support the show is giving us a review rating it sharing it with your friends and also sharing on social. I can't tell you how much I appreciate it looking forward to. You guys listening to another episode.

Sean Delaney billig Nice Journal twenty dollars
21: Theme Days - David Dulany

Daily Sales Tips

02:53 min | 1 year ago

21: Theme Days - David Dulany

"You're listening to the daily sales tips podcast. And I'm your host Scott Ingram. Today's tip comes from David Delaney. And if you don't know about David yet. Well, you're about to and you should he's the founder and CEO of ten bound has built sales development programs for glass door open DNS in for an act on software. He's also the host of the sales development podcast and the sales development conference. Here's David with today's tip one thing that I've been working on lately is themed days, so I'll try to break my week up into entire days focused on one activity and usually things that I tend to procrastinate on. I don't wanna do but will make me the most money in the long term or move projects forward that have been stalled. So, you know, run your priority list. Do a top five circle the top one that you've been for crossing into non and that'll make you the most money or. Some projects forward, and then just block out an entire day and focus only on that one thing the entire day. No matter what happens. I even sometimes stick my phone in the trunk of the car. I don't have my phone with me I closed out all of the tabs on my browser. My even use an old computer that only goes into Google docs. I'll pull up that one document or that one lead list or that one project, and literally that is all I'm allowed to do all day. And I really try to hold myself to that. And you'll find you know, the first hour or two you can go through, but it becomes really tough as you. You wanna bounce around? You want to answer Email? You wanna do all these different things? But think of it that you're on a desert island or you're locked up in a cabin. This is all that you can do put your out of office on, you know, close the door. Tell tell everybody that you're in a meeting all day or you're off. Sick or whatever you need to do more. Always be honest. But you know, let people know, hey, this is my money time. This is my work time. And I need this day to be able to laser focus and your productivity just absolutely skyrockets versus trying to bounce around two hundred different things all day. This idea of focus is starting to become its own theme. So let me ask you this. If you were to block out an entire day next week, what one thing would you choose to focus on and work on that day. Join the conversation that daily sales dot tips forward slash twenty one and on that page, you'll find links to all the great stuff that David is doing then be sure to subscribe to the podcast and come back tomorrow for another great sales tip.

founder and CEO David Delaney Scott Ingram
#167 Solo Episode: Finding Your Competitive Advantage

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

06:48 min | 1 year ago

#167 Solo Episode: Finding Your Competitive Advantage

"Today with Sean Delaney. What got you there with Sean Delaney? What got them Sean? Sean is bringing you a quick hit solo episode on uncovering your competitive competitive advantage to discover what your unique abilities are how to leverage them to distinguish yourself and how to keep your own unique skill. Set flywheel going Laney so multiple people send questions about understanding your competitive advantage especially early on your career and then how do you use this competitive advantage so today all discussed the importance of having your own competitive advantage how to discover what your unique abilities. These are how to leverage them to distinguish yourself and how to keep your own unique skill. Set flywheel going so early on in your career. It's essential to figure theurer out what your excellent at everyone has unique skill set and ability that can become unique them not everyone is a genius. Marketer or management management expert and. That's fine it's about discovering your own abilities identify what your competitive advantages and double down on it. When when you're able to leverage your skill early on you can develop exponential growth net skill and that allows for differentiation in a competitive market? We can all think of these colleagues who show up and do their job but are just average and they don't stand out these people they're dispensable and will never create valuable valuable impact for the company they work for you. Want your work to be unique to stand out to make yourself indispensable to quote Steve. Martin you you want to be so good. They can't ignore you. This isn't only for people working in a corporate structure. This is for the creative artists. The Solo Entrepreneur. You WanNa be reassessing your potential through this lens when you find your superpower that differentiates you. That's when you start creating work that truly matters. I don't think you need a crazy high Q.. To have a competitive advantage your advantage could just be understanding a particular neighborhood better than any other realtor in town or the the ability to discover and cultivate talented people. Maybe it's understanding. Distress debt financing better than anyone and one of the ones I've seen is people who are more resourceful resourceful than others and find unique ways to leverage thorough source witness. There are thousands of unique competitive advantages. Out there it doesn't need to be complicated located the work. So how do we go about identifying our competitive advantage. Well people spend too much time doing and not enough time thinking thing about what to do. This was a trap. I fell into early in my career. I didn't give myself in a free space. Time to think to work ideas out in my my head and start uncovering. What made me tick what I did? Well where my thoughts and how. I couldn't prove if you're like me. You have multiple desires and you want to do would dozen different things at once. It's vital that we become clear on which one of these things we care about. And what is going to receive our time when you found a large large block of uninterrupted time. Sit Down and ask yourself these questions. What do you love doing that? Others would consider work. What am I curious serious about what holds my attention? What fascinates me? What do I want to know more about? Who Do I enjoy Helping Ping for member unless you're retired free? Time isn't the default so make free time part of your strategy. My favorite way to identify competitive advantage is read read a lot. Then once you've read read a lot more in still this daily habit two of the most successful zestful people of our time our Warren Buffett and Bill Gates. Buffet is known for spending eighty percent of his day reading and thinking while gates takes what he calls calls a think week twice a year he goes off to a remote cabin where he just reads thinks all day while these examples are extreme and may not be feasible. It shows the importance of the reading habit. Start by just adding twenty minutes in your day and see after a few months the benefits that comes from that reading lots of books has proven to be highly correlated in my own life in the most voracious readers are the most successful. You'll see that intellectually curious people who you've read a lot of well written material as frequently as possible tend to have the most long term success. Once you've read broadly you'll start connecting the dots between multiple multiple disciplines and fields barring idea from here and transporting it there is a skill set that is hugely valuable. In fact I think my ability ability to connect the dots in different domains is my most valuable asset. Some of the best ideas and times. I've identified my unique skills are when I read biographies by studying some of the greats across different domains you start to understand what resonates with you and how people have used skill similar. Two years to differentiate themselves. I'll do another episode on reading but for now. Just start reading what interest you and this will get the habit going. Once you've been able to identify identify your competitive advantage remember to use it. Highlight it doubled down on it. Become the industry expert in your field and you will quickly discover how frequently people come to you because of the skill as you advance in your career and have separate yourself with the competitive advantage. You begin by adopting new skills sales and other advantages. This is when things get very fun and you start skill SCAP stacking to become truly unique for more on skill stacking. Checkout Scott Adams follow your genuine intellectual. Curiosity is a far better foundation for career rothe than following. What is making money right now by working on? What inspires you and playing the long term game? The the benefits will be incalculable until next time momentum breeds momentum. You guys made it to the end of another episode of what got you there. I hope you guys enjoyed it. I really do appreciate you taking the time to listen all the way through through. If you found value in this the best way you can support the show is giving us a review rating it sharing it with your friends and and also sharing on social. I can't tell you how much I appreciate it looking forward to. You guys listening to another episode.

Sean Delaney Solo Entrepreneur Bill Gates Warren Buffett Steve Martin Buffet Scott Adams eighty percent twenty minutes Two years
#142 Brad Thor- #1 Bestselling Thriller Author

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

1:01:37 hr | 1 year ago

#142 Brad Thor- #1 Bestselling Thriller Author

"They got we got Sean. Delaney Sean Delaney Brad Thor is the Number One New York Times bestselling author of nineteen nineteen thrillers including spy master which according to The Washington Times is one of the all time best thriller novels Brad Has Been One of Shawn's favourite authors for over a decade and is so excited for you all to get to hear more about Brad at in his journey Brad has been called the master of thrillers and America's favorite author. His bestselling novels have been published in over Thirty Countries Brad discusses going from an award-winning Creator producer writer and host of the TV show traveling light to conquering his fear and becoming a best selling writer. Hey guys I want to tell you about the brand. I'm obsessed with right now and you guys know. I'm pretty obsessive about the brands I work with especially when it comes comes to athletic apparel. You guys need to check out ten thousand. You need to head to ten thousand dot C._C.. And you guys can enter code W. G. Y.. T. and you're gonNA receive twenty percent. Yes twenty percents off your entire order. What what our love ten thousand ten thousand created the only training shorts you'll ever need they do so by simplifying your options deliver three premium shorts that perfectly cover all the ways you train? They've won built for versatility another for durability and one super lightweight perfect for one of those runs or whatever else you do for fitness no matter what you do they have you covered cross fit running spin yoga lifting or your weaken adventure. It doesn't matter what you do for fitness. They have a short for every way you train. They make it super simple to to find the right short. Just pick the short that's best for you. Your lifestyle personalize it with your individual needs with custom liner in seem options and start getting after it not sure they have the right short no need to were you guys make returner exchange they offer free shipping free exchanges and free returns on every order like I said ten thousand is my favourite brand right now. I'm wearing their apparel all the time when I'm working out I can't recommend MUNAF had to ten thousand dot C._C.. Enter Code W._G.. Y T and you've got twenty percents off your entire order making change transpire. That's the mission behind the most amazing tasting protein protein bar brand taking the nutrition industry by storm that brand their N._C.. TICO and they make the most delicious Kito friendly all natural collagen protein bars. If you're obsessed with the quality of food going into your body like I am then head out and pick up these amazing bars jam with ten grams of Collagen protein they only have two to three net carbs no added sugar and loaded with High Quality M._C._A._T.. Oil for the healthy fats from coconuts. Whether you're busy running the kids around from activity to activity a professional athlete or just someone looking for great tasting convenience stack do yourself a favor had debt MC tico dot com and use code W._G.. Y T for twenty percents off your order Brad Thor one of the major reasons I wanted to have you on is because you're at the intersection of so many things I'm intrigued by such as your entrepreneurial spirit and then a bestselling author of thriller writing I mean it's just things I love and and your culminating all of them but first. Let's get you warmed up. I know you've been busy on the book tour with three quick questions if you were a professional wrestler what would your entrance song be coming into the ring. Wow you got to fire fire up now. This is what you're gonNA learn about me Sean. I am incredibly thoughtful. In the details matter. I had to do my favorite five for don imus his show so used to have guests pick five songs in it took me like an entire day to pick the songs because I needed songs that even if they began them from the first bar people were not watching the TV. WE'RE GONNA turn on and look and say who the hell's coming on this show so I put on the spot right now. <hes> it's gotta the A._C._c. back in black because we get the crowd completely fired up right away even better we get a little better idea. New Your framework how you view things so next up sitting down with one cocktail or beverage of choice. What are you going with? Wow all right one cocktail Taylor beverage of choice <hes> Bourbon specific brand <hes> big fan of the Colonel Taylor in a like a lot because my liquor store in Nashville doesn't always have it so when it comes in it's a surprise and it's a treat in the people my neighborhood hate me because I buy every single bottle in the store so let's do next year when the new book comes out will be sitting down having a few classes that final one you have one vacation left where you going. I know you love travel. It's no question I go back to my beautiful little island of Paros Nonpartisan Carlson Greece very nice. I know you live there for a little while right. I did a couple of summers very good very good alright so I know you don't do your writing in the morning and you just mentioned it's morning there. You've got your big Carafe of coffee but how'd how'd you typically start your day so I start my day but taking care of myself so I get up no matter how rough I may feel from a late night the night before and I go when I work out so that's number one. I've got a gym at my house so I'll go on a workout workout. That's number one. <hes> it's important for me that the kids see me up and doing I mean I'm an entrepreneur. I own my own business. I could sleep in and I am not a morning person but it's important that my kids see me getting up early. They're getting up early. Go to school so yeah so I'll get up and I'll go work out first. GonNa come back and do breakfast with them very nice. What do you typically do for workout depends on the day so I mean I don't know I'm I'm lifting weights at least three to four days a week in throwing in Cardio two to three times a week and I'm trying on have one full day off but I get some sort of physical exercise on that date? It's it's normally walking. It's normally walking or hiking <hes> getting outside and making sure I'm getting away from all the electronics in that kind of stuff at least once a week very nice so we have a little bit better idea about how so you get your day started and something that really intrigued me was actually a former guest. They brought you up so guest of what got you there. Brought Brad Thorpe in the interview and this is what he said he said this guy is a force of nature. I don't know what he's going to do but whatever he's going to do he'll be successful at it and this was the first time he met you. Have you always had that. Get after it attitude ever since ever since I can remember it's part of my d._N._A.. My Gad's an entrepreneur. My Mom was an entrepreneur and you only got what you went after so I I've always been a high energy. <hes> really really hit it hard kind of guy so <hes> I'm not listen. That's very compliment lamented lovely compliment that somebody play paid me and I it resonates with me though because I am very high energy in varying gauged in again as you and I were joking around about what Song I have is my walkout songs a wrestler very detail focus because I think that's where success happens is in the details yet no I didn't. I didn't want to put you on the spot with that. Make you feel uncomfortable. I think it's just an attribute to you and the energy that you had so. I'm interested about that you mentioned Your Dad was an entrepreneur. What did you think you'd be as a kid? You know what I always wanted to be a writer but I spent a good amount of my young adult life running away from it <hes> I I went to the University of Southern California. That's where my dad had been doing a lot of work. He's a real estate developer. He he was a marine got out of the south side of Chicago by joining the Marine Corps. My mom was a flight attendant for T._W._A.. They both saw the world in those respective. Their Respective Professions and my dad went to school on the G._I.. Bill off and <hes> when I excuse me when I went to U._S._C. I went in as a business administration major because my dad wanted me to take over his business and I didn't like it was boring. It wasn't engaging me and I switched reached over creative writing and film and television production and when I left U._S._C. I went overseas to Paris. I had a friend who had an extra room and I started working on my first novel but I got three chapters into it and I quit because I had that voice in the back of my head that I think we all have <hes> that says you don't take the risk. Don't risk the embarrassment what if you fail better to have not tried than to have tried and failed and get into that voice in I shipped my laptop back home and I took all the money I had saved working college and I traveled throughout Europe and I had this idea. I'm going to do a T._v.. Show <hes> thought traveling made me a better American and I wanted to encourage young Americans to see the world. Don't wait till you retired dig overseas so I came back and I did it. It was an incredible lift lift in that it was very difficult. It was difficult to launch a T._v.. Show with no experience in in getting on stations from coast to coast but I did it but that was the size of my fear. I was willing to go through all I love love the T._v.. Show but I was willing to go through all that stress in hassle to avoid doing what was my true calling in life and that was to write novels and I really really believe Shawn that that which were destined most to do in life we are most afraid of that is is incredibly thoughtful and deep. I'm just thinking about your last few words there and thinking about that in my own life but I want to jump back to the show for a second and it was traveling light correct. I was the title of the show correct what I love about. This is you're an award-winning in creator producer writer and host of the show how to someone who has no television experience control and grasp all of that so I had the basic mechanics. I learned the basic mechanics at U._S._C. in college doing a show. But it was my dad he was brilliant in he said listen if you're going to do this. Nobody is born with a beard <hes> B. E. A. R. D. Nobody's born with a beard and I thought okay. This is interesting. was that mean he said Hollywood in television the film business it's full of freelancers so you don't have any experience but what you need to do is take the focus off of your inexperience in put it onto the experience of other people <hes> to what I ended up doing was researching and finding people I wanted to work with were freelancers getting their resumes and then putting together the team air quotes around teams when I pitch public television and they were asking about experience and everything I said well let me tell you about my team and then here's this award winning director this cameraman and all this kind of stuff so that would fell to me was getting public television to sign off on this concept and then raising the money because they don't <hes> in my case. They didn't just say here's money go do it. I had to go out and find sponsors but that worked to say oh well you know I graduated commodity from the University of Southern California studied film creative writing television production <hes> but again showing the team of professionals who are going to be working with me on this. That's what really helped <hes> take that my inexperience. Let's say a off the table. The word that comes to mind here is belief and you mentioned putting together a team raising money getting the television network to believe in you. What did you do so well to have all these people? Take a chance on you well. The my money came before the sponsors money. It turned out so what I did was I got public television. Put me in touch. They always put somebody on your production and make sure your abiding by the the extensive rules in public television so they team me up with a group called South Carolina e t the which was the <hes> the ownership group. Let's say of all the public television stations in the State of South Carolina and they were looking to bring new new product to market particularly. They wanted to appeal to a younger demographic so I found someone who had a need in had way to fulfil that need I admire needs to which was I got to get production off the ground so we were able to complement each other. I had a great show idea and they had people on staff crews and they offered me a crew. So what I ended up doing was bringing this director who is very well thought of and he had allowed me to use his real to show public television listen. This is the stuff that directors done before and he had a sizzle reel. It was really cool how we'd put it together and he had filmed around the world so it was perfect to use for travel show but I went over to Paris to shoot a pilot and I did it. They get South Carolina gave me e._T._v.. GimMe the crew but this was at a time Sean where credit cards like if you sneezed like a pilot credit cards would show up on your desk. If you blinked there your bathtub. It'd be full of them so I decided that I would finance myself. I figured you know what if I'm not willing to take a risk on myself. Why should I ask anybody else too so I paid for that pilot tens of thousands of dollars on credit cards at something like eighteen nineteen twenty one percent interest it was crazy but I got a pilot done in with that pilot I was able able to then take it to other public television stations to ask them if they would air it and then once I got the commitment of all these major stations then I was able to go to sponsor <hes> different sponsors and say hey first of all here's five minutes what the show would look like and if you Wanna I've got the full half hour? I can show it to you in. Here's the list of stations that have agreed to run it in. That's how that all came together Brad. You're getting me even more fired up over here. Just thinking about the confidence you had in yourself. Why did you believe leave that you could leverage all these credit cards and net failure wasn't going to be an option for you? Tell you what when I did this. I was a huge I still huge Tony Robbins Fan and I had gone to study in Paris gone to school rule over there in my mom had choose an executive recruiter at the time and she was working for a client called Nightingale Coconut Publishing Group and I had taken over a couple of books on tape <hes> in one was a book on negotiating and another one was a Tony Robbins series and it was the only thing I had that I could listen to besides music because there was no T._v.. In my room I was sleeping in this little attic bedroom thing and so I listened to the Tony Robbins stuff over and over and over and over again <hes> success leaves clues lose. If you show the same siege reap the same rewards that you have to have the acuity to fine tune your approach your pitch I mean I just I became like this monk in a cell only had one book to read over and over again for me. It was Tony Roberts in that stuff was very very powerful particularly at that time in my life and I realized that no matter how many knows I got every single know that somebody gave me on my project meant. I was one step closer to the yes. I never lost faith that the yes was out there and it's just it's going to be as many noses. It takes to get to that yes but there was no way I was going to give up carving your own path. What I love to is that you put in as much work as possible control what you can control and now I wanNA loop in your writing career? You mentioned you move to Paris begin novel. You got three chapters. In what was the book you were writing. Was it your first book. You ended up releasing lines of Lucerne. No it's funny it was not an I thought that I had lost those chapters for good. I was cleaning out my garage before I went a bookstore and I found this old file box and I'm like what's this stuff and I pulled it out and it was the inside the box with a lot of other pieces of writing. I didn't college at U._C.. I actually found the first three chapters and I think at at some point. I'm going to write that book going to complete it. I like it to be like the very last thing I write kind of a thing so I don't WanNa touch it for you know years and years and years and years decades Oh that is so interesting so talk to me about that moment where you decide to to end writing at that moment three chapters in was it something in the back of your mind you just couldn't escape or was it. One day just came to you that hey this is too much. I need to let this go right now. Well I say this with with every ounce of respect <hes> possible for the United Negro College Fund they had commercials when I was growing up one of the best commercials ever at best tag lines ever because it stuck with me which is a mind is a terrible thing to waste. That was their slogan but I began to take that slogan. I've I've never forgotten it. I began to take that slogan shorten it to suit what I was going. Through and I- short to a mind is a terrible thing period because of that voice that kept nagging me saying don't do this don't do this. Don't do this. <hes> I convinced myself that it writing was the most solitary act a person could engage in as a profession and I said you know it's no wonder so many writers become alcoholics in so many of them have committed suicide in this kind of thing and I just taught myself out of doing the book because it was hard hard and even more than being hard Sean <unk> demands a tremendous amount of honesty in introspection if you can't be honest with yourself if you can't fearlessly look inside yourself. You'll never even be a halfway decent writer so I yeah I talked myself doing it and I filled. I filled that hole that void in me with travel and I traveled traveled traveled Ben. I filled it with all of the highs and lows that come. I'm with beginning your own business and trying to get that first customer in the door with my production company but that voice that that told me you know you you shouldn't do this above above Abbad. It's not gonNA work out. There was something deeper and stronger in more resonate inside me and that was the need to write that had ever since I was a little boy in on my honeymoon my wife turned to me and said what would you regret on your deathbed never having done and before I could grab the words out of the air and shove him back in my mouth. I should writing a book and getting a published and she said fine when we get home. You're going to start spending two hours a day. No phone no Internet and you'RE GONNA start making that dream. Come true and so how am I gonNA tell my brand new bride that I'm a chicken <hes> that I don't have the courage instinctiveness to to see this lifelong goal through so it was out of Pri- <hes> that I got <hes> got that fuse lit again in got back into it and I did it two hours became three became four became five and she brings dinner to my desk and we just keep everything at bay so I could do this. When I finished writing that first book Sean Who's the greatest feeling in world it must be what it feels like for people to run their first marathon climb their first mountain? I knew I could do do it again. And again and again and again and just as incredible was the feeling of knowing that when I go to my deathbed I will not look back and say what if I'd only tried to go after that dream fried can be a motivating factor that is for sure I I love that she brought that <music> out of you and got you back to writing and I know all the listeners and readers of your worker thankful for that but let's talk about those two hours each day. You're about to get back into writing. What is that even look like planning out a new book sitting down to write anything those first first few weeks that you remember well? I can tell you a little bit about how it all came together which is kind of interesting and just shows you the way the universe lines up when you make the right decisions so for my travel show we had gone to Lucerne. Switzerland and in Lucerne is a <music> a raw a monument carved into a cliff face. It's a dying lion that was carved to commemorate the seven hundred plus Swiss guard that died defending King Louis Marie Antoinette in the initial throws of the French Revolution Mark Twain called it the most moving piece of rock in world. This beautiful lines got a spear broken off in its side and I always liked the alliteration of the line of Lucerne and even back when I was doing my t._v.. Show before I met my wife and had said I'm going to write a book. I would like to write a book. I said if I ever do a book I'm going to the title is going to be the lines of Lucerne. I don't know what it's going to have to do with Switzerland whatever lines of Lucerne Anyway <hes> my sponsor for my T._v.. Show in our second season was real Europe group in as a wedding present <hes> they gave us rail passes and as many overnight train. Train compartment rides as we want it which is a great way to save money and <hes> on our final leg of the <hes> of our honeymoon in Europe. We shared a compartment. We didn't have a private one with a lovely brother and sister. I've been dreading getting on the train because I didn't know who these strangers were going to be and I just thought to sleep with one eye open you know it's going to be we're going to be in there like Gypsies or bank robbers. I didn't know what it was going to be and <hes> they turned out to be lovely from Atlanta. Georgia in the sister. Cindy Jackson was a a big Fan of my t._v.. Show they traveled all the time and turn out cindy and I had a shared love of books and we talked about books all night long from Munich to Amsterdam and she said are you going to make more T._v.. Shows and I I had already on honeymoon told my wife was gonNA write a book and I figured if I kept talking about about it. It would make it more real so I said to Cindy. I said I'm GonNa Make More T._v.. Shows but what I'm going to do I someone to write a book interesting okay. I've told the second person now we get off the train in Amsterdam and <hes> we go to exchange contact information in Lo and behold. She's he's a sales rep for Simon Schuster and she told me she said if you write that book I'd like to read it and if I can help you at Simon and Schuster to be my honor so on my honeymoon I had already had an idea for a book told my wife I was going to write a book a meet a sales rep from Simon and Schuster shuster. There's just one element missing which is what's my story going to be in. Believe it or not my wife and I went from the train station to the hotel in Amsterdam. A room wasn't ready and the desk clerk centers around the corner to get a cup of coffee and a sandwich at this little cafe and I sit down. My wife has a paperback with her. She starts reading. There's an English language newspaper on the next table that somebody's left behind and I opened it up and I'm flipping through and I find this little intelligence brief little column about three quarters of an inch wide and two inches tall in it was about a Swiss intelligence officer who had embezzled all this money from the Swiss army in was training zone shadow militia high in the Alps with high-tech weapons from his own private arsenal. I said there's my story so all of that team together on that trip and then when I got home I started doing those two hours a day but I knew what I was gonNA write about. We were living in Park City Utah. At the time and Bill Clinton President Bill Clinton had been to visit ski he twice for his daughter Chelsea's birthday and so I knew some secret service guys and I said what's it like. How do you secure the entire mountain for a president and they said well? It's a lot of work and we like to keep it open so other people can ski and so all that bubble together with this idea of Swiss wish mercenaries. Why would you hire Swiss mercenaries well? Maybe they're snow kidnapping president while he's on ski vacation in Park City and that's how that all just kind of mashed up and came together. Well talk about the stars lying. There are so many different directions. I would love to go right now. We're going to get back to how you go from idea to to writing it down on paper but something you said that really hit me is when you put it out in public to a second person and you let them know your plans. How important was that for you again? It was pride right so I had the pride factor in there because I told my wife. This was my my one thing that I regret never having done it. My Wife's okay you're going to do it now. I had some professional pride on the line with Cindy Jackson because Cindy knew me as is Brad thor the host of travelling light so there is my professionalism. If you will is now at stake so kind of the way my wife viewed me a my that that large personal stake was on the table now. I had a professional steak on the table table with a big Fan of my t._v.. Show so it started bringing together. It's almost like the universe was conspiring to to hit me from all sides so that there was no way I couldn't do this and so yeah it was important that I do that. I didn't Intel lots of other people after that. That seemed to be enough for me but it was what I needed. No question interesting. Another thing you mentioned is when you I finished that book. Just the joy the pure elation you had. was that the biggest moment where you feel like you've arrived or you've accomplished one of your big dreams. Yeah there was no question when I wrote and I don't write this anymore but I did on that first manuscript I typed the end and it was the most incredible feeling I've written nineteen thrillers now and it feels really good to finish thriller but it never feels as good as that first one that was special that was reaching the top of my very first mountain in it felt awesome still feels awesome to finish a book but that was the big one that had that was a even if I never did anything again after that that was a major personal accomplishment yeah I have to imagine that has a special place in your heart now want to dive into your idea generation process and how you go from idea to creating a best seller and you mentioned you have to be sitting in that cafe in Switzerland and the idea came to you. Do those ideas typically. Just come out of nowhere for you or is there a methodical process to try to get them out <hes> so there's a million there's a million ways. I can describe this in a lot the anecdotes but people say to me they say Brad. Where do you get your ideas and I say I get him in the shower or after the second glass of Bourbon <hes> it it's because that's when I'm really relaxed in? That's when it flows so oh getting an idea in actually writing a book or two different things because you have to get the idea. The idea can't be forced but the book needs discipline so Jack London was famous for saying you can't wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club and you throughout history. There have been stories in movies made plays and all this kind of thing of the frustrated writer who sits down to write nothing comes. That's where the discipline going after inspiration with a club has to happen food but for me you can't force the the the the idea that seed that the book is going to grow from. That's gotta come naturally but Stephen King said that a writer is someone who's trained their mind to misbehave in my case. That's very true. I look at everything and say what if what if this had happened watched the news and say well what if that's not really the story what if it was this so I'm constantly flipping things over in turning them on their head turning them inside out just to see if there's anything interesting in there for me so it's just this kind of Mental Ping Pong that I play with facts to see if I can get an interesting story out of something that at first glance doesn't seem that interesting. You're never starving for ideas. Are you know <hes> particularly now I finally understand understand <hes> as crazy as the world is the Chinese curse. May You live in interesting times. I now understand that so then I want to know more about just your overall creative genius and then how someone may be interested in writing how they can help spark that in themselves you just mentioned you never starving for idea so are there things of writer can do is is it experience in life travel anything like that that has helped you along the way well thorough had a great quote which is and I'm going to bomb an absolutely just bastardize it here because I don't have the first part <hes> but it basically the quote was how vein it is to sit down and write when you have never stood up in lived in so <hes> <hes> I I draw a lot from my life experience. I am I have a I have a well in me that is never ending of Energy and passion and excitement and I'm constantly on the move and doing different things and seeing different things and I have this voracious appetite that I want to feed with new experiences and I feed that appetite in different ways. I'll travel. That's one thing <hes> I also a huge reader and I believe that you cannot be he <hes> a even mid level good writer without being an incredible reader. I think that's really really important <hes> in back to Stephen King again. Stephen King in his book on writing had a great piece of advice which which is to write what you love to read because that's where your passion is and I actually take it a step further and I say not only should you write what you love to read because that's where you'll find your passion but you have a mini p._H._d.. In that genre that you probably they don't even know about so if you like fantasy like or sci-fi or political and international thrillers like I right if you've read enough in that genre you know why some of the books succeed in some of the books don't for you personally. I don't mean sales. I mean Oh you know why you like certain books in certain books you don't there may be authors who have written multiple books where there's three of them. You'll love and four you don't in you say oh he did this and change that or she did this and change that I didn't like it as much as I like these other books well that all goes goes into this knowledge base that you can draw on as a writer so I believe part of being successful is having great self-discipline. It really is to be a successful writer. It's eight of pants to seat of chair. <hes> clancy at once said anybody can write the novel. The key is can you write a second novel third novel in a fourth novel. That's that's really where the talent comes into play <hes> but inspiration is something that you do have to go after with the club. There is no secret way to do it but every story's stories been told Sean <hes> that's one of the things they taught us in the creative writing program at U._S._C. so you're not gonNA find a story that hasn't been told but what you bring that unique and special is your way of telling that story. I had one teacher wants. The talked about did a whole thing we did. It was an amazing class. We're talking about Jesus in Rocky Balboa and no matter who argued what in the class he could make the argument that Jesus and Rocky Balboa was the same story in an appeal to people for the same reason <hes> so if fascinating fascinating class that was by Jesus and rocky but it made sense and so we talked about the art of storytelling in the craft and that's where the art and craft come in just how do you tell a story that's been told before but you tell it differently well how Brad Thor those last few minutes. I know we have a lot of writers. Listen to the show. They are going to absolutely love that. I just took a ton out of that. That's what I'm GONNA listen to over and over again you mentioned Stephen King actually just read his book on writing two weeks ago. I loved it. It was unbelievable. What else are you reading? <hes> so I am reading all the time in my genre but between books I like to read a lot about the art of writing the craft of writing because I don't think I'm anywhere near as good as I could be and I should be as a writer I feel there's constant room improvement and that's back to my parents. The entrepreneurs the the good solid mid Westerners that said you treat every day on the job as your first day on the as if it were your first day on the job and when I sit down to do a new book I always ask myself. Is this idea good enough and when I'm done with the Book I say is the book good enough to give me a contract at Simon and Schuster if they didn't know who I was. Is this good enough that if it was my first book I would get a deal for it and so that's really that's it's really important to me so I read a lot of books about character development and plot in story arc in all of this kind of stuff <hes> in my quote unquote off season which I'm never off but between <hes> publishing a book and being out on the road like I am now promoting a book I I'm trying to learn more about my craft. I think I will do that till the day I die. I will read books about writing and try even if only get one thing out of the book then that means I am. I buy whatever magnitude of that one thing. I'm a better writer you you mentioned you're kind of in the off season right now. I would love for you just to give a map of what a year looks like and then I'd like you to expand upon that that process of becoming a better writer so what's that year looked like for you so it's always different so I've been I've been doing this this almost for two decades now <hes> the books. It's like eight eighteen years my first book seventeen years. I've been doing it so every book is different. <hes> I try to pick a call what I do faction where you don't know where the facts end in the fiction begins. My job is devia the a white knuckle thrill ride you take it to the beach. Take it to the lake. A lot of people like to plan their vacations around the release of my books and <hes> so I do short Chris cinematic chapters because I want to entertain you but I also want to leave real life things into the books so that if you close the book having had that great white knuckle throw ride you're a little bit smarter or you know a little bit more <hes> this part of the world or this thing about spies or whatever something that was not writing a textbook this is you're not supposed to notice. You're picking picking up this cool stuff in. If you notice you're picking it up and I haven't done my job I just WanNa quietly. Weave it into the story so those those things those real life things that I spend time researching can take different amounts of time so I'll I may feel like I need a lot of runway. <hes> to before the the the writing can take off and sometimes the runways a little bit shorter and sometimes. It's an ongoing process where I am. I haven't got all the research done because I don't know which direction the books GonNa go when I'm making calls to experts during the day so the year is interesting. I can't say that my year starts with three months of just solid research in then I write for four months. Then I Polish for five it is always always different in the key for me is is can i. When do I get that idea that I mean that's the big thing I don't have the idea? I can't even start researching. I don't know what the book is going to be about. So every year is different but that's good right so I'm the guy that likes new experiences. That's constantly throwing up that well with cool things meeting. Cool people going to go places reading cool books having cool experiences and that keeps me lit. That is the stuff that really that's the fuel that I put in my in in my rocket to to get me through the year in it's different every year in you would think that having written nineteen books it gets easier but it doesn't because my good midwestern work ethic is I have to be better. <hes> <hes> there was a great every book has to be better. The bar gets raised every time so my job gets harder and harder and harder every single year just by the goals I set for myself so it's it's it's exciting. It's different every a year in it's also it's never boring in. That's what's important for me because if it was boring I wouldn't be able to do it and I've always promised my readers who are my employers. I worked for Simon and Schuster. I worked for the readers that I will never phone it in. They will always skit the absolute best. I'm capable of and I one of the books I read over. The last couple of years was a book called the content trap and the content trap dealt with <hes> the impact of the Internet on all sorts of businesses and it had all these great nuggets of of of knowledge and wisdom in there but one of the coolest ones for entrepreneurs is that <hes> one of the biggest mistakes entrepreneurs make in trying to increase their sales is they focused too heavily on perfecting the product sucked <hes> because that's the one thing they have the most direct control over and eighties a mistake according to the content trap if you've got an awesome product that your customers are raving about if you're spending a good chunk of your year tweaking that product in these are tweaks that yes admittedly make the product better but your customers aren't asking for that improvement in the product you've wasted time. You're chasing your tail. All this kind of stuff. It was great. I thought it was really cool. I'm like that's me. I'm constantly bringing the product <hes> but I can't help it. It's just who I am. It's how I was raised. My readers have not said you need to improve your product. I I feel like a half to that. I I am not honoring the trust. They put me if I'm not stretching myself further and further every year both thank you for that being a longtime <music>. I'm reader of your work. It's great to see the continual improvement. It's so funny a minute ago you mentioned certain readers will plan their vacations. I have a little vacation. My family and I are taking in two weeks so I actually have not read your newest book backlash because I just want to enjoy it purely purely on the beach while relaxing but I want to hear about that internal drive and just expanding upon your own writing skills. So what does that look like you mentioned reading books. Do you have a note taking process when trying to improve your skills. Is there anything like that yeah well yeah so. I absolutely destroy books when I read them so i. I'm only GonNa read a book on writing once okay. I'm not GonNa read it twice so I will highlight out ripped out pages. Go into a file so I actually have like an exacto knife razor blade box cutter. I've got these things all over the office and I'll I'll. I will slice out pages. They'll go into a folder. Let me give you an example of something. I just learned before I wrote backlash in. You're going to see you're going to <unk> seen in the beginning of backlash where the protagonist honors a promise he made to somebody in the the beginning of this book that very intense very dramatic action scene in the beginning of backlash and I'll tell you what inspired me to do it so I decided to look beyond just the regular writing books that here's how you write a novel. I thought you know what I like a lot of the writing. I'm seeing now in Hollywood. Let me look I talked to screenwriter buddy of mine and I said what are what are some of the big. Give me your top five to ten screenwriting books that if you were going to speak to a young up up and coming screenwriter you'd recommend he or she read these five to ten bucks. He gave me a list. I went out and bought all of them and I figured writings writing whether it's for it's it's different. It's like the difference between NASCAR and Formula One <hes> Hollywood in novels like I right but he's still got four wheels. It still goes very fast around a track in it involves a lot of technology. I'm like great all right. I'll read these read these books so there was one book <hes> called Save the cat and <hes> that's a very typical term that gets thrown on with Hollywood writers all read this book but it opens with talking about creating a special moment for the protagonist that that draws readers in two liking the protagonist in the took a scene from a movie that I loved from a longtime time ago with Al Pacino and Ellen Barkin called Sea of love in in it opens with a sting that the N._y._p._d.. Still does to this day from what I understand which is they're looking for people who haven't shown up for court that jumped bail l. all this kind of stuff. They've got an idea where these people may be but they haven't been able to track them down and arrest them so they send letters out saying you've when season tickets to the met so the Yankees whatever come down to the Grand Hyatt Hotel and we're going to have a big big thing. You're going to get your tickets. We get the players are going to be there to autographed baseballs and all this stuff congratulations you know three weeks from now Saturday morning nine o'clock so the movie opens with this sting underway the cops have deposing his like mets or or Yankees manager staff and P._R.. People get all these guys into a ballroom and they closed the doors behind him and you figure watching this that they're going to be that. They're all going to be arrested on. Moss together in the ballroom. Out Pacino is hanging out in the hallway outside inside the ballroom. In this man comes trotting in late Kinda sweating. It doesn't want to miss the opportunity to get the get the tickets and holding his hand is this little six year old boy scout us mets cap on. He's got a ball gloves got a baseball Mitt on his hand and everything we you know and this guy. This father has brought his little boy. You know they obviously love baseball together and everything in the father doesn't know he's going to get arrested. There and Al Pacino sees this in very subtly pulls back the lapel of his leather jacket shows his badge edge to the father and the father stops it just goes completely face goes white. He realizes Oh my God. This is a sting. I'm going to get arrested and the now Pacino looks at the little boy looks back at the father and winks at him and says I'll catch you later such a it's such a great seed and I thought okay that immediately makes me like him. It tells me he's smart. He's tough and that was one of the things that I learned between books last year and that had a big impact on me for how I opened or not how I open backlash but what you'll see with the protagonist in how he handles a particular situation in the beginning so <hes> again nineteenth book Sean this is me constantly trying to get better in to improve my product. We love the I love the content trap but Dan the torpedoes Dan that wisdom and advice about perfecting the product. I went full ahead in this year on tour I have had so many people. Tell me that backlash is the best book I've ever written. It is something I've always had people. Hosea read it one night. I've had more people come up to me and say I read it the day I got. It couldn't put it down already finished it. I did something I haven't done before which was to give in more to that voice inside me and trust it in let it take me in do things I've never done before my books. That took a lot of courage. I had a close my eyes in jump off the cliff. I could've done things and had a great book. No doubt top five New York Times bestseller list. I have no doubt that I've I've learned how to do that now but I really really wanted to do something more and do something different in really give readers something special in so it wasn't only the things I learned in the off year but it was also trying to turn everything inside out. Burn it all down in build it back for book nineteen <hes> because I just don't want it to get stale. I don't want people say oh. It's like the same book just said at a different. I don't ever want to get that kind of feedback from from my customers. Don't ever want that so I prevent that by. Just absolutely you know straining on some days over every word every sentence every paragraph so that I know I left everything on my laptop. There was nothing I held back. It all went into the book. Wow that is that so insightful inciteful and I love how you're constantly raising the bar. You mentioned your nineteenth book and it's great to see you not afraid to take that jump and not wait for book twenty to do that. Leap and jump off that cliff so I love that one thing I have to know about. Is your research process you you mentioned you right faction but you have to be so exact in terms of the weapons. They're using the technology. Could you talk a little bit about your research process yeah so you and I both read. I think it's funny that I would bring up Stephen King on writing and you read it two weeks ago. That's that's the universe two weeks ago when I picked it up. I loved it unbelievable. A great great book for the Writers who are listening lessons learned from a lifetime of writing by David Morale is also fabulous. David is is one of my inspirations. He's a great thriller writer in. He's the guy who wrote Rambo. Just ramble was his very first book and he's written a ton of stuff afterwards not about Rambo but he's just a really really smart guy so Stephen King David morale to great books on writing <hes> so my research prod- process I joke around a joke right. I'm pretty serious about the fact that I have no idea what it's like for Stephen King to write a book and I will never presume to say he's got it easier easier than I do but I do know this. Stephen King gets to make up his own rules because he writes about monsters and demons and all this pet cemetery and all this kind of stuff that just isn't real so he gets largely create his own rules. I have to operate within in a very specific set of rules so if I'm writing about a seal team I have to have the correct seal team. I have to have them in the correct location. All the gear and equipment has to be correct because in my business my publisher there is a B. Two B. and I'm B. C.. So I hear from the customer I hear from that consumer they find me on facebook or find me on twitter and they'll say hey brad you screwed up that gun you wrote about in that caliber doesn't exist and I will politely lately come back and say actually yes Smith and Wesson made a limited edition ten pieces for the Sultan of Brunei who not him. I hate the Sultan of Brunei to retract that. I want to get that guy a monster I hate he is the most anti freedom and liberty person so <hes>. Let's just say <hes> the King Sweden ordered Tennessee's God's being Swedish. Let's give the credit for for smart good gun buying getting something cool to King Sweden so Sweden has tended these things specifically made and then I'll share with the fan. Here's the article I found or here's the here's the thing on Smitten Weston's website about Oh we made ten of these twenty years ago for the king of Sweden and fans really appreciate that and I I've got several buckets of Awesome Fan mail all Arab categories that I put Fan mail into one of the ones that I am really proud of is when I hear from seals or I hear from people at the CIA or wherever in they say wow you got it exactly right when I was in Iraq I carried that exact doc rifle or when I was in Afghanistan I had that knife or whatever is here there you get what we're going through at Langley or when D._O._J.. Did this I was a protective <hes> agent for the Attorney General and we had at these things in our car and you nailed it to. That's a real tremendous source of pride for me so I have to get those details right so I'm constantly spending time with the people I'm writing about in. I get invited to do training things whether it's by the manufacturers of of the gear themselves or to go train and do things with people who are going to go out and do some of this nation's most dangerous business so I'm hands on in anything that you see in my books. I've probably gotten familiar with unless it's like something. That's bolted to an airframe so there's there's certain canons and stuff on a spooky gunship that I just I've never been up firing cannons out of a gun ship. It's not something they offer for even authors to do so I did in there with the details. I like these details in again. We're back to write what you love to read because that's where your passion is in my thing. My addition to that is you've got a mini P._H._d.. So I've read a lot in my genre and I like this stuff sir. I've been reading about <hes> all this gear in what these people do forever so I built up this knowledge base you mentioned being hands on. was there something maybe a weapon of course just a system one of these agencies use that just blew your mind that you can speak of <hes> well. I'll tell you one of the cool things that I did that. I did do it is the A._T._F.. Has Training facilities in Quantico Virginia <hes> where the F. B.. I. Is and I got to train screen with one of their lead firearms instructors in it was really cool. I never knew this and at eighty played into some of the training. I didn't know that the A._T._F.. Has the most gunfights out of any federal agency if the most gunfights because it's all drugs right alcohol tobacco firearms and there's a lot of drugs and stuff like this they do tons of raids and all that stuff in there gunfights happened very close in so there are a lot of techniques in neat things that they do <hes> but on top of that I learned that so when and you see Marine One helicopter that lands on the South Lawn at the White House and picks up a president they the Marine Corps White Tops helicopters. I learned that the A._T._F.. Actually trains there the pilots from those helicopters now those are marine aviators gators and they still go and get this really intense A._t._f.. Training because one of those helicopters goes down like in a bad area overseas or you know or a rough urban area in the United States I think of the movie <hes> <hes> escape from New York with Kurt Russell <hes> were New York was turned into Manhattan was turned in a maximum security prison and it was a free for all inside <hes> that was one of those cool things and I learned a bunch of stuff nothing that I'm comfortable putting out in the public because I certainly don't want to reveal oh techniques in in stuff that <hes> that federal agents us but that was one of those things where I got to do training and I was like Gosh this is cool. This is very very thoughtful. They know what they're doing and they are some amazing. Pistolero is there I can only imagine edging some of the Fun Times and things you've got to see. I WanNa know now bore about your actual writing process. You've done a lot of the research you're sitting down. What does this look like for you well so first and foremost I have no formula and I don't outline line? Every book is organic and <hes> The one thing that I will do because it helps me just kind of keep track of my beats if you will. The heartbeat of the story is in a word document. I'll create a table <hes> with I think it's normally five columns so going left to right. The first column will be a description of what's going on in that Chapter Second Column will be what chapter we in than we have day of the week in that. I have time of day at that location nation because I do a lot of international stuff and I go back and forth from D._C.. To London or D._C. to Cairo that kind of stuff I need to know you know you can't have people having lunch in both places at once right because of the time change so <hes> but what I do with that I left hand column wherever description of what's going on in the Chapter I color coded so is this my protagonist. Is this <hes> some other storyline in the book so that I can tell by glancing back at that table in word I can see okay. Hey it's been x amount of chapters. I haven't seen green which is my protagonist for four or five chapters all right. I know instinctively from the way put my stories together that I need to get back to him that whatever story I've been following a couple of story lines have been following. It's time to get back to him so that's one of the things that I do. When I sit down to write the other thing is is I want each chapter to end with a Cliffhanger Mickey? Spelane was famous for saying the first chapter sells the book. The last chapter sells the next book but all that stuff in between is really important. You have to get people from the first chapter to the last chapter in I wanted just keep the tension rod attention. I WANNA give people chance to breathe but not too much. I want you to catch your breath but I don't want your heart rate to go down. If that makes sense makes perfect sense and something I seem to have noticed over the past few books is your writing style almost seems to have changed. You've always been action packed and you capture my attention at all times but it seems like the chapters have become even slightly a shorter to capture my attention even more. Is that methodical. I think it's a process of me trying to get better. I also think we have a lot of things competing for our attention so before the Internet and stuff if you look back at like my early books Sean Chapters were much longer and I had many more storylines subplots and everything that I was weaving through the books so the again I'm creating an entertainment product and it doesn't exist in a vacuum I have there's competition for people's. Attention for their time for their dollars so I have to constantly evolve so I can stay at the top of the food chain where I am in that I remain attractive right so I'm the I'm the husband who doesn't want his wife to lose interest. I'm off and I'm lifting weights every morning and while I'd love to have have like a big huge bacon cheeseburger for lunch and a pitcher of beer. I'm not doing that. I guess I you know I'm going in and I'm having my chicken breast in in that kind of stuff because I'm trying to stay lean mean and attractive in so it's not only my personal personal life that I'm hitting it. That hard eats in my work life to again. My books don't exist in a vacuum. It'd be great <hes> I like. I say it'd be great. It'd be different if they did but I have to remain competitive and I remain competitive by constantly elite evolving. I will not be left behind. I refuse to be left behind. I won't shut down. I'm turning my kids onto music. You know I've got to teens a freshman in a junior in high school like have you heard this. I'm not trying to be too like middle allege guy. That can't let the the youth go not in that sense but it's part of who I am. I gotta feed the beast things have to I can't I can't have things stayed. The same because stagnation is death in any business stagnation is death. You've got auto lean out over the edge. Even if you're balancing razor-blade in your feet hurt you gotta do it. Stagnation is death. Is that somewhere you've you've heard that somewhere else or seen that written no that actually the first time I think I've ever uttered it really yeah so I actually have something in my my Home Office with with that saying on there it was it was the same thing I hate Stan. Yeah that's unbelievable so I don't know if I've heard that somewhere else. It just really hit me when you said that again but but I love how much attention you put into your own process constantly evolving constantly getting better. Who Do you see out there? They don't have to be a writer that has just impressed you with with that internal drive to constantly get better anyone come to mind for you. That's a great question great question so if I'm looking at from looking at brands in people trying to get a you know it's funny because I spent a lot of my time lamenting that exceptional customer service seems to be the exception not the rule <hes> so I can look at big brands in in see things that I'm impressed with you know I mean just crazy brands like Audi. I'm really impressed with with what they do in technology gene things like that and in racing in the things that they put into their cars. I just think the brand is really good and they've got a devotion to customer service. I happen to have a friend who is a builder and <hes>. This guy had everyone in his organization. Even if you're an intern you had to read the biography of Cesar Ritz <hes> who who started the Ritz hotels <hes> in learn about anticipating the customer's needs before they even have them that really blew me away but as far as somebody really famous this who's constantly again. I'm going to tie it back to Nashville where I'm from. I I've been really impressed with Taylor Swift's brand. I know she's had some legal. Battles go on but she's she's constantly cranking out hit. She's tried to keep her keep yourself aww too many cultural and political issues. I think that's a really good brand. I'm not giving you what I wish I had. If I'd known this question was coming. I would have spent time thinking about you know what when you talk to a writer and you ask a question question. They're going to give you words whether they've got an answer hot words instead of me just shutting up and saying nothing jumps to mind Shawn. Don't were you gave me Taylor swift and Cesar Ritz. I have not read that book so I'm GonNa have to check that one out. We've been going on with an hour. I know you've got gotta go. We haven't even talked about your newest book yet backlash. I mentioned I'm going to be picking that one up to read it in a couple of weeks here. What can the listeners know about this and obviously they can pick it up? Everywhere books are sold but just give us a plug here for the book sure well. It's my nineteen thriller and I tell people take the James Bond movies. It doesn't matter if you've seen all the bond movies or none of them you can go check out the latest so if you haven't read a Brad Thor book before you can absolutely start with backlash and essentially this this is this is me showing something I actually haven't even seen anybody do this. In a thriller before there is a top U._S.. Operative that has been the Thorn Been Eighth Thorn in the side of a very very bad foreign government. They risk everything to come to the United States. It's an act of war but they come over here figuring he won't see them coming. They put a bag over his head and drag him back to their country in doing the research for this book. I said I want to know what we teach our guys to escape so I plugged into several different sere instructors doctors in CR stands for survive evade resist escape and the number one thing was that if you are taken you may only get one chance to escape and you have to have already decided before that chance comes that you're gonNA take it no matter what and so the book begins with <hes> my protagonists it is getting his one chance <hes> but his code is we talked about the beginning when I talked about that Al Pacino seen he gets his one chance to escape but before he can escape he has to do one thing and there's one thing may mean he doesn't get this game but it and establish his who he is in in y the bad guys want him so bad and it's just a fun chase. There is <hes> there's a the reviewers have said it's part called the while Jack London as part the gray that Liam Niessen movie it's part the fugitive Harrison Jason Ford it's taken and a little bit of fast and furious in their eighties just a fun exciting toes in the sand book in the hand. <hes> Kinda read that again every single person I've met on the road. I'm exaggerating there but in overwhelming numbers something I have not seen before on the road. I've had so many fans. Come up to me and say you know what this is. Now my favorite book of yours. This is the most incredible thing you've ever written so <hes> we've got our fingers crossed. See what happens with the New York Times list but in the end it's not about where I sit on the Times list. It's about units sold and the greatest thing that can happen for an author. My publisher could have unlimited budget and take out ads in the Wall Street Journal and that kind of stuff but that's not as powerful as word of mouth so if you recommend I get my books because I've done a podcast in the somebody like you sean says Brad. You've gotta read this book or my dad gives me a book or my neighbors has had just finished. This one is great word of mouth. He's the best kind of promotion for an author in based based on what I'm hearing <hes> out on tour. I'm hoping that enthusiasm that readers have been <hes> the enthusiasm the readers have shared with me. They're sharing with their co workers and family and stuff like that great writers are great storytellers. You've even build up my enthusiasm for backlash. Even more. You've continued with Scott Horvath who I love that character so backlash. I cannot wait to dive into it. The listeners know of I have someone on it's because I respect them. I enjoyed their work so guys go out there. Pick it up backlash for sale right now but Brad Thorn has been a true honour someone. I've wanted to feature for a number of years so thanks for making this opportunity happen. It's my pleasure. Thank you for having me Sean have a great day. Hey guys I wouldn't tell you about the brand. I'm obsessed with right now and and you guys know I'm pretty obsessive about the brands I work with especially when it comes to athletic apparel. You guys need to check out ten thousand. You need to head to ten thousand dot C._C.. And you guys can enter code W. G. Y.. T. and you're gonNA receive twenty percent. Yes twenty percents off your entire order. Why do I love ten thousand ten thousand created the only training shorts you'll ever need? They do so by simplifying your options deliver three premium shorts that perfectly shortly cover all the ways you train. They've won built for versatility another for durability and one super lightweight perfect for one of those runs or whatever else you do for fitness no matter what you do they have you covered cross fit running spin yoga the lifting or you're weakening venture. It doesn't matter what you do for fitness. They have a short for every way you train. They make it super simple to to find the right short just picked short. That's best for you. Your lifestyle personalize it with your individual needs with custom liner in Encima <unk> seem options and start getting after it not sure they have the right short. No need to worry you. Guys make returner exchange they offer free shipping free exchanges and free returns on every order like I said ten. Thousand is my favourite brand right now now. I'm wearing their apparel all the time when I'm working out. I can't recommend them enough head to ten thousand dot C._C.. Enter Code W._G.. Y T and you've got twenty percents off your entire order making change transpire. That's the mission behind the most amazing tasting protein bar brand taking the nutrition industry by storm that brand their N._C.. TICO and they make the most delicious Kito friendly all natural Collagen in protein bars. If you're obsessed with quality of food going into your body like I am then head out and pick up these amazing bars jam with ten grams of Collagen protein they only have two to three net carbs no added sugar and loaded with High Quality M._C._A._T.. Oil for the healthy fats from coconuts. Whether you're busy running the kids around from activity to activity a professional athlete or just someone looking for great tasting convenience stack do yourself a favor had debt MC tico dot dot com and use code W._G._N.. I._T. for twenty percents off your order what got today with Sean Delaney what got you there with Sun the Lamey what got there with the lady. Thanks for listening to another episode of what got there. If you enjoyed today's episode please leave us a review on itunes and also share with your friends. Thanks so much looking forward to talking to you next time. If you want to stay up to date on all things I'm working on behind the scenes and everything we've got going on at what got you there head over to. What got you there dot com? You'll also be able to see more on podcast guests and what they're doing. Thanks to Justin great for providing the INTRO.

