17 Burst results for "Deepa Kumar"

"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:52 min | 8 months ago

"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"President bush bombing iraq Can you talk about what this has meant. And what a different kind of analysis would lead to. Yeah so let me start by saying that. There are people within the foreign policy establishment. Who are drawing the conclusion that. Us occupation off afghanistan off iraq has been a total disaster read. These have been defeats for the us. Both in iraq. As well as in afghanistan so that model off establishing imperial hegemony is one. That was already shelled right by obama but that increasingly has become a bipartisan consensus. Is that you congo. In in the way the us dead in japan or germany and remained those societies in ways that fit in with the us is global geopolitical orders that lesson has been drawn by suddenly sections of the political lead. And what's going on is a blame game right. it's you know it was. It was a trump's for there was no plan and so forth and the question is that's not being asked is. Why did the us go in in the first place and questioning whether empire whether colonialism this colonialism colonialism justifiable all that said. The war on terror is not overnight. Don't think that we should act like it's over at least since the mid two thousands when obama put out his boss joe the pivot to asia. There's been a desire to have less resources. Targeted at socal around the world with a focus instead on china that is seen as key threat to us interest on the global stage and various administrations right have tried to a scale back but that has not been possible but the war on terror is going to continue nevertheless. But it's going to take a different form there now anywhere between eight hundred and one thousand military bases. Us military bases around the world. And it's from these bases that drone strikes are possible right. These drawn strikes are not things that we know about. They just happen and very often as recently happened in august on innocent people killed some. That's going to be the muscle power along with special operations forces biden and others have already admitted and so unfortunately that puts us in a situation where it's no longer going to be dramatic and therefore covered by the media and people somehow thing that all the persecution off a muslims both domestically or internationally has ended. You mentioned the figure from the cost of raw project. I just want to say of the number of dead because of the war on terror. I just want to say that that study says direct wa- violence right. It does not include debts due to the destruction of infrastructure. That's not counted in official statistics as a ongo points out and really great piece in the new yorker which is from the point of view of gun women that the debts and the ones jews in afghanistan are typically not counted an official statistics. Which is why somebody like more alive. Joya who you've had on this program. What's the depth at over one million so all of that is going to be paper over. Unfortunately as the us continues its counter-terrorism policies. And with this which is that we know. Also that between two thousand eighteen two thousand twenty. The us was conducting counter terrorism operations in eighty five countries around the world. That's practically half the world and so terrorism has become a very useful way to establish hegemony and control on the global stage. So i do think that there's going to be more attention on china but at the same time the war on terror is far from over. Deepa kumar when thank you. So much for being with us scholar activists author of islamophobia and the politics of empire twenty years after nine eleven. The first edition of the book published in two thousand twelve Professor kumar Teaches media studies at rutgers university. Coming up as the world faces a climate catastrophe we look at the ferry creek blockade in british columbia where nearly a thousand people have been arrested. It's being described as the largest act.

iraq us afghanistan obama President bush congo germany japan china asia biden joe Joya Deepa kumar kumar Teaches rutgers university british columbia
"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:52 min | 8 months ago

"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"President bush bombing iraq. Can you talk about what this has meant. And what a different kind of analysis would lead to. Yeah so let me start by saying that. There are people within the foreign policy establishment. Who are drawing the conclusion that. Us occupation off afghanistan off iraq has been a total disaster read. These have been defeats for the us. Both in iraq. As well as in afghanistan so that model off establishing imperial hegemony is one. That was already shelled right by obama but that increasingly has become a bipartisan consensus. Is that you congo. In in the way the us dead in japan or germany and remained those societies in ways that fit in with the us is global geopolitical orders that lesson has been drawn by suddenly sections of the political lead. And what's going on is a blame game right. it's you know it was. It was a trump's for there was no plan and so forth and the question is that's not being asked is. Why did the us go in in the first place and questioning whether empire whether colonialism this colonialism colonialism justifiable all that said. The war on terror is not overnight. Don't think that we should act like it's over at least since the mid two thousands when obama put out his boss joe the pivot to asia. There's been a desire to have less resources. Targeted at socal terrorists around the world with a focus instead on china that is seen as key threat to us interest on the global stage and various administrations right have tried to a scale back but that has not been possible but the war on terror is going to continue nevertheless. But it's going to take different forms there now anywhere between eight hundred and one thousand military bases. Us military bases around the world. And it's from these bases that drone strikes are possible right. These drawn strikes are not things that we know about. They just happen and very often as recently happened in august on innocent people killed some. That's going to be the muscle power along with special operations forces biden and others have already admitted and so unfortunately that puts us in a situation where it's no longer going to be dramatic and therefore covered by the media and people somehow thing that all the persecution off a muslims both domestically or internationally has ended. You mentioned the figure from the cost of raw project. I just want to say of the number of dead because of the war on terror. Just want to say that. That study says direct wa- violence right. It does not include debts due to the destruction of infrastructure. That's not counted in official statistics. As a ongo fog points out and really great piece in the new yorker which is from the point of view of gun women that the debts and the ones jews in afghanistan are typically not counted an official statistics. Which is why somebody like more alive. Joya who you've had on this program. What's the depth at over one million so all of that is going to be paper over. Unfortunately as the us continues its counter-terrorism policies. And with this which is that we know. Also that between two thousand eighteen two thousand twenty. The us was conducting counter terrorism operations in eighty five countries around the world. That's practically half the world and so terrorism has become a very useful way to establish hegemony and control on the global stage. So i do think that there's going to be more attention on china but at the same time the war on terror is far from over. Deepa kumar when thank you. So much for being with us scholar activists author of islamophobia and the politics of empire twenty years after nine eleven. The first edition of the book published in two thousand twelve Professor kumar Teaches media studies at rutgers university. Coming up as the world faces a climate catastrophe we look at the ferry creek blockade in british columbia where nearly a thousand people have been arrested. It's being described as the largest act.