writer Sean Sean Delaney Brad Thor Stephen King Brad Thor Simon Schuster Paris Lucerne Switzerland Europe Cindy Jackson University of Southern Califor New York Times Bill Clinton Shawn don imus Hollywood South Carolina MUNAF
S5-06  Rosy Crumpton and Kamaria Delaney  All I Left Unsaid and Soul PWR

Charlotte Readers Podcast

1:02:01 hr | 10 months ago

S5-06 Rosy Crumpton and Kamaria Delaney All I Left Unsaid and Soul PWR

"Welcome to Charlotte Readers podcast for authors. Give voice to the written words. This is the show that features stories and poems by local local and regional authors. The kind that touched the emotions followed by conversations at offered depth and insight into the readings and writing lives of the authors. We record the show show and the well equipped podcast Studio Ed. That co working located right here in the Belmont community near Uptown Charlotte Support for Charlotte readers. PODCAST is provided by Park Road. Books the oldest and only independent Bookstore in Charlotte conveniently located in Park Road Shopping Center and by Charlotte Mecklenburg Library a connector of readers readers leaders and learners with twenty locations and a twenty four hour online presence for more information about these book minded sponsors who help authors give voice to their written words. Please visit them online at Park Road. Books Dot Com and see him library dot org or drop by the bookstore or any library. Branch support is also provided by members. There's like you and for that. We offer our gratitude along with some awesome number only content. You can find out more about these member benefits. It's Charlotte readers. PODCASTS DOT COM but enough the prologue bus get to the stores. I'm your host Landis Wade thank you for listening. Today's episode Rosie Crompton author of all. I left unsettle. The Tina's journey toward truth and Kamori Delaney author of the Poetry Anthology so power in Rosie's novel tinged with much personal personal truth and Idyllic Childhood in Panama disrupted when a mother moves her child in the United States with a man who is not the child's father and after many traumas child grows up and tries got to find a way home to the family. She left behind ultimately the authors able to celebrate her Panamanian culture. Exploring things family home in the secrets that have of a commodity delaney fine soul power as all things that make your soul smile your heart flutter and empower you to keep going in her poetry. Shantha Kamara celebrates her black heritage with poems with common theme. Never be afraid to soar for their freedom in the leap we start the show with Camario reading her poem for the dreamers. I Rosie Reading About College graduation dreams fulfill despite much adversity for the dreamers. I dream solid dreams I dream dreams that I know my God won't hesitate to manifest when I dream. I don't hesitate to let my whole imagination flow because if you know like I I know they told me to dream big you see I can never put my dreams in a box so far tucked away that I can't even feel my dreams anymore. Nah I gotta see my dreams on paper so I write them down. I read them out. Allow so I'd never lose sight of where I'm trying to go nowadays people here your dreams and start start planning praying downfall trying to find a way to change your course or some even make plans to go after what you plan to chase but hope they beat faster. We'll tell the kids to dream allow so they can be anything without putting them on game out here. The world gets real. We gotTA teach them to dream bigger dreams bouncing ball or getting a record deal not knocking anyone's hustle but James are only ideas with a hard work and consistency to make like the morality. James should go far beyond what you want to do and eventually reflect what you must do that burning desire to do something because it's what you're meant it to do. That's a dream turned into purpose. I promise it's worth it to start pouring into your dreams dream larger than life but don't forget to open your is and make it a reality. After four hard years. The Day of my college graduation finally came. Mummy bubby threw me a party that I put together. I Guess Party planning has always been kind of my thing. I found and secured the venue. Send out the invites provided input on the menu decorated the room with help from the four of you and me and bobby cooked and footed most of the bill. I remember feeling so strange that morning. All of the family wrote down to campus. Much later After me I drove myself and wrote in complete silence for the full thirty minute ride. I wanted to reflect on my college journey. Walking across that stage didn't feel like the beginning of my adult life. It wasn't joyous exciting or scary like the other graduates around me were describing represented the end of a bad era for me me. I was angry. I felt held back. I felt tired. I regretted not taking full advantage of the college experiences. The kids around me talked about and and we're already missing but maybe now I could be free. I had done what I needed to do. I had made mommy proud by becoming a college graduate. She had always told me she would have become a psychologist. If she'd been given the choice. Now here I was a psychology major wanting mommy to live that curiously threw me. My moment was finally here. My name was called and I walked across that stage to get the expensive piece of paper that symbolized achievement success and progression to me. It symbolized a larger larger earning potential for our family. Now I could get a well paying job move out live on my own but Megan of money to still contribute to the family but today A. and the next few weeks I would enjoy freedom. No work no relationships. Just me Mommy. And the four review Rosie Crompton uses her personal life expire assistant tell stories that promote healing and growth her debut novel. All I left unsaid is laced with raw vulnerability picks the message that we are not alone. Losses also celebrating her Panamanian heritage. Rosie is a writer community advocate an integrative health coach whose passionate inclusion culture and diversity she supports support causes that are loving and empowering especially for women for hobbies include journaling reading writing meditating cooking engaging her community which she does from a home. In Matthew's Kamari Delaney is a writer poet author and spoken Word Artists Hailing from the Queen City. At Twenty six years. Young Amari has gained inspiration from her travels to ten different countries her first poetry collection soul power addresses concepts of self worth love. Light faith dreams and Self Care Camara has been riding since she was in grade school. His poetry has been published an anthology such as a celebration of poets. She was a member of a spoken word. Group in college called Sisters Sisters and performs at open mics and the Washington. DC and Chicago areas which is not riding traveling. KAMORI enjoy spending time with family and enjoying the outdoors host. Landis Wade is committed to making this podcast worth your time. He's a recovering trial lawyer award winning author Book and Dog Lover Who's laid back style. Encourages encourages authors to read and talk about their published and emerging works. You can listen to this show for free at Charlotte Readers PODCAST DOT COM or Charlotte burglaries digital branch website. And you can subscribe and listen for free on apple podcast wherever you like to get your kicks. Show notes of this episode with images is links and information about the authors are available at Charlotte readers. PODCAST DOT COM CHARLOTTE readers. PODCAST is a member of the twin city. PODCAST network work powered by Ortho Carolina for more information. Go to Queen City podcast network DOT COM Rosie. Welcome to the show. Thank you Camario. Welcome so but title sole power and all left unsaid Latinas journey towards truth Soul power so power has been a journey as well It's something that has always been a dream of mine to connect the world to my poems. I would say so. Power is definitely like a blueprint into my life through poems through poetry. I have been able to perform a lot of the poems in the book through spoken word poetry in connect with audiences that way okay but it was so important for me to put those poems on paper for others to read in really connect with me through my poetry tomorrow. When did you saw you know you've been out doing the spoken word? You've been writing poetry for how long now. Honestly this is gonNa Sound Weird but my mom tells me when I was in first grade. My first grade teacher told her that I was going to be a writer. I think it was because like as young as maybe four or five I would you know. Just go up to anybody and kind of start talking. She jokes about it now but I can see her now. Just kind of being like rushing along like us. Let's go but I mean I've always been a talker. Always been someone who wasn't really afraid to like say what whenever whenever I was thinking so You know writing has definitely made a passion of mine for many years I think it really started with reading. I've always been avid reader. I love to read And then writing kind of stemmed from that but writing's never really been a chore for me in School. I was happy to write papers first term papers and stuff like that. Happy Right Turnpike okay. We'll speak speaking of You know the spoken word your title rosy All I left unsaid right so You decided there are some things you needed a survey right about your life and your past and while. It's pretty much Zhou Memoir. You made it a novel and But it's it's really kind of your journey tour truth right right. Yeah and how did you. Finally we get the courage to do that. Well I've been a writer like Youtube for a very long time. I used to journal and write poetry and I kept it it all to myself and then I decided to publish the hints the title now I left unsaid and now I'm sharing the world but I had a life changing experience experience. I found my father on a Google search and learned of two brothers and a sister that I didn't know that I had and I think you told me that you decided hard to do it as more of a novel. Just protect the names of some people. Yeah but they know who they are right. I did go ahead and change. His character lands An added a little spice to some details. So talk about this This tall all left unsaid. Latinas journey toward truth. What Truth Truth were you searching for? it was about when I wrote this book. I was twenty six years old. I had gone and healed from some past trauma but it felt like something was missing and I knew that part of that was binding my biological father but also I hadn't gone back home since I was little and so it's about the journey and I went as far as coming of age novel so it goes does as far back as it's growing up but then returned back home. We're going to get into some some reads from the book year shortly. But but your book and Camara your collection of poetry autry and both these books explore topics of love loss hope relationships family culture heritage nationality race. So now your friends through the podcast here is Introducing authors to each other. So you've read each other's books UH and Kamari you had a a preface to your book where you talk a little bit about The fact that you had some low points in your life as well will and This writing experience sorta helped you that that right absolutely I would definitely you know describe soul power as a big portion of my healing journey just healing from past trauma and just some personal things that I was dealing with In my life. So I think you know. Oh saw-power was more release in the literal sense but also like a personal you know release for me to just Kinda let things go In the form some of my poems in hopes that others could be inspired to you know share more of their own personal story. And just you know find a way to like love themselves regardless of what you've gone through. Yeah so you get domestic assault in the background and Rosie. You're dealing with the domestic abuse in in the book as well and your background and these are very difficult experiences to have to go through wants but as of the writing experience where you sort of talk about that and get to it. Does that help. Does it hurt. I mean what. How does that? Is there a balanced I well I can has begun that to For me as well writing has always been a release and a healing process like I said through poetry And there were so many parts in this book that when you reflect back on some of the experiences and you get to look at what you've overcome and how so far you've gone and witness your growth there so much rich power in that and writing was a part of that journey for me about you tomorrow. I mean I wholeheartedly agree with what she just said. I think for me you know. Mine was through the course of dealing with domestic violence. You know I would journal. No I will always you know. Just try to keep track of like my journal entries and just like record my thoughts and what. I'm feeling at the time but you know Gerald journaling definitely has some true power in itself. Because you're just you know doing some self reflection for me. No my poetry has always been something that helps me get through things and especially something as heavy as you know violence or domestic violence and Rosa What people find out when they read your book? Is that You you're the older one in the family because your mother and then the the new man that she took home when she left Panama had had more children together but they were younger anger. And you're kind of like a parent to them right and so you actually open the book with a little deer kids segment Where you're writing them uh-huh about why you decided to write this book and you speak to why you started at that way? It's almost like a dedication. Well I wrote that part of the book very like blast I wrote the rest of the story but writing this part of it. The very beginning is what gave me me permission to release the rest of the book of that makes sense. We've got these two books mm-hmm we deal with lots of emotional topics Kamori what was the reason you feel like you needed to get this on paper aside from you know just needing to release it for myself. I have always had dreams of writing a book I do hope to write a novel on the future but I definitely felt like poetry was something to start with. Because it's something I'm very passionate about something I do often in poor into often so's you know the perfect perfect opportunity for me to use my poetry to tell my story in a unique way You know I think that some people you know as much as they want to read dive into books you know. They may not be as Abbot of readers. I felt like you know with poems. You know they're not as long they're shorter but could still kinda get what I'm trying to convey across through poetry So a super important for me to just do that as an inspiration into others and to encourage others to you know. Take the time to really like care for yourself in love with your love on yourself Regardless of what you may have experienced in the past passed and did you share this with your family. And how did they react. Oh absolutely it's interesting because the space our end today admit co working gain is actually where I had. My book release grew so all my family and friends were here to celebrate power It's definitely something that's been well received from you. Know a lot of my family and friends and just people who I don't even know who have been able to purchase all power and read it My family's been very proud of me. I'm the first author in the family. So it's Kinda like now at family functions everybody's like hey author so that's Kinda cool but it's a cool experience for sure an author with a day job that Flies around as a flight attendant. Right yeah do you get any yours. Perations Lights Oh oh for sure. There's actually a problem with the book flight. it's interesting because I wrote flight before I even became a fight in the. I've always liked flying. You know airplane travel and stuff just you you know being in this guy is something. That's very I think taken for granted because I mean we're literally like Sorek medal to go with about one hundred. It is so awesome like up there. I do a lot of reflecting up there even when I am working and I get a chance to just look outside. It's just like outer body experience almost. You're you're in the clouds literally now. Rosa you Your book Actually is bringing family into it. So had they react to the store so my family always knew that I was in the process of writing the book I let them know. Now from the very beginning of what I was doing and then I let three are invited. Three of my sisters to read it prior to doing anything with it And they supported me. My siblings supported me. My family overall supported me Because you get into some tough stuff in the book I mean some honest appraisals about what happened within your family and a lot of family members might not want that kind of information to come out. Yeah there's definitely some. I don't think when I told them that I was publishing a book. I don't think they really believed to me But they always knew all along what the you know what I was working on and then when I was seeking publication and the night before I signed my contract I let them all know again There's definitely some discomfort but there's comfort in the fact that it publish fiction names are changed. okay well I I can. I can tell both in terms of preparation for the podcast and listening to read and talk when you today that you're both very strong women and you've dealt with some very difficult circumstances and now you're You're moving forward with your writing and since both your books focus on you know your nationality and your race. I thought we would kind of dive into a couple of readings that that address those investigate. Yeah okay so so we're going to start with Rosie you're gonNA read About the the town that you grew up in when you were a little girl and pronounce it force US there you go. I'm glad you did it like you to read That same because it gives a good sense of place. Instead of Anita's we loved it when it rained at the first sign of a rainstorm. Our family ran to the back of the House to make sure our to rusty iron bins were turned over so the rain water would fill them up. I'm not using the term rusty loosely. Either I'm not sure how old these bins were. But they served their purpose. The irons Arbenz were big enough to fit a large person in them standing up and they could store a lot of water after the rain. We would use his water to bathe with since we didn't have running water at the House House after we made sure the bins were positioned. We grabbed a couple of bars of soap and went outside to shower in the cold rain while we laughed and enjoyed the water as a family we then put on our pajamas. Wet worn out towels draped over our backs and shoulders and went back outside under the covered front porch to enjoy the rainbow that appeared over us into nightfall. I sat on the MIA deal. mateos ordeal Marcus's lap. As one of them combed out the knots for my wet hair. The Rainbow Never failed to appear on our property. We had dogs cats pigs. Hens of very mean rooster named Mario snakes exotic birds and mango stealing monkeys and the trees right behind our house. If you wanted to mango you simply went outside climb. The tree grabbed it and ate it. You could also use one mango to throw and make more fall so you could share the fruit with others when you heard a sudden loud bang on the tin roof you knew it meant a mango had fallen off the tree on its own. That's when we all stopped what we were doing to to run outside and find it. Whoever got to the fruit I could eat it? This wasn't a casual thing either. We literally raced. The mango was a treat. Now Rosie by all accounts looking back You wouldn't say that You were well off economically in that time period right right. It felt like you had the whole world in front of you rich and love and you had mango stealing monkeys. Still just just over a very main rooster name. Maria has too bad because even there was made you probably probably had a nice side to every now and then it was great. I guess a sense of Panama in your early years Let's talk more about race for a minute. You've got a little piece Sir Black is beautiful can read that for black is beautiful. My black is beautiful bold and free. My black black is strong and powerful like a deeply rooted tree when I look in the mirror. What do I see? I see a highly Melania McQueen staring back at me I am the product of my ancestors who fought long and hard to make a way for me you see I M my ancestors wildest dreams for they believed in me in us to achieve great things and exist as kings and Queens. I liked like that That your ancestors wildest dreams yeah have you done a lot of research and a history absolutely. I am have been super interested in genealogy and ancestry For quite some time but I took a trip to believes earlier this year and I just instantly. Stanley became so intrigued. By how The people in Belize are very rich in culture. But they're also such an ECLECTIC place like you have people from all all different colors and They look different. But they're all identifying as blazes like the one of the only nations where English is the the primary language in the part of Central America. Where it's at so you know Spanish? They speak Spanish but English is primary language and were boys for you. Wouldn't tracks you A lot of people don't know a lot about it but I have some like Heritage stemming from the islands not necessarily believe but the Bahamas and I just became interested in. Didn't like visiting believes because of what I've heard about it from other islanders in Nino why such a cool place but just being a believes in how they know oh so much about their culture but they say look so different like you have some people who are you know of a darker complexion and some that are lighter complexion but they're all the same nationality any So it was just important for me after that trip to really dive into my own. Personal Ancestry. I've been able to start working on that through like Ancestry the Dot Com and just like front an interesting stories in your past you about both sides of my family actually but like I said. My father's side has has Bahamian routes so I was able to shift to the Bahamas this year as well before. Unfortunately they got hit by hurricane. But it's a beautiful place as well and you know it's just something thing about like island culture like you know the people are just like as rosy said they may not be rich and money but they are rich and love like you know the people. They are just so proud to be a part of their culture. It's it's great to see because you know here in America is such a melting pot. But you don't really see that in in high demand here because it is such a melting pot and you're celebrating race and your your blackness here and has always has been something. You felt strongly about this. Come to you later. Oh always always always had a strong sense of of that. Yeah Good Rosie Rosie Latina you You come your family comes to the United States You're up rooted from Panama. You ended up where New York I believe in New York and lots of changes over that period of time is that was that kind of culture shot for you coming from Panama to the New York City. Absolutely that's the the snippet that I just read Fron Chapter two seven eight thus it was too for readers to understand the world of a difference coming from surrounded by nature and this tropical Land and property surrounded by loved ones and to go to New York mark to Long Island. And you're surrounded by buildings New People. Everything was different before Camario reach her next poem. You've got a little piece Rosie in your book where you talk about writing poetry right and So let's let's turn to that for a second. It's short read. Took that up a little bit force. What's going on your life at that point in time? I was discovering poetry and again everything that I was writing for me. It was a release and I kept it to myself. So you're what age around this time. This was probably late teens. At which point. If you're reading the book you know that you're helping raise younger siblings. You're doing a lot because you picked up language quickly your mother didn't. You are actually the interpreter for your family is that is that often. The case For people him immigrate to the United States the younger children I picked up the line and serves interpreters APP so the family was that difficult for you or did you enjoy it I mean it's a different. It's just very different. I mean I was. I had to write my own like letters for school if I was missing. Out For anything. true issue could grey the papers for your mother. Take them back in right now. Being the English speaker and failure to do or read this short I turned to writing poetry when I was hurting emotionally. I wrote about missing Carlos my confusion about love and my heart ache. I wrote about my insecurity with the man who took took my innocence. When I was eight years old and the confusion and discussed I had every day I lived with him? I wrote about feelings. I had about hurting myself and I would never do it. Because Mommy would me too distraught and you four needed me. I wrote about missing our family in Panama and wishing I lived there again when life was simple I wrote about the curiosity and anger. I had toward award my biological father I wrote and wrote and wrote I wrote about everything I couldn't say out loud. I very often found myself writing poetry instead of notes during class poetry. Got My angry thoughts out of my mind and away shared them even though no one read them or listened. Mommy always reminded handed me not to tell anyone about him. So I wrote and Rosie. This is a particularly hard part of the book to read for me Not only did you go through. Domestic abuse has your stepfather. But then you couldn't tell anybody even your mother and you and you continued to have to live in the house And she didn't find out until years later right right and I think you even said that There was some concern about whether she she wanted to report him to the police because then he might go to prison and then he was the breadwinner and so forth. So is this sort of conflict here that you know to keep the family going economically. You could report. How did you deal with that? Seems like a difficult thing for young person shoulder. Yeah unfortunately I forget what the statistic is but but in cases you know where there is sexual abuse in the home one. It's usually someone that you know a family member and then two there's that unfortunately I'm not alone in that situation. You know so. Many people are in that not position in that you can't report or are discouraged from speaking up. And so what I found is after writing this book sharing Olivia's story so many women reached out about thank you for putting this out there for a screw. I will let me turn back to Kamari from minute before the break here. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA do something and You you hit it added in your porn. Black is beautiful thing in your metal. Let's go until our listeners. Whose King and Queen? That's a great question. Landis this I really felt like it was important for my book to definitely have a message for the kings and Queens Specifically talking about all black men and black women in today's climate in our society. It's it's so overwhelming to see the number of black and Brown men and and women who are discriminated against and. Unfortunately you know dealing with police brutality. You know it's just been like a extreme increase in things things like this and you know to think that we're in two thousand nineteen about to walk into twenty twenty and we're still dealing with these kinds of things it's very disheartening. And so you know I just felt like it was so important for me to do my part to really like spreads a message positively to you know specifically to black and Brown men and women is so important that we keep pouring into each other. Because you know a lot of the world doesn't want to see us win or you know do do better as people So yeah I have a poem to my book titled Dear Queen Dear Kane and you do dear quaint spoken-word. Poach right idea. Because did you say you've got to memorize I do. I'm so proud of myself because you know it takes a lot in spoken word poetry to get up in front of people in perform but it it kind of has has a different message when you're able to speak it instead of reading it You know I've seen it done both ways in. That's awesome but for me personally. I really wanted to make sure that I like new because it it does mean a lot to me. It's gone over very well with a lot of audiences a lot of women have told me. Thank you you for that group. That wants you to lean back from the Mike just a little bit. Because you've got a strong voice here you know I want you to perform Dear Quyen Force before the break curtail. Okay Dear Queen you gotTA crown that you can't put down even when they put you down you must still stand tall rising above it off. Aw the pain. The fear. Doubts must be silenced. They needed to balance all of this and still shine like never before so many. Look to you for inspiration. They're counting on you to soar. You come from royalty your great great grandmother birth many young Queens of course. How could you rise to the occasion? Don't be fooled by the distractions. Get Melanin a million dollar smile are enough. You don't need to alter thing young queen and you're the real deal given real vibes. No Lies Your eyes on the prize. Keep going push through anyway when they tell you. It's much too hard. You are a queen after all realize that you cannot shrink to make them feel more adequate boldly walk. According to his plan. Step by step. They'll see it was your destiny all along they can never take your crown from you. Clean your education poison. Pride cannot be disguised. Thank Maya Af Alicia in Mary. J. For paving the way to embrace your inner queen then Colorado Michelle Auntie maxine for stepping on the scene Talita elite and not follow. They're counting on you to be in love all that you are. It was surely take you far young queen or I. We're all fired up so listeners When we strike here in the studio so when we come back listeners? We're going to get into the rotting adding life segment. We've got a couple more readings From Rosie's book and from Commodities Book. So please stay with us. Hey listeners I'm here with the Hannah Turner. She is is a publicist and digital marketer for artists across the creative spectrum including award winning authors musicians artists and independent filmmakers and she even works works with people like me. I'm good how are you so we're GonNa Talk Tips on marketing as an author or creator. So what should I took. My I tip is definitely purely focused on your email marketing strategy. I would say that's one of the most important things you can do. If you're writing business because it really helps you for your your relationship with your readers The opportunity to open that line of Communications. See what they like what. They don't like really kind of focused on with putting on how you operate steering just kind of gives you insight site into how the relationship is building just all spam. Yes don't span them right and This thing we call social media the we have to do Yes so bad you know. I do. Think social media's of US especially for authors But what I would say that is definitely picking one to start with and really putting all of of your energy into that in your content strategy because the big thing is it helps boost your engagement really kind of starting to build that relationship and get feedback. It's really valuable to your writing business. through social. It's just it's a big community. It's a great place to share your work. Okay since you or helping people be creative talk about crate. Events Yeah creative events. I mean there's there's so many ways you can get creative with the way you do author events book events now which is awesome. I mean for example. You can take your book in the topics matter of it in tight with a local nonprofit organization organization support group library anything like that and put on an event. That's a little bit different than it would be normally Bookstore tie in a local business bringing a bottle. Oh shot for some beverages things like that really kind of create it create a community around the event and big thing is that you'll be able to expand your market into readers that wouldn't have read your book. Otherwise have if people want to tap into this elevated energy level that you have thank you. They can find me spellbound public relations nations DOT COM CHARLOTTE readers. PODCAST and host land. Dissuade are grateful to you for listening to this show. If you like the show please leave a short written written review on Apple podcasts also known as I tunes or the podcast platform of your choice because your review helps authors share their stories with more listeners. I thank you for your support listeners. We're back with Camario Delaney's author of Soul Power Rosie Crompton author of all Lifton said Latinas his journey towards truth. Now the winning the show Roseanne Kamara. We had marine about dreams. We had rosy reading about new college graduation. which is sometimes bill with dreams so if some dreams come true absolutely tell us for sure power like I said? It's always been a dream of mine to to write and publish a book. So that's definitely a dream fulfilled in. Just you know I'm a college graduate. Had My bachelors in criminology and sociology. I've been able to do some work in the field with mental health and you know work with kids in the Avenue of social work. I did some investigative work with child protective services. Those specific dreams. What is was my dream to do something? That was impacting my community. And I was able to do you that through those career opportunities of but now you know as a flight attendant. It's always been a huge of mind to be able to travel the world and you know so I would always be at work. My previous jobs just like daydreaming. Like how am I going to be able to make this and no one day I just on a whim was just like I think this might be something. That's really good for me and took that leap of faith and everything just kind of happened. I've been so fast and to think that I've been flying for a little over a year. Now is mind blowing to me because soaring. Sorry sorry for a little over a year now and it's been an awesome experience. I've been able to see in eight countries this year alone in a something that I would have never been able to do If I if if it wasn't for my job my career. I'm going to be Gone Australia and a couple of weeks. I'm looking forward to that. Are Rosie the piece you read in the beginning of the show. You're frustrated to some extent college graduation. You didn't have a normal college because you were caring for your family working extra jobs interpreting for your parents helping your siblings. So I bet your dreams I would say absolutely My college experience was a little bit different at the time and now looking back on it. It's really it was all on me. It was my attitude at the time Well when I was in school I had nothing to do with my college And what they offered. But I was so stuck stuck in what I couldn't do that. I just lived in this negative space and I didn't realize until after because of your family life and important. Yeah I was to focus on what I couldn't do because I had this circumstance in my life and I thought I was alone in that and that's not the the case and instead of just focusing on the positive and the beauty that I had at the time I just that was in his negative space and then you took that and you gotTa Ritu out of it writing. This book was a dream and to be seven years to write it. From the moment I hit save asked for the first time to book and hand And then also worked at save as well so what was the first time you put on there. Say that the the first title says Rosie's book or what I think it was untitled entitled Untitled Book Okay. Well let's speaking of books and writing and everything I do. This little thing called the writing and You know just trying to find it. A little bit betcha paths and Rodney both already indicated that you started writing at a young age but what is it Keeps your juices flow. And what is it they get you excited about writing Camario. Honestly you know it's it's something that's fun for me. It's enjoyable for me to write I'll have times where literally a poem will wake me up in the middle of the night. I have had some pieces where I have to write this poem. For whatever reason I like. Wake up in doing that. I'll go back to sleep. It's very odd but it does happen to me often mm-hmm have a lot of writings. That I don't think I'll ever share with anybody because it's just personal stuff for me but it was important for me to write it down. I mean when kids were doodling in class. I was like writing random things on the side. It wasn't really dry so yeah right writing. It's cool like I mean I really like you know even if this journaling or like riding down you know people like doing lists you know whatever works extreme like write it down especially like your dreams and stuff because you look back at your dreams and goals that you write down and that's something that keeps you accountable of what you Wanna I do so you can look back and say hey. I actually did that. How about you rosie? What What inspires you to write? You know when you reached out to us about doing the segment together together and this was before I had read Kamari Book. Okay he's read both of our books. What does it have in common? I think I even asked you that. And I'm sitting. You're listening to your responses and I swear I want to say the same thing. There's so much in common here But I love to write even when I was younger. Her research papers. I was excited about writing research papers and especially if I could pick the beam could research something. I'm interested in and then write about it. Okay so in y'all And thank you for that for both of you to read each other's work that's awesome. Come on the show that way and you're prepared to talk about the other is written but I would be interested. You know you're writing Poetry Kamara. You're writing this novel slash memoir rosy the different types of writing Did y'all get something out of each other's Work Kamara absolutely You know I commend you for sharing in. Your story is such an important story that needs to be told You know I think it's great that you're able to use pain and turn it into like passionate and something that is helping you heal and possibly helping others he'll for sure So I definitely admire you for that. That's you know I believe that. If you're going to be a writer like you know write it down. Yes but like have a purpose for writing so I think that it's you know also that you're able to draw back on your cultural roots and you're you're able to actually physically go back home to Panama at so beautiful I wished that everyone can do that. You know they can go back to trace their roots and really see like rather see where they come from and learn about like who they are because so many people are like lost you know because they have no idea who they are and he and rose a u I'm actually we're helping pick some of the poems that she was going to read. I think that one of the end-july soul flower that we're going to do when you're what. What did you get from listening? Listen to her poetry and the spoken word in particular well likewise I read your book start to finish and it was I remember. I love the one that you're getting ready to do next. I think but I remember wondering what life experiences did this young woman because we had already met have for this work to be so rich in power in Seoul And there's there's just beauty in that you were able to create this and then share it with the world so I thank you for that. So writing live question. What was the first time each of you felt like you call yourself a writer i? Unfortunately it wasn't until I had published piece and I learned since that. If you're right you're a writer you don't necessarily need need to have something published. It was actually right before this book. I published an article. 'cause I blog as well But yeah you're right you're a writer Kamara less the good obviously You know I feel like I was a writer before pope solar power. Probably you know maybe in college when I was the part of my spoken word group and I was around. You know a lot more women who were also writers poets you know couple of them had published some of their own works but just like being around them we actually. She had the privilege of opening up for Nikki. Giovanni one time and it was you know listening to her talk and being around these other women where I was like. You know I'm a writer but publishing a book definitely like gives you some to like say that You know we're living off social media culture where you know. People are public figures now. So it's like you know I'm not sure so power wanted to dodd-frank exactly exactly it's Well it's interesting you both got jobs. your have careers doing things and and Rosie Lack Kamara. You've put yourself back into the work to kind of help people with different kinds of struggles but given that people who are listening who might wanNA write their own book or whatever. Sometimes I don't ever have time you know there's not enough time. So how did how did the two of you make time to do what you do. Start with you rosie. You have to be intentional about it. I mentioned it took me seven years. It was often on. There were months where I didn't even open the document but it when I decided okay this is going to be real. I'm GONNA finish it. I had to be intentional with my time. And so I work a forty hour job and do other community roles so I it it meant setting my alarm clock and writing from four to six. Am and then. After I got home cooked dinner cleans a little time with my husband. Said Good night at ten o'clock doc was buyer up the laptop again and right until midnight and then go to bed I bet you Camario that spot on your back in back when you're supposed to be serving as you're writing poems seriously I mean on the plane that is I mean honestly I tell anybody that asked that question Russian. You got to begin with the end in mind. You start how you WANNA finish when I started being serious about writing soul power. I was like you know this is something that it's GonNa be in someone else's hands one day like how do I want to finish this. So that's how I had to start You know I came up with solar power because there was a question that just kept coming to me. Like Camario what powers your soul. So I had to answer that question I before I was able to really dive into writing my book and I think you know I I started high. Wanted to finish and he knows turn into something. That's you know beautiful but you know I'm actually proud of it you know. I didn't want to put something out where I'm like. I wish I could have did this. And we're we're our own worst critics but I think you know if you start. Hi WanNA finish. It'll be gold And Rosie we're going to have a reading from you in a little bit here that relates to your search for your biological family your father and finding him again in Panama and finding out that despite everything he thought grown up he didn't really abandon you. was that tough as a young child thinking that your father had abandoned you in fact your mother had taken you without his knowledge. Yeah it it was you grow up thinking or believing this one thing and putting negative energy towards someone that you later find out. That's not the case. It changed my whole perspective. Change my story in a way sometimes ask authors you. Know what are your character searching for so What were you searching? Four and this maybe closure or I remember feeling that I didn't necessarily want the history but there was something missing And I think closure is the right word Kamari. Were you searching even for something through this These kind of collected poems. They all have the thing. That kinda ties together. Were you searching for something. You're running the these poems. Absolutely you know as I mentioned before just answering the question of what powers my soul. That's something that I had to answer but as I was piecing together the poems I wanted to go into the Anthology College. I had to make sure that you know not only kind of flow together. But it's like I wanted to prompt the reader to answer that question as well you know like I wanted them to be able to say this powers my soul and why You know I I would say some of the poems for sure would be closure as well the love chapter. It's something that's very personal to me because those for sure I'll closure well speaking of powers if last question if you had A superpower that you could apply to your the writing process. What would they power? That's a good one. Would you WANNA stop time. Would you wanna be able to read minds would. Would you would have a photographic memory. Would you want to be just you know. Is there anything that comes to mind would help you. I WANNA I WANNA see into the future. Okay there you go. I the house is going to be. How's it going to be perceived like writing is like something that you do but it's like it's a process but if I could I'd like see in the future fast forward to see like how's that process going to end? That would be all for for sure. And maybe rose you might WanNa take that little device that The character turn Harry Potter. Had where they could turn back time. And you could. You could go back in time that and then maybe if you could change some things or not. I mean it's fly on the wall. Yeah let's do this. We've we've got a poem here that Komo Morning Sun. Can you tell us about what the what that do. Absolutely some warning sign is very personal piece to me You know the poem essentially is is describing a journey or kind of like a process if you will through a very turbulent relationship that that did involve some domestic violence. I don't specifically say that in the poem. But that's you know what it stemming from You know relationships especially intimate relationships relationships. They often start off on a high. You know there's all good things in the beginning but If something's bad it's GonNa eventually spiral down to something. That's not so good unhappy. So that's essentially what morningside is you know. The Sun rises every day. It's up to us to decide what we want to do with our day. Are we gonNA keep going. What are we gonna live in the past? So yeah that's morningside. Her Morning Sun. It was an ordinary day or so I thought in my mind I made up. How things would be you see? We would have longevity substance and clarity. You were red wine and rich and bowed bitter to the taste but warm going down but then things shifted you no longer an asset or peer. Instead it became a burden almost overnight. The fights left US paralyzed frozen. In time time we can never get it back. I'm forever forever grateful for this paradigm shift like a gift that can never be bought. I'm up in the clouds soaring above ground looking down like look how far we've come. The turbulence tried to take out back when you used to chase clout in a had all the doubts about what my future would hold but then I leveled up my faith. Breath switched up the pace. Turn my face back towards the morning sun to face God allowing him to show me that. Everything that glitters isn't gold. The the world is in cold is just lukewarm. Never feel like it's too late to walk away from any situation. That's forcing you to stay after all if you're still getting force fed anything. These days is a choice. Choose wiser less wishing more doing less talking and more action. You GotTA learn to find your way early careful not to let the world swallow you whole because in the morning when the sun rises yesterday is buried in their lives another day to they make cal. Don't waste it now. Rosie having listened to Kamari read that I'm thinking that There's a little bit of lead here into your next release wishing and more doing talking more action. That's exactly what you do when you search your politics family right exactly. You dusted did things off. And he said I'm going to do this and this next read you've got Addresses that you sort of stumbled across I think Was It facebook or something about your your article brother or half brother. I guess it was a Spanish which social media site called Sony goal that I was not familiar with and you found him. And you you were thinking about whether you should write to him because he had the same last name as your father your biological logical father same first and last first and last and so you wondered maybe this could be my brother. Let's let's pick look it up on page one eighty six here when you're when you're doing the searching still. I couldn't stop thinking about the handful of memories I had of of my biological dad and decided to send this mystery boy a message after all. I didn't want to cause any problems so I was very careful with my words I typed in Spanish. Hello my name is Olivia but these the I live in the United States and I think we may be related. If you would like to contact me feel free to message me here or email me and I'm also on facebook I sent it made the sign of the cross over my face. Blue Kiss up to Jesus and prayer and logged off the strange new social media site to say I was nervous is an understatement. I experienced extreme anxiety I check my profile compulsively ably only to find an empty inbox. A million thoughts ran through my head. Had he read my message. Had He not read my message is he my brother. Should I have worded. Boarded my message differently. Had he read it and asked our father who I was have. I spark some sort of argument or drama is my father. Married does his wife no of me. What if this person isn't related to me? What do I say if we're family what do I do if they know who I am but want nothing to do with me? How would how how would that make me feel? What have I done I needed to feel loved? I was scared and anticipated nothing but rejection. He hadn't fought to be in my life. He never came to rescue me when I needed him through his absence. I felt rejected by him already. I went into full protection mode and turn to find comfort and love where I ahead always received it our mother. I told her what I had done. I needed her love. She couldn't believe I had looked him up after all these years considering what I have been told what about him. She was anxious for response. Just as much as I was and together we waited every single day seem like painful eternity. Act Prepared for the worst how to respond to this boy if he ever wrote me back and how to cope if he never did one and a half long weeks later I received a response. Hello I know exactly who you are. You're my older sister. I've thought about you and I'm happy to hear from you. My heart exploded floated. I had a seventeen year old brother and he knew about me I had no idea he existed and yet he accepted me. I cried like a baby. He complete relief filled my soul and gave me life after the long days of anticipation. This young man on the other side of the computer screen had total control of my emotions and he and he brought me so much joy with his few words. Filled your soul kinda like solar power. This step you took as you hesitated to do it led to a journey you went to Panama. And you met your father and your father's family correct and your mother went back with you. Saved her family. And you tried to uh families apart Yeah so how was that experience after all those years was that now you must have been nerve wracked going down there absolutely in the end It was I think I got the sense from reading the book that it was almost harder to leave. Then it wasn't the concern about going down there in the first place. I've gone back quite a few times. Now my first trip back was in two thousand ten and every time. I come back home Tom. It's difficult to leave. I mean it's just it's never enough time there with your family would also with the land that you were born in yeah. I love going to my grandma's property to the same house where I grew up with angry with the mango stealing. The A new look. We got time for one more This is going to be Kamara The toddler soul flower. Can you set that up for absolutely absolutely so. So flower is something that is one of them. I would say last pieces that I chose to put wouldn't so power. Ironically it's called so flour in the books called Solar Power You're you're a poet. They run the whole flower is more four of like The blossoming of me if you will You know I believe that we all have journey all. Start somewhere You you know. I wasn't always this polished in you. Know this author you know I came from the ground up essentially so I think you know I. It was important for me to include solar power so flower. Excuse me important for meetings. Include Soul Flower in Seoul. Power because I just wanted to have a message for any you. Women or young woman who vote feels like. They're you know not enough or you know this. This age of comparison our and right now you know for any woman who finds himself comparing themselves constantly to what the next person is still laying like understanding. You know your time is coming and you know eventually you'll be able to blossom into. Oh beautiful flower not in the consulate. Here she is a flower in full bloom. Something like a full moon own full of light shining bright sitting high in the sky for all the world to see this. Not No. This is due say baby because MS flour flower bomb. She'll drive you crazy. She is pure poetry. Heaven sent a gift wrapped up in the finest peddles missile flower. Our she's got power and rhythm to she's more soul food in a world full of candy she walks in the room calm not loud or boastful. She lets her art speak for itself. She is art. She is love and she has loved so hard that she had to pull back and love on her sophomore. So flowers grow from the ground up with route so deeply rooted in truth and clarity. She is consistent. Even when she's he's Matt she'll still give me the same side I you might catch. When shade is thrown missile flower searches for debt getting ahead by learning reading and walking in her purpose purpose she eliminates warmth from her smile to her glow? Didn't you know missile flower is a rare breed. You GotTa Take Your time with her careful careful not to pluck any of her pedals off. Careful not to dehydrate. This ever-growing fluorescent beauty queen so flower. You got the power to change the game. Make sure they remember your name. Mama Africa a queen. You are miss soul flower all right. Well it's I have CONC- talking with you today. Both you eliminate war and you both have glow back to you in a certain smile And that's come through difficult struggles right In the past but It looks Mark Your Kamara. She soaring as a airline attendant. You actually literally and Rosie you're also soaring in your your your job and your family and you got a larger family now than you had before right. Yeah and two countries right. Yeah Yeah it's great. Look great having both of you on the show and all the best to you and your tended Ryan thank you for having us well. That's it for today. Another found author giving voice voice to the written words next Tuesday. We'll have another in-depth episode with readings in conversations about the written word and the writing life of a local or regional author before that be on the lookout for another under the covers episode where we do much the same thing we do here but quicker and sometimes away from the student because there are just too many good authors and is not enough time. If you like. We're doing. Please consider leaving short written review on Apple podcasts or the podcast platform of your choice. Because when you do our authors there's voices travel much farther and wider in podcast land. And if you're inclined to help US Cup authors give voice to the written words and you'd like some member only contact cultivate abar authors. There's in me is our thanks. Please consider becoming a member support. You can find out how to become a member supporter and more about today show and all previous episodes at Charlotte readers. Here's PODCASTS DOT COM and you can keep up with news about the show but joining our email list and engaging with social media. We promise not to Spain because well that takes too much time and if you do join our email list we'll give you free e book written by me. Thank you for listening. We really appreciate it until next week. I'm Landis Wade for Charlotte readers pockets.

Rosie Panama United States Charlotte writer Camario Delaney Rosie Crompton Landis Wade Roseanne Kamara Kamari apple Rosa Park Road Olivia James Bahamas
Delaney is grateful for her ex-BF's penis.

Johnjay & Rich Present: Behind The Glass

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Delaney is grateful for her ex-BF's penis.

"Little flexibility can go a long way by refinancing your newer US auto loan with ten fed you can lower your monthly payments for more flexibility in your budget. You can even schedule your first payment for up to sixty days from the date of your refinance calculate how much you could save. At Panther, dot org slash auto refi or call one, eight, hundred, two, four, seven, five, sixty, six to apply membership is open to everyone. To receive any advertise product, you must become a member of ten fed insured by NCUA? He. was that a yawn was. I. We're going to get going because. As Delaney enforcement she has another podcast to do. Everyone wants to on their podcast bell. A hot commodity. This is an important podcast for you to be on. It is this I were doing it. I was just looking at the numbers I. Start Out this podcast with gratitude because I was just looking at. the most recent numbers for behind the glass and I'm blown away. I really am we do. We took like six seven weeks off and we bring the podcast back and I'm just so happy that you know. You're taking the time to listen to this. Thank you. I'm really I'm trying to be genuine took nor is it genuine? And it's awesome when you told me to I was like Damn Daniel. Yes we over we have a over a million downloads on this. Wow, that's great. That's that's. Thankful for that for anybody Downer howling, we had this. I've no clue episodes. well. The first incarnation of this was Joey and grants podcast. But I, mean of ours. Yeah, I don't know. I forget. I forget I honestly don't know we could we we. We might have been doing this for five six years now. You and I I think we might now told me it was If you told me, it was five six years I would believe you and if you told me. That it was just. Three months I would believe you too because it feels time flies when you're having fun, you know it feels like yesterday Delaney. When I walk through these doors. My first my first interview with you at starbucks. That's now you're sitting in yacht was it's not our first interview. That's not the first time that we met. Do you not remember the first time we met? Now. That starbucks. It was not where was it? It was On the third floor in the old conference room. Your rights was. Remembered. I was so sick I remember coming here. I was so sick. Did you tell me you were sick in advance. nope. I just came. And I forget why had the interviews there? I don't remember now. Oh i. didn't I thought I remember being so nervous, you're nervous and I was sick. My nose is running so bad I didn't want to reschedule the interview 'cause I, don't WanNa seem like a flake cy but now I, like. I didn't really have much energy because I was so sick. I don't remember even. No. If you liked me or anything I did. I. Didn't choose you. Choose me all because my cheer schedule Right Yeah I didn't have Delaney's like I said, are you available to come in during the show? Cheer, for Monday, Tuesday Wednesday Thursday and twice on Friday. So No, not really I'm not available to. Practice three times a week from six to. I can only two days and at the time and I think we were looking for somebody to just be here more. So it wasn't that we didn't like you. It was just you know you were busy I was busy. You had a commitment and then I think we hired to other people that just failed tremendously. And and then here you are. But. Then the second time we met at starbucks. That's right. Yeah and I remember about that one is i. chose that starbucks because I thought it was near your. House. But then I was living in. Chandler. Yeah I for some reason and and that's that's totally my fault because I just assumed I assume something. And It is always bad when I do that. But I just assumed that you lived in that area because you had you had lived in that area previously. Literally across the street from starbucks. Yeah. So I just assume that you still live there and that's why chose that starbucks because it was also on the way to my house. And and yeah. But that was that was good and we offered you the job that day right? I think. that. Was Post. After that was after I came on air to. Post. Pena's story. Yeah that's right. Delaney came on the air to tell us a story about her ex boyfriend that was my real audition. You blew everybody away with that story it made John J laugh and make other people laugh and so. I. Think that's solidified it for you. Do People I wonder if people know that story. I guess we kind of have to tell it now. Don't we? Yeah. So I was dating this guy at the time he was my college boyfriend. So we owe him and I only dated six months sweetest. You went on the face of the planet still We still have a good relationship with each other but at the time I was working for love pop I was helping out Blake with stuff and I had this boyfriend and he had to get surgery on his pianist because his Yuri throw was closing because there was like scar tissue in there or something like that. So he had to go get surgery. So I, was helping blake out with an after school pool party. And I was responsible for bringing like the lane. They wanted me like sit back and watch the kids all my boyfriend had just gone surgery Jesse gone out of surgery and I was like shit like I feel like I should be he was by himself and I was like Blake to. Like do you mind if I go? I'd already brought the AAA and I was like my boyfriend just had surgery like, do you mind if I go and she's like you have surgery on his penis and you want. And then she told John John brought it on the air and he told the story like he didn't say the story how it was like she just left and I was like, wait a wait a wait a second here. So I remember in the car because Kaelin, my friend and I were helping Blake again, not morning with with love pups stuff and Blake was actually driving in the car in front of us when John was telling the story. and then I called in I was like wait a second. That is not what happened. Yeah and then penis. Story. So his His Urethra. It was blocked was that what it was? Yeah. Closing like he was having a really difficult time going to the bathroom like King and so his surgery that day you said that he was he was there all by himself nobody else was there to drive them home I will I was the one who drove him he needed to be did he need to have someone drive him home? I think he was on pain medication any catheter because I was thinking how does your ex boyfriend drive? What is he used to drive? He had a catheter. Needed to be there I was just I I I don't remember the logistics. Took took him home but I remember being like, I. Need to go like I should be there. When he is out, it's good of you. Is My boyf- was my boyf- bright and you know we're we're talking about. You know a very delicate object. Yeah you know we date long after that though I. Broke up shortly after that. Did you ever. Did he ever use it again after that not with me. No see that was it because he had the catheter for like three three weeks, he should have never had that surgery. It was the beginning of the end now maybe together today Did We? I don't think we did. I think you have the catheter and then we broke up shortly after I'm not sure if we had. If we were intimate after that, I'd be afraid I'd be afraid to use it. He didn't even WanNa be near me when he had the catheter. Like he sat opposite side of the couch. Like he was afraid leg is a he would rip out stitches. Yeah. He was like I can't. He's like to sit over there and it was like, okay. What an awful experience that must've been I, know I felt so bad. I would and it's so funny because when he had the catheter, I remember being at home and a catheter commercial came on the TV. So I what I was watching some, you know the TV channel like law and order svu on. Your People Weird commercials, mortgages, and life. Exactly so I was on I was on watching something on a on a weird channel and that in that popped up and I sent him. Send the video to him. Like. Are you using the right catheter? Are. You let me ask let me ask boyfriend if he has the right catheter pretty frigging miserable. We asked me you're so understanding. Off I can tell that that might have been at to keep maybe he felt like because guys like to be Babied, we like to be pampered. Especially, when we're sick or you know we I would imagine if we have surgery like that and I I don't I don't see you as that person like I don't see you as being loving. See you making jokes and you know you're using the rank Candida. I do both. Comedic relief you have a loving side I will loving by like a a mothering side like what am I? Well, I mean. Mostly, I think every woman has a nurturing side nurturing side that's the word. Were natural nurturers. Why I wasn't sure if you were natural nurturer. Sure don't really see that side of you though you don't think I'm nurturing. I've never seen that side is what seen? What do you want me to do? Hold a baby like what do I need to do to show you nurturing? Yes. Well, get a baby thought neck now nick grab caroline delayed needs to all the baby. Just, I'm just saying that that's a part of you that I've never seen. There's parts of me that you probably have seen like you haven't seen while you've seen my anger side, right? I also remember one of the first week I was here. You kick the chair back there. You have see my angry side that was the old bill. That's that's not the new bill. I haven't seen. You be like angry like that in a long time I it's because I'm working on myself. Yeah. It's the new bill, the new and improved bill new interim, Belmont pushchairs against the glass and feeling great I'm really feeling good. Is going well although yesterday's therapy session, we got into Because everything. I've had like six weeks therapy now. and. Most every therapy session has been about work about. professional relationships which. You know there's a gray area between professional relationships and personal relationships and so that most of the most of the conversations of gravitated towards that. Yesterday's therapy session was about three minutes of that and the rest of it like getting into family stuff. And I got really uncomfortable. And I I have no explanation why and I think that she wants I think she finally I think she was bored the last six weeks with with everything else that I think she now she thinks she's found something. Yeah I think she's like she's like clearly she did if it means you uncomfortable, you really perked up she's like Oh. Let's explore this. You know let's Let's get personal about family stuff. so that's and after dots like when I stopped going. Why 'cause like after after my died, I needed to go back. Wait was it right when my dad died right before? It was one of the two and I was like I can't go like I can't go I can't go can I ask you some some questions that that you know might be borderline to personal and donated them if they are but k you don't have unresolved issues with your dad to you I don't think so. I think that's where I think it was just the emotionally where I was at. With after the Just. It's hard to face things. Just like let it. Bottle like I. Just didn't. I don't know. I didn't WanNA talk about it. Okay, the is probably different than the I. Think My my dad is still alive but not doing well. And I think that she thinks she's onto some unresolved issues. Yeah sure. All right. And I don't think I don't think I have hunters. Did you I mean? The the way. The way that it's turned out. My relationship with my dad is the way that it's turned out. It's not like I. Regret that it. You know it's not like I. I regret that we're not closer I mean I guess if if all things being equal, i. would have chosen that. But I, mean it just like every relationship were just not alike we just don't have a whole lot in common. Yeah. So we haven't found you know things. In. Common. You know to have a relationship like that. Yeah. I don't know see with this is not our podcast, not a therapy session. Let's. Let's move on. Let's move on what what else is happening that we should we should talk about. So it's the Halloween season. And Over the years, Suzanne has garnered herself quite a reputation of scaring the crap out of all of us at various times. in this morning we tried to, we gave it our best shot a we tried to get to set and it failed. It exploded right in our face. it was disappointing. It was somewhat elaborate because we had delaney as the lookout. So Delaney was set up outside and she was group Tech texting. US keeping US update updated on what time set pulled into the parking lot and walking into the building and that part worked great we put up signs on the elevator. That that said elevator temporarily down please use stairs. Somewhat unusual but not. Entirely unbelievable that that would happen. There's a bunch of construction happening in the in the building right now But what had happened is you know because when we do things like this, we we. it's like a movie set of. Cameras. Everywhere, and for some reason, and I still can't believe it. She noticed a Gopro in the in the lobby one of grant's go pros that was filming her as she walked into the lobby to see that the the elevator shutdown, and so that tipped her off that something's not right. Something something is. You know maybe she didn't fully figure it out. But as she had, she went to the stairs. She didn't walk into the stairwell like we had expected her to instead she just. Kind of like appeared her head. into the stairwell and is like, nope. She saw more cameras and she knew should. So the JIG. Was Up. Did you not have a chainsaw I did have a chainsaw. Oh Did you rather Ernie revved it and she just already know she already knew she said, nope, before she even came around the corner. So I never saw her I never saw her face. Because I. So yeah, it was just a big dud. Yeah, we we might. We might. Put the video together if it's if it's a funny fail I don't know. We should embrace our failures. Yeah. I I still I think people would like to see. Yeah. Like to see the effort that we went into it and to see the complete utter failure of it for sure. Yeah. I should do more of that is you know we should embrace all of our winds and we should really step into them. When we when we fail miserably because I think that it can be funny too. Yeah. I've run files right th relatable. And because it's crushing to us when we spent so much time. For grant when we try to create content and you know to say, Oh, we're just not gonNA use it. Yeah it sucks that sucks. We were too hard to to just throw content out. You know. So we we should probably post something like that. But the question is is who's at safe between now and Halloween. Do. We just give up and say you know what? We can't get her we're not quite. You think we can come up with something that that my work. Yeah I don't think it needs to be really elaborate either I think it could be something simple. I think with Susannah does I think it needs to be maybe not elaborate, but it has to be clever it has to be she's can't fucking see cameras. Right. But she can't be expecting it either it can't be any kind of because I think that. Right about now anytime you walk. into any room I think that you have to at least somewhere in the back of your mind expected someone might be. Ready to scare you because that's that's just me today. I did there's a tiktok video that horrifying. I don't know how to find the TIKTOK video but if people wanna find it. See, how did they do it? It's Let's see. I. Saw it on twitter because I'm not on the TIC TAC. I don't have a Tick. Tock thing. So this guy is Okay. So if you go to on TIC TAC. owain holden. The guys. It's at. At artem. Underscore mock. Russian. So spell that for you at a RT an underscore mlk. R. U. S. H. I., and Artem underscore mock rushing. In it's a scary Tiktok, it was really scary. I wish we were filming you when we when you watched it I know. It was really once again we fail. Yeah should have been filming. Are you. GonNa do Halloween this year how so? Are The boys doing hollowing So why? Well, we're going to like a harvest fest on Saturday. It's like a trunk or treat. we're going there with some friends and some friends of theirs. We could probably just do that and get away with it. drew doesn't doesn't know any difference he's five and then will I don't think we'll cares I really I'd I don't think he's never really. really been interested in Halloween. GonNa Dress up. I don't think so. Really they don't even ask about drew. Drew, he keeps asking about when are we getting pumpkins wants to make. CAL will couldn't care less but. He doesn't. He doesn't ask about anything really He's He's I. Don't know what he's into. My ask him it. What do you like? Well, it's just sports just like me. Yeah. You know you just outside interests. That's it's something. That's a big thing I guess. But most boys are all into sports and video games. Yeah. But he's never been. You know all the things that you do as a parent with a with a small child you try to you know show them Santa you try to introduce them to Santa you try to. Make Christmas exciting or try to make Easter exciting or Halloween, and he's not into any of it like he couldn't care less like even on Christmas. You. Know what you want for Christmas. And then. Does. He doesn't ask for anything. He's never written a letter to say he just doesn't get into it I loved writing letters to Santa and I would do Santa Tracker. Yeah, he watch him fly around the globe. Yeah I remember getting really into it as well. But he's so he's not I miss believing in Santa. And having not time. I think you still do believe in Santa. I wished animal Israel, will you stop it? I gotTA, believe all this out. Why? Because if someone's listening to this podcast with their kids in the car? Did that out I swear to God I do. Atari. All. I really have to take that far out. Yeah. That's that could come back. What the? Hell, yeah it it. There's never a time when that's ever gone well for anybody. Damn. That's unfortunate. That's fine at it at it. At aetna to cover I ordered my Halloween costume I'm GonNa be a pop star. What do you mean a pop star I I got like a sparkly outfit like I'm getting a little headset like microphone headset. I can just a generic popstar. Yeah. Just pop star. Just. Delaney. Delaney's a good pop star name. You think. Yeah. Hell Ya. The new album the new album by Delaney is out. Yeah I wish I could sing I. Wish more than anything. I could sing why wasn't I blessed with this stellar singing voice just wasn't really bad. I'm going to channel my inner Arianna Guerande be a Popstar. Maybe Michael Scott like the day before. Are there parties and stuff planned. my friend is having like a housewarming. So in people are dressing up. It's nothing like beggar anything just like a small group. Daniel, housewarming party and. Jessica. That's it. I'm thinking about putting Christmas lights up early this year. But maybe right after following your deal with the year that we're having I. Think we we need as much joy as we possibly think so too. Criticized today. Right, now, while we're very frosty, what's that bring out frosty? Well? We're going to start taking nominations for Christmas. Wish like right after. Halloween. So Oh, we'll just dive in completely and just embrace it. Yeah, and we need I. Think we just need joy I think Oh my God after this election on November third. I wish that my my wish is that. When we go to bed. On election night that we know who the president's going to be the next day either way. Because I don't want to drag this out anymore and then once we know who it is I just WanNa. Shut everything down. And and just enjoy the rest of the year and. Put Up Christmas and just ignore everything else in the world for the rest of the year. I voted yesterday I got my ballot I'm glad it was a huge weight lifted off my shoulders. I felt like because I had been staring at my ballot. Because I wanted to look into like stay things to you I mean and I and I finally did it yesterday and I felt so good and I just like I did something I know I'm just one person. I don't know I. I was stressed about it. Yeah because I don't know I wanNA make the right decisions and. I want to do. What's best so But I felt good I sealed my envelope. And I voted. All right. Let's go. Let's go through all your choices, right Yeah I did I voted for everything except for the judges I. Yeah I don't I don't know the judges I don't know anything you know. Superintendent. School yes. Everything else. Judges I don't know. Yeah. So I don't want to just write down gather out. I really appreciate it as they were sending La, almost like little. Sheets with like. This person views like they would like for example, gun laws. This person thinks this about a gun. This person thinks this I like that like it helped me they. Yes no yet you know what I mean like. I like that like I call him like little chief. I loved those they helped us because I mean for me it's like. I WANNA consume information in the most simple way. So that was like a simple way for me to. Bend it's good. It's I. It's the first time I've ever voted absentee. Every every other time I've I've always gone just like going to the polls I just like doing it. I know I wanted to stick her. I didn't get a sticker. I wish they sent it in the envelope. We should all still get stickers. Yes. What will people instagram? This year when they don't have stickers. We have to settle for instagram gifts. I just took a picture of the ballot. Yeah. But. I. Just want all of these Text stop and I get texts party. God. I get calls I tax. It's it's it's out of control and also because And also because i. have a a number that's out of state. I get California text too. So I get Arizona and California. But just this morning it was. The fire.

Delaney starbucks US WanNa Blake NCUA Drew Downer Joey Santa instagram La John John Took Candida twitter Pena Chandler
Fox News Embraces John Delaney