iraq us afghanistan obama President bush congo germany japan asia china biden joe Joya Deepa kumar kumar Teaches rutgers university british columbia
"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:52 min | 8 months ago

"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"President bush bombing iraq Can you talk about what this has meant. And what a different kind of analysis would lead to. Yeah so let me start by saying that. There are people within the foreign policy establishment. Who are drawing the conclusion that. Us occupation off afghanistan off iraq has been a total disaster read. These have been defeats for the us. Both in iraq. As well as in afghanistan so that model off establishing imperial hegemony is one. That was already shelled right by obama but that increasingly has become a bipartisan consensus. Is that you congo. In in the way the us dead in japan or germany and remained those societies in ways that fit in with the us is global geopolitical orders that lesson has been drawn by suddenly sections of the political lead. And what's going on is a blame game right. it's you know it was. It was a trump's for there was no plan and so forth and the question is that's not being asked is. Why did the us go in in the first place and questioning whether empire whether colonialism this colonialism colonialism justifiable all that said. The war on terror is not overnight. Don't think that we should act like it's over at least since the mid two thousands when obama put out his boss joe the pivot to asia. There's been a desire to have less resources. Targeted at socal around the world with a focus instead on china that is seen as key threat to us interest on the global stage and various administrations right have tried to a scale back but that has not been possible but the war on terror is going to continue nevertheless. But it's going to take a different form there now anywhere between eight hundred and one thousand military bases. Us military bases around the world. And it's from these bases that drone strikes are possible right. These drawn strikes are not things that we know about. They just happen and very often as recently happened in on innocent people killed some. That's going to be the muscle power along with special operations forces biden and others have already admitted and so unfortunately that puts us in a situation where it's no longer going to be dramatic and therefore covered by the media and people somehow thing that all the persecution off a muslims both domestically or internationally has ended. You mentioned the figure from the cost of raw project. I just want to say of the number of dead because of the war on terror. Just want to say that. That study says direct wa- violence right. It does not include debts due to the destruction of infrastructure. That's not counted in official statistics. As a ongo fog points out and really great piece in the new yorker which is from the point of view of gun women that the debts and the ones jews in afghanistan are typically not counted an official statistics. Which is why somebody like more alive. Joya who you've had on this program. What's the depth at over one million so all of that is going to be paper over. Unfortunately as the us continues its counter-terrorism policies. And with this which is that we know. Also that between two thousand eighteen two thousand twenty. The us was conducting counter terrorism operations in eighty five countries around the world. That's practically half the world and so terrorism has become a very useful way to establish hegemony and control on the global stage. So i do think that there's going to be more attention on china but at the same time the war on terror is far from over deepa. Kumar when a thank you. So much for being with us scholar activists author of islamophobia and the politics of empire. Twenty years after nine eleven. The first edition of the book published in two thousand twelve Professor kumar Teaches media studies at rutgers university. Coming up as the world faces a climate catastrophe we look at the ferry creek blockade in british columbia where nearly a thousand people have been arrested. It's being described as the largest act.

iraq Us afghanistan obama President bush congo germany japan china asia biden joe Joya kumar Teaches Kumar rutgers university british columbia
"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:52 min | 8 months ago

"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"President bush bombing iraq Can you talk about what this has meant. And what a different kind of analysis would lead to. Yeah so let me start by saying that. There are people within the foreign policy establishment. Who are drawing the conclusion that. Us occupation off afghanistan off iraq has been a total disaster read. These have been defeats for the us. Both in iraq. As well as in afghanistan so that model off establishing imperial hegemony is one. That was already shelled right by obama but that increasingly has become a bipartisan consensus. Is that you congo. In in the way the us dead in japan or germany and remained those societies in ways that fit in with the us is global geopolitical orders that lesson has been drawn by suddenly sections of the political lead. And what's going on is a blame game right. it's you know it was. It was a trump's for there was no plan and so forth and the question is that's not being asked is. Why did the us go in in the first place and questioning whether empire whether colonialism this colonialism colonialism justifiable all that said. The war on terror is not overnight. Don't think that we should act like it's over. At least since the mid two thousands when obama put out his show the pivot to asia. There's been a desire to have less resources. Targeted at socal terrorists around the world with a focus instead on china that is seen as key threat to us interest on the global stage and various administrations right have tried to a scale back but that has not been possible but the war on terror is going to continue nevertheless. But it's going to take a different form there now anywhere between eight hundred and one thousand military bases. Us military bases around the world. And it's from these bases that drone strikes are possible right. These drawn strikes are not things that we know about. They just happen and very often as recently happened. In gaston innocent people killed some. That's going to be the muscle power along with special operations forces biden and others have already admitted and so unfortunately that puts us in a situation where it's no longer going to be dramatic and therefore covered by the media and people somehow thing that all the persecution off a muslims both domestically or internationally has ended. You mentioned the figure from the cost of raw project. I just want to say of the number of dead because of the war on terror. I just want to say that that study says direct wa- violence right. It does not include debts due to the destruction of infrastructure. That's not counted in official statistics. As a ongo fog points out and really great piece in the new yorker which is from the point of view of gun women that the debts and the ones jews in afghanistan are typically not counted an official statistics. Which is why somebody like more alive. Joya who you've had on this program. What's the depth at over one million so all of that is going to be paper over. Unfortunately as the us continues its counter-terrorism policies. And with this which is that we know. Also that between two thousand eighteen two thousand twenty. The us was conducting counter terrorism operations in eighty five countries around the world. That's practically half the world and so terrorism has become a very useful way to establish hegemony and control on the global stage. So i do think that there's going to be more attention on china but at the same time the war on terror is far from over deepa. Kumar when a thank you. So much for being with us scholar activists author of islamophobia and the politics of empire. Twenty years after nine eleven. The first edition of the book published in two thousand twelve Professor kumar Teaches media studies at rutgers university. Coming up as the world faces a climate catastrophe we look at the ferry creek blockade in british columbia where nearly a thousand people have been arrested. It's being described as the largest act.

iraq us afghanistan obama President bush congo germany japan gaston asia china biden Joya kumar Teaches Kumar rutgers university british columbia
"deepa kumar" Discussed on THIS IS DEMOCRACY

THIS IS DEMOCRACY

04:52 min | 8 months ago

"deepa kumar" Discussed on THIS IS DEMOCRACY

"President bush bombing iraq. Can you talk about what this has meant. And what a different kind of analysis would lead to. Yeah so let me start by saying that. There are people within the foreign policy establishment. Who are drawing the conclusion that. Us occupation off afghanistan off iraq has been a total disaster read. These have been defeats for the us. Both in iraq. As well as in afghanistan so that model off establishing imperial hegemony is one. That was already shelled right by obama but that increasingly has become a bipartisan consensus. Is that you congo. In in the way the us dead in japan or germany and remained those societies in ways that fit in with the us is global geopolitical orders that lesson has been drawn by suddenly sections of the political lead. And what's going on is a blame game right. it's you know it was. It was a trump's for there was no plan and so forth and the question is that's not being asked is. Why did the us go in in the first place and questioning whether empire whether colonialism this colonialism colonialism justifiable all that said. The war on terror is not overnight. Don't think that we should act like it's over at least since the mid two thousands when obama put out his boss joe the pivot to asia. There's been a desire to have less resources. Targeted at socal terrorists around the world with a focus instead on china that is seen as key threat to us interest on the global stage and various administrations right have tried to a scale back but that has not been possible but the war on terror is going to continue nevertheless. But it's going to take a different form there now anywhere between eight hundred and one thousand military bases. Us military bases around the world. And it's from these bases that drone strikes are possible right. These drawn strikes are not things that we know about. They just happen and very often as recently happened. In gaston innocent people killed some. That's going to be the muscle power along with special operations forces biden and others have already admitted and so unfortunately that puts us in a situation where it's no longer going to be dramatic and therefore covered by the media and people somehow thing that all the persecution off a muslims both domestically or internationally has ended. You mentioned the figure from the cost of raw project. I just want to say of the number of dead because of the war on terror. I just want to say that that study says direct wa- violence right. It does not include debts due to the destruction of infrastructure. That's not counted in official statistics. As a ongo fog points out and really great piece in the new yorker which is from the point of view of gun women that the debts and the ones jews in afghanistan are typically not counted an official statistics. Which is why somebody like more alive. Joya who you've had on this program. What's the depth at over one million so all of that is going to be paper over. Unfortunately as the us continues its counter-terrorism policies. And with this which is that we know. Also that between two thousand eighteen two thousand twenty. The us was conducting counter terrorism operations in eighty five countries around the world. That's practically half the world and so terrorism has become a very useful way to establish hegemony and control on the global stage. So i do think that there's going to be more attention on china but at the same time the war on terror is far from over deepa. Kumar when a thank you. So much for being with us scholar activists author of islamophobia and the politics of empire. Twenty years after nine eleven. The first edition of the book published in two thousand twelve Professor kumar Teaches media studies at rutgers university. Coming up as the world faces a climate catastrophe we look at the ferry creek blockade in british columbia where nearly a thousand people have been arrested. It's being described as the largest act.