The Young Turks

1:00:18 hr | 1 year ago

Fox News Embraces John Delaney

"Hey guys you've heard of the young Turks podcast because you're listening to it right now but make sure that you subscribe and give it a five star rating. If you like it thank you for listening what's up welcome to the young Turks. Anna Casts Burien Maze Alhassan. I don't know why Pasi in notting jet like energy was just transmitted to you so I thought I would be insanely exhausted today because it was a long day yesterday filled Alden for John on the damage report. The main show did the debate coverage by the time I got home. It was like almost ten o'clock but you did to read is yeah and it came here which is crazy insane but thank you ladies for joining us today. I'm really excited about today's show. <hes> and we're going to do a little bit more analysis on last night's debate debate which I'm excited about because I'm really curious to hear what you guys have to say about it. Later on we are going to have a few live hits. John Zarrella and Jank younger are still both in Detroit Detroit for obvious reasons. It's the second of the debate which we will be doing <hes> coverage of as you know we're not able to stream the debate as we did back in the day but right as the debate ends we will go live and provide analysis much like we did yesterday so yeah. That's something that we can look forward to later but let's get started with breath. Today's main show because again we do have a little more analysis and I love going a little deeper and not analysis so we're going to do that with Delaney next. It was standing room. Only this and the person who got the most loved throughout the night was senator. Standards Trump is a pathological liar now while that crowd certainly loved the Progressives on stage one individual did not and that was John Delaney who was bloodied politically speaking the progressives on stage in fact Delaney was so salty about how much he was defeated or how badly he was defeated on that stage that he decided to enter enemy territory Fox News and Trash Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders. Take a look. Let's go to video to please. You're talking about Elizabeth Warren because he has a plan for everything but she's never implemented plan for anything well. It's not just Elizabeth Elizabeth Warren. It's Bernie Sanders. I mean if you if you take what they're saying to an extreme what's next free vacations. You know free housing free everything I mean at at some point. Would you pay for these things. I believe there is a role of government to to do things to give people the kind of opportunity. They deserve like we've seen here in Detroit in the last couple of years where we've seen a really good turnaround when the government in the private sector actually worked together and that's kind of how I think about the way we should be approaching everything so there are two things things that I would like to debunk from that video beginning with Brian Kilmeade accusation that Elizabeth Warren has never accomplished anything or hasn't done anything in government the whole the reason why we have a consumer financial protection bureau is because Elizabeth Warren Thought of it pushed for it and succeeded in getting that it done that was her brainchild that was something that she did to ensure that some of these predatory lenders would return the money that they had stolen from American consumers and that that agency that government agency has returned tens of millions of dollars to Americans who had been defrauded by these financial institutions now I bring bring that up because Elizabeth Warren actually accomplish that a while ago when she wasn't even in government right so she pushed for this as she she finally convinced Obama and some of the Democrats in Congress to do it she wanted to head the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and <hes> the Senate refused to confirm. I heard the Republicans and Senate refused to confirm or so you know what she did after that she decided to run for Senate and she she won. Obviously she's a senator now so I bring that up because we literally early have government agency that has the responsibility of returning money to defrauded Americans because of Elizabeth Warren but she hasn't accomplished anything. That's the one thing I wanted to debunk before we get to the rest rest of it. I wanted to get some thoughts though oh it seemed like it was in an incredible cheap shot number one. It's unfortunate that Delaney felt he needed to go onto Fox News but if you got beat so bad by the progressives says that he's going to change parties I could see that happening. He wasn't that devoted to begin with but then also to act this way in terms of trying to tear down Elizabeth Warren for her just speaking up in calling him out on his mess <hes> like that great pretty much observation she made in terms of why one for president. If all you're GonNa talk about is what you can't do that exact ax purpose and point you should have a plan for what you can do and that's not something Delaney had but clearly had a backup plan for after he got a beatdown which was to go onto Fox News and cry absolutely and it is is very telling that's that's where he went the day after the democratic debates because those are his people his people are not the people who are listening A to Warren and Bernie Sanders and raving in the crowd and you know what was so interesting. What's next you know this alleged slippery slope of the promises is that are so extreme free housing <hes> free vacations where they're gonNA get money for that? Well guess what in Denmark there is no rental economy because people own in their houses right. How do they own their houses because the government gives them free money to go to college so tuition is free and then they type it they saved that stipend and they buy a a place so actually it is subsidized by the government and the government did through the F. H.? A. In the nineteen fifties subsidized housing for a select group of people so he is the beneficiary of that free <hes> welfare from the government and also corporate welfare so one thing that I wanted the the second thing I wanted to debunk is the notion that these programs are quote unquote free. They're not free. They're funded through U._S.. Tax Payer money money right so I bring that up because on one hand you'll have people like jake tapper who's also very much against these programs. I mean he won't explicitly say it but you can tell in the framing of his questions nations that he's against programs like Medicare for all because what are they gonNA do taxes. What is it going to do taxes and his own reasonably way pretending as if he cares about the middle class and their taxes going up? No you care about your taxes going like it's it's very clear and so they'll argue that oh my taxes are going to go up because that's how you're GONNA pay for it right and then you'll have the very same type of people make the argument that these are just free programs. These are handouts. They're not handouts. They're paid for through tax payer money. Eh But let's keep it real. Those tax cuts that the wealthy got to enjoy under the trump administration two trillion dollars in tax cuts the rich would have to be reversed and they don't like it people like Delaney don't like that let me give you some more information about who delaney is and what really drives him right because has these are not the type of questions that get asked of him and I think it's important that people know who he is so delaney according to Alex Koch at a sludge Delaney has as as much as three point two million dollars invested in healthcare companies and funds with Health Industry Holdings also the business friendly Democrat a finance executive at Ed a former representative from Maryland is worth as much as two hundred eighty million dollars that is what drives him and that is the reason why he is put on that stage to to try to tear down progressives who have real solutions to issues that Americans have been struggling with for decades now. Let's go to the next video. There's more I don't understand why anybody does to all the trouble of running for president of the United States just to talk about what we really can't do and shouldn't fight for what's your reaction to that. I mean you're running for president because you're being honest with the American people I don't understand why people run and then they promise stuff and then it never happens well. That's the response <hes> when someone really can't defend their plans so for example if John F. Kennedy Twenty said we should go to the moon and by the end of the decade in the sixties. Someone could've said to him well. You're not saying we should go to the moon next month so you're not being ambitious enough right so it's dishonest kind of lazy response. It's similar to when they say it's a Republican talking point. You know that's the problem with the with the extreme left of the Party when you point we now obvious flaws and the things that are talking about they say well. That's a Republican talking point and I'm like no. It's actually a fact so just going back to Ainsley and <hes> what she mentioned about people running as president they get elected and they don't actually follow through with what they promised I talking about trump campaigned on lowering the price of prescription drugs who campaigned on you know combating immigration in solving that problem who even said that he was going to bring manufacturing jobs back to the United States what happened remember what he said. It was going to bring coal jobs back the story about how <hes> we've lost more coal jobs under trump's administration because those jobs honestly in today's society are antiquated. <hes> industries are moving away from using coal as fuel so just it's amazing how they can make these arguments in attacking people on the left left but they'll never take a second to reflect on their their favorite candidate or their favorite president who has essentially fallen short on every single promise promised that he he had during the campaign and especially the one he ran or seemed to ran the hardest on which is about Mexico paying about border wall which we now see gets to come out of taxpayer dollars dollars. It's just it's unfortunate to see someone like Delaney on the stage with other individuals who are committed to the American people and to the agenda and it's it's clear that Delaney's really just trying to fill his own coffers and make sure that he needs his own interest especially with all of his investments and healthcare as a businessman and it just makes you wonder why necessarily are these people there but as we get to see you know and him appearing on Fox News he's there really to bring down into knock down the progressives in the left who actually want to do something for the people absolutely and more and more you see that he is clearly positioning himself as a cool collected and trump and that's what makes him so appealing to a Fox News audience and also this this kind of love. I love in America for some strange reason of the entrepreneur nominee for somebody who knows how to build themselves up allegedly because he probably has a history like most of these folks do of generations of wealth and then using that to create an industry for themselves and then maintaining it by having those relationships ships within politics so that their interests are protected absolutely so while you might hear one narrative in mainstream media certainly on Fox News about about how the moderate Democrats the ones who have the biggest shot the poll numbers indicate something very different. I mean even even establishment media. You read read The New York Times you read C._N._N.. Everyone seems to agree that the two progressives on stage did really well yesterday and it's not just about the perspectives of opinion writers on these publications. It's also about the reaction they received from people so let's give you a little taste of that. Here's a video from C._N._N.. Booted you like tonight morning. Elizabeth Warren really did impressed you about her. We know how words she has answers and solutions assist. I thought Elizabeth Warren did the best job tonight. She showed empathy ensure energy intelligence. You know Bryn in some of the centrist Democrats didn't do so well tonight in this room at least Governor Bullock Congressman Delaney and Ryan. They got booed at certain points it's here. Did you not like tonight. The Ladies Molly favorite by far I I don't think he has solutions America canoes way. No sorry I mean it is what it is so whenever someone tries to feed you delaney like talking points just know what the reality is. There's a reason why he's barely even polling. There's a reason why <hes> you know he got the type of reaction he received last last night during the debates and it's not just about Delaney. It's about other candidates who represent the same nonsense he represents which is the same you know `incrementalist. Let's play pancakes with Republicans policies. They're not gonNA work. They haven't worked and honestly the frustration that people felt under the Obama Ed Ministration for Falling Short on economic policy that actually helped the masses. That's what led to people you know flipping from blue to red and it's unfortunate because because I don't agree with that vote I don't agree with supporting trump. He definitely I mean you can tell he had absolutely no interest in helping the average American I mean he's been exploiting the system of of corruption his entire life but we we need someone better. We need to go back to Democratic candidates who actually do care about the average American care about economic justice and the American worker and I think the miscalculation here is that there's an assumption that the midwesterner is somebody who can be easily pandered to if you say that we have a moderate electable person but actually that's the mistake and that's the mistake because the person in the Midwest the person was the most downtrodden mm trodden on because of the old those policies guess who sounding really good to them a warrant a Bernie Sanders even Marianne Williamson you saw people in that crowd who were cheering like I've never heard a democratic debate based on her reparations argument. This is a mid western issue because they are forgotten economically and they're not gonna be easily pandered to yes and I just hope we can all kind of consider this as Delaney's eulogy on done. He's done okay yeah. I mean we might I consider it that way. I don't know if he's in the same camp <hes> but if he wants more of what he experienced last night fine it was at least entertained yeah. He's GonNa Ross Perot it. Maybe yeah we'll see we'll. We'll see all right <hes> so now we're gonNA switch gears a little bit and go to John. John Zarrella is in Detroit. He's in fact at the Fox Theater in Detroit. What's up John Looking good? How's it going ANA yeah? I brought my one nice outfit all right so so what's going on. Give the latest giving you the We've got the debate hall right behind us. Across the way it looks like the Biden and the young people were able to get their signs deployed the most outside of the spot where the debates actually going to held <hes>. I've been talking with a lot of people since last night's debate and I also expected like like you guys were just talking about the Delaney was probably like kaput and in terms of being able to make get to the debate stage that's probably true but he's also extremely wealthy and the murmurings I'm hearing are that he doesn't intend to actually drop out for quite a while even if he's not on the debate stage she's going to to hang out and yes he might not make it on the stage but he'll probably have no trouble getting back on Fox News. Jonah one is what what is the reasoning or the logic behind doing that. Why would he want to do that knowing that his political views are deeply unpopular with a party that's clearly he moved to the left? I mean I don't think this is the actual reason but one argument would be that he thinks that he's genuinely only right and he has to fight back against what he sees as dangerous turn for the party no politicians actually that honest though I would say that it's possible that he thinks that either this is sort of a moment and if he holds out perhaps a future party will find him more appealing or it could be that he thinks that perhaps some state level race or something like that like he might be positioning positioning himself not very well for the presidency but to raise his profile in advance of either you know commenting position on Fox News a governor's run or something like that John What is the sentiment been like outside of Delaney what a folks been saying about the other candidates that we haven't really been hearing and mainstream traditional additional media. I don't know I mean look. I'm in a different sort of bubble but this is one hundred percent of bubble here and <music>. I mentioned I think in our coverage last night that most of the people in the press room were pretty restrained. <hes> as the debate was actually going on there weren't a lot of people were making extremely clear who they actually supported there. Were a few lines honestly the lines that you guys pointed out that that got a lot of applause at support. I've talked to a few people not involved in all this. We were just like living living in Detroit. I talked with one woman and she said that she <hes> she liked Warren. She liked some of the stuff that Williamson said but she also said that she likes Biden is. She said that she finds him to be very charismatic and he seems like he's always had people's back. So that is one person I talked to so I think you can take that to the bank and John since you were there last night in your there this night and you're in that beautiful bubble. What would you say? The vibe is like in a different way tonight. I mean in relation to what's going to happen tonight. Honestly can't say I haven't jumped back into the belly of the beast yet. Maybe once I do that. I'll be able to get sort of a vibe for what people are expecting. I've I talking to a few people in my expectation is that it's probably not likely to be as fiery as last night. Last night. We really saw a clear I would say delineation of the ideological battle lines and we had people defending honestly both sides the more moderate side and the more left side. I think that we might see something like that tonight. Because their candidates Biden who are pitching themselves as I think more honestly as a centrist and then there are people who say that they're now progressives and to some extent. Maybe that's true true. I think that there's a divide but I think a lot of its feigned. I think that these people when it comes to the at the end of the day what they actually are looking to accomplish issues like healthcare things like like that. I don't think there's as much of a difference will that will be on the stage today. There might be some conflict because they have to try to differentiate. Themselves are so many people on the stage but I don't know on on on issues that we talked about last night the the ones that were biggest. I don't know how much honest disagreement there really is so. Do you think that there will be this. Is there a lingering question that you think will be the heart or the focus of this debate so I'll just tell you what my one of my predictions is now. Kamala Harris has been pretty wishy washy on Medicare for all she'll go up on stage as we know and she'll say she clay she'll say that she supports Medicare for all and then show you auto back out of what she said on stage later. Do you think that C._N._N.. Is going to hold her accountable for that. Maybe ask her to really clarify what she means. Supportive Medicare for all and if that's not the issue that they focus on is there something that you hope they focus on it might be that they do that. They did make reference in last night's debate to some of the previous raise your hands moments. They seem to like using that sort of thing and so. Maybe they'll do that again I I honestly I don't know they were very willing to use a variety of different centers candidates last night to try to pick apart whether you think it was fair or not Sanders in Warren. I don't necessarily see that happening with Biden. I mean it would make for an exciting night and they want ratings so maybe they'll go down that road. I think the thing that I've been predicting predicting since last night is that we're probably less likely to see sort of a let's take out the battle lines on medicare for all and have people defend their position and more can we spur awesome more moments to attack Biden for particular things from his past. Can we get someone to finally start picking into comma harasses record. I think that all of them have some land land mines that are gonNA. They'RE GONNA tempt to exploit them and I think that a number of the candidates on the stage are going to have seen what comal Harris was able to accomplish in terms of polling it or fundraising and there's going to be an incentive to try to duplicate that. I don't know that they'll they'll be successful at it and it's probable that Biden is going to be more prepared for some of those attacks than he was last time but I think I think the attempt to might be made. You know one other thing that I'm very curious about going into the second night of the debate is there's been some some drama. There's been some beef between Kamala Harris and Tulsi Gabbard like Tulsi. Gabbard isn't really known for attacking people but you know she's a dove love when it comes to Biden but a hawk when it comes to Kamla Harris so do you think that there might be any type of drama or any type of instigation of by I c._N._N.. When it comes to that issue because you're right they do? They love the little quotes that they can use. They love you know having some sort of dramatic moment they can talk about for the next week. I think that there's an okay chance that they'll bring up the TULSI comments about communism fitness to be commander interim chief that's possible. I don't know that they'll necessarily tied in with Biden. Yeah I mean it's possible because she did. Ah You have that that triangle of those three of Tulsi Biden Harris and you had a Tulsi defending Biden against Harris's last attack at the last debate and now she's pick this thing with with Harris. It's possible that we'll see more to flesh that out. I'm trying to get an idea of what that relationship is. I get the incentive for Tulsi to draw this back to her preferred. Territory is talking about being commander achieve her passed in the military things like that. I'm not exactly sure I didn't see the context on on that last comment to see why she singled out Harris as opposed to I mean you could say the same thing about any number of people on the stage. If you WANNA talk about experience in the military so oh I don't know that Tulsi will double down those comments. It's possible that the moderators will bring it up though do you do you think that people maybe this is too. Early are pitching themselves as there's potential V._p.'s especially during this debate with Biden Yeah it's possible I think end while it is early <hes> <hes> we expect that between this debates on the next set a number of different candidates are going to drop out so if you're going to hope to do that you can't wait until December January or February like you couldn't normal nominating contests. You gotta get on that now because you might not have much influence later on. I don't know who exactly I would throw into that but the cabinets it's a big place as a lot of spots and not everyone can really be thinking. There's a good chance that they're going to win. At this point I mean if you've been polling it zero or one or two percent. We have to start to wonder what your game plan is like you guys were talking about with Delaney and so we might see that but as you say it is early and you never know what could happen coming out of this debate. I think that there are still some people I think that they definitely have a chance and indeed kind of piggybacking off of that question and yesterday we really saw kind of Liz and Bernie to this almost tag team thing where they didn't go after each other sir. Can you foresee any of that happening tonight and if so between who I don't know that any two people on the stage tonight have the <hes> both the ideological similarity but also the the shared history as Bernie and Warren. I mean maybe Castro and Booker. I don't know I I don't. I don't don't say exactly why that would develop though Yeah No. I don't think that will likely see that's what I was talking about the ideological divide before I don't think that will have to people sort of set off against the others. I think this is more likely to be a royal rumble. Not only do you have like the front runner Biden in terms of the polling but you have a number of different candidates that have staked <unk> out very particular issue territory for themselves so you know it's likely the inslee is going to try to make it about climate. Change Gabbard is going to bring up some national security stuff. There might be someone who stake out territory around immigration or something like that. I think that this is likely to be a far more fragmented night. In terms of where the conversation takes self all right John well we are going to you. Have you take part of our analysis later tonight. When we do <hes> debate coverage thank you so much for joining in and doing this live hit during our main show looking forward to speaking with you tonight here all right and for all of you who are watching now and you're wondering all right? What is the game plan for T._Y._p.'s coverage for debate night <hes> we are going a basically do the same thing that we did yesterday? The debate is likely to go on until about ten PM eastern time but we will go live. I'm sorry ten thirty thirty P._M.. Eastern time we will go live at ten pm eastern time so we will start our coverage a little before the debate is over so you can join us then and we will ah provide the same type of analysis that we did yesterday. We'll have some highlights from the debate will break it down issue by issue members. You actually have the ability to rewind thirty minutes knits and watch the beginning of our coverage so you don't have to miss anything. If you decide you want to watch the debate all the way through so if you're interested in becoming a member super easy you to do so you can go to T._y.. T. Dot com slash join to become a member and if you're still like a little iffy about it and you're like I don't know is it worth. It is the exclusive content enough off to convince me you get to try out membership go to t y t dot com slash trial and you get to see what we have to offer for about a week and then you can make your decision again T._Y.. Dot Com slash join to join T._Y.. Dot Com slash trial just to try it out and then you can decide anyway. We're GONNA take a quick break and when we come back Claire mccaskill is sharing her our expert analysis as someone who just lost her reelection rate. I also want to tell you about one of our new partners. One of our newest sponsors is the weekly on F._X.. From The New York Times Times the weekly is a new T._v.. Series in pursuit of truth each half hour episode features a Times journalist investigating one of the most pressing issues of the day and also brings unparalleled journalism to the screen so definitely check it out they talk about everything from the collapse of the taxi medallion industry to the impact active G._M.'s transformation into an automotive tech company every Sunday the weekly tells these stories in an unforgettable way you can catch episodes of the weekly Lee streaming now on Hulu all new episodes airing on Sundays at ten pm on F._X.. Welcome back back to T._Y.. T. I want to give you some info four one one on some of our latest partners the weekly is one of our latest partners and this is a wonderful show that you guys should check checked out on ethics or Hulu. The weekly is one of our newest sponsors and it airs on F._X.. Each half hour episode features a Times journalist investigating reading one of the more pressing issues of the day and also brings unparalleled journalism to the screen from the collapse of the taxi medallion industry to the impact of GM's transformation formation into an automotive tech company and I promise you they have other topics as well every Sunday. The weekly tells these stories in an unforgettable way so you can patch episodes of the weekly streaming on Hulu or you can watch each new episode Sunday nights at ten pm on F._X.. Also one of my favorite sponsors aspirated aspiration is a great place to do your banking <hes> it is a financial institution that will not charge you any shady fees they will not invest your money in any shave company including the fossil fuel industry and they also do pay you two percent interest rate on your savings account so please check them out <hes> aspiration dot com slash t y not to open your account all right with that so let's move on free stuff from the government does not play well in the Mid West that is Claire mccaskill woman who lost her re election bid in North Dakota but somehow she's an expert who can weigh in on politics on M._S._N._B._C. now she <hes> shared that expert analysis after the first night of the Democratic debates and she made a point to specifically go after Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth with Warren. Let's hear more America is generally not as far along the left line as Bernie and Elizabeth free stuff from the government does not play well in the mid West because they're just convinced that they're never the ones getting the free stuff you know. They're working really hard and they can't afford to retire and that was part of the thing that trump did he said basically I'm going to tap into your anger and your angst. WE'RE GONNA blame the Mexicans in the Muslims for everything that's wrong with the world and a lot of people who voted for Barack Obama said you know maybe this guy is finally GonNa pull the pin on the grenade. Toss it and see what happens so there's Claire mccaskill who lost her reelection bid in Missouri and and she lost her reelection bid running as Republican light but she is on M._S._N._B._C. giving analysis arguing that the This country really does reward failure. Oh Gosh isn't that true but only failure of certain people as we see and it's interesting on mccaskill and just kind of has this viewpoint that it doesn't go well in the Mid West. Even though as we've observed people there are struggling they do need help just like the rest of us do and also these are things this this is money that we work for these things that are paid out of our taxes that we've contributed from our paychecks. There's no free handouts. This is us being able to get back what we have earned as opposed to going to major corporations and big farm and everything else that does not trickle down to us and we the people like we were talking about a little bit earlier. Entrepreneur onyx has a logic to it and the logic is that if you don't make yourself from something this imaginary invisible bowl something <hes> then you you don't WanNa work and you're a bad person if you don't want to work and you rely on other people people and their savviness to make themselves to give back to them and so it's created this idea of philanthropic class and that philanthropic class is it's such a such a to what is that Oh my God Way Street No Sword O. W. Sure thank you you guys haven't slept in forty eight hours. It's such a double edged sword because here's what happens they get revered for being able to make that money as an alleged entrepreneurial business this person and then they say guess what I'm going to give away to. You and you have to applaud me for being that kind and giving but really the foundation is a setup to to keep their money. It's a setup to keep themselves from being taxed and that's what again going back to Elizabeth Warren people want is fairness. They want to get the fruits of being taxed at a percentage. That's higher than wealthy people <hes> <hes> and that's that's what they want. I just like every other country in Europe. Europe want to see that my tax money that's being taken out. Every single paycheck is going to give me something and not give a delaney something and not give give a trump something exactly exactly I mean I try to think of it. I mean people think politics is more complicated than it needs to be. It's not that complicated think about it in your you're in your own terms in your own life. What you spend money for and what you expect to get back right so I like to think of it? As every month I have to pay the Homeowners Association Association of certain fee right and that feed goes toward maintaining the grounds you know paying for the water bill whatever it is imagine like paying paying that fee every month and having the head of the H._O._A.. Tell you okay. Here's the thing we're not going to give you free water. You're just looking for free water and that's unacceptable settled. We're GONNA take this money and we're going to build those the building next door because we don't like the head of the H._O._A.. In that building right I mean that's essentially what our government does as money goes post toward nonsense wars and we purposely do it because hey the private contractors love those giant federal contracts right. They love love that taxpayer money. I mean we gotta Pay Boeing. GotTa Pay Raytheon. We gotta pay all these defense contractors. That's where the money goes and then little by little they keep cutting taxes for the wealthy again lately to the tune of two trillion dollars over the next ten years and then they also start defunding programs that help people who need it I would much rather have my money go toward keeping children in poverty fed in America then giving contracts defense contractors and also when they we do have those quote unquote programs that are funding people and trying to make up for historic diff- inequalities. They have conditions Russians right. If you are a woman who is on welfare you have to be a single mother to receive that money and so that and prevents her from having any SORTA real relationships with other people could point I mean and so people are in a permanent class of poverty and always vulnerable to any sort of like I what I really. She loved Elizabeth Warren's messing around healthcare is that people are pretty much a healthcare bill away from poverty. Yes all of us all of us all of us and we're that honorable whether you are in the working class whether you are middle class and so to not talk about why we're in that position that has gone been the result of of decades of endless wars decades of giving tax breaks to wealthy Americans not even rich. We're just talking about wealthy. We're talking about point zero one percent of Americans who outsource all your jobs to that's right <hes> so we're getting the raw deal. You're going back to the H._O._A.. And H away is supposed to provide you with with water the responses Oh you're lazy. Why don't you go find your water? Exactly exactly you hate me money but you're so lazy you can't put your little rain collector her so the rage that someone would feel if they would be confronted with that type of situation is the rangers they should feel toward our federal government and people like mccaskill and honestly people felt enough rage rage to voter out of office which is why she lost her reelection bid which we'll get to in a second because I want to give you some commentary on that but I wanNA share some tweets that I thought were fantastic in in response to what mccaskill said this is for Walid Shaheed and he writes free stuff from the government does not play well in the Mid West Claire mccaskill number one one Rashida to leave Ilhan Omar are also from the Midwest and obviously they champion the types of policies we heard from the progressives on stage last last night and also number two <hes> Medicare and social security are both technically free stuff and they play very well. Now look the second part. I really want to move away from using the right wing framing on these programs. They're not free right. These are not free programs. These are programs that are paid for by the U._s. a U._S. taxpayer this is money that we pay into the system and it should go back to helping us to helping our peers to helping our fellow Americans right. Let's move away from that. Republican talking point now by the way and Shaheed is amazing and you know I've made that mistake as well like when I referred to the pro-life you know the antiabortion group as pro-life. They're not pro-life. I mean they sit by and they watch these migrant. Children died the border. They don't care they're championing. Executions is all over the country exactly so let's move away from that framing. Let's not use their their P._R.. Stunts to to make them look better than they really are so so Parker Malloy writes <hes> out of curiosity. Why does Claire mccaskill have all this free time to be paid cable news commentator again or to be paid cable news commentator again? That's a great point and then I wanna read a few excerpts from the New York Times. This is a piece from twenty eighteen beating back a liberal suburban groundswell that approved lethal too many House Republicans. Josh Halley claimed victory here on Tuesday over Senator Claire mccaskill so this is the night that she lost toppling one one of Senate Democrats last remaining moderate voices the Associated Press set miss mccaskill turned heads in the campaign's closing days by backing trump's polarizing arising approach to a caravan of asylum seekers marching toward the southern border and releasing a radio ad that described her as not one of those crazy Democrats she later elaborated on Fox News so seems like a great expert to have on a program to do analysis on what what does and does not play well with voters. She definitely seems to go with whatever side in the moment could possibly benefit her knowing. She's on her way out of office and hey she's going to need a job. She's going to need opportunities and so we see her pretty much almost speaking out that republican rhetoric and keeping that dialogue going to help that side and it's just it it really is unfortunate to see this especially because you know so many people are struggling and the thought in their mind by planning that seed that this is a handout as opposed to something you've worked for is very damaging because they may actually turn it away <hes> out of ego and pride and that really becomes an issue because then you start having the poverty eighty that becomes even more problematic and becomes more systematic and that's a big thing when we come back from the break I will read your tweets and we'll also associated some highlights from Jank's interview with Marianne Williamson. We hope you're enjoying this free clip from the young Turks. If you WANNA get the whole show and more exclusive content content while supporting independent media become a member of dot com slash joined today in the meantime enjoy this reset welcome back everyone. I just WanNa let you know that. If you're looking for a way you can help support this show and this is a member supported show their are various options. We have our partners which I've told you about already but we also have a membership on Youtube so if you're interested in becoming a member on youtube all you have to do is click look that little joined button that you see and it's it's a great option because you get perks within the platform including perks within the a chat room. You also get access to our Mo- Jeez and so again just click on that little joined button and you can make it happen. I WanNa read a few members comments and these are T._y.. T. Remembers Nicholas Ward says Claire mccaskill would know what doesn't play well in the Mid West having just run a campaign that didn't play well in the mid West exactly exactly by the way I know in the beginning of that story I mentioned North Dakota. I had North Dakota on my mind because I had this whole idea of talking about the most federally dependent states in the Mid West and North Dakota came up so it's one of those things where you just like say something and think something different but luckily luckily bret caught that unprecedented mandate madness says says the woman who got a socialist paycheck and benefits provided by tax payers for how long mccaskill ask only like socialism when the check is written to her all of these guys though or getting government healthcare right I mean they're all just hustling for themselves. They don't care about the people booker writes in and says I love I love it. When Edwin goes <hes> Ed writes in and says thank you and I'm so tired of people calling all of this stuff re- no one ever talks about free stuff when farmers are bailed out or or vets get preferential treatment although they get paychecks or companies get tax subsidies? I don't care if I if my take home. Pay Doesn't change at all. If everyone can have healthcare I agree with and by the way I mean you can do comparative analysis between how much we pay taxes and how much some of these Scandinavians Etienne's <hes> Scandinavian countries paying taxes. I had a great conversation with a tourist from Scandinavian country at a bar and when they told me how much they pay in taxes. It's pretty much the same as it's very close. Their money goes toward taking care of their people right for us. We have a very different story. <hes> in a few not not lives for you. The mathematician says free stuff doesn't play well in the Mid West. Yes Americans would love to keep paying for healthcare. Give mccaskill that millionaire check until until she runs for police. She's also subtly racist. I don't know if you noticed notice. They don't think they're <hes> they're wants to get free stuff stuff all right and then finally Mesa. Where did you get that top? That was actually kind of romper situation. It's not really a top sorry I gotTa let the folks know. I can't fashioned questions all the time. Hello sponsors out the the seamstress right you have do have I do have a seamstress. <HES> and I need to go back to her game stuff. I I got trained to being a Lebanese culturally Lebanese so that's that's part of yeah. That's part of the package. We need to have a post game at some point about fashion because is <hes> like I want to be more sustainable when it comes to my choices and I found like great options so at some point when jenks not here and we have like a women's only post game. We'll talk about it. I liked tank would love to be part of that calling all right so speaking of Jank. Let's move on and talk about his interview. With Marianne Williamson Jank Uber was at the Spin Room or in the spin room during the first night of the democratic debate and when you're in the Spin Room you get an opportunity to run into various candidates candidates. Maybe some of their advisers and you get to do interviews well. He conducted an interview with Marianne Williamson and talked a lot about Medicare for all so let's hear what she had to say obviously <music>. I didn't agree with your Medicare for all answer but you did kill it on a couple of other issues okay when I said what I said I felt dirty after I said it yeah no I you know I maybe had I had to say it. I saw the needle really move from tonight when I cause hearing it from them and having to say to myself. You're agreeing John Delaney here. You're really being pulled over here. I just I felt I was going to have people like yourself like on my tax there. Is this irony that did you you score so well when you talk against corporate rule and he did it again tonight and on the issue of Medicare for all you seem like you know you're stuck on that when it feels like you're almost in mid evolution I am I am and that that's the truth. Thematic Matic Natal moved last today. That's really interesting so you think the needle move for you a little bit when you saw yourself in the middle of the debate agree John Underlain so before I jump in with my thoughts I wanted to hear what you ladies had to say. I thought it was I thought it was it was really cool <hes> that she was open minded enough to consider other people's viewpoints and I think that's really strong and that is something I would want a a presidential candidate or anybody <hes> who's a politician I think you should always be learning and also because it doesn't tether you to one corporation or one interest in any way so you can't necessarily be manipulated late. If you are open minded then again I also would like to think she that she's done sufficient research and has come to the stage with a complete knowledge base of not only what her competitors are saying but just what the options On a debate stage one that says okay I am listening to I'm curious to see what you're saying and if that aligns with the ways that I've approached this issue and she does later clarify that she was talking about a transition from public option from from private insurance to in the future everybody being on Medicare for all and so I think that through that conversation it was eye opening for her. I've actually talked to Marianne Williamson a couple of times. I used to go to her sermons on Monday. Nights and a lot of people Los Angeles did and I can tell you that when I've talked to her about things like I said thank you for your tweets on Syria her as she was exiting her whole body turned around she ran to me and she said tell me what's going on <hes> so she's curious in a way that I don't see from many politicians that have have a script that they need to stick to and don't WanNa beer very far away from yeah so I don't like politicians who stick to a script and refused to evolve on issues even when they're provided evidence indicating that their positions are wrong or shortsighted but with that said I that interview was did not sit well with me okay so I'm going to try to be diplomatic. This isn't a joke right so it's like the issue of Medicare Medicare for all and healthcare in America overall like that is not a joke that is not something I'm interested in seeing a presidential candidate evolve on in real time right so like the fact that she's she's doing this debate. She had said Oncle bear show. I don't WanNa be an agent of chaos in response to why she's against Medicare for all right okay so she's kind of all over the place on that issue. It doesn't sit well with me with that said though she has interesting things to say I actually do think she deserves a place on the debate stage because if I compare her to Tim Ryan John Delaney <hes> I mean almost any other establishment candidate who's up there especially just keeping been a real white. Male establishment candidate been there done that we've seen that throughout the history of America. I want something different. It's not just because they're male. It's because they don't bring anything to the table. That's different Bernie. Sanders is a white male. Obviously I'm a huge fan is because he brings something different to the table with Marianne Williamson. No one else on I'm not stage talks about reparations as clearly as she does. She's actually thought this through and I commend her for that but when it comes to the issue of health care there I'm not really interested in seeing someone evolve on it in real time right. I want someone who knows what they're talking about and who who has a conviction when talking about it I think it's also about in this moment really the conversation we were having with John Decoding People's intentions for being on that stage having that national platform and my gene hunch with Marianne Williamson is that she wants to revive or awaken of moral and spiritual conversation that doesn't exist as the national title discourse in America to the extent that we are talking about it at the same time in watching the same thing it exists in pockets at exists as maybe a far Christian right conversation station exists may be in spaces or Jewish places or we're not having a collective conversation about the moral debt that we have rusting on the wealth well of centuries free labor. Yeah I think she would be great as like a Minister of social responsibility sure you know good thoughts and happy places <hes> and I hey I would love for her to run any kind of reparations you know setup that'd be awesome but when it comes to collectively being a true presidential candidate it doesn't seem like if she has those fundamental roots that we need for someone to know the issues to have a command of them and also able to guide in a lead on them that doesn't involve you. You know crystals and sage so she she actually signed a T._y.. T. Progressive Pledge which specifically mentions that you have to fight for Medicare for all she signed signed that and then she went on Co bears show and said she didn't want to be an agent of chaos so she does not sit well with me either obviously <hes> but she she also talks a or clarifies her tries to clarify our position a little more in this next clip. Let's take a look at that the argument that I think you made tonight we'll sound to people like you don't WanNa eventually wind up there. Oh God no Oh oh my goodness. Oh I've never been there. I've never been that really depressing that it sounded that way. What do what do you view is the role for private insurance? Let's put it this way eventually any role eventually ochre and then eventually go on the the they are as they they perform as greedily as Elizabeth for instance saying tonight they it is horrible. They take a lot of money and give as little Tara's possible. I'm very aware of that. I remember when I had my own daughter and the doctor didn't want me to have to leave the hospital that fast and the insurance companies made me you have to be clear. You have to speak with conviction. You have to know what you stand for and out of all the issues healthcare is not one of the topics. You should be like wavering on so it again I I'm not as dismissive of her as others are like people talk about the orbs of the crystals and like whatever it's funny but that doesn't it's not something that disqualifies her in my eyes what does disqualify a candidate is someone who doesn't really know what they stand for especially when it comes to the important issues that's just where I stand no online I saw somewhere where she was kind of described as having Santa Fe on syndrome where she knows she'll pray over you and speak all these good things but doesn't really have those core principles foles take get it done and so I love to hear her speak. I love to hear the things that she says on certain issues but when it comes to getting it done good yeah no I at like I said I think she had a clear plan for being on the stage the the second time now that she's been on and that is I'm gonNA inject conversation. We haven't been having <hes> A and that is especially from white woman because that clearly gets dismissed if it's a black person who talks about reparations and so I think she wanted to h- to to be on that stage to have that conversation and I don't know she gave much thought to be other things. That should be important right. That's a good point yeah all right. Well <hes> one more story before we wrap up the first hour. Mitch McConnell is real salty about the fact that people are calling him out for not not protecting U._S.. Elections now there's overwhelming evidence indicating that Russia not only tried to meddle in our elections last time around there currently meddling in our elections actions and so the lawmakers who actually want to do something about this both on the left and the right has drafted legislation which has passed the house but but Mitch McConnell has blocked it in the Senate so just to give you a little taste of what he's blocked <hes> he got in the way of a bill that would require campaigns to report art to the F._B._i.. Any contributions by foreign nationals. She wonder why he'd block that. Let me give you more a bipartisan bill that would protect lawmakers lawmakers from foreign attacks. Maybe like hacking that kind of stuff. <hes> Chuck Schumer's securing America's Federal Elections Act which would direct six hundred million dollars collection assistance to states require paper <hes> ballot backups a bipartisan bill requiring facebook Google and other Internet companies to disclose purchasers of political ads to identify foreign influence again. This is legislation that he blocked he won't even allow vote for it in the Senate but I'm not even done yet a bipartisan bill to ease cooperation between state election officials and federal intelligence agencies a bipartisan bill imposing sanctions on any entity that attacks a U._S. election and finally a bipartisan bill with a severe new sanctions on Russia for its cybercrimes again again blocked every single one of them and he got called out so Dana millbank wrote a piece in the Washington Post was quickly go to graphic three Mitch McConnell is a Russian agent and he did not like that one bit and whined about it like a little baby on the Senate floor. Take a look we can't let Modern Day McCarthyism Wen and so here's my commitment no matter how much they lie no matter how much they bully I will not be intimidated terminated for decades abused my Senate seat to stand up to Russia and protect the United States of America. I'm proud proud of my record. I'm proud is right there. In Black and white and liars cannot gas lighted away facts matter details matter history matters and if our nation is losing to build a debate public policy without screaming about treason that really matters okay so he's not allowing for a debate on the Senate floor. He's blocking this legislation. He's blocking any type of vote any type type of discussion. He is such a weasel and he's beyond undemocratic. He is exactly what Dana millbank wrote about in his his piece and I love the fact that he got his feelings hurt because he is a Russia. I mean look is he working with Russia. No that's not what anyone's accusing him of but what he is doing by blocking walking. This legislation is essentially jeopardizing our democracy our elections just the help his buddy donald trump and so he even tweeted about about this because his feelings are hurt. He said modern-day McCarthyism is poison for American democracy. No your poison for American democracy Louis It is shameful unfold to imply that policy disagreements make the other side unpatriotic. The people who push such unhinged smears are doing Putin's de-stabilizing work for him well A._F._C.. Hit him up on twitter and I love this response. She said quote McCarthyism is the practice of baselessly accusing political opponents of being communists as unjust grounds for targeting and harassment. You are blocking action to protect U._S.. Elections Despite Official D._O._J.. Please that doesn't make you a Communist. It makes you a bad leader ladies. I think she was kind enough and using the term bad leader like if anything this man is treasonous reasoning in his actions. Are you kidding how how blatant how more blatant could it get. It is apparent in his actions that he won't even let this be decided on. I don't even I think someone should necessarily have this significant power. Especially under these circumstances the U._S. is so vulnerable and yet he says that's perfectly fine. Let's continue the wait is because it's short-sighted right. I mean the meddling helped one candidate and so in his mind. Why would I wanNA pass any type type of legislation that could potentially help protect our elections so the right candidate based on votes wins right? How is he using McCarthyism? Let's break this down for a second. I know we talked about this but this is such a pervasive tactic on the right I is to Co op the social justice language of the left and use it for their own victim blaming so Mitch McConnell use McCarthyism which was targeting people who may be identified a socialist or communist and then blacklisted them and then they had to go underground the can work. That's affected people in Hollywood affected. Politicians people were sent to jail for this and then Donald Trump using the term witch hunt which was used to persecute women. What Donald Trump has been doing his lifetime to win like I can't wrap wrap my brain around these folks using these terms as protective shields from legitimate critiques concerns of the unraveling of our political process here they've created new playbook essentially with what they've done and the problem is is that they continue to take away from people who have that real need and the right to vote to exercise in to`serve voices and now hey you know just because they're wrote has been compromised? Why do anything about it so we're gonNA continue uncompromising that and it just continues to really speaks to the legacy of America in keeping people disenfranchised from being able to vote and have a say in how their government's Ron Yeah Yeah? We still haven't done anything about in down. In Georgia went went down in Florida. We I mean this again is pervasive Yup and so it continues the legacy of disenfranchising certain populations and then over counting certain other types of populations than both whether it's gerrymandering rendering or being able to block legislation like this that would allow for foreign interference much easier. This is the reason why I get so frustrated with with Democrats who think they need to run a centrist to appeal to Republican voters because if their policies if Republican policies were actually popular do think Republicans would you cheat the way that they do Gerrymander the way that they do disenfranchise voters the way that they do. They have to cheat in order to win. Elections that is one example example of why they're policy. Proposals are not popular you know and you look at the polling issue by issue progressive policies pull really well what what Democrats Democrats should focus more on as opposed to like changing their messaging and becoming more moderate or centrist is hey. What can I do to buy back against these Republican lawmakers? I who are gaming the system to their advantage absolutely I mean with the exception of Bush ws incumbency the Republicans haven't won a presidential campaign since nineteen eighty eight so if you take into my and they've all been shaving all that all the way up to George Bush and then post him so they've had to get even even more aggressive with the way that they cheat and scam the system and they're even more blatant about

Elizabeth Elizabeth Warren Governor Bullock Congressman D Tulsi Biden Harris Bernie Sanders Tim Ryan John Delaney Fox News Senator Claire mccaskill Medicare Mid West Marianne Williamson America Trump Detroit Barack Obama John Zarrella delaney president Tulsi Gabbard The New York Times Jank
'You're wrong' vs. 'I'm right': Sanders and Warren spar with moderates

POLITICO's Nerdcast

09:18 min | 1 year ago

'You're wrong' vs. 'I'm right': Sanders and Warren spar with moderates

"Hello NERD casters. This is Scott Bland. Your host and this is a special debate. Show Tuesday night was another Democratic presidential financial debate round two part one tonight with ten candidates on the stage in Detroit broadcast on C._N._N.. And we are going to take a key moment of the debate replay it for you and then we're going to break it down with politico healthcare reporter Dan diamond author of the political pulse newsletter and the host of the pulse check podcast. Dan Thank you so much for stepping to the sidelines of politicos crowded debate night newsroom to to talk through this. I am thrilled to be here with you. Scott all right. Let's let's get right to it. Here's the moment we picked kicked out the moderators and the candidates jumped right into <hes> the biggest policy issue facing Democrats had twenty twenty the one their voters say the most important to them health care and the early exchanges between Bernie Sanders and John Delaney with the Little Bit of Elizabeth Warren will will bring her in a little later really set the tone for the whole debate so right after the opening statements C._N._N.'s Annan's Jake Tapper turn to Senator Bernie Sanders Senator Sanders. Let's start with you you support Medicare for all and ask him to explain his support for Medicare for all in terms of criticism from Congressman John Delaney rival for the Democratic nomination who said it would take private health insurance away from tens of millions of Americans and he has called the idea political suicide that will just get president trump reelected. What do you say to Congressman Delaney? You're wrong right now. We have a dysfunctional healthcare system eighty seven million uninsured ensured or underinsured five hundred thousand dollars five hundred thousand Americans every year going bankrupt because of medical bills thirty thirty thousand people dying while the healthcare industry makes tens of billions of dollars in profit five minutes away from the John is a country it called Canada it they guarantee healthcare every man woman and child as a human right they Senator Sanders Congressman glading. I'm right about this. We can create a universal healthcare system to give everyone basic healthcare for free and I have a proposal missile to do it but we don't have to go around the party of subtraction and telling half the country has private health insurance that they are health insurance is illegal. My Dad Union electrician loved. I love the healthcare he got from the I._B.. W he would never want someone to take that away all right Dan we're we're going to go back through this thought by thought a little bit but the the big picture here and then I think you're writing about your newsletter tomorrow morning. This exchange right at the top of the debates crystallized everything everything about the the the big policy debate going on in the primary and also that we really saw for the entire debate on Tuesday night. It's clearly a debate that will define the Democratic Primary Mary although I don't know if John Delaney is going to be the one making it at the end Joe Biden Her p Buddha judge might step into that role but this idea of how far to go on healthcare her the candidates want to expand coverage how they're going to do it. How many people would benefit how expensive it would be? The the details remain to be decided first first off. We have Bernie Sanders explaining his vision for Medicare for all is a human right not a privilege. I believe I will for that. The Dan Ta- talk us through this and this has become one of the defining elements of the primary so Bernie Sanders has campaigned for years on this idea of Medicare for all what's interesting is the plan he has is not actually Medicare it would be a souped up version of what Medicare currently is and that single payer plan that every American would be enrolled in the sanders campaign things that could lead to negotiating lower prices with drug companies with insurers lower payment for hospitals c._N._n.. was casting a lot of questions around this in terms of people under this plan losing the insurance they have to get on this and now I think Sanders supporters would take issue with that framing right the whole their whole point is that it's it's going to be better but as John Delaney said this is a real concern among some Democrats it's as well. It's a concern among voters. Every poll There's a public option on the side where you and me. Scott if we decide that maybe we don't want politicos coverage. We WanNA go shop for government plan. People prefer the idea of of some choice the sanders model would put us all in one government plan. We all lose the employer coverage. We have that's one hundred seventy eight hundred eighty million Americans Oregon's so there would be some loss up front but Bernie and his supporters argue is that right now we are at the whims of whatever political editor carry booed off Brown and the political I wanted to every year. Maybe they switched to a new ensure. Maybe we lose the doctors that we have your ear and Sanders and Delaney went back and forth on this about how there's already <hes> health insurance loss or change every year because of people changing jobs losing jobs getting new one so on so forth. Dan You mentioned this at the beginning but Delaney's Delaney's prominent role in this debate. It was a little bit surprising. He's not he. He's been campaigning for president for a very long time now. There's a former congressman from Maryland few terms. It's been campaigning for a long time not not really registering much in the polls but as you said he he was standing in a little bit for maybe a couple of the other front runners tonight and where this ideological battle is shaping shaping up John Delaney declared for president declared his campaign two years ago this week I candidate in the field and I think what's interesting about his role is he actually is closer to Bernie Sanders. Then say Joe Biden. John Delaney has a plan that he's calling quote better care and a wit involve a public book plan for all Americans under age sixty five he would get universal coverage faster than say Joe Biden Joe Biden who wrote out a plan a couple of weeks ago assumes that there will still be millions of Americans uninsured after a number of years so John Delaney has been a big critic. This is how he's trying to elevate his profile but his plan might be closer. Lucerne Bernie Sanders than the average viewer would have understood from tonight's debate and now despite that what we saw for most of the debate after this this is this is how the debate kicked off. It was opening statements than we jumped right into healthcare. This was kind of where where everything's going every question. It seemed like that the moderators were putting forward ended ended up pitting one of Bernie Sanders or Elizabeth Warren versus one of <hes> Delaney or <hes> governor Steve Bullock Montana. <hes> or governor former governor. I should say John Hickenlooper of Colorado who who were kind of trying to sound this call about <hes> or would they were calling a warning warning about maybe Democrats promising a little bit too much promising a little bit too much change <hes> and we could go down the list of policy options but <hes> started with healthcare that was kind of the where the the big conflict was at the beginning. Yeah I think that's right. Healthcare and the idea of a single payer plan remains this bogeyman. You can call it. Socialism and dad is tangible as any issue and I'm probably biased as a healthcare reporter but that seems like a tangible tangible way to really show Bernie Sanders in a certain light in the campaign and I think what Elizabeth Warren was getting to a few times was this idea of Republicans taking the attacks that John Delaney my level and using them against Democrats. We are not about trying to take away healthcare from anyone why that's what the Republicans and we using Republican talking points in order to talk with each other other about how the best provide and I think that's the policy difference that we've been talking about right but Warren just said there is a big part of her a political argument in the political argument that she and Sanders are putting forward as they continue to occupy two of those top four spots that we're seeing in the polls through now <hes> <hes> and so big policy question animating the Democratic primary that was animating big section of tonight's debate Dan Diamond. Thank you so much for helping us cut threw it Scott. Thank you for letting me nerd out with you all right. Thank you so much listeners for tuning into tonight's show if you liked it that's great because we've got another one coming up tomorrow. After night. Two of round two of the Democratic presidential primary debates thanks Jenny comment for producing Dave Shaw. The executive producer of politico audio will see you right back here tomorrow.

Senator Bernie Sanders Senator Congressman Delaney sanders Scott Bland Medicare John Delaney Democrats Senator Sanders Congressman gl Joe Biden Elizabeth Warren Dan president Dan Diamond congressman reporter Detroit John Hickenlooper Dan You
2020 Opening Arguments: Andrew Yang, John Delaney, & Jay Inslee

NPR Politics Podcast

29:31 min | 1 year ago

2020 Opening Arguments: Andrew Yang, John Delaney, & Jay Inslee

"Hello, I'm Eileen. And I'm Joe we're at the Laurie auditorium on the campus of trinity university in San Antonio, Texas for the live presentation of the NPR news quiz. Wait. Wait, don't tell me where here because we receive tickets as a present on our fiftieth wedding anniversary this podcast was recorded at. It's a nice adding congratulations twelve thirty eight eastern on Tuesday. April sixteenth things may have changed by the time. You hear this? And if they didn't change why would there be a podcast keep up to date with all the latest news by listening to your local NPR member station. Ours is ks TX Texas, public radio in San Antonio. Here's today's NPR politics on cast. Really cute like find someone who will go with you to wait. Wait, don't tell me. Nothing says romance like live podcast, take my book. We've had lots of couples at our live shows doll. If you've got an anniversary coming up and you live in the Philadelphia area. You know, what even if you have an anniversary, even if you just wanna fun night reminder. We have our live show in Philadelphia coming up a week from Friday. You can get your tickets NPR presents dot org. It's a romantic night out there. It's the NPR politics podcast. I'm Scott Tetreault. I cover congress Daniel Kurtzer political reporter, and I'm Dominica months in our political editor we are continuing our conversation listening to opening arguments from twenty twenty presidential candidates. If you go back in your feed, we've done a couple episodes like this already today. We are going to talk about three candidates who maybe haven't been getting as much attention as the others. But they're running interesting campaign, and we're going to hear from them, and that is Andrew gang. John Delaney end Jay Inslee, Danielle you're up first because you just sat down with Andrew Yang yesterday. Right. Who is he what's his deal? What's his campaign about right? So. Jiang is an entrepreneur. I think is the best way to put it. He most recently ran a nonprofit called venture for America. Which is a group that helps place young adults recent college graduates that sort of thing in the startup world helps them become entrepreneurs. The idea is to go to different cities and set up. These new businesses set up these people with jobs at new businesses, and hopefully grow jobs, and so he's running for president based on his business experience and the central focus of his platform is a universal basic income a certain amount of money for everybody in the country. We're gonna get to that later. One of the things that I asked him about was this hats that one of his staffers had on when I met up with him this hat. It's navy blue. It's a baseball cap, and it said in big all caps letters in white letters math across the front of it. I didn't recognize it. I as an Andrea hat, but then I saw the logo on the back at one point math math. So I said, okay, I have to ask you about this. Tell me about your staffers hat will one of the Ma. Mottos for the campaign has been the opposite of Donald Trump is an Asian man who likes math, and my remarks naturally include a lot of facts and figures, and so now, we have this math hat that reflects the fact that we're all about facts and solutions, and it's become something of a stealth acronym for make America think harder think harder. I mean taken than Carter from from maga- math, right? Yeah. Yeah. I guess he started the, and then it just kind of the rest of it writes itself, which is interesting because Dominica like I feel like so much of the political wisdom is that lake making logical fact based empirical arguments to voters isn't necessarily historically the way people really revved up about your campaign. You know? No, it's not I mean. Wrong. He's not. I mean, we can lament the state of politics in a different podcast, maybe. But the fact is, you know, most people just look at a candidate they sort of thin slice them. They see if they like them or not, and they sort of, you know, make a choice that way as long as they ideologically go in the direction that they want. That's kind of the end of the story for most people, but the math hats are selling. Well. Yeah. And I mean, he their math t shirts buttons. He it's a thing at his rallies. But like this thing you just has to medical about being emotional as opposed to sort of cold and logical. I asked him about that. And I said, you know, Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren, they're running on this whole idea that the economy is rigged, and you should be upset about it. And Donald Trump famously one on a lot of anger, and I said, so what about you isn't emotion the way to win votes. And he said will no I don't necessarily think it is. And aside from that this just not who I am. So I'm just being me and me is a guy who likes math are. So that's who he is. But Dinnie Wisey running. It's a great question because. Yeah. He's not a politician. So I asked him that why why you and why now and he had a big response for it. I'm running for president because America is in the midst of the greatest economic in technical transformation in our nation's history. When the third inning of what's called the fourth industrial revolution. And this led directly to Donald Trump's victory in two thousand sixteen if you look at the voting district data, there's a direct correlation between the adoption of industrial automation in an area and the movement towards Donald Trump. The reason he won is that we'd automated away for million manufacturing jobs in Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Missouri, Iowa. And now my friends in Silicon Valley know that what we're doing to them. Then you factoring jobs. We will now due to the retail jobs, the call center jobs, the fast food jobs, the truck driving jobs and on and on through the economy Americans. Do not seem to understand that we need to. Address the fundamental challenges of the twenty-first century. Instead, we're scapegoating immigrants who are very little to do with the set of problems too. I'm running for president both to wake us up to what we're facing and then implement real solutions that will actually help Americans transition through this time Saad Danielle if not automation specifically, this general erosion of industrial jobs has been a big part of politics for decades now, and there have been candidates who say the answer is to bring these jobs back to America. There have been candidates who say we need to train people for new skills. What is Andrew gang solution for this problem? His solution. Like, we said earlier is universal basic income what he calls a freedom dividend. That's his branding on it. The idea is a thousand dollars a month for everyone everyone richer, no questions asked and you can do as you like with that money. Well, and also you mentioned retraining one of his rationales for this is that retraining it has spot. Eighty success records. It's it doesn't necessarily always help. So why not just give people money to stimulate the economy to let them try to find their own retraining, if they would like that sort of thing and also cover their basic expenses is interesting because there are so many Democrats specially more mid western Democrats. Get shared Brown, Joe Biden, not mid western. But you know, that kind of talking about the importance of the dignity of work the importance of having a job having having a mission and how that's part of you. And and part of your self worth and self being. Yeah, any Andrea is basically saying it doesn't matter. No matter here's the money because your jobs going away. Although it's twelve thousand dollars a year. It's not meant to be a total replacement for a job because you can't live on twelve thousand year and pretty much anywhere in America hit I asked him about this. He said the idea is that if you are in a job that is at risk of being replace, you know, you're a truck driver. You're a CVS clerk, you know, that sort of thing then this is money you can use right now, assuming that you know that. This is coming in the future. And that you believe this is coming in the future, and you can use it to create a cushion for yourself or try to retrain yourself. Now. Of course, there are a lot of questions about this out to you pay for it, and our people that forward thinking, but I mean, how would you pay for it is a central part of this. How would he pay for it? How much would this cost and his estimate? So the central way that the end campaign says this would be paid for would be a value added tax. If you've been to Europe, you may have paid one of these as using some European countries, you experience it like a sales tax because you go to the store and you buy a loaf of bread, and you pay a value added tax on it that's tacked onto your seat. When you go to the cashier is a tax that is paid at every stage of production. So the farmer raising the wheat pays a little bit of it. The person that mills the wheat pays a bit of it. The Baker that bakes the bread pays a little bit of it. And then you pay someone you buy the bread from the grocery store. That's value added tax and one criticism is that a value added tax is regressive that it might hit poor people harder. So that is one potential criticism of this now aside from all that. A few other ways that Yang says this would be paid for that. In implementing this twelve thousand dollars a year to everyone you would save money on welfare programs and other programs because some Americans will get a choice between either taking current welfare programs or this twelve thousand a year, but not taking them both at the same time. So you'd save a bunch of money. He says anything else from your interview that's worth lacking. Yes. So once again, let's get at the math thing because that's at again at the center of I can't help it. That's just the the bent that. This interview took I asked him about, you know. Okay. So you see this automation crisis coming you think it's happening already. And yet as our president often says and he's right? Unemployment is pretty low right now, and the economy's humming along at a pretty good clip. Okay. So I said Andrew Yang is it that the crisis isn't happening now is it happening now when is this problem happening, and here's what he said to me. Well, the headline unemployment rate is quite low. It's a three point nine. Percent. But the labor force participation rate is that a is near a multicolored low, and that's not included in headline unemployment headline unemployment also doesn't take into account. The fact that forty four percent of recent college graduates are doing a job that does not require a degree. It doesn't take into account. The fact that ninety four percent of these jobs. We're talking about are temporary Giger contract jobs that don't have real password or healthcare benefits. So the headline unemployment number is an example of terribly misleading stat that is leading us a stray and one of the key tenets to my platform is that we need better measurements. So what I found? So fascinating about this is that he's kind of saying something similar to what an Elizabeth Warren might be saying, which is you know, she would argue to you. I think that you know. Yes, the economy has been growing, but you American workers have not been partaking in the benefits of that. Yes. GDP grows. But what where's your share of it that share? Has gone down or at the very least flatlined in recent years would injure Yang is saying is the measurements are flawed which is not he's highlighting a different thing. He's highlighting the number. She's highlighting the you. And what you're getting out of it. But either way he sort of making a somewhat similar pitch here that the these numbers are flawed. Even when the economy is doing, well, maybe you're not partaking in the spoils of it. Like, he's like the Bill James type baseball figure saying stop looking at wins and losses for pitchers. They're better stats out there. I take your word for that. This guy sounds right? All right. We're gonna take a quick break. And when we come back, we're going to talk about John Delaney and Jay Inslee support for this podcast comes from REI co op as do the following questions where do you see yourself in five miles? What does silence sound like can bear spray? Help you sleep. What's the easiest version of climbing, a mountain dew mosquitoes, find me attractive REI can help you. Find out for yourself with gear classes and eighty one years of outdoor experience. Learn more at REI dot com. Summer movie season is here and pop culture. Happy hour has you covered for a guide through the blockbusters, you know, about and the surprise bright spots. You might not we'll tell you what we are looking forward to secretly dreading. What might seek up on? Listen, Friday, and subscribe. We are back and the next candidate up, John Delaney. Former Maryland, congressman and Dominica somebody who's been running for president and spending more time in Iowa New Hampshire and basically any other candidate in the field Hanau on July twenty eighth twenty seventeen. So he has been running for quite some time. He's spending a ton of money a ton of his own money because he's pretty wealthy guy on his bid and in his effort to do that. He's fifty six years old. He's worth somewhere between fifty two million and almost a quarter billion dollars. This is somebody who was very wealthy before he entered congress. That's how he sort of made his way to congress because he was able to sell fund his campaigns for Maryland's sixth congressional district, and he had been there for three terms and he gave up his house seat. Right. He didn't run for reelection commit to that. He gave up his house seat in after twenty eighteen or so you listen to interview between Delaney and Laura. Oy from New Hampshire public radio. What stood sit out for me? First of all was how he sort of presented himself as compared to the rest of the democratic field. He doesn't see himself in the same ways. That may be many of them do in many ways, a different kind of democrat because I'm definitely defined by some more moderate more, centrist, I tend to think of myself as someone who's a problems over, you know, I've spent my whole career whether it's been in congress or in the private sector bringing people together and actually finding common ground and getting things done. And I think that's exactly what we need today. Because there's so many things we should've already dealt with in our in our country in our society, we need someone who actually wants to lead us around a conversation about some of the things we agree with each other on and actually make progress on those issues to help the American people, but also to help us rethink our future because the future we're leaving our kids right now is not the one we want to leave them. You know, it strikes me listening to him that even within the Democratic Party that some of the candidates might have. A problem that we talked about during the general election last year, which is making the case for yourself in a negative versus a positive way. What he saying here is I am not like those other guys. But in this massive field, you still have to make a positive case for yourself. Okay. I'm not like the other guys who are you? What is your main thing? Yeah. Well, he makes plenty of points about for an affirmative case for himself. Certainly he was asked to sort of differentiate himself and asked about this, quote that he had made about being sort of socialist versus capitalist in this campaign. And how he doesn't see it that way he sees himself as firmly capitalist. He said that the truth is that in the United States. It's a free market economy. But he also thinks that there needs to be really strong social programs. He said allow capitalism to work its magic and reimagined. How could do that? So, you know, that's the way he views it rather than it needed to be something that's more northern European socialist or government led solutions. So that's. To get into his his thought process of how Democrats are going to beat Donald Trump. Right dominica. It really does. Because he really talks about how that's the critical issue for most Democrats. That's what's gonna stand out and for him. The political argument is pretty clear now that the Muller reports over. Now that we're in a country where the economy's doing reasonably well, I think it's pretty obvious that the way you beat down Trump is with a more moderate centrist candidate. And I think that'll be obvious to everyone in the Democratic Party when we get closer to the Iowa caucus and the New Hampshire primary because I think people will appreciate that the president is gonna turn out his voters and he's going to do a good job turning out democratic voters. We don't need candidature not voters we're gonna turn out against Donald Trump. So this election's going to be fought in the center. Guess they had a commercial break coming up. I have a couple of thoughts on that. I think what's been interesting to me looking at polls talking to voters talking to campaigns is that it does seem like more than any other overarching issue. There is just a hunger democratic voters to find someone to beat Donald Trump. So I think he's right there. But I think a lot of people would disagree with him on how moderation is the way to do that. I just worked on a story about how Bernie Sanders is the latest candidate to campaign in Michigan, and Wisconsin and Pennsylvania a lot of lot of candidates are doing that. And I talked to a few people who said look the focus has been on. How do you get back that moderate suburban voter that rural voter, but the fact is in order to win these states you need to excite the Democrats in the core urban communities in these states who weren't super excited about Hillary Clinton in two thousand sixteen particularly so I think this is going to be one of the biggest areas that the primary is going to be fought out on do you want to appeal to moderates or do you wanna just excite hardcore Democrats? He also does. Have a lot of solutions and ideas on things like healthcare in particular because he is somebody who has worked in that field, or at least in lending in that field where he really believes that a single payer system would be problematic for the country. He said that like Medicare, for example pays too little too a lot of hospitals, and when they talk to hospitals and doctors they don't like having to take less money, and he has the solution where essentially an opt out government plan, you would essentially get the baseline minimum ObamaCare plan automatically guaranteed to and then you would get tax credits for getting supplemental health care now the criticism with that is that some people say that that would just continue to allow the rich to get even better plans because they can afford it any other policies that he focused on this interview. He talked about immigration and talked about asylum seekers. He he said that in his first hundred days he would push for the comprehensive immigration reform Bill that got. Sixty eight votes in twenty thirteen so he'd like to go back to that to be able to solve some of the issues in the country on immigration, but he really did talk a lot about climate change, and he had a three step plan on climate change. He didn't say, by the way negative thing about the green new deal. He said that he thought that it was exciting that it created a lot of excitement, but that he likes his plan better one. He would put a carbon tax in he'd put a price on carbon give back people a dividend to he said that he would increase research fivefold called it a climate moonshot and the third thing was about creating a market for what he calls negative emissions technologies. That's where he got most aspirated in the third thing. I would do is create a market for something called negative emissions technologies. These are machines that actually exist that suck carbon out of the air filter it and pump it back in the earth. The problem is these machines are incredibly expensive and not of scale what I've proposed is take. The five billion dollars that we currently give fossil fuel companies in tax breaks in use that money each year to create a market to basically by carbon and encourage all this innovation to basically get these machines to scale so that they can actually be effective is he right? It can these carbon sucking machine save the world at a big enough scale. It's more theoretical than than where the technology is right now. But yes, and we're gonna talk about this next with the next candidate most experts agree that the amount of carbon dioxide already in the atmosphere is is at the point where the temperature is going to continue to go up to a point where it's going to do a lot of damage, and and the solution needs to be at a certain point getting that carbon out of the atmosphere in one way or another hopefully, avoiding the the snow piercer scenario where you go too far in the other direction. But yes, that's that's the general thinking. But again, it's something where. The goal is not near where the two right? And what I find fascinating about what his solutions are are. You know? You know, these are things that I feel like were are would be viewed in previous years as pretty radical. You know, these are things that you know, putting a carbon tax in place and giving people a dividend. Seems like the kind of thing that would have probably set Republicans hair on fire for trying to do something like that, you know, ten years ago, and he's essentially saying we need to incentivize behavioral change, and in that way, which is the kind of thing that you can actually do right? Liberals are probably thinking that's not big enough that leads us to our last candidate. Which is Jay Inslee, the Washington state governor again, it's an eighteen person field and you need to find a lane. This is my thing. This is my area whether that's a tonal or approach to the campaign, or whether it's specific issue Inslee has gone allot further than most other candidates at. He is saying I am organizing not only my entire campaign. But if I'm elected my entire presidency around one issue granted, a very big issue that affects a lot. Of things, but that is climate change injuries argument is if the country and world are ever going to be serious about this. There's really not much room for anything else. And that's one of the first points. He made in an interview with Rick Ganley also of New Hampshire public radio we need leadership to call this country to a mission statement to defeat climate change. And I'm the only candidate who says what to me is clear the feeding climate change has to be the number one prior to the United States if it is not job one it won't get done, and we need to make it the first and foremost priority of the next president. And I am committing to do that. And I have the use of the nation with me. I have entrepreneurs who are who are ready to put millions of people to work or just affiliate here right now as a renewable energy company. We're seeing economic growth like crazy around the clean energy industry. And it's time to have a president who understands that. Okay. So that is his big top priority. But what are his specific policies prescriptions? Does he support the green new deal, for example? So a lot of injuries argument actually is more about the focus and less about the policy right now. You know, I think his message by large is this needs to be issue. Number one, not something I wanna do. But first, let's talk about health care or the economy. I'm looking at its website right now, which interestingly for such a forward-looking campaign, if you are of the age of our podcast cohort or older, you will appreciate that his logo with the color. And the font looks exactly like the Netscape Navigator logo from from back in the day. I had a friend compared to the Microsoft and Carta logo from that old encyclopedia. Remember, it's definitely like mid-nineties internet like nineteen ninety-five internet. Let's foresight. I love it four point. Basically a lot of it's overlapping invest in clean energy, get to the point of one hundred percent clean energy, really play up. The fact that that this would create new jobs, and then kind of use the money from from various ways of tax and carbon to reinvest it and and direct money and programs towards people in lower income community. And people who suffer a lot from pollution again. It's basically, it's basically the framework of the green new deal and a lot of other big picture climate plans generational. This is a top issue. Those under thirty for sure and feel like older generations haven't done enough in talking about it. And that point that he makes about how this can't just be something that you say that you're in favor of, but we gotta do these other things. I he's saying an echoing. I think a lot of what younger people are saying, which is that this needs to be the top priority. And that gets to the second point that I wanted to bring up is that Ganley ask the obvious question. What about all this other stuff? I mean, are you really just gonna focus on climate as president and his argument was one climate change effects. Basically every aspect of the economy in the world. Once once it goes into effect, more and more and has bigger consequences. But second he said I want to deal with economic issues through climate change, for example, climate change is an economic issue. Look if the economy is your. One interest climate change warriors like myself or for you because we're going to both prevent damage to the economy, and we're going to grow jobs by the buckle bucket, full a building clean energy future. This is probably the the number one growth opportunity for the US economy because we know the world is going to need new products and services, and that's what we do in in America. We we create we invent we build we we build new technologies whenever there's been a transition America's done. Well, and there's going to be a big transition to me this frames. What seems to me like a pretty risky bet. Jay Inslee is making. Because most definitely if you take it as a given that climate changes and existential threat to our planet and our future children and all of that. Okay. Yeah. Well, then what he the bet he's making is that voters hearing climate change at the forefront of his message are going to weigh that above these other things perhaps because to your average person what is of more immediate. Consequence is do I have do. I have a job is my job going to be to a factory somewhere else away of paid leave at my job. It might being paid a fair wage at said job or do I have healthcare all these all these things not necessarily just economics? I think there is some research that that is starting to change. The question is would that change fast enough to serve in place for the primaries? So last point from Jay Inslee is that again, it's all about climate change. It's not change throughout this interview. But he is using that as a way to try and politically outflank some of his opponents, we've talked and I think in a couple other of these opening arguments podcast and also another podcast episodes about this this unexpected big debate that broke up about the filibuster. Right. Like, I didn't expect filibuster reform to be a top issue in the in the primary the way that it was for a little bit. He is longtime house member before it became Washington governor, and he was one of the first people saying, yeah, the filibuster which three second refresher. If you don't remember is as basically in order to pass any most legislation in the Senate, you need the support of sixty votes, you need the support of sixty senators which in all, but a very small handful of cases means bipartisan support, he saying you gotta get rid of that you need to be able to pass bills with just fifty one votes because because otherwise these big solutions are never going to happen. Otherwise, you can't adjust climate change. I believe in democracy. I believe in the power of one person when vote I believe that we should follow the constitution, which does not have a filibuster in it, and it is now an antiquated antebellum archaic institution, and we just have to face reality. And there's a really simple reality. The earth is affectively on fire. I'm marched with thousands of kids the other day striking because they they know their futures are very much endangered. We know that we have just a few years to really start defeating climate change and to Quaid. Antebellum archaic. I don't know if that or math is the really like breakout who phrase of this podcast. I'm gonna go with math. I don't think we can downplay, you know, the seriousness which with which he takes climate change as an issue, obviously, he's gonna bring everything back to that. And I think that there is a significant chunk of the population that sees one party the Republican party completely ignoring the issue of climate change, having President Trump pull out of the Paris climate accord, for example, when the science is pretty clear, and he's determined that you know, win or lose. This is going to be the issue. He runs on. All right. That is a wrap for today. A couple things to flag. First of all we've done several of these candidate interview podcasts if you look at your podcast feed. You can find him. They are all worth listen point. Number two. It is April sixteenth, which means as of yesterday all of the presidential candidates released their first quarter fundraising information, there's a lot of valuable information in there about how these campaigns are doing where their support is coming from. Luckily for you, if you go to NPR, politics dot org. We have one chart looking at. All of the campaigns. How much money they've raised how much money they spent how much cash they have on hand. Really interesting and useful tool and PR politics dot org. It's a lot of math a lot of math. And hopefully, we didn't make you think harder. But think easier not in no way would a graph on a website described as antebellum. So we've got. Point number three. You probably are aware that the redacted version of the foam report is coming out later this week. It's coming on Thursday when it comes out rest assured, we will be here in this podcast studio, telling you, what matters what you need to know. And how it could change the political conversations look for that in your feed late on Thursday after we have read all four hundred pages. Tetreault congress Daniel Kirkland political reporter, and I'm Dominica Montenero political editor, Hugh for listening to the PR politics.

president Donald Trump Jay Inslee America New Hampshire NPR Andrew Yang John Delaney United States Iowa NPR Andrea hat Bernie Sanders dominica Elizabeth Warren Joe Biden Maryland
Radicals Vs. Pragmatists

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

24:39 min | 1 year ago

Radicals Vs. Pragmatists

"Hi I'm Nick Trzcinski join me every trading day on numbers by Barron's at two minute morning briefing that helps you navigate the market you can add numbers by Barron's to to your flash briefing on your Alexa device or subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts from the opinion pages of the Wall Street Journal this is Potomac Watch Democratic presidential candidates show the party's sharp ideological divide on the issues shoes and on the strategy for victory in twenty twenty in the first night of two nights of debates in the second round of the presidential sweepstakes <hes> <hes> the first hand of twenty <hes> candidates squared off on Tuesday night. We'll talk about who said what to whom and why and what it means means welcome on Paul Zhigo with the Wall Street Journal Opinion Pages in here with my colleagues Kim Strassel Hello Kim Hello Paul and Count Peterson Kyle. How are are you doing well. How are you all right so <hes> several many takeaways from that <hes> the the first night of this round of debates of course of the next night <hes> coming with Joe Biden and <hes> squaring off against Kamala Harris and cory booker among others <hes> on Wednesday evening but on Tuesday <hes> Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren Were Center Stage Center stage on the stage also center stage in the debate in terms of setting what I would consider the terms of debate by dint of their policies on healthcare energy and others things which made them the target of the the so-called moderate candidates on the further fringes of the of the stage and there were some really educational <hes> and <hes> stark dark exchanges especially on healthcare thought the exchange on healthcare at the top was <hes> informative to any voters out there <hes> because John Delaney and Tim Ryan in particular <hes> Delaney the Foreign Maryland Congressman and <hes> and Tim Ryan the current <hes> Ohio Congressman really zeroed in on some of the potential vulnerabilities Kim on medicare for all but both Bernie and Bernie Sanders and and and Warren fought back and you could see the fault lines here about <hes> on this issue. What did you make of who got the better of that exchange in in your mind well for those of us who really do appreciate actual classical debates where you have two sets of competing ideas and you make the case for and against against it was a great night because this was really was. Democrats <hes> having a fight within their party between the side the Warren and Sanders side ride saying it is time for big and bold ideas <hes> and the Delaney Ryan side saying we should not be the party that is <unk> advocating tearing up everything including things that work I have to now I could be biased but I do believe on the facts and the points that Delaney and Ryan and Steve Bullock the Montana governor the moderate side had the better argument because they were talking about out reality facts and figures. How much is this GONNA cost. There is no way to pay for it from a practical sense what it would do to hospitals would to put them out of business. If you went to a medicare for all model because of the reimbursement rates <hes> the fact that you'd have to take away a lot of choice including from core Democratic Democratic and Constituents Union members whereas Warren and Sanders most they tried to defend their plans but they can't really in terms of some of these tax because their opponents are correct and so a lot of their rejoinders were look. We as Democrats need to be big and bold but I'm not sure that's terribly persuasive. Well Kim Strassel as always the rational mind but I'm not sure that sweet reason here was is is what they were relying on. I mean you're right. I mean Sanders and <hes> and Warren were essentially saying they're making big moral arguments went and they're making arguments about the perfidy of the insurance companies <hes> and they don't WanNa talk about cost and they don't want talk about <hes>. A lot of those details kept her burning kept repeating one no deductibles no co pays you go into the hospital. Oh you have a heart surgery. It's it's IT'S ALL FREE and Warren wanted to say. We're going to eliminate these <hes> evil <hes> I think she said <hes> five five times <hes> insurance companies or energy companies that are sucking out profits from the healthcare or or or other systems. What is especially interesting about the debate last night. Is What it precautious for the election going forward. I mean if I were on Joe Biden's campaign team. I would be rewatching Delaney Laney videotape today and memorizing some of those lines <hes> I mean if you look at the second order polling on Medicare for all it is not all that great below the line of saying healthcare for all right exactly I mean it has so far floated along kind of as an unchallenged slogan but so if you look at the Kaiser Laser Foundation tracking poll the high was in June two thousand seventeen fifty seven percent of the public overall said that they favored a medicare for all plan now that has has dropped down to fifty one percents. That's the public overall I mean even among Democrats <hes> in April. It was eighty percent now at seventy two percent <hes> you know if you ask ask adults who have private insurance whether they like their coverage eighty six percent say it's either good or excellent right but <hes> but but she just blew right past all that Kyle I mean Warren and Bernie debt and they made it a fundamentally immoral question. It seems to me and all of those that polling is is a useful warning. The Democrats I agree but when you listen to the audience and their response that audience in the room was clearly more in the Bernie and Warren camps camps because when you know her reply to <hes> to Delaney was I don't know even why you're running for president. If all you're gonNA tell us what we can't do right so older is though the dynamics kind of strange because you have so many candidates in the race so last night you had sort of a moderate pile on but all of the moderates moderates are people who are pulling at one percent who are not very well known nationally who were going up against these giants of Progressivism Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren so what will the interesting going forward is as the field narrows <hes> if if Joe Biden either takes up some of the same arguments <hes> he could drive those numbers for for Medicare for all down even lower in popularity. He is already starting to do that a little bit talking about how you know. I'm for Obamacare. <hes> we need to build on. Obamacare <unk> care <hes> invoking the previous Democratic president who still remains very popular among the party writ large <hes> so either I mean that's it's one way it could go as he could start to build on those arguments or if he can't get the job done if he starts to fall in popularity <hes> and plummet among moderates people who are more or in the center of what has become the Democratic Party. Maybe one of these other guys can can rise in stature <hes> and begin to take on the you know the Sanders Sanders Warren Wing in a more serious substantive way just a little more broadly than healthcare won't these nomination fights intro intraparty fights tend to be <hes> <hes> <hes> about <hes> things temperament <hes> your experience <hes> whether you're an insider or an outsider. Your age is a generational clash. These things I mean there is typically a kind of moderate center right or center left debate but this is a sharper ideological logical divide. Kim The as I can remember in any major pirating nominee <hes> in a very race in a very long time for Democrats. I'd say is is the sharpest ideological choice. The Democrats are going to have to make sense. Maybe nineteen forty eight when Henry Wallace was running were running for the nomination against Truman and and ultimately broke off ran as a third party candidate. I mean Warren and Bernie in particular but even peed Buddha edge to some extent on on process. They're talking about a really radical transformation of American capitalism and in some sense our democratic democratic processes and the moderates were saying last night the American public isn't ready for that <HES> and even if we supported it which they didn't in many respects <hes> but they're getting that debate and if they nominate somebody like <hes> Warren or Bernie <hes> you're going to have the sharpest ideological divide <hes> in general election in certainly since nineteen eighty and maybe much longer the map yeah. The divide is very striking. We've obviously been talking for months now about this. This growing split in the Democratic Party <hes> between between the Progressive Wing and the more centrist moderate side but never I mean I've never seen it this <hes> severe in all of the time I have watch politics. It was almost at times like watching two separate parties up on stage last night. You know the from the left of center. It was almost like like a right left debate except for all within one party it was it was really something to see. I think go ahead sorry but I think that what what you touched on as well to is interesting because these are not necessarily this is not a debate about facts and figures and costs. It's as you said and the the war in in the sanders of the world are placing as a moral debate. It'll be really interesting to see in the coming days when we start to get some polls is out following this whether or not some of those moderates like Delaney up on the stage did get a bump from this because while I agree with you that the audience there <hes> was much more aligned with the progressive willing <hes> there seems to be a hunger out there in the in the polls and when you read for a lot of more moderate the Democrats that are pining for someone that does not want to rip up the party well and and just on your point about right left the the moderates as they're are being called for convenience purposes. These these are left. I mean these are not con. They're gonNA Conservative up there by certainly in economic terms I mean in every one of them is for higher taxes. Delaney himself is for raising the capital gains tax to the same income level tax which is essentially a doubling of the rate up to two a little under forty percent <hes> all of them favor a public option for Obamacare as an alternative to Medicare for all but none of them are for <hes> for much lesser reforms all of them. WanNa spend enormous amounts of money on climate change <hes>. It's a re- they're really the <hes> <hes> <hes> it's it's a pretty I mean these are positions in and of themselves that would have been considered on the left of the spectrum as as recently as two thousand eight and two thousand sixteen and sorry go ahead now what struck me though is it was almost more of a debate not between right and left. It was a debate about whether or not you believed in capitalism anyway. I was just going to add that. Delaney's for even more than a public option. He says a public option. It doesn't go far enough and that's what I think is <hes> one of his <hes> one of his attempts to try to get the democratic vote. I mean he's appealing to people who are in the middle title but he also wants to get those Democratic voters by saying a public option doesn't go far enough. I am for universal healthcare. Elizabeth Warren is for universal healthcare. I am for universal healthcare as well we. I just have different ways of getting there and mine is not. GonNa take private insurance away from one hundred fifty million people. I mean he's explicitly. Why do we have to be so extreme. Why can't we give people a choice and AH I agree I will. I think it'll be interesting to see whether he gets enough of of a bump out of this to <hes> to potentially put himself into the the third debate. Excuse excuse me in September <hes> which requires about two percent polling threshold we're talking about the democratic debate the first evening and you're listening to Potomac Watch from from the Wall Street Journal Hi. I'm Nick Trzcinski join me every trading day on numbers by Barron's at two minute morning briefing that helps you navigate the market market you can add numbers by Barron's to your flash briefing on your Alexa device or subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts from the opinion pages of the Wall Street Journal this is Potomac. Watch welcome back. I'm Paul Zhigo with cow Peterson an and Kim Strassel and <hes> on the first democratic <hes> debate <hes> <hes> some of the the quite apart from policies. You also saw a real striking difference in rhetoric and tone between what I would call the pragmatists. I call him more pragmatist than moderates because because they really are center-left politicians John Delaney Hickenlooper Steve Bullock and so on but on the one hand and then and then sanders and the and Bernie <hes> just want to greet a quote from Bernie here along the line when it came when climate change up he said we've got to ask ourselves a simple question. What do you do with an industry that knowingly for billions of dollars in short-term profits. Is Destroying this planet. I say that is criminal criminal activity that cannot be allowed to continue on quote okay so just think about that for a second oil and gas industry is illegal legal industry has not been barred as far as I can tell Kim they're doing. They're employing millions of people <hes> remain people at least <hes> I think directly and many more indirectly <hes> they're providing energy for tens of millions and Bernie says they're involved in a crime that's I mean and people say say Donald Trump is a extremist rhetoric. Yeah it's over the top and you saw this you saw from Warren as well. You mentioned mentioned her talking about capitalist just basically as repay. Shis bloodsucking Vampires Vampires people who exist to just destroy the world and destroy average people they have no value I mean the terms were incredible and excessive and even Pete Buddha judge edge who likes to come across as the reasoned well-spoken intellectual he the moralizing out of his mouth to in in particular have Republicans and suggesting I had this one quote I wrote down if you were watching this at home and you are a Republican member of Congress. Consider the fact that when the sunsets on your career and they're writing your story of all the good and bad things you did in your life. The thing you will be remembered for is whether in this moment with this president you found the courage to stand ended up to him or if you continue to put party over country so basically anyone who's not with the Democrats. These days is morally repugnant. It's it's really quite remarkable. A couple <hes> sometimes Buddha at sounds to me like <hes> <hes> his <hes> he has a little bit of the tone of the the the associate professors his twitter feed from a Midwest College where he's explaining how morally inferior the American public is and if they only listened to him it would it would be the promise of America would be redeemed. I Don maybe that's too harsh but he has that that that that tone but that can at times be more appealing then Bernie Sanders who has one one mode of voice which is shouting. Tim Ryan had a pretty good line where he said you know you don't have to you. Don't have to yell at me and I it's to the point about saying that you know get putting gasoline in your car is a criminal offence. I mean I do think that kind of stuff limits his appeal. I mean he has been remarkably steady at fifteen percent of the vote. <hes> and I'm not sure that he helped himself last night whereas you Elizabeth Warren says a lot of the same things things famous in the similar directions <hes> but has a a softer way of putting it <hes> she speaks with emotion about you know a guy that she knows with L. S. she she talks about <hes> you know she she. I think she can connect better than Bernie can <hes> which is why I think she's been going up and he's been <hes> sliding a little bit or staying steady the the <hes> I in the moderates basically the centerpiece politic. There's difference in addition to the ideology Kim. There's a real difference here between the two camps <unk> on strategy <hes> basically the the pragmatist <hes> their their attitude toward the election can be summed up. I think in one of the lines from Delaney any who said that bad policies like Medicare for all free everything and impossible promises will turn off independent voters and get trump reelected end quote now. That's a the we've got to have a kind of move. The country left and by degrees in slower slower fashion more careful. Let's not scare everybody and then you have Bernie in and Warren whose policies are tied to their strategy edgy. <hes> I'm not sure which comes first but <hes> <hes> their strategy basically is trump is mobilized <hes> the the a lot of conservative voters culturally conservative voters working class voters through right wing populism of trade and <hes> An and race and other things. We need to mobilize a comparable better bigger movement by mobilizing. Through left wing populism and we're GONNA do that through economic issues. We're going to do that through identity politics but they think that that is the winning strategy gene. I was struck by a line from from <hes> Warren who said <hes> we live in a country now where the president is advancing Environmental Racism Economic Racism Racism Criminal Justice Racism Healthcare racism and she's linking her economic agenda again to that identity to that any politics and they think that's the path to victory and yet if you look at the polls consistently Sanders and Warren while they appear to into sometimes one goes up a little bit more over the other I mean certainly Warren has been rising in the polls but that wing of the party doesn't seem to break about thirty percent don't in terms of their their cumulative support so I do think that that means is that the Democrats on stage for making the argument that this is not an agenda that is going to appeal even to the broad bulk of the Democratic Party much less turn <music> off independence and conservatives. I think they have a very valid and legitimate point is is is there anybody Kyle who oh you think broke through on the moderate side any any standout omitted Amy Klobuchar make an impression on you at all did <hes> did <hes>. Ryan make an impression. I thought and I and I think I seem to be an out liar on this because I've seen a lot of criticism of his performance but I thought Ryan <hes> made some some excellent points <hes> and held his own. He's a populist union kind of <hes> of economic <hes> Traditional Union guy. Yeah not unlike Biden from the Youngstown Ohio area but I thought he was pretty good yeah closure I.. I was a little bit disappointed in one point. She said you know in in a previous debate. My opponent called me a knife fighter from the iron range or something like that and then she explicitly refused to take on some of the people who were on the stage with her <hes> Ryan's. I think that okay I mean the big guy. I think is Delaney for me. I mean he he actually did not speak that much. He had about ten minutes so he was less than closure and Beto O'Rourke O'Rourke <hes> but in terms of <hes> you know effectual moments on the stage. I think he had a lot of them. <hes> Steve Bullock. I think he did okay. This was his introduction will see where he goes. I mean <hes> we'll just have to see what will we'll have to see what the polling shows in coming days. I mean one thing to keep in mind is <hes> the breakout star or of the last debate was Julio Castro <hes> and he got a little bump in the polls in <hes> in the days after that he jumped from one percent to about one point four percent and now he's Kinda backed down so we'll have to see if it makes any difference especially when you have the big Kahuna Joe Biden who is still sucking up a lot of that centrist moderate vote and and the rest of them are are dispersed appoint Hickenlooper. You've former Colorado governor. You've got Delaney got bullock. You Have Ryan. You'RE GONNA have Michael Bennett <hes> tonight might the for the senator from Colorado a couple of others. It's very dispersed. It's hard for any of them to get traction because they're all competing in the same lane Kim Yeah. I think think what really needs to happen here. If you were to have a true kind face off between just a handful of candidates you you kind of have to see some of these people drop about. It's it's impossible for anybody to to to rise above and become a competing force of gravity when they're they're all out there with one or two percent. <hes> I was struck that I do have to say that. I thought that Sanders had a better night than he had his in his first. I night <hes> because he sort of sounded too so other people were talking around him on the First Debates <hes> Warren. I think though definitely came out of this in terms of the Progressive Team Looking Great Delaney to me was the star of the night from the the more pragmatic side. Is You call them but I think that there were a couple of losers as well. I thought Amy Klobuchar this was. She needed to really distinguish herself in this debate bait and cheat. I didn't think she did much in that. <hes> Baidoa work this was supposed to be his chance to stage a big comeback. I don't think he in any way hit that mark and I actually think Pete Eight Buddha judge in contrast to his first night's performance sounded a little bit more meandering and not like he knew where he fit up there on stage and Marianne Williamson. We can't to fash- discussion of this without the spiritual guru who's up on stage and had a <hes> had a couple of moments. I want in particular on slavery reparations and <hes> the <hes> an called. She said these are there's psychic force that trump has unleashed on the country that needs to be <hes> purged and she dark dark psychic force yes and she is going to spread love to <hes> to overwhelm that she is is <hes> as getting a lot of attention searches on the Internet <hes> but <hes> <hes> <hes> I kyle I just don't see her as <hes> as the nominee I would agree with that and this is part of the issue again we have twenty five candidates running for president so maybe if we had ten she would would <hes> be picking up enough of the chunk of Americans <hes> that she would be able to make something of it but it's hard to see where that goes the astrology vote <hes> <music> <hes> which is not <hes> not to diminish the astrology vote all right so we've got the second debate tonight and again this will be. I think <hes> Joe Biden <hes> Kamala Harris Cory Booker are going to be the spotlight they've been teeing up <hes> discussion about some of <hes> Biden's past and support for crime bill among other things things is GonNa be fascinating to watch and see how that goes <hes>. Thank you kyle. Thank you Kim. Thank you all for listening. We'll be back <hes> later in the week with another addition of Potomac Watch.