iraq Us afghanistan obama President bush congo germany japan gaston asia china biden joe Joya kumar Teaches Kumar rutgers university british columbia
"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:52 min | 8 months ago

"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"President bush bombing iraq. Can you talk about what this has meant. And what a different kind of analysis would lead to. Yeah so let me start by saying that. There are people within the foreign policy establishment. Who are drawing the conclusion that. Us occupation off afghanistan off iraq has been a total disaster read. These have been defeats for the us. Both in iraq. As well as in afghanistan so that model off establishing imperial hegemony is one. That was already shelled right by obama but that increasingly has become a bipartisan consensus. Is that you congo. In in the way the us dead in japan or germany and remained those societies in ways that fit in with the us is global geopolitical orders that lesson has been drawn by suddenly sections of the political lead. And what's going on is a blame game right. it's you know it was. It was a trump's for there was no plan and so forth and the question is that's not being asked is. Why did the us go in in the first place and questioning whether empire whether colonialism this colonialism colonialism justifiable all that said the war on terror is not overnight. I don't think that we should act like it's over at least since the mid two thousands when obama put out his boss joe the pivot to asia. There's been a desire to have less resources. Targeted at socal around the world with a focus instead on china that is seen as key threat to us interest on the global stage and various administrations right have tried to a scale back but that has not been possible but the war on terror is going to continue nevertheless. But it's going to take a different form there now anywhere between eight hundred and one thousand military bases. Us military bases around the world. And it's from these bases that drone strikes are possible right. These drawn strikes are not things that we know about. They just happen and very often as recently happened in august on innocent people killed some. That's going to be the muscle power along with special operations forces biden and others have already admitted and so unfortunately that puts us in a situation where it's no longer going to be dramatic and therefore covered by the media and people somehow thing that all the persecution off a muslims both domestically or internationally has ended. You mentioned the figure from the cost of raw project. I just want to say of the number of dead because of the war on terror. I just want to say that that study says direct wa- violence right. It does not include debts due to the destruction of infrastructure. That's not counted in official statistics. As a ongo fog points out and really great piece in the new yorker which is from the point of view of gun women that the debts and the ones jews in afghanistan are typically not counted an official statistics. Which is why somebody like more alive. Joya who you've had on this program. What's the depth at over one million so all of that is going to be paper over. Unfortunately as the us continues its counter-terrorism policies. And with this which is that we know. Also that between two thousand eighteen two thousand twenty. The us was conducting counter terrorism operations in eighty five countries around the world. That's practically half the world and so terrorism has become a very useful way to establish hegemony and control on the global stage. So i do think that there's going to be more attention on china but at the same time the war on terror is far from over. Deepa kumar when thank you. So much for being with us scholar activists author of islamophobia and the politics of empire twenty years after nine eleven. The first edition of the book published in two thousand twelve Professor kumar Teaches media studies at rutgers university. Coming up as the world faces a climate catastrophe we look at the ferry creek blockade in british columbia where nearly a thousand people have been arrested. It's being described as the largest act.

iraq us afghanistan obama President bush congo germany japan china asia biden joe Joya Deepa kumar kumar Teaches rutgers university british columbia
"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:52 min | 8 months ago

"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"President bush bombing iraq Can you talk about what this has meant. And what a different kind of analysis would lead to. Yeah so let me start by saying that. There are people within the foreign policy establishment. Who are drawing the conclusion that. Us occupation off afghanistan off iraq has been a total disaster read. These have been defeats for the us. Both in iraq. As well as in afghanistan so that model off establishing imperial hegemony is one. That was already shelled right by obama but that increasingly has become a bipartisan consensus. Is that you congo. In in the way the us dead in japan or germany and remained those societies in ways that fit in with the us is global geopolitical orders that lesson has been drawn by suddenly sections of the political lead. And what's going on is a blame game right. it's you know it was. It was a trump's for there was no plan and so forth and the question is that's not being asked is. Why did the us go in in the first place and questioning whether empire whether colonialism this colonialism colonialism justifiable all that said. The war on terror is not overnight. Don't think that we should act like it's over at least since the mid two thousands when obama put out his boss joe the pivot to asia. There's been a desire to have less resources. Targeted at socal terrorists around the world with a focus instead on china that is seen as key threat to us interest on the global stage and various administrations right have tried to a scale back but that has not been possible but the war on terror is going to continue nevertheless. But it's going to take a different form there now anywhere between eight hundred and one thousand military bases. Us military bases around the world. And it's from these bases that drone strikes are possible right. These drawn strikes are not things that we know about. They just happen and very often as recently happened. In gaston innocent people killed some. That's going to be the muscle power along with special operations forces biden and others have already admitted and so unfortunately that puts us in a situation where it's no longer going to be dramatic and therefore covered by the media and people somehow thing that all the persecution off a muslims both domestically or internationally has ended. You mentioned the figure from the cost of raw project. I just want to say of the number of dead because of the war on terror. I just want to say that that study says direct wa- violence right. It does not include debts due to the destruction of infrastructure. That's not counted in official statistics. As a ongo fog points out and really great piece in the new yorker which is from the point of view of gun women that the debts and the ones jews in afghanistan are typically not counted an official statistics. Which is why somebody like more alive. Joya who you've had on this program. What's the depth at over one million so all of that is going to be paper over. Unfortunately as the us continues its counter-terrorism policies. And with this which is that we know. Also that between two thousand eighteen two thousand twenty. The us was conducting counter terrorism operations in eighty five countries around the world. That's practically half the world and so terrorism has become a very useful way to establish hegemony and control on the global stage. So i do think that there's going to be more attention on china but at the same time the war on terror is far from over deepa. Kumar when a thank you. So much for being with us scholar activists author of islamophobia and the politics of empire. Twenty years after nine eleven. The first edition of the book published in two thousand twelve Professor kumar Teaches media studies at rutgers university. Coming up as the world faces a climate catastrophe we look at the ferry creek blockade in british columbia where nearly a thousand people have been arrested. It's being described as the largest act.