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443 - Best Of: Rob Delaney

Mental Illness Happy Hour

1:03:51 hr | 1 year ago

443 - Best Of: Rob Delaney

"Welcome to episode four forty three which is the best of rerun of an episode from Twenty Eleven with my guest Rob Delaney. Today's episode is sponsored by squarespace. Turn your great idea into a reality with squarespace squarespace makes it's easier than ever to launch your passion project. Whether you're showcasing your work or selling products of any kind with beautiful templates in the ability to customize just about anything you can easily make a beautiful website yourself and if you do get stuck square spaces twenty four seven award winning customer services there to help so head to squarespace dot com slash mental for a free trial and when you're ready to launch us the offer code mental to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain one also give the shout out to our sponsor better help dot com. They provide online counseling. I'm a huge fan of it. It's been helping me weekly for years. If you WANNA try it I highly recommend it. Go to better help. Dot Com slash mental make sure you include the slash mental so they know you came from this podcast and just fill out a questionnaire. They'll match you up with a better help dot com counselor and you can experience a free week of counseling to see if online counseling is a good fit for you and you need to be over eighteen. Today's episode is also sponsored by the calm APP. We all know that stress is a Mo fo and it's part of life and so let's face it and let's find a way to deal with him. Calm is the number number one APP to help you reduce your anxiety and stress and help you sleep better more more than forty million people around the world have downloaded it. If you guys go to calm dot com slash mental make sure to include slash mental you'll get twenty five percent off a calm premium subscription description which includes guided meditations on issues like anxiety stress and focus including a brand new meditation each day sleep stories which are bedtime stories for adults and they help you relax had to the fields of a southern France the lavender fields with Stephen Fry or explored the moonlit jungles of Africa with Leona Lewis <hes> their their adult bedtime stories are really cool really soothing and I don't know anybody that couldn't use a little more soothing in their life. They also have soothing music. If that's your thing if you're into that kind of fake so right now you guys the listeners get twenty five percent off it calm premium subscription at calm dot com slash mental that C. a. l. m. dot com slash mental. Get Unlimited access to all of calms content today at Combe Dot com slash mental get calm and stop stressing and here now is that episode with Rob Delaney from twenty eleven our interview today with Rob Delaney is a little on the short side for this show <hes> probably for a lot of shows it wouldn't be considered short. It's about forty five minutes. <hes> I would have liked to have spent spent more time with him but he's a super busy guy and <hes> we had to kind of squeeze squeeze this into his his busy schedule <hes> but I'm I think it's a great interview and <hes> and <hes> I'm. I'm really happy that he was able to to come by and <hes> and talk with she's got a really interesting story and I think a great perspective <hes> many thanks to the people at the onion AV club they picked <hes> our podcast as one of the top town of twenty eleven seven and <hes> they've given us great support along the way and <hes> I really appreciate that at <hes> I feel fuel really <hes> <hes> honored to be to be put on that list with the with so many other great podcasts and <hes> and and I want to thank all of my guests who helped make <hes> made that possible over the last year you guys know who you are some of <hes> listen to the show so if you're listening thank you thank you thank you <hes> as I've mentioned there is a certain the website for the show is a mental pod dot com and there's a survey that you can take on there. There's two surveys. Actually there's the the basic survey and then there's the shame in secret survey and I find myself really drawn to reading and you guys can not only take the survey but you can. Let's see how other people filled out the survey and I find myself really drawn to the shame and secrets survey because we're late to so much of what people rights what people feel shame about in that and that that one and <hes> I wanna read one that I don't necessarily relate to but it I relate to the feelings that this <hes> that this guy has he his name is caged Lyon. I have people kind of put nickname down because obviously they don't want to be referred to by their actual name. He is straight. He's in his thirties his environment that he was raised in totally chaotic <hes> he was the victim of sexual abuse and he reported it on any rights. I was terrified. It was my fault <hes>. What are your deepest darkest thoughts not things you would act on but things you're ashamed to admit you think about he writes sometimes? I think that an abortion would have been the best for everyone involved. It's pretty fucking harsh. We we get some harsh thoughts on this <hes> on this podcast and that's right up there. That's that's some deep. Deep Self Hatred. Were your deepest darkest secrets things you have done or things that have happened to you. He writes. I was sexually abused by my older siblings siblings starting when I was a preteen after several years one of them became pregnant <hes> when this was discovered social services intervened. I felt that I was to blame for all of it. One day a state police detective in the social worker came to my house looking for my parents. I was home alone. I just knew that they were there to arrest me. They said they would return later. I close the door and started to shake uncontrollably to this day. I get nervous around police. After much chaos. I was living in the same home with the same people ostracized and helping to raise a baby that resented for the first year and loved dearly from then on the secret was very poorly kept in the family he puts in parentheses not at all outside the family everyone suspected and school was hell. I was the uncle for several years until I was sued for paternity and child support. I'm raising my daughter on my own now. I have no contact with my family. I got married had more children got divorced. I'm in a relationship now do these secrets and thoughts generate any particular feelings feelings towards yourself he writes. I always feel that I am guilty of something even when there's nothing to be guilty about I feel like I'm a poor parent. I feel overwhelmed most days. I am terrified to move forward with anything in my life. You know I encourage. I don't have answers for ninety percent of the stuff on this show. What I do know is sometimes I'll hear somebody any story and the one thing I do know for sure is that person could benefit from talking to a professional and talking about what is going on and letting some of that steam out and you sound like a prime candidate <hes> who would benefit from going and getting some help so I encourage you <hes> you know one of the things that that comes up so much in this survey is sex between siblings <hes> which I would imagine of course people would feel secretive and shameful about it <hes> but I think it happens a lot more than than people talk about and and the other thing <hes> I think the other reason I wanted to read this this <hes> survey responded to was <hes> sexual <hes> Medrano what the word would be molestation by females? <hes> is so much more widely <hes> I it is happening so much more than people think that it is. I can't tell you how many friends of mine were molested by female babysitter. <hes> and I don't say that to <hes> <hes> to try to take women down or make them look bad but I say it because I think a lot of men minimize it because they think Oh if you hadn't erection that means that you wanted it <hes> and and that's not the case your body can be turned on and your soul can be violated at the at the same time and I think that that this guy I I think that's what he's experiencing. Is You know he's blaming himself but just because he got an erection and had sex with his older sister. <hes> that doesn't make what happens right at his letters little vague so I can't really I'm assuming it's his older sister <hes>. I don't know if why he would have been arrested for that. It's but I don't think we need to know really any of that stuff to know that he could benefit from going and talking to somebody about this and getting help and you know the one thing I if I've taken anything out of all my years of therapy and support groups and psychiatrists visits is the things things that I assumed that were broken and irreparable about me or not they were just unhealed and never underestimate the power of talking and connecting to another human being specially professional to to help you turn a corner and to help let a little glimmer of light and darkness. Everybody I know is bizarrely beautifully fucked up in some weird way. I could stand you in the audition. I can send you has grown and I learned that I could solve my problems and said through violence since I couldn't communicate from only guess. I'm afraid that my genitalia is ugly. That's hurtful. And what was your role in the robbery. I mean you never knew what you were going home to. I had a jar. You're had teeth in other people's teach. I'm here with Twitter Monster Rob Delaney. Do you mind being called twitter monster. You can call me any kind of monster you want. <hes> Robin I met briefly at the Upright Citizens Brigade theatre probably what three or four years ago we are on the same show yeah I think around four years ago and <hes> me having a pot adult brain could can vaguely remember ever meeting anybody so <hes> ROB head to head to remind me when I asked him to come through the podcast <hes> one of the reasons I wanted to to have you come to it is <hes> when I heard you on scarborough country you ed mentioned you had talked about quitting drinking and ten years ago you had been with a car accident. <hes> yeah I <hes> drank into a blackout as I often did and I woke up in not woke up I mean I got physically got up but it didn't get back up into consciousness <hes> but I drove I went for a drive and I drove into the Department of Water and power by the corner of Pico and in Fairfax and no one else was involved in the accident but I broke both my arms <hes> very badly they had to have surgery on both of them and my legs were damaged. They weren't broken but they had to be an stabilisers as which were these like kind of ankle to thigh velcro steel enforced socks that so he can't bend your knees because they had to kind of they were open to the bone and so they set them up so none of my limbs worked and I was in a wheelchair in jail and I would periodically since I since my arms didn't work I couldn't hold onto the armrest of the wheelchair and since my knees couldn't bend they just sort of stuck straight out and periodically just the weight of my the body would pull me down gradually out of the wheelchair and I would fall onto the floor of the jail and my hospital would come up and it would expose my private parts to everyone there and then you know whoever was around you know guards or other folks would just pick me up and put back my chair nicely and it was then at that moment that I thought it was time to probably make a lifestyle change that made me the greatest opening to the show that we've that we've done so far along in jail for not long under twenty four hours a day I would have been in longer. You usually are in L. A. if you get a D._U._i.. But they were like we can't take care of you. We're going to bring you home and then two cops brought me home to my apartment and I remember my landlady was outside of the building. When I got dropped off and she saw the cops take me out of the back and I'm GonNa Bloody Hospital <unk> gown in the leg stabilisers with arms don't work and I'm six three and oh my face is bloodied from the air bag and so- bruises and she's looking at me just stock still with her mouth open and and there's cops on either side of me leaving back in our apartment and I looked at her and I go everything's fine so yeah? That's how that unfolded. I I love the the everything's fine when the elephant is just shitting all over the room this yeah that is its own particular brand of sickness. <hes> were you raised in a household where emotion and fear and pain wasn't kind of disgust not really I can't point to any of my behavior <hes> with booze and say you know pin that on any bad habits that I was taught by my mom or dad. They're pretty good people well. Everybody has their hangups you know but but no you could say what you were thinking or feeling in my house and a wouldn't be crushed but you did bring up an interesting point the my saying everything was fine it was I had been trying to quit drinking for years before that and when did you I know you had a problem. <HES> early high school like probably fifteen. I got suspended at a young <hes> yeah at age around fifteen or sixteen gene furred being drunk in school and then the guidance counselors and the vice principal rog. You should get help you shouldn't be drunken the day as a boy and I thought as you know relax but then a few months later I got like blackout drunk again and then I thought I don't want to be like this and I remember thinking I probably shouldn't drink or I shouldn't drink so much. You know started to kind of wrestle with it but one thing I wanna say is that it's funny that you know the my thing. Everything's okay <hes> that was like I knew clearly. It wasn't okay but it's good because as I said I had wanted to quit for so long but it took getting to the point where I was so messed up that on site you could see that this was a person who needed real help. You know like I couldn't there is no way to hide it anymore. Yeah I always I always say that. Alcoholism is the best the prosecuting attorney ever because it makes such a convincing case why you should have that next drink while you're a piece of shit in anxiety and doubt and fear etc for sure and you will believe that voice ace because it warps reality to make you believe that and until you are presented with a counter argument as powerful yeah you will continue to drink yeah I mean I'm really lucky I kind of kind of symbolically. I had my arms were broken. Both of them you know so I was quite <hes> powerless and I needed that you know I needed people to look at me to be able to see me from across the street at night in the rain and go that has fuck up like I needed it had to be open to the public. You know like undisputably. This guy's a disaster if he drinks we're all in trouble was the obsession to keep drinking being. was that still there even though you had known game game over no because because because I had wanted to quit you know it's like you WanNa quit and then finally you're like oh I get it. I mean really I got to the point where you know especially with somebody who drinks a lot you can be like. Oh well sure I might die who cares but when I realized oh how my drinking will kill other people if I ain't drinking then I was like Oh drake that bad yeah I was like because he gets the point. We don't care about yourself anymore and that's no no. Nobody's GONNA write about that in the paper right but you know really guy drank until they died who cares but if you kill other people you know I didn't want to be that I liked. I liked everybody else so we were. We were talking before we started rolling in you. Were saying that you you've battled depression for for a long time. Can you kind of talk about the how it manifests itself. I think the tendencies existed in the past I can remember a couple dark episodes in my college years but then after I quit drinking and had been sober for about a year I think like the fight or flight syndrome kind of powered me through that first year of not drinking and then once I finally you know months into <hes> sobriety after all the court stuff was settled which took months chiefs plus I was sentenced to I would have had to go to jail for quite a while because my I drank the blood alcohol level that they got Outta me was point two seven one all my garbage its point. Oh eight is illegal illegal in California so point two seven one that's three and a half times the legal limit and that once you get over point two oh they just double whatever the sentence would have been for normal drunk point one five or whatever so so I had to go to classes for six months and for four and a half months I was in the care of the state of California. I had the choice of Gaol or jail for awhile or a month in Rehab and three and a half months jumps in a sober living halfway house. I had not enjoyed jail in brief time that I was there so I chose the chance rob. Did I give you. I gave it to college Trotta. People don't give jail a good chance you have to judge hello and <hes> I figured well you know what it was is. Even when I was in Rehab was totally pleasant but the halfway house I was there were people there who were just getting out of prison and stuff and there were tough guys and there was fighting and I both my arms are broken so I really had to rely on like a head to shore up my mental defences because I would sometimes have to like talk people out of beating me up and so I'd be like well. Here's let's think of some reasons why you shouldn't do that and they'd be like whatever go beat somebody else up but like oh I forgot where I was going with that but I we were talking about depression and how it manifests itself in your your history of it and so anyway I'm sure it will come back to that but yeah so so for about a year into Oh right right right the fight or flight syndrome is what I was saying so it several almost six months in living in places that were not a house or home or an apartment and then also all the classes that I was sentenced to and then all court stuff and then all the surgeries because I had to have surgeries on both my arms and they did them one at a time so that I would have use of one arm at a time so it was almost a year before I was like a regular dude working again and all that and living in an apartment and so after that then my mind kind of fell apart and went into you know I think what would be called like major depressive disorder unipol or you know very very bad suicide and depression where I thought all the time of suicide even though I was going to talk therapy and exercising and eating well and working out and not drinking and every I mean doing living blyth reasonably well you know and everything that you had control over to improve your mood. Who'd you were doing were doing and so yeah so then I got depressed and it was <hes> it was a lot worse than jail? I think about it this way. It's jail. You'll get out. Eventually you know a broken bone will knit but depression or other mental disorders and stuff are that's the worst you know. That's the worst kind of because that's like a presence L.. Let you carry around with you you know and so after a while you just need to not feel sorry for yourself. Don't you love on. I don't I try not to judge people who say stuff like that. You know they don't understand and that's is fine. I'm glad that they don't I wouldn't want people to you know my ultimate wish when I was going through that and it happened more than once I had two major like smack downs in the last last ten years the most recent being like three or four years ago around when we met I think when you and I first met I had been fine but just even get looking into your eyes threw me into a spiral and were you on meds at that point. No I started going. I start my psychologist said you should see a psychiatrist and so I did and how did you get out of the first <hes> suicidal genetic ation first one so you doc medications so bad I mean I couldn't sleep at night described some of the thoughts and feelings that you had for because there I know there are listeners to this program that had never experienced depression and want to understand it better or at the very least be entertained aw battles. Yes I know and it's funny because as a comedian I generally try to be entertaining but right now I think it would be more useful to be honest about this. Basically the symptoms for me of depression and I can only speak to my own case were era where quite physical I couldn't sleep at all and I normally sleep pretty well but no sleeping at all I would wake up and in the morning and have diarrhea immediately really yep I would go to brush my teeth teeth and when the toothbrush when the bristles on toothbrush touched my tongue I would vomit oh yeah I felt physical pain constantly like swimming physical pain throughout my body and and my thoughts were just kill yourself on a loop and thought of different ways to do that why I should do that how the world would be better if I did do that and what kept you from from doing it because my God the picture right yeah it. Did it very much sucked. What can you have any kind of support system of family or yeah yeah I would talk? I would talk to my family who they live in Boston. I would talk to them regularly because the funny thing was is that even though I had been a drunk for a long time before that I was always like intellectually curious. Oh yes and I you know I read a lot. I loved to exercise. Even when I was drinking. I like to do things I like to travel and be creative in various ways so there was sort of it was almost like there were ambers inside of me. <hes> I've always been like an optimistic person and even though the physical symptoms of depression were on adulterated hit harder. There was some wear these where I felt like first of all. Let me say this. I I would write down the way that I was thinking and I'd be like let's let's pretend that you're not you for a second and look at them and I'd be like that's crazy or you're writing. You know what I mean like. Even though I might be envisioning my head being blasted apart. We'll buy shot gun or drowning. I I would think you know what I kind of them. Reviewing my life and I'm looking at people and at no point. Can I find you know people being like you should definitely kill yourself you know or like Oh. I wish you were dead. It wasn't the people who didn't like me but there wasn't like a large lobby in this wasn't on a continuum. This was just kind of a period you know now and again somebody would be like Oh fuck. I really wish you were a corpse. Now that we know so so I kind of was like all right. Look let's because it can be good because we get I still do everybody does your we think we it's hard to step out of ourselves and put ourselves in other shoes and look at ourselves. This seems crazy. So why don't I put it off and I'll try. I'll do what these people are saying which are state regular communication with the people that I care about you know eat food even though I don't want to even if a throw it up eat it anyway you know you literally had no appetite. Oh not at all and like and like sexually didn't even think about sex like you know not that I was attractive to women at that point. I was like wait like forty pounds less. I'm not kidding and was like just you know sunken. I'd had just I remember when they took one of my arms out of the casts it was so skinny and where they had put in a big plate in my forearm bulged out and they took they took the cast off and I just started a cry. I was like I don't have a normal looking arm now. It took like two years to put muscle back on it like to be able to do a push up again but now my arms and as far as I know don't make people cry. I don't cry when I look at them and so I mean it was it was awful and but anyway so yes I went to a psychologist. I went to talk therapy and you know what it would be good at this point to also mention that I lost my health insurance after the car car accident so I had to I had to apply. I applied to three wonderful organizations that were just amazing. There was the map the musicians assistance program music cares which is like affiliated with the Grammy's both of them are actually and then the society of singers and each of them because I didn't have health insurance afforded me a little bit of dough to pay for therapy and I even paid for my surgeries on credit cards my second surgery I paid for with three credit cards and it would take me years to pay this off so I just mentioned. Were you a musician before this. I always sang that's what I studied in college and so I did a lot of musical theatre afterwards and stuff and they were and I had like made money making music so so they that was enough for them but they wouldn't necessarily take anyone apply no they wouldn't there might be some. You know I mean for example in this is not a joke one of my my emergency room bill was huge of course because it wasn't just like a yes so his thing and send him on his way. It was like lots of cops you we know multiple limbs being worked on all kinds of crazy ex raisins and so so that was a huge bill and I remember bringing in I was like I can't pay for this or if I do. It's GonNa take years so they were like well. They had a special office for people who have no money that you could go to and I went to them in the hospital and I brought and this was like a year after the accident where I'm still negotiating with all my and I know this. I know this is boring a and you probably like I wish he would no it's not because one of the things that contributes to the depression and the hopelessness sometimes is that you don't know away out illegally. There is no way out so this is perfect great. This is exactly what people I mention in this because like if you host podcast because you care about people and you've been through things yourself and you know it's funny for like a person like you or I and I'm sure lots of other people you would much rather be caught in a bank robbery where bullets are flying then then have to pay bills. You know what I mean because like Oh gunfire hey that was neat serotonin where I enjoyed that book stack of bills you're like Oh. It's going to take all day. It's like I always liken it to lifting and Villes if lifting anvils also felt phony yeah exactly right so so I'm just so I just say this because the quagmire of all the crap you have to deal with and it's good like if you get a d._U._i.. You should be tied down and poked out with a second. There'd you should be many levels of unpleasantness but if it also is accompanied with alcoholism and mental illness and stuff you know there's just ways to deal with that. One ingredient is patience somedays. You should do nothing if you're like. Maybe I should go to the Mike Creditors House and blow it up the bomb or just do nothing. That would be a good thing to do anyway so I mentioned this long boring drawn out story because I went to them and I brought three years worth of tax returns to this office us at the hospital and they were like wow you're very much are broke and so there's this group of nuns in Kansas. How insane is this and they paid the bill for me now the way that they found out about this is this is just it's like this philanthropic group that was looking for people to help and they contacted the office so I mentioned that because that's insane right and you would never think oh maybe some nuns in Kansas Oh pay my bills you know but sometimes things like that happen and so like it can also be in depression? You'll be like oh nothing good will ever happen to me. You don't know maybe nothing ever goodwill but also maybe nothing never ever bad well. Her bad ever will <hes>. I'm not good at words but you know what I mean like. You can't see I can't predict it you can't in the universe is so complex trying to predict how it's going to unfold. It is not only illogical. It's the height of arrogance it was arrogant and it's ridiculous and it's wrong and so you never know what's GonNa Happen Tomorrow. You're going to be good stuff bad stuff. They're both GONNA happen so chill out asshole and you know maybe try to focus on the on the good stuff yeah you know because we have magnifying minds and what we focus on grows so and then you extrapolate it out into the future uh-huh there is few things worse than the combination of imagination in pessimists. Oh Good God no and pessimism just doesn't make sense. You know I don't proselytize. I don't try to convert people to my way of thought whatever it is. It's it's not like I have some big elucidated belief system but pessimism just doesn't work that ultimately in the final analysis and they feel cool especially when you're twenty s because you not risk anything by being pessimistic but it's ultimately it's a dead end street in just kind of somebody had one time had an analogy for like hitting your your bottom smoking weed and they said it's like getting kicked to death by a rabbit and I feel like pessimism is kind of that way too. You don't lose a big chunk immediately bunion just like sandpaper where's away at the joy of life not a fan yeah so so you've had this you were diagnosed diagnosed than as being what I think major depressive disorder or uni-polar whatever and and they put you on meds yeah they did yeah they put me on S S R. I I A selective Serotonin reuptake inhibitor and <hes> that work it did it did work. Can you talk about what before and what we heard before. Can you talk about what you began to feel when the MED started working you know what's funny is like the only like for me. There's not side effects to these drugs that I'm really aware of that. I that I don't deal with but one weird thing that happened. I remember like after like a day. After the first or second day I remember felt like I got struck by lightning and I had a memory of walking to catch the bus home for middle middle school and it was like I was and I was there walking down village street and marblehead Massachusetts all the smells and sights and everything and that was like whoa something's happening up in Synapse town on land. It only happened once but it was that's like one. That's like one of three major weird things that have ever happened in my brain. You know that that could have been a small stroke. I don't know but then I remember very we slowly after that I never noticed anything weird again after that other than very gradually felt better my poops began to become more solid less diarrhea always a fan of less diarrhea I would I vomited less and less by brushing my teeth the physical pain in my body <hes> slowly went away by the way I love the catch twenty two of vomiting brushing your teeth you vomit then you need to brush your teeth now. I'm not a model you know. I was skinny the at that point too so I didn't need a vomiting <hes> but so that happened. Oh in on I noticed women again. I remember jerking off for the first time for like six weeks or something and being like Oh yeah. This is awesome and you know never I hope I'm not depressed because masturbate but unless you live in a monastery and you're actively meditating towards enlightenment you know like in this life or something then you should be sexual if your person. There's no way to stuff that down if it's not that should be healthy. That's kind of like a Canarian coal mine type of thing you should WanNa fuck people and you should want to jerk off not all all the time. It shouldn't dominate your life but like if you're sex's off you know people need to get their fuck on and so I do think it is sort of a litmus test as to my mom has that crocheted on the wall. You need to get your fuck on and yeah that's that's beautiful. Oetzi is so fast forward to the MEDS are working. Yes you're sober Yup. What then is the the next battleground in Robb's head? I mean after that. It's <hes> let's see or is there none. No I mean there was one there was a second depressive episode several years later even though Oh you were on the meds well I went. We dialed it down and <hes> so I was on less because there's the thing where like look. I wish I didn't have to take pills each morning. You know <hes> and so you know ego. We'll come in and I'll be like hey I've been feeling good for a while. You know and is there anybody that doesn't go through that. That's on meds everybody. I think does that not that. I've met or spoken to really know. That's what I'm saying. I don't I'm agreeing with you. Everybody at some point tries to go off and right and <hes> and that didn't work you know I we and then the second episode had was as bad or worse by a little bit than the first and <hes> it was it's interesting because I after I needed health insurance right after these surgeries I was like Jesus Christ United States of America. I need health insurance I had I got a Shitty job that has benefits and I started working at a company. I got a job as an accounting temp right and then I got hired to be some ad sales guys assistant at this company and then they wound up creating my space yes so it was working in the dot Com wacky nece I had health insurance and I gradually just sort of failed upward in this company I would get passed around from department to Department till I wound up being I think director of Business Development for a division of the company and so I was buying and selling ads and making a lot of money and I had an office in skyscraper and it was crazy and I didn't like it yeah no enjoyment. No I hate it a lot and <hes>. What did you feel? You felt like you should be doing something creative. Yes yeah I mean I went to college. I mean I had been my first professional. Acting GIG was when I was seventeen so at this point <hes> Twenty six seven eight nine so I kind of in the wilderness you know as far as you know my life path viewed from now would look like I mean I'm glad it all happen. During that time I got married which was awesome and and you know a lot of good things happen but professionally I fucking hated what I did and <hes> so around four year a little over four years ago now like thug. It does one company. I was now at a makeup company. I had left that company in two do companies later. I'm director Business Development for a makeup company and kind of like took them online and so that was didn't enjoy it <hes> and so I decided when that company folded and they laid me a bunch of other people like I'm a comedian now and so I mean I've been doing lots of Improv in stand up but I was like this is all I'm going to do and so if money saved up that you could that I could make lady yeah and I went through that very quickly so I had money and it was great and my wife was like give it a shot and then after a little while we were like okay so I've spent all the money they saved and sold like yeah. I mean I was like ready to I was getting my real estate. License took all the classes but then just kept pushing the test back. I was taking investment classes at U._C._L._A.. Extension I read probably thirty books on all kinds of investing and real estate investing. I was looking at like duplexes and triplex hi plexus to buy and stuff crazy stuff that now I look back on like that didn't happen anyway so started doing comedy and <hes> going doing show every night you know and writing and trying to get hired on shows and stuff putting together the packet and all that and and <hes> and it was hard as it is of course you know and I was fortunate to be able to kind of rely on sort of I sort of hit the ground running in the sense that I had performed all lot in the years past across a variety diety of formats I had been on t._v.. I had been cut out movies. I had I had done. All you know. Hundreds of Improv shows in Hollywood. I had done toward the country in doing musical theater so I was very comfortable on stage you know but I had to still there's no shortcut so it took a took a lot of work and after a while just and reducing my medication and then it was just like flow what's happening here and I I went got into another depression so we adjusted the medication and added did some experimenting which was incredibly painful all and then the worst being between the fucking worse as you're going through the withdrawal of the one that that you're trying to get off of and you're experiencing the side effects of the new one because a lot of drugs you will acclimate to but there may be months of sleeplessness or a month of sleeplessness with the with the new one and and on top of that. You're not even sure either decision is going to work you. Maybe back at square one two months after that so you got yeah you got to be patient and you got to take care of yourself. During that time I just flashed to during the first depressive episode that I had <hes> I read the book when I couldn't sleep because if you can't sleep. I don't know if people notice if you're lying you can't sleep fucking. Get out of bed. You don't plus you. Don't want to associate your bed with sleeplessness so I'd go read and I remember one book. I read that really helped me a lot. It was a called Carter beats the devil by Glen David Gold about this magician around the turn of the last century it was so weird and good and detailed and beautiful. I remember that book. That book is a good friend to me. It was like a book. It held my hand when I was really. I hope Thomasson when you find something like that. The the Beatles Anthology book was that for me Yes funny and by the the flip side of that pointed out also like to add as like if you do deal with depression and this also happens I note of victims of sexual abuse recent stuff like this. There are some things that you should take care of yourself by just not absorbing and not paying attention to like. I don't really WANNA spend I don't want to make the deposit into my mind reading too much about <music> out like suicide and other stuff like that I try to fight it. I might say the words suicide a lot but it's always in the goal trying to help people not do it. You know so so what you're saying is the thing that you find to distract or entertain yourself or to be good to yourself. Make sure that it's not kind of feeding what it is. You're trying to get away from me for example like William Styron wrote a book called Darkness Visible About Depression and I've heard people read that it'd be like Oh yeah wow really paints a picture. I don't think you should read that depression. I read like to go back and read it. Read something lighter like Sophie's choice exactly except it's funny that you said because like literally reads office joys and said because although there might be some people who commit suicide who says that book it's just about other stuff. It's not just about depression so like you can consume enough writing and film and whatever about depression if you have depression you can reach your limit and so I would say be careful with that stuff yeah because while you do want information to help you understand what it is that you're going through. You also need something to kind of escape escape from it you. You seem to be a person that doesn't do five five zero or ten. Yeah I think so yeah I often wish that wasn't the case in certain things you know I have to be a comedian who is very grateful to be making his living from comedy. I have done some sort of self self-analysis character traits that are responsible for putting me where I am some of which are positive and some of which are negative you know an obsessive and weird yet you I heard you on the scarborough talking about when twitter first came out if you have how many twitter followers <hes> right now I have like two hundred sixty something thousand. I think that's fucking amazing. It's ridiculous and you built them up the hard hard way people didn't know necessarily who you were. It's not like you were celebrity. That people followed over no you just tweeted funny shit. Consistently every single day will thank you for saying that MM. I I will say yeah whether you like or don't like what I tweet and there are certainly plenty. Who Don't I did build that house myself as it were you know <hes> yeah so and I do that too much? I still do it too much. You know my wife will be like put that fucking phone down and she's the correct one. I don't hear that and I'm like Oh you Nag. I'm like Oh you normal. Human your correct. You know thank you for saying. How often do you say the the right thing to her and recognize that she's right? I'm getting better at it. I mean there's great things about being married and being in a relationship with somebody for a long time where you do get better things about the other person that you're like. Oh if that were physical part with them I would cut it off with a bone saw. You literally are growed ray or lies that that's actually the person that you must need to be with because they have a lesson that you can really use you know so so my wife is fucking awesome <hes> and if we come to a disagreement about something she's very frequently the correct one. I mean I am too. Sometimes it's not I'm not some like mouth reading idiot in the corner being washed by her with a hose brush. Bring like be fit for the world. You know I mean. She's a person to but I'm she's been very helpful even then things that are shitty about her. That's what's so great about. Marriage is like everything that you do for each other can be a gift even if it's awful. Can you talk about and I don't know if this is a difficult thing to discuss but what the for somebody out there who lives with somebody who has depression. Do you have any any advice I would say or any type of mental illness. I mean anything you know. Patients in this time name is going to be very very helpful. You know you're not patients with that permutations with that person. You can't fix them. You know so you owe it to both of you to encourage them to talk to other people you owe it to them to would leave for eight twelve twenty four hours at a time. If you want and go hang out with your much more enjoyable friend to be with suzy you know you definitely you have to take care of you at that time because the person living with a depressed person and going through a very difficult thing so you have to be good to you you have to kind of go through the sort of finances of your relationship and look at all the good deposits that depressed press person might have made in the past and then like Oh yeah that time we went to New Hampshire that was fun. You know what I mean that time. He surprised me at work with flowers or that. I mean like you literally have to be like Oh yeah. Even though this person is tremendously industry unattractive just rally awful right now you have to sort of take the long view and realize that this is one of those difficult times that you knew do you would go through when you signed up for a human relationship and so yeah patients love and and know that you are dealing with someone who is reality is being warped but believes leaves that that is reality Warp nece yeah and so give give them a little bit of China to try not to judge the fact that they are seeing everything through a funhouse mirror yeah and you know but but the by the same token much like the way you would deal with an alcoholic or whatever they still have to adhere normal human standards they might be quote sick. They might be hurting but they should still eat the fucking meal that you made they should still bay. You know what I mean like you can't should they should do what they have control over tried to better themselves if they are just going to sit on the couch for years and self pity then get out. I think fucking absolutely get out but a lot of people don't know where and I'm not saying I know where that line is but you know there is a line somewhere between when you stick with somebody and when you don't but if you're not talking about it with somebody you're never going to find where that line is right and do you see that forward motion in them. Do you see them wanting in to get better than you know. Stick around for as long as you feel like it really so so what what are the the battles that you're you're dealing with the nowadays. If you have any <hes> well well I mean I'm a dad and a husband and those are the most important things you know. So one thing that's weird about having a kid is like your capacity to love. Another thing is violently why stretched out and that's uncomfortable. I mean like you literally. I wish that I loved my son lasts. Sometimes you know what I mean because it's like are you shitting me like the amount of feeling feeling that you can feel towards another person. It's true what they say. You got to make you feel really vulnerable because you're like what if something happens to this person I have all this emotion. No literally like my wife and I are like we have to have more now. You understand why like settlers had twelve kids because we're going to die. I'm Kinda. Not I'm not getting you know. It's sort of funny to say that but I very much like get over like fuck. We're GONNA have more now. How many kids do you have one one yeah so we definitely need to have more lands for plans for more? Yes we would like talk more and enter careers taken off since you've I think you may be one of the first examples of somebody having a writing career kind of take off from twitter yeah. I'm very lucky because of that because like I was is trying to get hired on every show you can name I was submitting to and you know I'd go through different gut to different levels with each of them you know and they'd or some of them to be like hey fantastic you know or we're not hiring our we're gonNA whatever or fuck talk it out of here you know but there are different things and so I was like you know what I'm GonNa just right anyway. I was GONNA. I'm gonNA write for me if other people I get great. Mike kind of motivator was like you don't have to think. I think that I'm funny but if you say that I don't work hard than I'll punch you in your figurative face yeah not literal because I abhor violence but I will draw a picture reface and punch it if he's so I knew the work work ethic had to be there funny hope so you know and so that's so yeah so gradually I did turn into jobs yeah I did because of that get hired to write on different television shows and the and magazines and stuff and so so you're currently <hes> currently employed right now I well. I've it's kind of weird I fig- nominally yeah I just delivered a pilot to comedy central that I shot and you know wrote and produced and awesome mm-hmm so that was great and I'm writing a book under contract right now. It's fantastic yeah so I'm very very lucky and happy because of those things but the nature of this podcast but I found out about the book deal and the pilot deal both I found out about the pilot then a few days later mice no. I'm sorry found out about the book deal then literally not a week but three days later. My son was born and then three days after that sold the pilot so wow my life changed very dramatically in the earlier part of this year and I am glad that all happened around the birth of my son because he's more important than any of those things you know they're just absolutely great and very important but speaking of like depression and alcoholism and stuff you know people that people like me can freak out over good news to you know and so I'm glad that I had that that my son was born because when you say people can freak out about good news how do you how do you mean like you can be like go nuts. You know you can get high. You can go on a spending spree you you can cause you want more of that. Yeah you can screw it up. You know I mean so easy to screw up opportunities so that cool and then another thing that was going to say about when my son was born I remember the hospital and being like Holy Shit. I am definitely GonNa die because you realize like oh you just saw a life begin and you kind of get in touch with like beginnings and endings in your in a hospital and I was like I'm Super D- Definitely GonNa die and and that was comforting I mean it wasn't like I mean I knew and I hit even flirted certainly with death in the past but <hes> knowing seeing a life start was like whoa life wall so end and and so enjoy it while you've got it. You know what I mean well. I think that's a that's a great note to end down and I think you are a great example of what can happen if somebody decides to face the challenges head on and say to themselves. What do I have to do that can make this better? What do I have control over well? I'm going to put the best effort forward I can over those things and then hope that the universe is going to help me with the rest of those well thanks. I tried to look at it. I try not to be of victim of dualistic thought. Things aren't good or bad that I really shouldn't drink alcohol. That's not good or bad you know. Let's let's call it alcoholism to have him be simple. Alcoholism isn't in bad accepting it or not accepting that would be more a bad could come in yeah. I have it so don't drink you know depression. I gotTA treat it. You know what I mean. I don't WanNa hate it. I don't hate alcoholism. I don't hate hey depression. You know powerful forces. I respect them. You know but I gotta listen to them so that I can be of use you know and ultimately I think that's really the the the best piece comes from feeling of views that I found yeah you gotta work. You know I think Chekov said somebody I'm like why are we here and he was like oh to work and I agree with that or not. Not here to relax eat pie. You should eat pie but we're here to work. Well Rob Delaney. Thanks thanks bye. I appreciate it. I I know you got somewhere you got to you got to go to but thank you. Thank you very much. Thanks for having me Paul. I cannot believe it has been eight years since we recorded that episode <hes> there's still a little bit more of that episode to go but I want to give a couple of shout outs to our sponsors for this week. Today's episode is sponsored by crazed. It's a new podcast created by the National Mental Health Innovation Center it highlights big new ideas in the world of mental health from how to transform mental health treatment to prevention and stigma reduction and the visionaries behind these ideas of the two hosts are Matt Vogel and Rick Record. All Matt is the founder and Executive Director of the N. M. H.. I. C. and also former professional stand up and rick is <hes> or was the senior executive at DreamWorks Animation and their guests are familiar with the impact of mental health both personally and professionally and you'll find compelling stories information about cutting edge mental health technology and just great dialogue about difficult issues guests include policymakers nonprofit leaders researchers technologists filmmakers and more and the ideas and stories presented on crazed or the kind that you dig and we'll probably be talking about long after you've heard the episode so you can find crazed anywhere you get your podcasts or on crazed podcast dot com subscribe and listen today. Today's episode is also sponsored by squarespace. Turn your dream into a reality Eddie with squarespace. They make it easier than ever to launch your passion project. The beautiful templates created by world-class designers in the ability to customize just about anything with a few clicks. You can easily make a beautiful website yourself. L. And I've done it. It's super intuitive. It's simple. I did want to host my little musical snippets and pictures. I've taken of dogs. It's Paul Hyphen Gilmartin Dot squarespace DOT DOT COM and I'll put a link to that under the show notes for this. If you WANNA see it but <hes> it's Nice squarespace is just a great product their e commerce functionality. Let's just sell anything online and analytics help you grow your site in real time. Everything's optimized for mobile right out of the box. <hes> check it out had to squarespace dot com slash mental for a free trial and when you're ready to launch us the offer code mental to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website site or domain that squarespace dot com slash mental and also offer code mental and now the rest of the episode from twenty eleven the website is I've mentioned for the show is mental pod Dot Com. There's a form there. There's here's the surveys you can take you can support their show. Non Financially is going to itunes and giving us a good rating and a good review that taboo ranking and that brings more people to the show and the show has been growing a little bit every week and that's that's really cool. It's really nice to I know that <hes> the people are enjoying <hes> what what we do here and <hes> that really brings a brings a smile to my face especially on the days when I'm feeling a little down and I have to say it since I've gone back on selected the the last show that we did I kind of mentioned that I was in his really dark place where <hes> suicide wasn't becoming a reality but it's I was starting to fantasize about it a little bit and I knew that that was the darkness talking and <hes> so I went back on Alexa feeling great great and I've just had a really good week of feeling like I am enough and that is such a great place to be <hes> it takes work it takes fucking work sometimes to get there and to stay there. <hes> <hes> and I never stay there. I always slide back but knowing that I can get to that place is so comforting to know that is possible to have moments even days even weeks or months of feeling like I am enough. I have enough tonight and I'm doing enough and I know that sounds kind of new agey but <hes> that's the that's the fucking truth <hes> so. Let's take it out with a survey respondent. His name is Jimmy. He straight. He's he's in his twenties has environment. He was raised in was a little dysfunctional. He's never been the victim of sexual abuse <hes> darkest thoughts <hes> that I will. It's not things that you would act on but two things ashamed to admit you think about. He says that will kill my pets that I will hurt my wife <hes> and the deeper starkest secrets things you have done things that have happened he writes when I was a teenager. I masturbated a lot often an inappropriate places <hes> and then do these secrets and thoughts generate any particular feelings towards yourself. He writes that I was stupid and that someone had to have seen me <hes>. Maybe it's just my take Jimmy but I I wonder how anybody can get through their teenage years not masturbating in an inappropriate place. I'm just going to list some of the places I remember jerking off that where people could see me you know it was usually dark is usually at night <hes> sometimes during the day were you know nobody's around but <hes> backyard driveway beach <hes> into Lake Michigan Sorry Anybody Drinking Lake Michigan Water. There's filters. I wonder how many listeners of losing right now <hes> and maybe the one that that comes closest to making me feel <hes> a lot of shame was in a van of friends friends coming home from skiing in Colorado in in high school. Everybody was asleep and just those teenage hormones were just raging and I had a bunch of blankets covering may so nobody could see anything and everybody was not out anyway but yeah after you have it you know what it might be easier to actually list the places that didn't jerk off as a teenager church Wrigley Field and the Hoover Dam. If you're out there and you feeling stuck doc you're feeling ashamed you feeling self hatred. Let it go and if you can't let it go get some help because there is help and there is hope you're not alone. Thanks for listening <music> <music> uh-huh uh-huh.

depression Rob Delaney twitter Alcoholism robbery squarespace Combe Dot Mike kind C. a. Leona Lewis Lyon vomiting California France Boston Department of Water bunion
Thursday, June 13: 2020 hopeful John Delaney

The View

38:50 min | 1 year ago

Thursday, June 13: 2020 hopeful John Delaney

"Hey, I'm Brad milkey, and I hosted new daily news podcast from ABC news called start here. Every day we get you up to speed on the story that are going to be driving your day. We get important context from experts with on the ground access, and we do it all in twenty minutes. So start smart and subscribe to start here. Subscribe now to our podcast to get hot topics delivered every afternoon. And while you're at it rate us labor review, grab your coffee and Schill because the view is lie. Trump's foreign aid, the president's stunning admission that he'd be open to other countries giving him dirt on rival candidates figured wanna here. Is this an invite for hostile governments to meddle in the twenty twenty election mystery in paradise question surrounding the seven people who died while they casing in Dominican Republic beach resorts, and former Maryland? Congressman, john. Delaney is the latest presidential candidate to hit the hot topic stable, why does he want debate fellow democrat Alexandria across yo Cortes? And does he regret what he said at the California convention? The got resists reaction on telling you. Leads fire up hot topics. Wip whoopie. Oh, be huntsmen. Joy, they are sunny hostage in Megan. Mccain and Ana Navarro. Now, let's get things started. Well. One. Guys you see we almost didn't make it out. We had like a blockage in the we're all making the movements dumping as they were going on. All right. Everybody looks good. That I love that. Thing is very chic. It is, especially with the glasses. Really do. It was really. It's really nice. Everybody looks good today. Everybody looks and from you. Yes, this is. No. Let's hear about that. This is my line and I'm gene. So kin in folks yet, dubbed g in folks today and I'm thanking them for participating in this, so but I'm not allowed to talk about. So we'll move on. Okay. So, you know, who in the White House invited George Stephanopoulos into his Oval Office interview, and he has lot of people concerned about his views on foreign governments, who want to meddle in the elections at look, your campaign, this time round of foreigners if Russia if China if someone else offers you information on opponent should they accept it. Or should they call the FBI? I think maybe do both. I think you might wanna listen. I don't this thing with listening, if somebody called from country Norway, we have information on your owner. Oh, I think I'd wanna hear you want that kind of interference in our elections. It's not an deferred say have information. I think I'd take it. I'm so the FBI is kind of already said that they know Russia's planning to try to meddle in the election for twenty twenty is he giving other folks the green light to meddle, if they can buy sort of welcoming all of this because it's not new. I mean. You know, he's encouraged ship before God start. I think he's done it before. And I think he's saying I'll do it again. If the chance comes up I think it is, I think it is treasonous. I think it is compromising I think it is dangerous. I think it is wrong, it's illegal, and frankly, congress needs to clarify for him, if it's not clarified enough that it is illegal. They need to pass legislation so that this does not happen. And people clearly understand that it is not allowable, I think is just so uniting wrong, when he realizes what he said, you know, how he's always bragging that he won this election, fair and square that there was no help. Now he's really admitting that he got help. How does this impact his ego? You know what I'm saying? He totally denies that the Russians helped now, we say, bring it on man, I brought it on also. So I'm wondering and the, the point I wanna just make about Norway. He's obsessed with Norway because it's the whitest country in the world. It couldn't be wider that Norway. And plus Norwegians would never accept him. It's basically a socialist country. Oh, that's true. Yeah. Well, I don't even think we need legislation for this because Mr President, it is illegal. It is already illegal to accept information from foreign. To benefit yourself. It is already legal. It's very clear US in the constantly you it. Well, it's not only in the town to mention law, US law explicitly banned way. It'd be working on a campaign before everyone knows that U S law explicitly bans contributions from foreign nationals, and federal election, law states of foreign national shall not directly or indirectly make a contribution or or donation of money or other thing of value connection with any federal source, the local election. Right. And you're saying it's now if you've ever worked on a campaign, it's not new at all in any ways, and it's people have tried to do it before. And I've said that many times on this show, someone from any country Norway. Whatever came to me and said, hey, Megan. I have information on X opponent experts in. Now anyone you should go to the FBI it. It's very basic crap here, by the way. And I think that when you open up this. Dora's box in the way that he has. It's a very, very dangerous precedent is illegal, but I think he feels emboldened because the Muller came out and said, no collusion, but I will say when you have Lindsey Graham going on TV and saying the answer is no, that's it. And Lindsey Graham isn't always a lot of countries on the same side as President Trump. So when you have Lindsey Graham this morning, saying that I think this was a huge mistake on President Trump. Instagram is also pointed to the Democrats. I don't wanna read it. It's too long. He's basically going after the Democrats that they allowed the Steele dossier to Christopher Steele and it so happens that the Steele dossier was originated by conservatives. So what does he talking about? He talks to both sides of his mouth. Here's the problem with the Muller report. Clearly says that Russia interfered in this election, metal and Russia tried to give information to Trump campaign for the Trump Tower meeting at the same time Muller, did not find did not charge Trump. So they are interpreting this, including people at Rudy Giuliani who you will remember just the week after the mullahs report came out said he was going to Ukraine to try to find negative intelligence on Joe Biden's, that's fine. They are interpreting this as a blank slate as a clean Bill, go do it. Get out of jail card. There's no problem you can do it. And that's why I think there needs to be absolute clarification. I. Isn't it shouldn't just be democrat wells, ain't fifty that it should be Republicans? But part of that there is clarification Sunny's a lawyer. We just talked about laws on the books like there's it's very clear. So why not so? Here to him. But, you know it is. The law is the law. It begs the question. What's going on? Because this is this prelude unconfined way the question for the past three years with scary because telling on do you remember when he said, if you have emails. No bring them on member win. When, when the rally rally hear me, you can hear me. I think that was another coal what we just saw with George Stephanopoulos. He said, I would take it right. We've had a twenty twenty. Actually, I wish he pulled me to hear what he wants to stay with the question is, we know it's against the law. We know we know we know it, it's there. It's Clinton FBI. So why isn't where where is everybody what's going by? But why is looking at why is this happening? Why is this being maybe laugh? How how saying he would do it, but it hasn't happened yet. Maybe that's the logic bit. I think it's very dangerous. And again, not if anyone watched the show veep, there was a story line at the end of that was about China, the Chinese government in interfering in her election and getting elected. And I think art imitates life imitates art, imitates life. And I do think as you're saying it could be a signal that maybe they're like, hey, we're open to it. But again there's a law on the books. So if anything is going on, I employ people on both sides, take action makes me nervous because this is a prelude again to a coup for twenty. This is how coups happen. He will sow we'll go well, we're going to let this go to. No. It's that's just how people are. That's how this happens. This is how you wake up and in, in a in a new country that you don't recognize. But you are. You're stuck in. And so I think that someone needs to be really, really clear about what it is to break the law because. If in fact, he doesn't win in twenty twenty. This to me is go to jail. This is this is at least a trial. This is how I you know, I just I mean, we're not talking about coups and things like that. I mean, it's really like to still be in idea. And it's really petrifying why we're living a checks and balances should be put into place now. I think it's everyone is Mitch McConnell. Look, Wolfer impeachment. Is that a call center that every node him? I, I say that if he does not win because we heard Muller say, listen, we cannot, we could we didn't feel we could. Said this emotion bring charges because he's a sitting president. But once you're not the sitting president, I think a lot of this has to be looked at because this is to me. If I broke this law, being deep doodo get. Well, that's why we think. Peach mint you would be, but you would never think like that. So Nancy Pelosi could be pushed to impeachment now. But it because then it did Donald, but that's not. Yeah. I think he would do it again. But his him towards peace. You know. Yeah is not really going to help if you can't impeach him. But why would we do it again? If he did it already know, legal concept. We gotta go right? Right. We'll go okay. We'll be right back. Yeah. Later mystery in DR the search for answers after seven people died while on vacation in the Dominican Republic. Tomorrow on the view. You're in for a fabulous Friday, 'cause the phenomenal. Billy border is in the house, and the one and only Kevin bacon is here to hang with the ladies TGIF tomorrow on the view on ABC. Mahan maryland. Congressman and democratic presidential candidate John Delaney's make an campaign. Stop on the view. Today's cried and why is the grandfather of the gay rights movement. Frank Cami he served in the US army during World War Two and became an army astronomer after receiving a doctorate from Harvard, but in nineteen fifty eight he was fired along with thousands of other gay federal employees in the so-called. Lavender scare this began a lifelong mission for quality he brought the very first gay civil rights lawsuit against the government all the way to the supreme court and sued the American psychiatric foundation for classifying homosexuality as a mental disorder in two thousand nine two years before his passing, the US government, formally apologized for firing him. And we thank you for teaching generations, how to speak truth and pride to power. Very interesting. I didn't know that it was classified as a mental disorder. All yes. As he blamed it on the mother for years, that you'd rather was overbearing. And you father was ineffectual as if that had something to do with it. They now know that, that's not true. Either less for very long time. Yeah. Well, a day after Jon Stewart's passionate plead, the congressional panel. Unanimous unanimously voted to permanently we authorized the funds for the nine eleven victim compensation. Expected to pass easily. So Joan, we wanna make sure you get to the Senate floor and make your case to Mitch McConnell. Yeah. We'll look. This is this is one thing. No matter what your political beliefs is the one thing we can all agree. We've got to take care of our first responders. We have. That when it comes to this, and we promise them, we would not forget. And we just cannot forget, this can be an opportunity for bipartisanship. It can be an opportunity to actually get something done. I, I was really, you know, touched by the idea of John Stewart, using his platform, and his celebrity leverage, some Canadian. Yes. The lava power in being from me. Much more than a comedian though. I know of course he is. But I mean when you're funny all the time, and then you go after them like that it's very effective. Yes. What billy? And you. So Jerry Lewis, remember, Jerry Lewis Hannah telephones. I mean, we have a different way of looking at things comics do has we have to. But so when well, now, we are a little bit scared, but not a scattered a lot of people. Well, we, we have we have more to lose, but we don't care. Well, yeah, that's, that's the thing why don't care because. I'm curious. Why don't we kick because we don't know. So we your hair. Yes. I think it has more to do with when you're comic, you learn to get a thick skin. You are eat some days at work, some days, it doesn't and you learn that that's life, some days life is better than others. And so we know that you can come at us with anything, but if you're not where we are. We don't really want to hear it. And we think we're in the right, and that's the, that's the beauty of comedians doing this because John Stewart can go and say, listen, you've got to do this. We are here we can tell you things about what we see that you won't hear from anybody else. Such a great healing in heckler is also, if you work with heckling people yelling you in the morning after ten drinks, I knew you deal with that, you can deal with congress. Well, yeah. Yeah, it's about the thick skin. Maybe we should skin and take everything personally lie. Here's a little you not. But you get. That's when people start getting on you. If I know you can't take it there, right there. So you gotta learn how do you think at this point, there's any way that the Senate would not pass this McConnell is shameless. I don't know. Anyone? I mean I don't know. I can't imagine it. They're there. This is not about right and left. This is just about right and wrong. It's about, hey, don't want us. The money McConnell said it was too much money. He's the one. Republican voices from New York, beg that could chime in and contribute to this people like Rudy Giuliani for home. This was, you know, he's all because the ducks billions influence in ways, we're willing to give twenty three wall. Here's the thing. Here's the thing, this isn't just we don't know what this price is going to be because we don't know how people are going to get sick or win. Billion what we want is for this to be open ended for those folks who went in when nobody else was rushing. In those folks, whose lives are changed because they made a commitment to us. And as Joyce said yesterday, and John said the day before they didn't say, you know, we're, we're coming to death to SoHo. Deborah, try debt to too. To america. So this is an American. This is all of us. We this is this is where our tax, money and acting. Right. It's just a funding issue. Pundit. We'll see what it is. But not make this because I guess what? Anywhere. And that's pretty much the only people I socialize with that. This point was not for the funding of let's make sure it really is about America until it got. So the real housewives of New York rallied around, Luan, when she was having problems with alcohol, but I'm the last night's episode she was called out for not returning, the favor when Bethany was going through some Jarque stuff herself. So take a look into while my guy died of a drug overdose. Hawaiian guy he plays ground. I'm going through a lot and come to my thing and Cuban cabaret upstate. And cabaret cabaret cabaret all day life is not a cabaret. Can you never asked about tennis you'll never rest? Every day. It's about you. Go into it for free. What you're talking you wanna talk. All righty. I scout. No Oscar, no, nothing now, now, I mean, is this, the right way to do with a friend who can't see past their own problems? Give him a wake up, call on TV like they make us look civilized. And then who's the one who's more self involved. Yeah. Exactly. Who's them as having a nervous breakdown? What's the matter with the girl? I you looking at me, like I have no. Girl knows it. Well, I do know because I watched the show. Oh my God. A lot her fiancee, died of a drug overdose on the friend that she's talking to. She basically did her intervention centre to rehab and facilitated the entire thing. And she's in a lot of grief this season. And as someone who has been in a lot of grief this season. She's having I, I watched last night, it was actually kind of hard for me to watch because it looks like she was having, like a grief panic attack, and I haven't had a bet. Yeah. It just it was very. I mean, I'm very involved in the in that show and I felt really bad for her. I felt and I do feel like they're times when you shouldn't be on camera. And I felt like maybe this was one of those times that one of her friends should have been cut filming. And I don't know her and it's entertaining. But for me it was hard to watch. I have to push back on that, because that's exactly the time to be on camera. Okay. And I think that Bessant he knows it. Okay was one of the most scripted rehearsed shows I've ever seen in my life. It didn't. I mean, isn't maybe I just like drank the koolade on the outside. Yeah. And if it's I mean I don't know Bethany. But I've seen her behave that way on the beach. Come here about, again, he ever actually feel. No, no. She's not a couple of times. They're telling me not to talk about it in my ear said that was. I'm just saying I've seen that kind of behavior when Bethany yelled at my child on the beach. Yeah. Say they did not. Every ebony hills, my whole mild or on the beach because she's it was in the middle of the day, and my child was about seven playing with other children at about two o'clock in the afternoon. And she said that her child was mapping inside with the window open, and that our children were being too loud, on the beach, not skinny Margaritas for you. She do. So she went out there and yelled at the Kenya? My child, and I went out there and stood in front of my child. And I yelled at her and told her that adults speak to adults. Cinnamon. That's a reality show, right? And she knows I'm telling the truth, you know what real house was of, of, of New York is missing. Puerto rican. Bentley a very nice note after my dad died, and I like her. And I, I didn't I wasn't there at that beach in that scenario, I don't have kids, but I, I didn't get a nice. No. Okay. I don't think you're getting one today. Well, I got a really nice. No. Right now. All of us want all of you to come back and watch the rest of the show. We'll be right back. How does presidential candidate? John delaney. Answer critics saying, we don't need another rich, white guy in the White House and really have to lean further left to avoid another one of these moments. On the view next. Get cash back for shopping, you were already going to do racket in is free member based loyalty program that lets you earn cashback on shopping at over twenty five hundred stores like Macy's best, buy, Nike, and more. Shop online and earn a percentage of every purchase you make up to forty percent cashback every three months members are paid by pay pal or another method sign up today at rackets in dot com. That's our A. K U, T E, N dot com. Capital One is building a better Bank. One that feels and acts nothing like a typical Bank. It's why they're reimagining banking and building something completely different capital on cafe. They offer accounts with no fees, or minimums. They also offer one of the best savings rates in America and you can open a Capital, One account from anywhere in five minutes. Capital One, this is banking. Reimagined open account today and experience banking. Reimagined for yourself Capital One. What's in your wallet Capital, One NA member? FDIC. Now. Former Maryland congressman, John Delaney is also a guy who knows business who wants to be your next president. So what's he going to bring to the table that the other four thousand Kansas? Let's ask him, please, welcome John Delaney. Mcfaul. We doing that. We were talking about, you know, who talking about the fact that he'd probably taken formation from a foreign government comfortable uncomfortable. Right. Wrong. What do you think? Well, it's un-american I mean that's a really simple way of thinking about it. It's un-american. It's unpatriotic. I think it's the law, but putting aside the law, I second. It is completely unamerican. This is an example of he was, you know, one quarter of the man, Senator McCain was we would never have to have this conversation for the apple. But none. In the public in leadership is one quarter of John McCain at the moment. Thanks guys. But there is no do John McCain, there's far as I can tell older stepping forward that except that. No one who has the courage of their convention to actually step forward and say the right thing. Now is a moment where leaders need to step forward? Whether you're democrat Republican independent, that doesn't matter and say it is unamerican for a sitting president to make an offer to collude with one if they don't, if they don't step up. I'm looking at then are they also want American well, they're enablers? Let's put it that way. Yeah. A mosh sit though there. Yes. You're right. Yeah. I'm so let me ask you this. Because you the first democrat to announce your candidacy about was fifteen years ago, and I thought going go here. Yeah. Since then you on the hundred million. Making it. Kinda get lost. So how are you gonna distinguish yourself? What are you going to say to people that says, I'm going to help you get back to the dream that you had before your taxes got screwed over before your healthcare? Yeah. We're full you was polluted for your taxes were messed up before all of these kind of rollback started to happen. What, what do you how you going to do that? How you gonna make me both for you because I have real solutions. I don't have bumper stickers out. I have real solution. Tell us they could actually address the issues that the American people are so desperately dealing with whether it's healthcare infrastructure, fixing our broken immigration system, dealing with policy. I'm also getting run. Gimme one, she's tactile. Tell me tell me tag. Let's talk about factual since you brought up or yes. So what I would do on tax reform is really simple. I'd roll back the tax cuts, and I would do something called double the earned income tax credit. The earned income tax credit is a tax credit goes right in the pockets of hardworking Americans. I think it's should be the centerpiece democratic so break it down for me. So if you're, if you're an American, you work, and you kind of earn on the lower pay scale, you actually get a tax credit from the government. If you're a single parent with a couple of kids, this is a few thousand dollars, I wanna double that half the country can't afford five hundred dollars. Right. If we actually put a couple thousand dollars in the pockets of hardworking Americans, which is what I'm proposing it makes a huge difference in their lives. I mean my dad was an electric. So I get what it's like to grow up in a working class family, right? Where you're kind of living paycheck to paycheck, right? As opposed to giving tax cuts to the wealthiest Americans exaggerating which totally what he did. Right. He did. I mean, totally what he did imagine if we could do something, like double, I called the workers tax credit double the workers tax credit and put money in the pockets of hardworking Americans. That's the kind of thing if the Democratic Party puts the worker at the center of our policies you immediately go there. So instead of a fifteen hundred dollar let's say earned credit, you would get three thousand dollars. How much difference with that makes it for my family? That would have been a life, say a whole different. The Democratic Party used to be for the working man, somehow people's slept lost sight of that anyway, you, did you did make an impression recently at the California's democrat convention when you took on Medicare for all watch. What happened there? Medicare all may sound good. But it's actually not good policy, nor is it. Good politics, on telling you. I'm telling you. Hundred. We. Okay. Well nobody can do pandering to be auto. I'm a truth teller, right? I'm for universal healthcare, and I'm sure your audience agrees. Everyone should have healthcare is a basic human right in full stop. Great. Not everybody agrees. Why do for free? Everyone gets healthcare. A basic government healthcare plans to base give you right? But what I'm not for is making private insurance legal one hundred and fifty million Americans have private insurance, one hundred million of them like it. Why do we have to be the party that stands for taking something away for the American people? That's what Medicare for all does it forces one hundred and fifty million naira likes that I don't like it. And I was my, you know, something I have Medicare because I'm oh, great Medicare. But I it's great. But I also have to supplement it with my, my insurance from my job. It's not doesn't pay for everything. So so you really people need both the incentive if you if you have these private insurance companies, and then you have the government, the government that doesn't have the negotiation negotiating strength shirt. Does I mean the government, first of all, we should let the government negotiate pharmaceutical prices right now? The only reason the government doesn't have the negotiating strength is, we don't allow it to the government can absolutely we as a government. Prohibit our government go sheeting pharmaceutical price. That's ridiculous. I mean my dad again, was a union electrician. One of the things I grew up right over the river in New Jersey. My dad was like Tricia, neither my parents went to college. I in my family to go to college. I was successful entrepreneur. I've been happily married to an amazing woman for twenty nine years. I four daughters. My second daughter is in the audience if it's her birthday by. I saw cringing and the video I saw your faith. I used to hate it when people booed dad. Just look song means he's doing something right though. So I've been blessed and have lived the American dream blue-collar kid very successful entrepreneur created thousands of jobs. That's one of the things that makes me different than the people, I'm running against. I've actually run things elected to the congress, the United States and now have the privilege of running for president, you have. But I know what it's like growing up in a working class successful businessman running really against the bankrupt may, yes. Yes, we have a lot of differences. There might companies never filed for bankruptcy. They were always voted the best place for you didn't lose a billion dollars. You know. The Obama administration gave us an award for our investments, disadvantaged communities, like his dad gave him four hundred million dollars. The only thing my dad did is helped me carry in the furniture to my first thing these are very different stories. Well, I appreciate that. You're running as a more centrist. I also appreciate the every answer here isn't just write a check that for fiscal conservative. It's a great answer. And now Alexandra Cossio, Cortez, also took you to task and she said you should just quote ballot out of the race. I believe she encourage you to quote fast shea away. We've seen Biden's poll numbers a little bit in recent weeks. He's pivoting further to the left is being a centrist and pragmatic Jacksonian democrat is that realistic for today's Democratic Party, just what most people are looking for an including most Democrats. You know, I'm a problem solver, I think there are real solutions to how we fix healthcare, and I just talked about that, universal healthcare. But allow the American people who have options doesn't that make sense building infrastructure. I put together the biggest bipartisan coalition a trillion dollars of infrastructure. I had the head of the freedom caucus on the Bill and the head of the progressive caucus on the Bill. That's how you get things done. Fixing our broken immigration system, dealing with what technology is doing with our lack. Of privacy, which is an area that my wife is one of the leaders in the country on, there's real solutions to all of these issues, but we have to get back to this notion of finding common ground. Here's the thing, his how we cooperate you stand with John Delaney is going to be with us when we come back. So come back. Okay. So there's a big election coming. Meaning candidates here. Today. It's are lining up first interview he's given since the amount of former vice president, Joe. Voice different views. You think this country is ready for a good person? There's only one way to find out all have one thing in common. They come here to make news. I'm gonna run for president of the United States. And I think you'll make it a fissile right here on the few. This is the best place to do in this epic year ahead anybody who's anybody who wants to make it to the next one politics, has to come on this show, because this is the place to being her people come here because they know folks are watching on ABC. Hey John Delaney. So you are a capitalist. A successful one, unapologetic one. And you say some of these socialist policies being proposed are intellectually dishonest yesterday. We heard Bernie Sanders talk about socialism democratic socialism. So our Bernie Sanders are Elizabeth Warren, being intellectually dishonest. Or are they lying with some of the things I proposed listen, I agree with many of the things Senator warranted saying, for example, but I think on many of these things. Yes, they're being dishonest. I think this Medicare for all proposal is at its core. Intellectually dishonest. They was it does take healthcare away from one hundred and fifty million Americans and forces them to get a new plan with the government. Whether it's better or not. They want the options. The other problem is if you go to every hospital in this country and ask them how it would go all the bills were paid at Medicare rates. They would all say, we would close because Medicare doesn't pay the cost of healthcare. How is that a drew science Medicare? What other thing they she has greatly floor the student debt? Well, you know, I think it's hard to just right off the student debt. I mean why don't we write off the national debt at some point? Right. I definitely think we should make student loans way more affordable. We should have free community college about taxing the Uber wealthy and paying two cents to sound. The Dow over five hundred million a year or something. What are we doing? We simple. We got cut the rates on the student loans. We gotta give more opportunities for kids to refinance their loans into programs where they only pay a percentage of their income. So if they go work for Google, they pay their loans off fast. But if they go do community service, they, they probably never pay them off. Right. Those are commonsense solution to this. We also need more in early childhood education. Why we can't have the entire focus be on college is a lot of things we need to do there. But we every kid in this country should have pre K. It's the best investment. Universal pre-k. And you know what's really important zero two three a lot of poor kids start kindergarten. They've heard one third. The words that other kids, have it is structurally injust, and they never catch up. Yeah. So we got to put resources. Yeah. We do. Little ones or to swallow fail. We, we have to be sporting them. This is your first time joining us I wanted to get your quick two sentence. Okay. Take on some of the most important issues for voters on twenty twenty so we do a policy speed route ready closing the racial wealth gap, reparations not for cash reparations. I don't think it's the right way forward, but fixing public education that it's funded equitably early. Childhood affordable housing and getting out the structurally racist institutions in our society is, I think how we make a difference, immigration comprehensive immigration reform of two thousand thirteen that's going to be at my first one hundred day agenda, it should have passed green new deal. I don't think the green new deal, which isn't specific is the right way forward, what I would do is a carbon tax take all the money, give it back to you, the American people in a dividend. I use that in a bipartisan basis, Democrats and Republicans in the congress, and then I would make massive investments. Ovation when you do battery technology when you do transmission technology, and I want to launch a whole new industry called direct air capture, which is machines that take carbon out of the atmosphere, that technologies are proven? It's really our only way to get to net zero by twenty fifty last one Hyde amendment, we should repeal the Hyde amendment. I'm pro choice, if the Hyde amendment exists that women can't get the, the healthcare, they need. Okay. Okay. The only two years but John Delaney, people know you now and members of our studio audience are going home with a copy of your book, the right answer. How we can unify are divided nation. It's coming to all of y'all. We'll be right back. Tomorrow. We're given city on a hill star, Kevin bacon. A flashback Friday of his very first big screen role. Billy borders, talk in fried politics, and the new season of pose, and it's feel Good Friday on view your deal. I don't know. Why laughing just feeling good? We want you all to have a great day and take a little time to enjoy whatever view you happened upon. So you just woke up your phone is lighting up with headlines and push notifications and text from your mom saying, how do I click this? Okay. Maybe that's just me. But if you wanna get up to speed, check out the new podcast from ABC news, start here, literally, the ground was shaky. I'm Brad milkey and every morning we're going to take you to the stories that matter with fast fresh insight. Low robber mower. Michael Cohen calling all in twenty minutes start here. Listen for free on apple podcasts or your favorite podcast app from ABC. This is no limits. Even from the beginning, all of us for saying, this is so important. I'm your host Rebecca Jarvis and each week. We're taking an honest look at success, and how to get there with the boldest most influential women in the world. I said, I am a working mother, and I'm here to tell you how to do it. What happened after that, as a very long story to tell vulnerabilities actually a strength, you could hear new episodes of no limits every week on apple pie. And casts or your favorite podcast app.