iraq us afghanistan obama President bush congo germany japan gaston asia china biden joe Joya kumar Teaches Kumar rutgers university british columbia
"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

01:43 min | 8 months ago

"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"So we will fifty five percent of our emissions. That's a huge transitioning so we have to really get going during these first four years. Do that way. And those are some of the headlines. This is democracy now democracy now dot org the warren peace report when we come back islamaphobia and the politics of empire twenty years after nine eleven. We speak with rutgers. Professor deepa kumar. Stay with us..

islamaphobia warren deepa kumar rutgers
"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

01:43 min | 8 months ago

"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"So we will fifty five percent of our emissions. That's a huge transitioning so we have to really get going during these first four years. Do that way. And those are some of the headlines. This is democracy now democracy now dot org the warren peace report when we come back islamaphobia and the politics of empire twenty years after nine eleven. We speak with rutgers. Professor deepa kumar. Stay with us..

islamaphobia warren deepa kumar rutgers
"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

01:43 min | 8 months ago

"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"So we will fifty five percent of our emissions. That's a huge transitioning so we have to really get going during these first four years. Do that way. And those are some of the headlines. This is democracy now democracy now dot org the warren peace report when we come back islamaphobia and the politics of empire twenty years after nine eleven. We speak with rutgers. Professor deepa kumar. Stay with us..

islamaphobia warren deepa kumar rutgers
"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

01:43 min | 8 months ago

"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"So we will fifty five percent of our emissions. That's a huge transitioning so we have to really get going during these first four years. Do that way. And those are some of the headlines. This is democracy now democracy now dot org the warren peace report when we come back islamaphobia and the politics of empire twenty years after nine eleven. We speak with rutgers. Professor deepa kumar. Stay with us.

islamaphobia warren deepa kumar rutgers
"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

01:43 min | 8 months ago

"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"So we will fifty five percent of our emissions. That's a huge transitioning so we have to really get going during these first four years. Do that way. And those are some of the headlines. This is democracy now democracy now dot org the warren peace report when we come back islamaphobia and the politics of empire twenty years after nine eleven. We speak with rutgers. Professor deepa kumar. Stay with us..

islamaphobia warren deepa kumar rutgers
"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

01:43 min | 8 months ago

"deepa kumar" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"So we will fifty five percent of our emissions. That's a huge transitioning so we have to really get going during these first four years. Do that way. And those are some of the headlines. This is democracy now democracy now dot org the warren peace report when we come back islamaphobia and the politics of empire twenty years after nine eleven. We speak with rutgers. Professor deepa kumar. Stay with us..

islamaphobia warren deepa kumar rutgers
"deepa kumar" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:57 min | 9 months ago