John Delaney president congress US Medicare Mitch McConnell Maryland President Trump FBI Senator McCain Russia Muller Democrats ABC news George Stephanopoulos Norway drug overdose Democratic Party New York
Historian Henry Louis Gates Jr. / Rob Delaney Of 'Catastrophe'

Fresh Air

49:49 min | 1 year ago

Historian Henry Louis Gates Jr. / Rob Delaney Of 'Catastrophe'

"This message comes from NPR sponsor Dell. Dell small business technology advisers offer one on one partnerships and reliable business PC's with Intel core processors to help you get business done. Call eight seven seven by Dell. Hi, it's Terry gross. I'd like to know more about you. And why you listen to podcasts. And now there's a good way of letting me know by completing a short anonymous survey at NPR dot org slash podcast survey podcast, surveys, one word, it takes less than ten minutes helps support the show and helps us figure out how we can better serve you. So that's NPR dot org slash podcast survey. Thanks so much from WHYY in Philadelphia. I'm Terry gross with fresh air today. Historian, Henry Louis gates, his new book is about reconstruction white supremacy and the rise of Jim crow. He says white supremacy wasn't born during the era of slavery. It was born after the slaves were freed and. White southerners were looking for ways to roll back the newly acquired rights of African Americans. If it says, if the genie had been let out of the bottle, and the white supremacists the Neo confederates, the former confederates had to figure out how to put it back. Yet gates also host the PBS genealogical series, finding your roots. And we'll hear from comic, rob Delaney, co creator and co star of the comedy series catastrophe about two people who decide to marry after their wild six day. Fling leaves her pregnant, he'll talk about being funny, even when life isn't. The white nationalist movement of today has my guest has star. In Henry, Louis gates, looking to the past for the roots of white supremacy. His new book is titled Stony the road, reconstruction, white supremacy and the rise of Jim crow. It covers the period after the civil war when new amendments to the constitution enshrined rights for African Americans and covers the period that followed known as redemption when white southerners found ways to roll back those rights. He also writes about the cultural and artistic black renaissance of the early twentieth. Century included in the book as a series of visual essays containing racist. Images of those periods from ads flyers posters. Playing cards song books and more. The book is his companion to the new two part PBS series. He hosts reconstruction America after the civil war which airs April ninth and sixteenth gates. Also. Host the PBS genealogical series, finding your roots. And is a professor at Harvard where he directs the Hutchins center for African and African American research Henry, Louis gates, welcome back to fresh air. It's a pleasure to have you back on our show Boorda. The reason why you wanted to do this book is that reconstruction and redemption the period that rolled back. The gains of reconstruction seem particularly relevant to you. Now, why reconstruction was period twelve years of maximum black freedom followed by an alright rollback. What's that sound? Like what's that reminds? You of right. Dylan mcgeown, I'm my partner had a list of three black history series that we wanted to do for PBS one was on the black church. One is on the great migration and one was on reconstruction in redemption, the official name of the rollback to reconstruction. And we had decided to start with the great migration, and then Donald Trump was elected, president United States. And I realized that what we were seeing what we were witnessing was reconstruction reductions the period of black optimism in black hope when we thought that, you know, even for a time scholars fantasize that we were at the end of race and racism, you remember that at the beginning of Barack Obama's presidency. All of that was followed by an outright rollback and the rise of white supremacy. And that's exactly what happened in the period immediately following the civil war between eighteen sixty five in eighteen seventy seven when black people experience, more freedom and more rights than any other time in American history. Eighty percent of all the eligible black men in the former confederate states registered to vote. In eighteen sixty eight five hundred thousand cast their votes overwhelmingly for Ulysses s grant, the irony is grant, only won the popular election by just over three hundred thousand votes. So historians said quite accurately that black men actually elected a white man, president of the United States, you listened zest grant, this is three years after the end of slavery and in South Carolina, which was a majority black state. They actually had been Giardi a black members of the South Carolina house of representatives south wouldn't stand for it. Not the south wooden Sam fat rollback. Yeah. That was the Robak. And what remember there was that pesky problem of who was going to pick. All that cotton. Cotton remains the most profitable United States export all through the nineteenth century well into the twentieth century through the nineteen thirties and. Slavery was based on the profitability of exploiting free labor. So if you had to get rid of slavery, if you had to abolish the slaves if you had to abolish such a large source of your profit. What are you gonna do? You're going to re institute a form of Neo slavery. And that's exactly what happened redemption the rollback to reconstruction unfolded onto planes, one was political and that was disenfranchising black men who had been allowed to vote because of the reconstruction acts initially in eighteen sixty seven and then the fifteenth amendment, and then Secondly instituting a system of peon engine share cropping, which is close to slavery as you can get without actually being slavery. Some of your book is told through some of the images and sheet music and books and posters from the redemption era. When rights were being rolled back when black people's rights were being rolled back. And I'm wondering a lot of those images from your personal collection. I happen to be the my day jobs. I'm a professor at Harvard and one of my jobs at Harvard is to be the director of the Hutchinson, and for African African American research, which houses a big project called the image of the black of western art project, and it's comprised of twenty six thousand images of black people in western art, starting with the ancient Greeks and Romans, but part of that collection is also these horrendous stereotypes and these images per liberated in the eighteen nineties in advert assessments, trade cards, postcards, and one of the favorite subjects was Sambo. Extremely black skin exaggerated. Features huge red lips. And the whitest of is. And these images took every pernicious form that you could possibly imagine. And they were the visual counterpart of disenfranchisement, you have an image of Jim crow in your book. And this is, you know, he's a an African American dancer who was portrayed by a white comedian named Thomas Dartmouth daddy rice, right? That's from the eighteen thirty. So Jim crow was born as a figure a parody of black people at the height of slavery in the eighteen thirties. And somehow that figure of Jim crow came to be used better for for the system of the separation of the races. After reconstruction wondering like how this stereotypical image of this. Fictional character. Jim crow became the words that were used to define the segregated south. And that we're used to define the laws that officially segregated the south. I have never read a simple explanation. That connected. The figure of Jim crow to the concept of Jim crow segregation. So I don't know maybe some scholar knows why in the world that some white supremacists. Use this as a metaphor. But that's the metaphor that was used. So, you know, the performer who did the character of Jim crow performed it in black face. It was a white performer performing a black face. So I I couldn't help but wonder what you made of the whole like Virginia scandal where we learned that governor Ralph Northam posed and black face for his medical school yearbook photo, or at least you included a photo of him in black face. And then the attorney general of the state Mark herring admitted he. He'd been in black face. Did you know that this kind of thing was still going on even though it might be in a different form than it was in the eighteen hundreds and early nineteen hundreds after I graduated from Yale. I went to graduate school in England at the university of Cambridge. And there was this nineteen Seventy-three and still then there were quote, unquote, black-faced minstrels performing on campus in student groups. And there were black-faced benchers performing on stages in London, and I was shocked. So if you could imagine if I was shocked in nineteen Seventy-three how I felt realizing that they were even later even today that there are forms of mental see being performed why would someone who's a medical student feel compelled to put black coloring on his face and pose with a Ku Klux Klan figure at a costume party. I mean, it's racism, pure and simple. So in Jim crow segregation becomes the law of the land in the south you need arguments to justify it. And when a one of the arguments that was used to justify segregation was that. Well, you know, black people are subhuman. In fact, I mean, they're not even you there from a different species all together. So among the like pseudoscientific arguments that are made for the supremacy of white people and the sub human characteristics of black people is studying there far heads studying their skulls and having these, you know, these pseudoscientific explanations for how skull size correlate with intelligence or lack of intelligence. Can you talk a little bit about that pseudoscience and how it figures into our American history? Well, it's called cranial Aji, and it was thought that the size and shape of the skull reflected the degree of intelligence within. But that's I it starts in the late eighteenth century early nineteenth century, and it's taken quite seriously. But now, no one would take it seriously and out of that developed Ray science bad race science. It has a long and tortured history in the west and particularly in the United States, and it was drawn upon at any given point to say that Africans were by nature fundamentally different and created to be slaves because either they weren't descended from common ancestors, like Adam and eve, if you wanna go with the biblical interpretation or in terms of human evolution that we weren't all descended mono, genetically that we were descended Polly, genetically the basically there was a black Adam and eve, and there was an Asian Adam and eve, and there was a European Adam and eve and on the great chain of being Europeans were always on the top shelf and Asians were on the second shelf and people from the subcontinent Indians were on the. Third shelf and the four shelf would be native Americans who was always at the bottom Africans, and what kind of being was under the Africans on the great chain of being apes. So this discourse was designed to show that Africans were separate from Europeans. And indeed the rest of the human community more related to the animal kingdom, and you find metaphors of animal ISM being used to describe people African descent all through the eighteenth and nineteenth century, but I can't stress enough that this discourse has an economic basis that it didn't just come out of the air. It was used as justification for the slave trade. It was used. So that the people who ship twelve point five million Africans across the Atlantic Ocean between fifteen fourteen and eighteen sixty six could sleep at night. You have some lynching postcards in your book and lynchings. Had been like public spectacles people like picnic and watched and what souvenir postcards of lynchings in the archive that you oversee at Harvard is their big collection of these the biggest collection of racist memorabilia in the United States is it fair state university and some of the images of you. When you look the credit some of the images, we use the book come from that archive some from my own personal collection and some from the collection that we have at Harvard, but many people collect these images between eighteen eighty nine. I think in the late nineteen thirties officially there were three thousand seven hundred twenty four lynchings, many of them were were photographed and some were used for commercial purposes. So that you could actually go into a drugstore. And by a lynching postcard and say having a good time down here in Galveston, Texas. It's it's disgusting. It's. I had a difficult decisions to make when I had to decide which images to include and which not to include. I remember in because there are just too horrible to include. They were too horrible in the original formulation of the book. It took a long time for me to decide not to include it, but I included a visual essay on racist images of President Obama. And I thought about it not. I mean, they if you go to faira state university to the Jim crow museum, they have a whole wing dedicated to images racist images of President Obama. But the point was that they are tying into themes and tropes that have a long independent history. Didn't matter who the black person was it could be Frederick Douglass could be Barack Obama. They would just substitute one black person for another and I woke up one night. And I thought you know, this is just too much. These are two real white supremacy is too vibrant too. Vital. Oh, and their people walking around today who really saw Barack Obama in through those images through those lens and see other African Americans through those lenses, and I'm not going to include that, and I decided to take it out because it disturbed b but you can find these images all over the internet on just that I didn't want to gather them in one place in this book. I think also a difference might be the images that are in your book from like a hundred years ago. So right. You can see them in a historical perspective. Whereas Barack Obama is still very much a live. He's still being very much demonized. And it's dangerous for somebody to be demonized like that. So it's it strikes me as a different kind of decision. In other words, I'm trying to basically say I really understand why you would put in racist images from the past in your book. But she's not to include racist images of Obama. No. I'm glad that you agree. And it was the right decision. Now, you know that the the book is dedicated to the innocence who were martyred at mother Emmanuel church under the leadership of Reverend Clemenza Pinkney, and I did that. Because when I did the last major interview with Clemente Pinkney for my film, many rivers across and two because when I heard about it, I thought well, this guy is just deranged. But then when roofs opinions about race were being reported. I thought my God, you know, that this this guy was playing out these white supremacists. Fears and fantasies that had been hatched in the rollback to reconstruction and those which had been reformulated from things that human cont in Jefferson and Hegel had said in the in the enlightenment in the early part of the nineteenth century. Then I'm trying to say that I didn't know that the tenants of white supremacy were still in cultural DNA of the United States to the degree that would lead a man to commend to church on Wednesday night. Pray and watch people pray for an hour. And then systematically, murdered them in the name of these same tenets of white supremacy. The title of your book Stony the road comes from a line in the black national anthem lift every voice and sing. I'm so we call it the negro national, and I still I insist that's the name of it. Because that's what my mama told me to call it. It's such a beautiful song. There was one of the radio shows on on the jazz station in New York when I was in high school used to use that as a I think the closing theme of the show. So I used to tune in a lot of nights just to hear that. Oh, you did. Oh, yeah. Great. But anyways, I think most people know the I I better than the verse that you take your title from. So do you do you want to quote that I for us? Now, you want me to sing. Or you want me to recite? Would you sing? I don't know. I don't know if I'm invoice that would be great. If you're saying it, okay goes like this Stony the road. We tried bidder. The cheese thing run felt in the day that who on bone had died yet with us. Eddie bead have not are we come to the plays on which are false. There's. Well, thank you as more way more than I hope for I actually singing that what role has that song played in your life? Well, the song was written to inspire. Young black children at a time. When there was nothing on the horizon that was inspirational nothing that would make black people think that the writes are people had been given by the amended constitution in thirteen fourteen and fifteen th amendments would ever come back because starting in eighteen ninety those rights had been chipped away. A by the redemption, governments in the former confederacy so that the fact that our people never gave up hope that we never stop believing that a better day was coming and that if we worked hard enough and prayed hard enough. And believe deeply enough that one day the glories that we saw reconstruction would return and hope against so that's what happened before we have to end. I'm wondering if you hear any other echoes of reconstruction or of redemption, the period of the rollback of rights for African Americans. If you hear any echoes of that today, the issues central to reconstruction, and let's let's think about them citizenship. Voting rights who has right to vote who has a right to be a citizen terrorist violence, the relationship between economic and political democracy. Those issues continued to Royal our society in our politics right now, understanding what happened to reconstruction will help us understand how to keep the rights that we have accrued. From being dismantled all over again by the evils of white supremacy. Henry Louis gates, a pleasure to talk with you again. Thank you so much. Thank you. Terry. Henry Louis gates is the author of the new book Stony the road, reconstruction white supremacy and the rise of Jim crow it's his companion to the new PBS series. He hosts called reconstruction America after the civil war which airs April ninth and sixteenth gates. Also has a new book for young adults called dark sky rising reconstruction and the dawn of Jim crow after we take a short break. We'll hear from comic. Rob Delaney co-creator co writer and co star of the comedy series catastrophe. I'm Terry gross in this is fresh air support for this podcast and the following message. Come from subzero, refrigeration, wolf cooking and cove dishwashing. Here's head demonstration. Chef Joe JR. Hasbro on the benefits of gathering around common table, one of the beautiful things about being chef is that I can use those resources to bring people together around a delicious meal. This is what food does lower. Allow you to have these wonderful moments of human interaction. Coke create and live deliciously with subzero wolf and cove, visit subzero dash wolf dot com. Our next guest is comic, rob Delaney. He co created co wrote and co stars in the hilarious series catastrophe all the episodes, including the fourth and final season are now streaming on Amazon in the first episode of the show an American man named rob meets an Irish woman named Sharon at a bar in London. They have a six day fling that becomes serious very quickly. When Sharon finds out she's pregnant, even though they hardly know each other rob moves to London. So they can try to raise the child together. The series follows them as they get married. Have children lose parents all the while trying to stay together remain, romantic and not kill each other. Sharon has played by Sharon Horgan who co created and co wrote the show with Delaney. He first became well known through his really funny tweets Delaney has since written essays about recovering from alcoholism and his bouts with depression in January last year, Delaney's two and a half year old son. Henry died of brain cancer soon after Delaney had to return to comedy writing the last season of catastrophe. Rob Delaney spoke with fresh air producer Sam brigger. They started with a clip from the final season of the show Delaney's character, rob is a recovering alcoholic who had relapsed and gotten into an accident while driving drunk injuring himself in this scene. He's back in recovery and is returning from a checkup whereas neckbrace was removed. All good. Clear got the clean full Bill health. You know, she even said that my weight loss has made my penis. Look bigger. The bad Smith. She wasn't worried about that, greedy. Soaks the whole bad neck. She don't think that's weird and growth. She didn't. Use those words what the Brian thing. They just ruin your leg. First of all. It's beige. And is it bother you that I've been declared healthy other me that your health. He scrapes interesting that you could spend four years inhaling sausage rolls and got rewarded with a team. That's good for you. You should get a check up. I'm fine. We'll have you know. I mean, you look fine. But could be a mess in there. No, just thinking, you know, one day each of us is going to go to the doctor and be told I have extremely bad news. Crowns. I think I'm gonna train for a ten K. Do you want to join me know, what you thought when you run healthy ran passer? And then you wouldn't have to help them flow, and that's a scene from the final season of catastrophe. And my guess is rob Delaney who co-stars co created and co wrote the whole show, rob Delaney. Welcome to fresh air. Thank you, many people are going to be really upset that this is the final season of catastrophe, myself included, one of the things I really love about the show is just having Sharon, and rob argue together, and it feels so real, and you know, these disputes like some of the worst ones just come out of nowhere, like they're having this tender moment like rob is clipping Sharon's toenails. And then something there's a misstep and things just go so terribly wrong. And then shouting at each other and yelling, and it's just I mean when that happens in real life. You're like what? How did how did this just happen? Yeah. Or you might even feel yourself in an argument thinking, oh, I think I'm about to do something stupid. And then you try to pull back you do it. Anyway. Yeah. It can really be a minefield, you know, even in a good marriage. And whenever people get you know, if like younger people watch the show and take a hook. I don't want to get married. I'm seeing that. And I'm like, wait. Why not they're a great couple is what I think you have such a wonderful writing partner and star of the show, and Sharon Horgan, how do you to write together? It takes us about four months to write a season. And we outline like crazy people are outlines are very long and very detailed. Then we write a very bad first draft, and then we polish it and rewrite and rewrite and rewrite, and we read it out loud constantly one thing, we always try to do is have the things that we say to each other really sound like human speech. So even though we've worked very hard on them and refined them our worst nightmares that it would sound like written or literary. There's a lot of sex on the show and Robin. Sharon, talk about sex all the time, and you know in season for they've got two kids. They're both exhausted. They're not they're not having as much sex. And I wanted to play a scene where Sharon's dad has recently died, and and her mom has sort of started seeing a new man who's this senior citizen male model and Sharon thinks that her mom's moving onto quickly. So I wanna play a scene with Sharon Robert talking about this. See the way she laughed at his jokes. It was obscene who uses their tone to laugh. What was that? Chink thousand sacks. I don't know. Maybe she still has her original hips right on feel about boss. I mean, we only have sex anymore, and that's fine. My mum's going to be doing it more than me, the Salako coal to start making more of an effort. I don't know. I mean, here's how I feel about sex with you these days on paper. It sounds amazing. But if you were to initiate it like tonight, I just be angry. But I still love fund feeling when I look at you. Maybe that's enough dominant is enough. That's a very funny scene. It gets it. As idea it's incomprehensible to young people that you know, there might be a time where you're just worn out to wanna have sex. And I just was wondering, you know, these conversations that you surprised you have as you get older about things that you take for granted in this part. It's your romantic relationship with your partner that just seems like an interesting issue to talk about. Yeah. And I mean, I hope that people who have kids are still having sacks from time to time. You know, we're not saying, you know, that they don't have sex anymore. But sometimes I mean like in real life, for example, my wife, and I are both reading a collection of short stories by Lucia Berlin. And so we'll be like, you know, we can be doing whatever we're doing folding laundry or turn it off the TV, and we'll look at each other and like, raise eyebrows. And be like, hey, you wanna go religion Lucy. That's like our flirty go to bed and absolutely read together and go to sleep and. It's wonderful. You know, so, you know, it's important to have sex, even after you have kids, but it's also important to do other things, you know, and yeah, your libido, you know, waxes and wanes over the years. And personally, I'm looking forward to, you know, maybe sometime around age seventy when my libido just dies and then enough to be led around by it. There's not a lot of nudity on the show. But when there is it's generally provided by Hugh and tip my box guts were you at all nervous about being naked on the set. Oh, definitely. But at the same time, you know, and plus I'm I'm a big person. Like, the first thing you notice when you see me among other people's as big and so just a big naked man as funny, and we never wanted any of the sex stuff to be we didn't want anybody to watch it. And be like, yeah. Baby. We want people to watch this because it's just like a it's like another body function. Like, you gotta do it. You know? And so we just wanted it to be just generally first of all funny. Second of all, you know, uncomfortable slash awful, plus nudity can really stop story short. If there's naked people on screen. I'm not really paying attention to the story myself. But if it's a big naked guys hairy, white, but. But that's kind of funny. And so I'm happy to use my. But as a punchline that might be the funniest naked part of a male or female body is a silly giant man's hairy white. But well, I wanted to talk about your physicality a little bit your you said your big guy, you're like six through Boone six four six four did use me. Correct. You're six four. But you you don't come across as looming or intimidating you. You kinda come across as gentle cuddly. And I was just wondering like if you thought about how to use your body as a comedian as you were starting down that career. Know, that's interesting. And I sort of think about that even when I'm just out in the world. Like, I know I'm big I know I have like a heavy chrome brow. So I know I'm scared like if you're walking down the street at night, and you see me, it's you're like damn it. And I I feel bad about that. So I do try to sort of counter that with my attitude. I do try to sort of, you know, project a kind energy in a, hey, don't worry. You know, like the scary package lovely caramel center or something, you know. So I am aware of that. And definitely yeah. There's aspects of rob. That are like a gentle giant. I'm sure people have asked you all your life. If you play basketball on the show, there's this couple times sharing your character. Rob is is not working in these looking for work, and Sharon a couple times suggests that you try out to be a big and tall model. And she's letting you know, your handsome, your big, and you're tossing. That that felt so real to me like I was wondering if someone had actually told you that new life. Yeah. Twice. What happened once when I was in high school in Boston and another time when I was going to college in New York City both times it was I had a friend who worked at at a modeling agency. And they were like, oh, I see the guys coming in there. I think maybe you I can get you a meeting with the person. And I'd be like, okay. Like, I would rather do that than work is like a barbeque or whatever. So I'll try and so I went in and both times with the meeting. They set up that people were like, we are you kidding? Are you kidding me? And like that person got chastised for even suggesting it. Yeah. So that so two times I went into modeling agencies. And they were like oh gosh. Hey, thank you for coming in but turn around, and and when you walk out of here, and and you don't need to come back and. It which was just exquisite pain like pins and needles like behind the eyeballs like walking out trying not to cry being giant probably knocking can't hide out. Yeah. Just just awful. So I'm glad that when we did have him finally go into one in the third season. I think we did do a good job of conveying the utter horror of what that felt like he certainly tucks his head and. We're listening to the interview fresh air producers Sam Brigham recorded with comic, rob Delaney. The co writer and co star of the series catastrophe, which is streaming on Amazon will hear more after a break. This is fresh air support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from better help better help offers licensed professional counselors, who specialize in issues such as depression stress, anxiety and more connects with your professional counselor in a safe and private online environments at your convenience, get help at your own time and your own pace schedule secure video or phone sessions plus chat and text with your therapist. Visit better help dot com slash fresh air to learn more and get ten percent off your first month. It's a fear Eisenberg host of NPR's asked me another March was women in history month, and we've declared April is women in comedy month kicking it off from the Netflix series Russian doll. We've got actor Greg. And co creator, Leslie Hedlund, plus Reta from NBC's parks and recreation and many more start listening this Friday. Let's get back to the interview our producer Sam Brig recorded with rob Delaney. Co-creator co writer and co star of the comedy series catastrophe all four seasons are streaming on Amazon you were writing this final season in the wake of losing your son to cancer. And you know, it's it's hard for me to imagine. What that must have been like for you to be grieving for your son, but have to go to work and try to find humor in the world. Can he just talk a little bit about what that was like for you? Sure. I only started to do the fourth season. Once I found out that Henry's brain tumor had returned and that he was going to die, and I knew I wouldn't start. But I agreed. I signed up to the fourth one knowing I wouldn't be able to really begin until after he did die. And the reason I did that was because I have two other kids, and we have a third now my wife was pregnant when Henry died, and I just wanted my kids to see their dad go to work, really. I didn't want to. I didn't want to do anything. I still often don't, but I love my other kids, and I love my wife, and I knew I had to sort of create some sort of scaffolding in my life. That would keep me going and helping to help me. Sort of fake it through. And then maybe, you know, approximate normal behavior may be occasionally feel somewhat normal and it was hard. It was very hard. I come in and work gradually. I started doing joy it, and I found grief and work to be compatible and. I didn't mean that. I. Inouye was a distraction from grief. I don't know that I could distract myself from the grief of losing a child. But it did sort of like the way that I've been doing grief is I must, you know, remain sober of been sober for seventeen years. I must if I'm not sleeping. I still have to be in a bed for seven or eight hours a night. I force myself to eat I my wife, and I force ourselves to go on the odd date. So that there are kids have, you know, a their parents have a relationship, and they know who we are. So that they can lean on us. So I I re- and so work was a part of that. Because I just I needed to put a support system in place. So that grief could work through me and not kill me. You know, because if you lose a child, you know, part of you is like oh well. Why the hell am I hear you know, 'cause parts of may wish that they were dead? And wish that they were with Henry wherever he may be you know, league, I don't fear death anymore. I'd like it to happen a longtime in the future because Henry's illness and disability and death. And being without him has not made me love his brothers, any less or his mother any less, and I want to be here with them. But when it comes time for me to die. I'm going to tap dance. But yeah, I mean, I have like. A significant portion of me is lives in another realm now and and is with him. Did you find support in the people that you worked with on the show? Yes. So in the room is Sharon, of course. And then our writing assistant Christie Ducker who's also wonderful and was with us for the third and fourth season. And so just start crying at the desk. And then they'd start to cry and did sort of take a cue for me as to win. We could start up again. And by doing that by sort of grieving at work in front of everybody. I know created sort of more honest and healthy environment for us to work in you know, and amazingly we were writing a comedy a joke. Heavy comedy right throughout this. Which is insane. I mean, that's I still can't believe that Robert tens AA meetings on the show you've been pretty open in the past about your struggles with alcoholism. And it sounds like in your memoir, you wrote about this that you were trying to stop drinking for a while. But just got in. And then you had this terrible car accident where you blacked out since seems like you would black out a lot when you were drinking, and I did he rammed a car? Not not your own car into a municipal building in LA. And what did you break? How many limbs did you break? I broke my left wrist and had to have surgery on that, I broke my right arm and had to have surgery on that. And then my knees neither number broken. But they were the skin. When they were ripped open to the bone. So I had surgery on all four limbs. But only two of them were broken. You said you were the most messed up person in your rehab house. And so you were kind of physically. Yeah. Guess physically. And so you were like, the mascot. Yeah. I mean because I was the type of person you could see from across the street at night while it was raining out. And be like, oh, he's he has problems. Whereas other people might have had an easier time hiding them, and I'm so grateful for that. In fact, the line in the first episode of season four were rob says to Chris, you know, I realized that my drinking could kill other people. That's just something. I would often say when I was first getting sober. Because like a lot of alcoholics I didn't care if I died, but I didn't want to kill anybody else. My god. And so when it was really driven home for me that my drinking could and likely would kill other people, then then it made it much easier to stay. Stop. I guess not easy. But maybe simple because there there was no other choice, you know, addictions, actually, a big part of the show. Your character. Rob is recovering from alcoholism. There's a character. Dave who overdoses and ends up in a Komen has. Yup. Cognitive. Yes. It's the only show I know where two characters have psoriasis. I mean. These, you know, these issue, it's it's fun, you're laughing because these these issues are taking seriously, but they're also played for laughs and in season three rob is secretly drinking. Again, I was wondering if it was hard for you to play a character who'd fallen off the wagon. It wasn't hard to play charactered fallen off the wagon one of the things about catastrophe. I enjoy is that since we write it and executive produce it as well, which means like we hire everybody and are really behind the look of the show and the music and everything so we're always thinking about so many things. So when we finally go to shoot it, and we put on our acting hats, if I'm in a sinking of a show that I wrote and also produce, and I've an playing anything it doesn't matter if I'm pretending to be weeping while drunk and begging our babysitter to forgive me for something or I'm going into a store and buying a bag of potato chips. I'm constantly thinking of things like, okay, we've got this much daylight left here. You know, it would be a good cut opportunity that we didn't think about earlier or be like, you know, up where you need. There's kids in the next scene. So I should probably finish this one up early. So we can get to that one. So that they. Because kids can only work certain number of hours a day. And all that stuff. I find really useful as an actor because it makes me way less precious about my performance, you know, so I try to fully inhabit it and believe what I'm doing and stuff, but I don't I'm also thinking so much about the bigger picture that I don't really stress out terribly. And I think that might be good. We're listening to the interview fresh air producers San Brigham recorded with comic, rob Delaney, the co writer and co star of the series catastrophe, which is streaming on Amazon will hear more after a break. This is fresh air support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Fidelity Investments as a fidelity wealth management client. You get a dedicated advisor to help grow and protect your wealth. Find ways to minimize the impact of taxes and make clear recommendations for your full financial picture. Learn more at fidelity dot com slash wealth. Fidelity brokerage services LLC. Let's get back to the interview our producer Sam Brigham recorded with rob Delaney co-creator co writer and co star of the comedy series catastrophe all four seasons are streaming on Amazon. Are you grew up in Marblehead, Massachusetts and went to NYU to get a degree in musical theatre. It sounds like when you were in college you decided that what you really wanted to do was stand up comedy. Do you? Remember your early routine like some of your first jokes? Oh god. I mean, the first time I ever did stand up. I mean, just a mill I can remember go into an open, Mike, and I had like an atlas with me, and I held it up and pointed to green land, and I noticed that. I don't know what language they speak in Greenland, but there's a native name for it, which is like colleague Nunavut or something is what it looks like phonetically, and I literally like pointed at the atlas on stage, and then handed around it was like that's crazy that it has a different name. And it's funny to me because I don't know what it is. And people were like what is get off stage. How dare you? How dare it's worse enough that you stole my money to see this. But you still might time and people were rightfully angry. And so I was very very bad and then slowly got less bad. So your career really took off because you started posting jokes on Twitter. Do you? Remember like? How or when your account started becoming really big and well, one of those first jokes were that hit an audience. This is like sexual, but it's not you can say it on the radio. I think I think I said something like sometimes if I get home from work before my wife, does I can get paralyzed deciding whether to masturbate or eat a whole pizza, and the member people being like, hey, that was funny, and and you know, re tweeting it and or like, I did something like you're damn right? I'm still gardening, the constant gardener too. You know what? Gotten zone. And so just crap like that. And yeah, gradually people started to pay attention. And the reason I use it exclusively for jokes was because I was trying to get hired as a late night writer. So I was submitting Joe packets to Jimmy Fallon Conan O'Brien Jimmy Kimmel Chelsea handler and just trying desperately to get work as a joke writer so Twitter worked pretty well for that. So I think I sort of hit Twitter with the right mindset at the right time that I was able to get an followers that. I was then able to say like, hey, Bloomington. Minnesota I'm coming to do stand up, and then be able to sell enough tickets to justify it and stuff. So so, yeah, it was Twitter was very helpful to me. Did you like us to assess like how your jokes do like what kind of jokes worked best on Twitter and things like that? Or did you only as a way that an insane sad? Scientists would only at that level of microscopic detail like a real basement. Yelling psychopath. Yes. So not much. You moved to London to do the show, and do you think the UK audience response differently to the show than the American one? Not any more. I think in the beginning when we would really put Sharon and rob through the paces. There's a more. Sort of fatalistic streak in British people or a more resigned quality where they'd be like us. Yes. Of course, another terrible thing has happened. Yes. Why would we have expected otherwise where as in America? People would be like why I tuned in for a sitcom they can't do that. They're yelling at each other. At the end the the last episode. Why aren't they tying it up in a bow? And but now four seasons later Americans. They now know how we operate. So there's more say parody the response between the two places, rob Delaney. Thanks very much for being here. Thank you for for everything. I appreciate it. Delaney is the co creator co writer and co star of the comedy series catastrophe all four seasons are streaming on Amazon he spoke with fresh air producer Sam brigger. Tomorrow on fresh air will hear the interview I just recorded at a live event with uniqueness ace again, the new conductor of the Metropolitan Opera and the conductor of the Philadelphia orchestra. He's a charismatic young conductor leading to institutions with extraordinary histories. I think you'll love hearing him talk about music and conducting. I know I did I hope you'll join us fresh Air's executive producer is Guinea Miller. Our technical director and engineers, Audrey Bentham, our associate producer for digital media is Molly seavy nesper. Roberta shorrock directs the show. I'm Terry gross. For say goodbye, I wanna remind you that it would be super helpful. If you let us know something about you. And how you use podcasts. I'm hoping you'll complete a short anonymous survey at NPR dot org slash podcast survey. It takes less than ten minutes. Help support our show and helps us figure out how we can better serve you. So that's NPR dot. Org slash podcast survey podcast survey is one word. Thank you.