"deepa kumar" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The Schmidt dot org For the next couple of hours, a chance of showers and even a slight chance of dry thunderstorms as well. The red flag warning remains in effect because of the possibility of dry lightning, perhaps sparking some fires. While that, according to the National Weather Service. The one a program now with Jenn White is underway on KQED Public radio at 906. This is one a I'm Jenn White in Washington as we near the 20 year anniversary of 9 11, many Americans are reflecting on the attacks and their fallout for some that fallout included a rise in Islamophobia. I'm black, but I'm brown passing, and I noticed that I would experience an intense amount of harassment even end up being followed by People in stores and different locations. It was a time full of anxiety and stress and fear for my my family members, especially my female family members who wore the traditional jobs people would say these horrible things to me. And what I start doing was I stopped straightening my hair. I wouldn't have to experience you know our our male friends and relatives who wore beards. You know, many of them, shave their beards and stopped wearing Islamic garb. It was weird existing in a world where I for once had the ability to Stop passing as something to start to experience harassment from a whole different perspective and the type of harassment I was normal used. It was a time of great anxiety and fear. One which Forced my family and I really to detach ourselves in many ways, from mainstream America and and really just stick to our own kind for fear that people outside of our group would not be so welcoming. Hate crimes against Muslims in America spiked 500% between 2000 and 2009. That's according to data from Brown University and surveillance programs led to the detention of thousands, including the Bush administration's registry of non US citizens from Muslim majority countries. How have we emerged from that moment and given the fact that hate crimes in the US just hit a 12 year high? What have we learned Joining us now to reflect on the anti Muslim discrimination Following 9 11 is Rozina Ali. She's a contributing writer at The New York Times Magazine, Rosina Welcome to the program. Thanks so much for having me also with us is Professor Deepa Kumar. She's a professor of media studies at Rutgers University and the author of Islamophobia and The Politics of Empire. 20. Years after 9 11 Deepa Welcome Thank you. And also with us is Assad Dania, a New York based educator and organizer. Assad. Welcome. Thank you so much for having me so I would love to hear from each of you what you remember about the aftermath of September 11th. As a Muslim person in America, Rosie now come to you first. Yeah, well, I was in California at the time, and I was with my parents. My parents were watching the attacks on T. V and I distinctly remember my father saying, Please don't let it be a Muslim. Please don't let it be a Muslim and That's because there had been terrorist attacks in the US abroad and because in culture and popular culture and Muslims were depicted, and Arabs were depicted as terrorists. So there was that fear. Um, that it might be a Muslim. But the other fear that he was talking about was what the government might do. And I was not. Uh, I I didn't quite understand what he meant until I observed it myself. Years later how the government responded. But, um, you know, one thing I should also point out is that We were immigrants. We were not citizens at the time, and I think immigrants in particular had a Different experience than Muslim citizens as well. People. What about for you? So I want to clarify that I am not Muslim. I am as one of the people you played at the beginning of the program Muslim looking, and so I was in the I was in North Carolina at the time that 9 11 happened. And the day of the attacks. Of course, all of us was shocked and horrified as to what had happened. We were all afraid. That maybe some of our friends or relatives might be on the twin towers. But I went to school. I was teaching at Wake Forest University at that point, and I went to school to teach my classes. And one of the first things that I encountered was a colleague who jeered at me and said, Are you happy? And I was just so shocked to, you know, encounter this. Why would I be happy? I wondered, And then on the way back home, I went to a grocery store to pick up groceries and the checkout counter clerk was just so angry. And finally he just came out and said, You need to apologize for what your people did. They can. I was just so stunned at how an entire group of people not just those who practice Islam, but everyone who called and called looks Muslim, was collectively held responsible for the actions of 19 people. Assad and your experience after 9 11. I was actually in New York on 9 11. So I spent my entire life in God, um, born and raised here. I had just returned from a trip, a family trip to Pakistan. My family's of Pakistani background. Um and I was actually, um, in the hospital. I was sick. I had gotten sick from the trip. And I was hospitalized and You were able to actually see the smoke from the towers from my hospital windows. And I vividly remember my mother. Who was tending to me, Uh, getting into an argument with one of the nurses, um, that was assigned to my room and it was a very I don't remember the precise Contours of the details, but I do remember it had something to do with 9, 11 and And it was it became a very vicious argument. Um, and to me, it was very jarring because this is someone who was and interested to take care of me. And how quickly The environment just shifted to one of animosity towards me and my people and It really drove home for me. You know what happens, you know, in in circumstances like this, where someone who, quite literally who's interested to take care of you can In a in a in an instant view you as enemy or a suspect. Um and I spent, you know much of my years in New York, growing up and in a very defensive posture. Um, because of Circumstances in instances like that one Hadippa, your book, Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire 20 Years after 9 11 traces the history of America's treatment of his Muslim population. How did 9 11 affect that relationship? Yes, Assault just mentioned, you know, even before 9 11. There were practices and policies that treated Arab Americans, Iranian Americans and later South Asian Americans as suspect communities and they were practices and programs of surveillance that were already in place. But 9 11 just takes this to a whole new level. You start to see as you mentioned registration programs in the Bush error, um, which then involve massive as well surveillance programs. So one such program was conducted by the NYPD, which basically went into the tri State area. Went into mosques, went into schools and spied on Muslim students, Faculty and so on. Um we know this firsthand at Rutgers, New Brunswick because the NYPD was stationed at a house just off our campus, and the landlord actually called the cops on them because he thought that something suspicious was going on. And that's how we came to know that the NYPD was spying on student groups and professors and so forth. So really, what 9 11 did is it created a suspect community? That was targeted and profiled in these ways, not just in the tri state area, but across the U. S. Rosina. How did this period of time inform your work? Well, I, um, you know, like so much of my generation, uh, B. We started pursuing careers that really looked at counterterrorism and the ways that America has changed. And I have to say that for me personally, I wanted to understand how the war on terror affected People at home here and abroad. And one of the things that I'm looking at in my book is just how profoundly America has shifted politically culturally. Um, because of 9 11, and I think one of the things that we have to remember is that After 9 11 so many There were so many other ships that affected that affected the U. S, like, for example, for example, the economic crisis but that also became enmeshed in How we think about immigrants and how we think about, um you know, for example, minority communities who became suspicious. Assad. How to daily life changed for you following around 11. I appreciate deeper and Rosina offering this context and background because, um, so I actually was one of the individuals. Who has spied on directly as a result of the NYPD is policies when I started undergrad My friends and I co founded a charity. Um And that charity, you know, to put it in simple terms was doing what today we call mutual aid..

Rozina Ali Jenn White NYPD Assad Dania Pakistan Brown University Assad California North Carolina Deepa Kumar New York Rosina Washington National Weather Service Rosie The Politics of Empire 12 year 19 people thousands Wake Forest University
"deepa kumar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"deepa kumar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Speer or adapted version of special counsel, Robert Muller's highly anticipated final report will be released to the public tomorrow. As NPR's Ryan, Lucas reports the documents of the combination of mothers investigation into Russian interference in the twenty sixteen election over the course of the twenty two month probe Muller's team indicted, thirty four individuals, including twenty-five Russian nationals the special counsel's office also secured seven guilty pleas. Among those were former Trump campaign chairman, Paul Manafort and the president's first national security adviser, Michael Flynn Muller wrapped up his and submitted. His final report to the attorney general last month the version released Thursday will be redacted shield several categories of sensitive information, including grand jury proceedings and intelligence related materials. Attorney general William bar has said the investigation did not find the Trump campaign conspired with Russia. And that mother did not make you decision on obstruction of Justice. Ryan lucas. NPR news, Washington senior White House adviser of Trump says her father asked her if she was interested in taking the job as head of the World Bank. But she says she passed on it in the Societa press interview during a trip to Africa to promote a global women's initiative. Vonk? Trump says the president raised the job with her as a question, but she said she was happy with the work. She's doing vodka Trump worked on the election process for new head for the one hundred and eighty nine nation World Bank. Choose David Malpensa to run the organization said she believes now passer do an incredible job attorneys for New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft are trying to stop the release of video evidence that's expected to show craft receive sexual services at south Florida massage parlor, my line, FOX member station. W L R N reports. Kraft is believed to be one of several people shown soliciting prostitution in the video. The Palm Beach county state attorney's office says the video evidence collected as part of a prostitution sting. It's public record and has to be released under Florida law craft pleaded not. Guilty and requested a jury trial after he was charged as part of an investigation involving several Florida massage parlors and spas. His attorneys filed an emergency petition to stop the videos release. They say releasing the videos to the public could poison potential jurors against him. A state attorney's office spokesman says the release isn't happening anytime soon, the F is also has to prepare other records in the case for public relief. For NPR news, I'm Madeline FOX in Miami. Reserve in its latest region by region. Snapshot of the US economy says labor markets remained tight across most of the areas where the fed has member banks with company struggling to find skilled workers and many noting modest wage growth. The beige book looks at conditions in twelve regions of the country and found economic activity rising at a slight to moderate pace in March in the early part of this month on Wall Street, the Dow fell three points today, the close at twenty six thousand four forty nine the NASDAQ was down four points. You're listening to NPR and this is. WNYC in New York. I'm Sean Carlson. Faculty at Rutgers University have called off a looming strike after reaching deliver pay equity across its campuses. The deal includes raises for seventeen hundred teaching assistance and equalize salaries across the university's three campuses in New Brunswick Newark and Camden union president Deepa Kumar says the tentative agreement also includes a new process for faculty to address salary concerns. If you are woman.

Trump attorney NPR president Ryan lucas Robert Muller prostitution World Bank Michael Flynn Muller special counsel Florida Robert Kraft Paul Manafort Speer Sean Carlson Africa Rutgers University south Florida massage parlor
"deepa kumar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:36 min | 3 years ago