rob Delaney Sharon Henry Louis gates Jim crow NPR Terry gross United States writer Amazon producer Harvard America President Obama London partner alcoholism Twitter Philadelphia
The Future of Social Marketing

Skill Up

10:21 min | 8 months ago

The Future of Social Marketing

"Breath. Hi I'm Matt Brown from hub spot, and this is skill up the show where you'll learn at take your sales marketing and service skills to the next level. Final rose ceremony for our social marketing season of scale up. I. To tell you for me, it's looking like an emotional ride in the back of the van as I exit stage left off into the sunset. But this season's been the best yet. Can I say that? I can't say that. That's bias. Okay. No, it's fine. This season has definitely been the best yet. We've heard from hope spots ensemble of experts who covered everything from social strategy to driving engagement on twitter even some insights on social reporting. Or was it social insights? Not sure it was one episode ago go back Avalon. After this episode because today we're talking Dolores and Westworld the flying cars of tomorrow, the vision of twenty, forty, nine, I was promised. We're talking about the future. And thankfully I Andrew Delano, the guidance cue that name title Clip Hi. My name is Andrew Delaney and I'm the senior manager of social media at hotspot. Nailed it from the very first question I asked who are some of your favorite brands on social I realized Andrew doesn't exactly fit the bill for your typical social marketer Ooh I feel like I shouldn't say this but I don't really follow many brands. Well, I guess that brings us to the end of today's episode. Andrew has a good reason. My team does and I like to just look at what individuals are doing a of what's going on in society or culture as a whole, and that's where I draw inspiration from power the People Andrew. Okay. So brands are often paid to play scenario when it comes a social, they pay for ads and boost posts but on the organic side of social brand pages are still in assessing for companies. What are rampages great question. Hanging this. Brand pages are the accounts that are owned and operated by brands or companies. themselves. Brands dictate the messaging, the creative and the frequency of posting and in turn pages help brands connect, engage with and delight thing. You can post anything photos, videos job opportunities to event pages can even be a way to help drive traffic to different parts of your company's own website. Great, we all on the same page because it's all about to change. Episode I, see the value of brand pages overall diminishing. So everything we just covered. Yeah. Going away each individual user is going to have much more. Authority in a way in terms of the things they say and what they choose to cover I, think branch GonNa have to get more clever and tactical their approaches and less. So focus on their own voice as user share less and less that gives other users less of a reason to go to those platforms and check them and see what's happening. So I think as groups become more popular on facebook. In particular and other communities pop up on other platforms. I think that the the main voices in those will be individual users talking to each other and I think people are going to start to get more value from them versus from the brand itself I, do think there's an opportunity for brands to enable those conversations to happen, and some of those conversations could happen in like brandon communities and they could have. Oversight of it and be aware of what's going on how people are talking about their brand. So they can still get a lot of insight and get a lot of value from those communities but I don't think their voice will be as prominent. I think when it comes to the future social media, there'd be two main types of networks BC was ones that focus on privacy of that focus on discovering connecting with others. Okay. Let's break the two. Networks focused on privacy. In the ways we communicate with people already see some of that now snapchat and messages that expire or talking and Messenger on a one on one basis. Those are really focused on people that you already know and can connect with, and then the second type of network focuses on broadening connections and enabling you to speak to other people and meet new people who are not part of. Your existing trusted circle, and we're starting to see this on tiktok right with its feed that defaults to other people not necessarily the ones you already follow. The playing field is level where on a lot of social platforms for a long time was all about growing your followers so that your organic reach could reach a given percentage of those followers in order to reach more people, you need a bigger falling. On. Talk every day that playing field is level and. Content spreads in this really I don't know unique sort of way where you could have ten followers and get millions of us, and if you had a facebook page on instagram account, the chances of that happening are a lot slimmer and you see that happen on. Tiktok much more regularly and I think that just gives a lot of say new or younger traders are new brands. It creates a lot of opportunity for them to really make big progress quickly where more like the incumbent networks and platforms that growth is much more difficult at this point. And it's this sort of focus on discovery and distribution the Andrew season. One way networks will not only start to split but also start to do really well. The whole idea behind social media is simple. Beautiful Platform is bringing people together to share ideas. So it's this type of behavior system that's likely not going to change. The question then is, how will we evolve in staying connected and sharing ideas? Well, interest starts by looking at two things. One of which you're likely using at this very moment right now, we have air pods You see people walking around the city all the time with these things and talking to people listen to music podcast whatever they might be doing. kind of waiting for someone to. Leverage, that hardware and? Do something really interesting that connects groups of people to kind of like an always on group chat but a group chats focused on voice not focused on like text and Buick in a group chat with all my friends and I could just be like a spectator like I'm listening to a live podcast if I was in like an audio group of people talking about social media, people propose problems someone else might be able to hop in for thirty seconds and give a solution or a proposal to fix that problem and then kind of hop out and you could be. Like little support network facebook groups, I think is a big part of the future and I think we'll see that platform shift a lot more towards that, and I do find a lot of value in the group that I'm a part of I'm just kind of waiting for it to take that next step to that more intimate experience where can be speaking to different people in real time all the time something Andrews. Getting at here is how stale that way don't say boring certain types of social content can be I spend an incredible amount of time watching live streams. Probably, multiple hours a day I don't really follow any of the creators and I always watched different ones. But to me, it's more exciting than recorded media. I don't spend a lot of time watching TV shows or movies. I. Guess I do spend some time watching live sports and I draw a lot of similarities in a weird sort of way between twitch and live sports where them watching like a professional. American football game. I don't know what's going to happen and that's what I love about twitch and it's that like unexpected thing that I will wait hours for just seeing what it could become. A really interesting dynamic on twitch between creators and their audience were with chat the creators able to really have a conversation with different people that are posting things as messages to them as an individual and different people can leverage that in different ways whether it be text onscreen or reading comments or having those comments read aloud to the entire audience I. Think there's a second dynamic and it's the way audience members interact. With other audience members, it's not just about talking to crater the what you have in common and it's talking to other people that share that same interest. Now, many of these craters will have dischord channels that allows the audience to talk to each other and talk to the Creator, but it's still separate platform and I'm excited to see if in the future someone comes up with a way to merge these two things. SORTA summarize as brand pages continue to develop. The power will shift from brands to people in the social continues to evolve things like live streaming will likely involve more seamless integration with conversations and communities that community you can get either through people you have a close relationship with or people you've never met. that. I think is really interesting. I think different people strive for connection in different ways and think social tools that really enable that in the future will be really valuable. So, with that. season, of skill up comes to a close it's been quite the trip but you may, and all of these hub spot experts were all now well versed in the art of social marketing. Look at us. If you haven't already be sure to subscribe to skill up, we'll have another new season loaded up into the podcast machine before you know it until then you can check out all episodes of this season or previous seasons here in our shows feed anytime or you can always learn more at hub spot dot com. So, until next season. Hey. I'll see there.

facebook Andrew Andrew Delano Matt Brown twitter Andrew Delaney Avalon Dolores senior manager Westworld BC football thirty seconds
NBC Reporter Cusses, and More Celebrity Politics

KILF Morning New Podcast

05:29 min | 3 weeks ago

NBC Reporter Cusses, and More Celebrity Politics

"Thing that you learn when you get into radio or tv is don't speak when there may be a hot mike around. Well let's say anything you don't want people to hear. Don't say anything that your grandmother would not approve of. This is a particular problem. We've mentioned this but this is a particular problem in television here in radio. We turn our own microphones. Sometimes but sometimes we forget or make mistakes and we think it's often it's really on. The rule is the rules. still stay. i'm just saying it's much less likely to happen in radio than it is on tv because they don't control their own microphone now but people should consider that there. Mike is hot twenty four seven. They're on. There's a guy with nbc. A reporter named kevin delaney n- who started swearing during a live segment on tuesday and msnbc host. Craig melvin asked him for some breaking news you. Here's the here's the audience and what happened and the awkward silence that follows our trip. Ministration is handling the transition with the incoming by team or not handling it. We should say to a certain extent this time. It involves our intelligence community king. Or what have you learned sir. Listen okay think rules. I think we lost ken for a second. You think delaney and ted so he tweeted later on so sorry for the profanity. I used on air. Last hour is experiencing some technical difficulty. I believe it mistakenly hung up on the control room. Though my mic was still on perils of playing producer cameraman and tech support all at the same time from home and the added the hashtag. Twenty twenty. I believe him now. I do believe him. I first of all. I just ridiculed the idea of technical difficulties. That's what we always say. We don't know what the hell's going on around here but Or if we do no and it's something that somebody who's made a big mistake. But no i believe him and i also believe that this is what he said the perils of playing producer cameraman and tech support. Because i know my my husband works from home. upstairs does a lot of zoom interviews. And he's had technical difficulties he hasn't sworn on the air. But no. But i mean it's it's hard when you're working from home. Yes you know although we should say that case he did have control of his own mind because he was working from home but Actress abe longoria has apologized four and clarified controversial remarks. She made during an msnbc interview after many accused her of downplaying the pivotal role of black women in joe. Biden's election win. Yeah what she said was. Us latinos are the current of the two thousand twenty election victory so that seemed to exclude black women black women as he said she said latinas because she's latina watching this back. She says i can see that. This sounds like a comparing latina's two black women which i would never do. Yeah I was comparing latina's to their male counterparts but my wording was not clear and i deeply regret that. Yeah we have to apologize for everything these days. That's the problem. I i you know. I have no problem with what she. I'm not particularly interested in what famous people what actresses and singers think about politics than you care about robert non-iraqi not not in the least but But in this case i can. I sent her frustration okay. I didn't say. I didn't say all the words right. I didn't say it exactly right. It's like referring to somebody who's gay. And you're trying to refer to the entire. Lgbt community as a whole but all you said was gay and then use the plus pyrite so left them out. you know. Life is tough enough without everybody. Parsing every word that comes out of somebody else's mouth it seems like we're chastise for what we say and what we don't say okay you can do robert deniro because i have no interest at all other than the fact that he's like him as an act terrorist fabulous. Just wish he'd show. Setting was relieved. That joe biden one last tuesday's election but he warns another wanna be dictator like president. Trump will come along by using the same playbook as mussalini hitler. Yeah that's what he did. That's what trump ted murdered. Millions of people like mussalini and hitler. He says someone's going to come along. Who's a lot smarter more sensitive more mercurial and not so boorish. We'll be able to pull the wool over the eyes of the public. And that's the other thing a really really getting tired of all of these people who who act like the half of america that voted for donald trump were total idiots. Well disrespect for people who believe something other than what you believe. We have a story later on. About what mark. Cuban said mark. Cuban said the people who voted for are not stupid. They're not misinformed. Thank you mark. I'm just thinking on behalf of all the people who voted today. We're never we're never going to settle down and get together and talk nice to each other. If we don't stop that have a little respect. A little respect okay. You can disagree. You can think the guy's an idiot you just don't say it have a little respect.

kevin delaney Craig melvin abe longoria msnbc delaney robert non nbc ted ken Mike robert deniro msnbc Biden mussalini hitler mussalini joe joe biden Trump Us hitler
Best Of: Henry Winkler / Rob Delaney

Fresh Air

50:33 min | 1 year ago

Best Of: Henry Winkler / Rob Delaney

"This message comes from NPR sponsor Comcast. Comcast values your time. That's why you can schedule to our appointment windows, including nights and weekends that way. You can spend more time doing what you love. Comcast working to make things. Simple, easy, and awesome. From WHYY in Philadelphia. I'm Terry gross with fresh air weekend. Today. Henry Winkler he won an EMMY for his performance in HBO's dark comedy series berry. He plays a self important acting teacher. This is not long time. Barry, this is not cheers. I am not Sam Malone. You won't have blow off steam Detroit after class Winkler became famous for his role unhappy days as the fonz a guy, so cool. He could attract any woman with Justice nap of his fingers. Never actually snap your finger in real life. Women will break it off. Also, we hear from comic, rob Delaney, co creator and co star of the comedy series catastrophe. About two people who decide to marry after their wild six day. Fling leaves her pregnant he'll talk about being funny. Even when life is not an rock critic, Ken Tucker reviews, the new album by seventeen year old pop star Billy eyelash support for this podcast and the following message. Come from mayo clinic when the search for the right answer becomes the most important journey of your life. When a clear diagnosis would mean the world to you when finding new options could help you find hope, you know, where to go mayoclinic, find out more at mayoclinic dot org slash answers. When Henry Winkler accepted his EMMY award last September for his performance in HBO's dark comedy series berry. He said, I only have thirty seven seconds. I wrote this forty three years ago. The forty three years is a reference to when he was first nominated for an EMMY for his performance on happy days as Arthur Herbert funds Ereli, aka Fonzie, aka the funds a network sitcom version of a cool guy with slicked back hair, a motorcycle and a leather jacket who could attract girls with a snap of his fingers since then he's been in movies and TV shows, including recurring roles and parks and recreation and arrested development in berry, which is now in its second season. And just got renewed for third winter plays, gene Cousteau, a self important acting teacher who sees himself as a wise, experienced mentor. One of his students berry is played by Bill Hader, an alum of Saturday Night Live who co created the series gene tries to get students to draw on their emotional truths. But berry is hiding his truth. He's a veteran who fought in Afghanistan and after returning home use the skill. Does he learned to become a hitman? He first came to the acting class on assignment to kill one of the students. Someone else ended up taking care of that. But berry becomes increasingly drawn to acting and wants to stay in the class and changes life. Here's a scene from last Sunday's episode genus having his students tell their own stories for show. He's putting together berry. Reluctantly reveals a little about himself and tells the story of the first time he shot and killed someone in Afghanistan. Gene is so moved by Barry story, and so unaware of what Barry is still hiding. He tries to convince berry to tell the Afghans STAN story onstage, but BARRET tries to get out of having to do it. Here's Henry Winkler is gene casino and Bill Hader as berry Mexico. I don't really have to tell the story. I told yesterday in front of an audience. Of course are good. Thank you know, that version is just the beginning see during rehearsal, and this is just my instinct your. Gonna find more complicated up. Details. Those we have to hear right? But you know, you said that this is story that has to define us. And I just I don't think that's the person that I am Parry. You're justifying the nervous, but I will not hear a word about switching it out. One iota for something less compelling user, like doing Afghanistan. I wanna do a story about meeting you go on. Yeah. You know being in this class and senior teach and you want to tell the story of meeting me. Yeah. Allow it. That's great despair. I think it'd be way better than Afghantistan. I can be as involved as you need me to be in order to craft space orcas. Stay on the sidelines. I totally understand either ways. Okay. I don't think any new would know more about me than me. That's a good point back. I don't think you need to be involved at all. You know? I I was there. Remember scrapbooks? Oh, cool. If you need them. I've got diaries. I've got pictures. I've got taste berry. I have got a lot of tapes. I think I'm good, Mr. Cousteau. Thank you. Henry Winkler welcome to fresh air. You're terrific in this role. I'm so glad to have you on our show. So your character Gina so intent on getting truthful performances from students and have them dig deep into their souls. But he's also so narcissistic and wrapped up in the mystique. He's tried to create around himself in this little class. This must have made you think a lot about some of the best and worst acting teachers you had now that you're playing an acting teacher have you gone gone back to look at your past and your acting teachers I have I've had about fourteen teachers from Emerson college to Yale drama school. And what was amazing is that some of them were inspirational some of them were mean, some of them lost their way and some of them had nothing to say, what is one of the worst acting exercises? You were obligated to do when you were a student. I did an exercise with one of my favorite teachers his name was Bobby Lewis. He was a member of the group theatre. Bobby Lewis had us pick a painting pick a character in the painting. Get some element of clothing that represented that character take the pose step out of the pose and create who you thought that person was I am so dyslexic. I got my piece of costume. I struck my pose I stood there. And he said is there any reason you are mirror opposite to what is in the painting. I said, no, I'm not I there's no reason at all. And I just turned around and immediately struck the pose in the other direction, and he started to cry. He said you're making a mockery of my work. And. I had no idea what he was talking about. Well, that seems really harsh except that he was the man to be honest. Most of what I know most of what I use in my well of education comes from the great Bobby Lewis. So do you tribute this like a mirror reverse thing that you were doing to the dyslexia? I do I had no idea. And I of course, had no sense of self at that time. I was an unrefrigerated bowl of jello. Just before it congeals. I just thought. Well, that's it. My career is over my they're going to kick me out of school. And by the way, you didn't know you had dyslexia at the time or did not until I was thirty one. And you find out found out at the age of thirty one because yes after my stepson was tested because he was so verbal and he is so smart. And but he couldn't do reports. He couldn't write. He couldn't organize his thoughts. And when we had him tested, everything that they said about jed was true about me. And I realized oh, I'm not a stupid dog. I actually have something with the name. How was that helpful to have a diagnosis? The first thing I got very angry because all of the arguments in my house with the short Germans who were my parents were for naught all of the grounding was phenomenal. Gleaming grounded like your ground. Yes. Yes. Like, I couldn't go to the dance on Friday night because your grades weren't watch. My grades were horrible. I am in the bottom three percent academically in America that is calculated. And then I went from all of that anger too. I now understand possibly if I didn't fight through my dyslexia. I would not be sitting at this microphone chatting with you. So how did you get the part in berry? My wife, and I had just left an estate planning meeting. I didn't understand one word that the two office. We're talking about. That's not your true. Yes. I don't know. But I really didn't get it. And all I kept saying was guess that sounds like a great idea. And oh, yes. The kids are taking care of. That's good. And then we were driving down Ventura boulevard. I got a call in the car from my then agent iris who said. They want you to come in. You're on a short list its Bill hater, I went Bill Hader, Saturday Night Live, and it's H B O H B O. And then I said, okay. I'm on a list is Dustin Hoffman on that list. Because if he is I'm not going in. 'cause he's getting it. They said, no he's not on that list. I said, okay. They sent me a script our youngest, son. Max who is a director directed me in the scenes for the audition. And it was very strict. So you see your set of Dustin Hoffman is on the list. I'm not doing it. Why did you think of destiny decimo v star? Well, there's a lot of Oscar winner. I know, but you know, where have you been the same height? Okay. So you got a primetime EMMY for your performance as the acting teacher in berry. Did it take a long time for you to unfunded yourself in the eyes of the industry? It did not with me. But yes, I literally saw it. I was going to beat the system the funds were so popular in so many countries. I thought well, this is gonna be I'm not going to be typecast. I'm gonna go from mountain to mountaintop. And then I had a rude awakening that you don't beat the system, and it took me, maybe. Eight years after the fawns to really get a good acting role. That's when I started producing we did macgyver and sightings and so weird and directing a little bit. I'm gonna talk a little bit about happy days. How would you describe the series and your character to people too young to have seen it? It was a a story about a family about the trials and tribulations of living together. It was set in the fifties. Where the music was great. And my character was a tough guy who wrote a motorcycle war or leather jacket and had a very soft heart. Ear character exuded? Good good. I I don't think you got to the more goofy parts of the character. What would what would that be that in your mind? Okay. That he thought he was like it, you know, that he was just like the greatest most handsome people treated him like that. Right. I don't know that he thought he was because when he, you know, the first thing I said to the producers when they called me on my bursting in nineteen Seventy-three seventy three and said would you like to play this part? I said, hey, when he takes the leather jacket off when he takes his jacket off who does he have to be cool for in his apartment. If you let me show the other side, it would be my pleasure to play this character. What did you really like tell them who the character needed to be before you accepted the part? No, not you. I would not tell Gary Marshall a rest his soul who I thought he had to be. But I put the character on. And then they let me so it onto my being. My guest is Henry Winkler. He stars in the HBO dark comedy series berry, which is now in its second season. We'll talk more after a break and Ken Tucker will review the new album by seventeen year old pop star Billy eyelash, this is fresh air weaken. We'd like to thank our sponsor who brings you this message. Discover who alerts you if they find your social security number on any one of thousands of risky websites. Discover believes there are some things you just need to know. It's just another way. Discover looks out for you, not just your account and best of all social security alerts are free for discover card members. All you have to do is sign up online. Learn more at discover dot com slash free alerts. Limitations apply. Let's get back to my interview. With Henry Winkler. He won an EMMY for his performance as a self important acting teacher in HBO's dark comedy series berry, which is now in its second season. And just got renewed for a third. So you're character when he. He was in public, and especially when who is around girls exuded confidence a comic confidence. But confidence us confidence is something you told us you were greatly lacking in that's true because of your dyslexia. And because your father was always like punishing you and insulting you for not doing well in school not realize because you had dyslexia. So was it. What was it like for you to be this comic character who just like exuded confidence? He'd snap his finger and girls would like walk over to him. He was here's my advice. Never actually snap your finger in real life. Women will break it off. That's good advice. Yes. Thank you. Okay. It's you exemplify the kinds of things you should not say or do regarding women. We're going to play a scene from happy days in which you're talking about how to deal with women in. You're you're talking to Richie's parents hear about that Richie's there too. I missed the sieges take seat. I'll tell you about women, right? Boy. This could be very enlightening. You gotta understand women. They are not real people. Excuse me. Listen, they expect the guy to make a pass they get angry Lee expect. But now this is crucial. But. Let them feel. Dunked passed from hand to hand unwanted sight unseen, and you've got hurt feelings. Maybe he's right that maybe. He's wrong. I'm role. Now, look, I don't want to hear any more about this. We are going to tell the truth. And I don't want to hear any arguments of funds is wrong. Okay. Some bad advice there. Let me just say the worst advice ever given out of prisons mouth specially. But you know, there were many writers there were like twenty writers in the room from twenty one year olds to seventy seven year olds. And when we were doing this in the seventies. There was a completely different dynamic between people not that it was more. Right. It was just different. But if you know, I I now when when a fan comes and wants to take a picture, I asked if I can put my arm around them to take the selfie because we live in a very different time with a very different expectation and level of respect does some of the dialogue from happy days. Make you cringe listening back. No because it was what it was. And I love doing that show. And I didn't know better. So you've told the story before about how early on in happy days, you're only allowed to wear your leather jacket when you were with your motorcycle. That's right because otherwise it looked to what ABC thought I would be associated with crime. So Gary Marshall in his wisdom because of the jacket you look, yes. What you look like like with like a hood. I mean, like one of the people who made the leather jacket famous and movies is Marlon Brando. Yes. That's right. So he was a motorcycle, you know, like thug. What's also hilarious is considering how many leather jackets and vegan leather jackets are out there. Now to think that like the leather jacket had such power that the network was afraid of you wearing it that is really a different time. It's amazing. And now that but I all those leather jackets from the tiniest leather jacket that the person had when they were three to the new leather jacket that they are wearing now I have signed. In silver. So I want to ask you about your parents. I don't know if they're still alive or are not they're not. Okay. So, you know, your parents were German immigrants. They came were here in nineteen thirty nine they did. So and and your Jewish so it's good. They came when I did I I think the door closed. Yeah. So what what how do they know to to leave? I always want to help people know the time is right. And they'd better. My father knew that it was time. He got a six-week visa from Germany to come and do work in New York, but was expected to come right back. I have told this story that he took his mother's jewelry. Bought a box of chocolate melted. The chocolate down put the pieces of jewelry in the in the chocolate box melted. The poured the chocolate over the jewelry put the box under his arm. So when I he was stopped by the Nazis, and they said are you taking anything of value out of Germany? He said, no you can open every bag. We've got nothing and the jewelry that he encased in chocolate he sold when he came out of Ellis Island into New York and was able to start a new a new life here, slowly. But surely, I have the the actual letters from the government each time my father requested to stay a little longer, and they would say, yes. And I was born in thank God. Because I love our country. This is the US government giving him permission to status and. You had an uncle who stayed behind a little longer and couldn't get out uncle Helmut. And he was supposed to escape with a submarine. That was supposed you know, they had a meeting place, and they a lot of friends we're going to get on this submarine and get out. And he said, no, no, no. I'm just going to stay one more day. It'll be fine. I'm having a white dinner jacket made at the Taylor. And I I would I think I can wait one more day. I'll be okay, and he was taken Auschwitz, and I just did a show called better late than never where I traveled around the world. And I saw the plaque in the street that commemorated my uncle and every other Jew that was taken from Berlin. And it said his Helmut Winkler his date of birth. When he lived in the building the plaque. Was in front of and a what year he was taken to Auschwitz? So was it was your family religious where you will. You raise my family was religious. They are certainly more religious than I am. I am proud of my religion. My children were all bought and bar mitzvah. But I I'm not as traditional or keeping the tradition as my parents were we we said the prayer over the bread and the wine and the candles on Friday night. We had Shabbat dinner. My parents went to temple every week. My father was president of the temple. Do you think that the holocaust made your parents feel more strongly about being observant? I don't have an answer to that question. Okay. I didn't like them so much. I didn't pay attention a lot like I era. That's right. Yeah. I didn't now certainly now I've I've mellowed well. But a lot of my life was fueled by the fury of these two people who were so. Non present on who I was on the earth. Do you think that your parents having gotten out just in time your ankle having died in Auschwitz, you know, the knowledge of what happened to everybody was all the juices stayed behind Germany. Yes. Yes. Do you think that that made your father more disappointed in you in in in your difficulties reading and everything because it's like what do you have to complain about? Why can't you'd be better? Look, what happened in Germany like, you know, what I don't know. If that is true, listen, I figure the trauma of leaving your country losing your family. The holy cost of what was happening in the world at that moment, certainly affected the way they were. But on the education part the being lazy the not living up to my potential being a Duma hunt, which is dumb dog. I think that was in his DNA. I think that they brought that with them with oh without a war. Henry winkler. It's just been great to talk with you. Thank you. So you Henry Winkler co-stars in the HBO series. Barry the second season is being shown on HBO Sunday nights. It was just renewed for a third season. No. Tell me I've been. The two. Greatness, q. Billy Irish is a seventeen year old singer songwriter from California who's just released her debut album, titled when we all fall asleep. Where do we go? She's already enormously popular on the strength of a series of single. She's released most of them recorded at home with her brother as her producer rock critic, Ken Tucker says no one else in current music. Sounds like Billy eyelash. Here's his review. Late shit. Now planting who say. To those. Like. I think so clean. Over a pulsing beat the voice of Billy eyelash slides in that voice is at once intimately confiding and slurry. It's hard to catch the words, but you get the gist. She's taunting a guy for being a bad guy. But then mid verse she changes course, suggesting that she's the bad guy that far from being a victim. She's a perpetrator it's a clever wily move. But then so much of what this seventeen year old singer songwriter does is Wiley and clever and her debut album called when we all fall asleep. Where do we go is frequently startling showcase for her sly smarts? They don't feel so good six no food Fundus. To go five team who said. I laugh. Thanks, Sean days as of so love. Three's a crowd to slip away. To do. Shut. Billy was raised in. Los Angeles, home schooled by parents who are actors over the past couple of years. Young. Billy has racked up over a billion streams for her songs of quiet angst and self mocking humor. Pretty good for a kid who's making most of her music at home inner bedroom, where their brother that brother is finished O'Connell, an actor and musician who writes some of her work and produces most of it the song. I just played wish you were gay is one of the singles that established her popularity in it, she talks about a stalled romance rather than confronting the reasons he might not have liked her. She says she just wishes he were gay because if so the pressure would be offer that is Primo teenage thinking and kudos to island for being honest enough to set it to music, another song Zanny may warm the hearts of parents with its anti-drug message. Missing. They just keep doing nothing. Tell and talks Cade to be scared. But you will with the. Nothing wooden stable. Bring us chase to to. Nuts about the. Thing. Small. Doc. Zanny to feel but. Me. Of a song about being repulsed by her generations, rampant misuse of Xanax, Zanny temps listener to fixate on the lyrics, but the music should not be ignored eyelash begins that song with a smoky psi. It reminds me a little of Lanta del Rey. And even more of the torch singer, Julie London to make a reference that might mean something to baby boomers, but will seem hopelessly obscure to eyelash and her generations Z core audience. There's a premature world weariness about Irish that she somehow makes enormously appealing her perennially poker faced affect is a rebuke to any adult who might have the goal to tell her to lighten up, but her songs, give her blank moutainous context detail and wait. One. Onto speaker. Why? From play. Do we? Come in. Fitted? Oh, what is it? Exactly pain is the amount cleaning out the Muslim is fact to Lincoln about things that the two way Lincoln. You don't wanna jump like? Step on the glass. That's bury a friend who's screechy sound effects. Dramatize eyelash lyric about a monster under the bed. She and her brother like to play around with a recorded voice distorting it making it blur into dance. Pop. Who's beats something to hip hop in their precise rhythms quest. No. My lesson. To be talking. But said it. In the looks faecal Mets like what on? On. Billy Irish doesn't sound like anyone around right now, partly because her frame of reference seem so vast. In addition to hip, hop, electric dance music. She seems to be on familiar terms with folk music soul music, glam rock heavy metal. It wouldn't have shocked me at all. If the seventeen year old had concluded her album singing a duet with Willie Nelson. Instead, she wraps it up with three songs that are the most bleak and despairing ones on the album. I dunno where Irish is heading. And I'll bet she finds my confusion. Just another measure of success Kentucky reviewed Billy eyelashes new album when we all fall asleep. Where do we go coming up? We hear from comic. Rob Delaney co-creator co writer and co star of the comedy series catastrophe. This is fresh air weekend. This message comes from NPR sponsor REI co op we all have wild ideas. But rarely do we get to see our wildest idea. Lia's come to life. Started by adventure? Journalists Shelby stinger and brought to you by REI wild ideas worth living is a podcast that explores everything from mindfulness in school to adventures in space, overcoming fear and learning how to unplug ideas that started big in wild and never stopped growing. Learn more or listen now search for wild ideas worth living. Our next guest is comic, rob Delaney. He co created co wrote and co stars in the hilarious series catastrophe all the episodes, including the fourth and final season are now streaming on Amazon in the first episode of the show an American man named rob meets an Irish woman named Sharon at a bar in London. They have a six day fling that becomes serious very quickly. When Sharon finds out she's pregnant, even though they hardly know each other rob moves to London. So they can try to raise the child together. The series follows them as they get married. Have children lose. Parents all the while trying to stay together remain, romantic and not kill each other. Sharon is played by Sharon Horgan who co created and co wrote the show with Delaney. He first became well known through his really funny tweets Delaney has since written essays about recovering from alcoholism and his bouts with depression in January last year, Delaney's two and a half year old son. Henry died of brain cancer soon after Delaney had to return to comedy writing the last season of catastrophe. Rob Delaney spoke with fresh air producer Sam brigger. They started with a clip from the final season of the show Delaney's character, rob is recovering alcoholic who had relapsed and gotten into an accident while driving drunk injuring himself in this scene. He's back in recovery and is returning from a checkup whereas neck was removed. So good. Clear clean, full bell. She even said that my weight loss. My penis. Look bigger. Yes. She wasn't worried about that really tell her how. The whole bed neck. She don't think that's weird and growth. She didn't. Use those words the Bryant, they just ruin your leg. First of all. It's beige and bother you that I've been declared healthy other me that your health. Great interesting that you could spend four years in hailing sausage rolls and get rewarded with the team. That's good for you should get a check up. I'm fine. Have you know? I mean, you look fine. But could be a mess in there. You know, just thinking, you know, one day each of us is going to go to the doctor told I have extremely bad news. Crimes. I think I'm gonna train for ten K. Do you want to join me know, what you far when you all the ran faster? And then you wouldn't have to help them flow. That's a scene from the final season of catastrophe. Am I guess is rob Delaney who co-stars co created and co wrote the whole show, rob Delaney? Welcome to fresh air. Thank you, many people are going to be really upset that this is the final season of catastrophe, myself included, one of the things I really love about the show is just having Sharon, and rob argue together in it feels so real, and you know, these disputes like some of the worst ones just come out of nowhere, like they're having this tender moment like rob is clipping Sharon's toenails. And then something there's a misstep and things just go so terribly wrong. And then shouting at each other and yelling, and it's just I mean when that happens in real life. You're like what how? How did this just happen? Yeah. Or you might even feel yourself in an argument thinking, oh, I think I'm about to do something stupid. And then you try to pull back you do it. Anyway. Yeah. It can really be a minefield, you know, even a good marriage. And whenever people get you know, if like younger people watch the show and hook. I don't wanna get married. I'm being that. And I'm like, wait. Why not they're a great couple is what I think. You have such a wonderful writing partner and star of the show, and Sharon Horgan, how do you to write together? It takes us about four months to write a season, and we outlined like crazy, people are outlines are very long and very detailed. Then we write a very bad first draft, and then we polish it and rewrite and rewrite and rewrite, and we read it out loud constantly one thing, we always try to do is have the things that we say to other really sound like human speech. So even though we've worked very hard on them and refined them our worst nightmares that it was like written or literary. There's a lot of sex on the show and Robin. Sharon, talk about sex all the time, and you know in season for they've got two kids. They're both exhausted. They're not they're not having as much sex. And I wanted to play a scene where Sharon's dad has recently died, and and her mom has sort of started seeing a new man who's this senior citizen male model and Sharon thinks that her mom's moving onto quickly. So I wanna play a with Sharon Robert talking about this. See the way she laughed at his jokes. It was obscene who use their tone to laugh what was thousand sex. I don't know. Maybe she still has her original hips, right? Feel about boss. Very have sex anymore. And that's fine. My mum's going to be doing more than me the Salako coal to start making more of an effort. I don't know. I mean, here's how I feel about sex with you these days on paper. But sounds amazing. But if you were to initiate it like tonight, I just be angry. But I still have a fond feeling when I look at you. Maybe that's enough. Dominant is enough. That's a very funny scene. It gets to decide it's incomprehensible to young people that you know, there might be a time where you're just worn out to wanna have sex. And I just was wondering, you know, these conversations that you surprised you have as you get older about things that you take for granted in this part. It's your romantic relationship with your partner that just seems like an interesting issue to talk about. Yeah. And I mean, I hope that people who have kids are still having sex from time to time, you know, we're not saying, you know, that they don't have sex anymore. But sometimes I mean like in real life, for example, my wife, and I are both reading a collection of short stories by Lucia Berlin. And so we'll be like, you know, we can be doing whatever we're doing folding laundry or turn off the TV and we'll look at each other. And like raise our bras and be like, hey, wanna go relive Lucy. Flirty go to bed and absolutely read together and go to sleep, and that's wonderful. So, you know, it's important to have sex even after you have kids, but it's also important to do other things. And yeah, your libido, you know, waxes and wanes over the years. And personally, I'm looking forward to, you know, maybe sometime around age seventy when might lip just dies, and then enough to be you know, let around by it. There's not a lot of nudity on the show. But when there is it's generally provided by Hugh and my box. Were you at all nervous about being naked on the set? Oh, definitely. But at the same time, you know, and plus I'm I'm a big person. Like, the first thing you notice when you see me among other people's as big and so just a big naked man as funny, and we never wanted any of the sex stuff to be we didn't want anybody to watch. And be like, yeah. Baby. We want people to watch this is because it's because it's just like a it's like another body function. Like, you gotta do it. You know? And so we just wanted it to be just generally first of all funny. Second of all, you know, uncomfortable slash awful, plus nudity can really stop a story short. If there's naked people on screen. I'm not really paying attention to the story myself. But if it's a big naked guys hairy white, but that's kind of funny. And so I'm happy is my, but as a punchline that might be the. Funniest naked part of a male or female body is a silly giant man's hairy white. But I wanted to talk about your physicality a little bit me, your you said your big you're like six through six four six did use me. Correct. You're six four. But you you don't come across as looming or intimidating you. You kinda come across as gentle cuddly. And I was just wondering like if you thought about how to use your body as a comedian as you were starting down that career. You know, that's interesting. And I sort of think about that even when I'm out in the world like, I know I'm big no, I have like a heavy chrome gnan brow. So I know I'm like you're walking down the street at night. And you see me it's you're like damn it. And I I feel bad about that. So I do try to sort of counter that with my attitude. I do try to sort of, you know, project a kind energy in a, hey, don't worry. You know, like the scary package lovely caramel center or something, you know. So I am aware of that. And definitely yeah. There's aspects of rob. That are like a gentle giant. You were writing this final season in the wake of losing your son to cancer. And you know, it's it's hard for me to imagine. What that must have been like for you to be grieving for your son, but have to go to work and try to find humor in the world. Can he just talk a little bit about what that was like for you? Sure. I only started to do the fourth season. Once I found out that Henry's brain tumor had returned and that he was going to die, and I knew I wouldn't start. But I agreed. I signed up to the fourth one knowing I wouldn't be able to really begin until after he did die. And the reason I did that was because I have two other kids, and we have a third now my wife was pregnant when Henry died, and I just wanted my kids to see their dad go to work, really. I didn't want to didn't want to do anything. I still often don't but. I love my other kids, and I love my wife, and I knew I had to sort of create some sort of scaffolding in my life that would keep me going and helping to help me sort of fake it through and then maybe, you know, approximate normal behavior, maybe occasionally feel somewhat normal, and it was hard very hard. I come in and work gradually. I started doing joy it, and I found grief and work to be compatible and. I didn't mean that. I. In no way was a distraction from grief. I don't know that I could distract myself from the grief of losing child. But it did sort of like the way that I've been doing grief is I must, you know, remain sober. I've been sober for seventeen years. I must if I'm not sleeping. I still have to be in a bed for seven or eight hours a night. I forced myself to eat. I my wife, and I force ourselves to go on the odds date. So that there are kids have, you know, a their parents have a relationship, and they know who we are. So that they can lean on us. So I I re- and so work was a part of that. Because I just I needed to put a support system in place. So that grief could work through me and not kill me. You know, because if you lose a child, you know, part of you is like oh well. Why the helm I hear you know, because parts of may wish that they were dead. And wish that they were with Henry wherever he may be you know, league, I don't fear death anymore. I'd like it to happen a longtime in the future because Henry's illness and disability and death. And being without him has not made me love his brothers, any less or his mother any less, and I want to be here with them. But when it comes time for me to die. I'm going to tap dance. But yeah, I mean, I have like. A significant portion of me is lives in another realm now and and is with him. Did you find support in the people that you worked with on the show? Yes. So in the room is Sharon, of course. And then our writing assistant Christie Ducker who's also wonderful and was with us for the third and fourth season. And so just start crying at the desk. And then they'd start to cry and sorta take a cue for me as to win we could start up again. And by doing that by sort of grieving at work in front of everybody. I know created sort of more honest, healthy environment for us to work in, you know. And amazingly we were writing a comedy a joke heavy comedy throughout this, which is insane. I mean, that's I still can't believe that Robbins AA meetings on the show you've been pretty open in the past about your struggles with alcoholism. And it sounds like in your memoir, you wrote about this that you were trying to stop drinking for awhile, but just got in. And then you had this terrible car accident where you blacked out since seems like you would black out a lot when you're drinking, and I did he rammed a car. Not not your own car into communicable building in LA. And what did you break? How many limbs did you break? I broke my left wrist and had to have surgery on that, I broke my right arm and had to have surgery on that. And then my knees neither number broken. But they were the skin. When they were ripped open to the bone. So I had surgery on all four limbs. But only two of them were broken. You said you were the most messed up person in your rehab house. And so you were kind of physically guess physically. And so you were the mascot. Yeah. I mean because I was the type of person you could see from across the street at night while it was raining out. And be like, oh, he's he has problems. Whereas other people might have had an easier time hiding them, and I'm so grateful for that. In fact, the line in the first episode of season four were rob says to Chris, you know, I realized that my drinking could kill other people. That's just something. I would often say when I was first getting sober. Because like a lot of alcoholics I didn't care if I died, but I didn't want to kill anybody else. My god. And so when it was really driven home for me that my drinking could and likely would kill other people than than it made it much easier to. Stop. I guess not easy. But maybe simple because there there was no other choice you moved to London to do the show. And do you think the UK audience response differently to the show than the American one? Not anymore. I think in the beginning when we would really put Sharon, rob through the paces. There's more. Sort of fatalistic streak in British people or more resigned quality where they'd be like us. Yes. Of course. Another terrible thing has happened. Yes. Why would we have expected otherwise where as in America? People would be like why I turned in for a sitcom. They can't do that. They're yelling at each other. At the the the last episode. Why aren't they tying it up in a bow? And but now four seasons later Americans. They now know how we operate. So there's more say parody response between the two places, rob Delaney. Thanks very much for being here. Thank you for for everything. I appreciate it. Rob Delaney is the co creator co writer and co star of the comedy series catastrophe all four seasons are streaming on Amazon. He spoke with fresh air producer Sam brigger. Fresh air weekend is produced by Teresa Madden. Fresh Air's executive producers, Danny Miller, our technical director and engineers, Audrey Bentham. Our interviews and reviews produced an edited by any salad Phyllis Myers. Roberta shorrock sambergen, Lauren. Crendall Heidi Simone moods. Eighty Thia Challenor and Seth Kelly. Molly seavy nesper is our associate producer of digital media. I'm Terry gross. This message comes from NPR sponsor Comcast. Comcast values your time. That's why you can schedule to our appointment windows, including nights and weekends that way. You can spend more time doing what you love. Comcast working to make things. Simple easy. And awesome.

Henry Winkler rob Delaney Sharon berry EMMY award Fresh Air Billy Ken Tucker HBO Comcast NPR Bill Hader Saturday Night Live producer Terry gross gene Cousteau Barry Gary Marshall Los Angeles