"deepa kumar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The unionized faculty at Rutgers University is threatening to strike. The faculty union has been negotiating a contract with the university's leadership since March of last year, and they say they'll walk out if a deal isn't reached in the coming days, it would be the first faculty strike in Rutgers two hundred fifty three year history. Joining me with the latest on the negotiations is nj spotlight reporter corley Citron. Welcome back to WNYC, Jamie. Thank you so much for having me. Let's start with the Union's demands. We spoke with Dr Deepa Kumar. She's professor of media studies and president of Rutgers largest faculty union, she said one of the things faculty is asking for is a concerted effort on the part of school administrators to diversify the teaching staff. She says that back in nineteen seventy six Rutgers had one hundred seventy five African American faculty and that in. In two thousand seventeen the number went down to eighty nine up. -solutely no reason why the should be the case. And so we as a union have been fighting to diversify the faculty because it's very important DeVos body to have faculty that looked like them that was a huge actor in their negotiations was getting those diversity numbers up. And it's important to note that Rutgers recently announced about twenty million dollars in additional funding for its faculty diversity hiring initiative, and that a lot of the union members will say is a direct result of their continued push during these negotiations the staff says it would also like to see pay parody between campuses. They say faculty at Rutgers flagship campus, which is in New Brunswick make more than those on the Newark, and Camden campuses, how significant is that disparity. So it's important to keep in mind here that the data we've had access to comes from the. A union, but at the same time those are done by professors who are experts in their field. So you've gotta take it with two grains of salt there. A union analysis did find that faculty at Newark and Camden on average earn ninety percent and eighty percent of the salaries of their colleagues at New Brunswick respectively. So that means if you are professor working in Newark, you earn ten percent less than your colleagues in New Brunswick in Camden. You would earn twenty percent less. A lot of the requests on the part of the union are tied to more spending does Rutgers have the resources it needs to meet the requests union officials point to about seven hundred eighty three million dollars of what's called unrestricted reserves that Rutgers has they basically are saying that that's a pot of money that could be spent on teachers salaries, but at the same time records has defended itself, basically, saying those unrestricted reserves aren't up for the taking that money is being held for financial aid for construction improvements research. In student services records, president rapper. Archie said at the university is in what he said is a vulnerable financial situation and increasing the funding for professor salaries could signal further tuition increases Cory Booker is expressing support for the faculty union on Twitter. But he is a Senator on Capitol Hill a federal job so Rutgers is a state school. And that makes me think about say governor, Phil Murphy and his administration, maybe the state legislators what about that has governor Murphy said anything about these negotiations. He has kind of danced around the issue a little bit. He said he supports the sentiment behind them. But I asked him directly a couple of weeks back, and he wouldn't comment on the negotiations as they were ongoing a lot of it lies at seek government and with the individual universities to negotiate contracts and to put these things in play, Leslie, I do want to ask you about the students is this having an impact on. On the campus culture life any student response to the looming potential strike yet. So very recently. We're starting to see a lot of student groups in students coming out in support of their professors picketing right alongside them taking to social media to let their pensions being known, which is important because part time lecturers news contingent faculty members teach more than thirty percent of the courses at records. And so because most of those classes are large core curriculum lectures, most if not all the students at Rutgers will encounter on one of these contingent part time faculty at some point during their college experience. So for them to be able to come out and say, my professor is going through this. And I support them is actually a pretty big deal. Corley Citron is a reporter for nj spotlight. Thank you very much Carly. Thank you so much for having me. If you live in the central part of this country. You don't need us.

Rutgers corley Citron Rutgers University Union professor governor Murphy New Brunswick Newark Camden Cory Booker reporter WNYC Dr Deepa Kumar president Jamie Carly Twitter Archie
"deepa kumar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:05 min | 3 years ago

"deepa kumar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Rapid set notes on his debut album, man on fire pretty circus. Tina Koller caught up with him at the south by southwest music festival. Matty. You're listening to all things considered on WNYC. I'm Jamie Floyd. The unionized faculty at Rutgers University is threatening to strike. The faculty union has been negotiating a contract with the university's leadership since March of last year, and they say they'll walk out if a deal isn't reached in the coming days, it would be the first faculty strike in Rutgers two hundred fifty three year history. Joining me with the latest on the negotiations is nj spotlight reporter corley Citron. Welcome back to WNYC, Jamie. Thank you so much for having me. Let's start with the Union's demands. We spoke with Dr Deepa Kumar. She's professor of media studies and president of Rutgers largest faculty union, she said one of the things faculty is asking for is a concerted effort on the part of school administrators to diversify the teaching staff. She says that back in nineteen seventy six Rutgers had one hundred seventy five African American faculty and that in two. Two thousand seventeen the number went down to eighty nine up. -solutely no reason why the should be the case. And so we as a union have been fighting to diversify the faculty because it's very important for diverse student body to have tackle ty- that looked like them. That was a a huge factor in their negotiations was getting those diversity numbers up. And it's important to note that Rutgers recently announced about twenty million dollars in additional funding for its faculty diversity hiring initiative, and that a lot of thinking in members will say is a direct result of their continued push during these negotiations the staff says it would also like to see pay parody between campuses. They say faculty at Rutgers flagship campus, which is in New Brunswick make more than those on the Newark, and Camden campuses, how significant is that disparity. So it's important to keep in mind here that the data we've had access to comes from the union. But at the same time those studies are done by professors who are experts in their field. So you've kind of got a ticket with two grains of salt there. A union analysis did find that faculty at Newark and Candian on average earn ninety percent and eighty percent of the salaries of their colleagues at New Brunswick respectively. So that means if you're a professor working in Newark, you earn ten percent less than your colleagues in New Brunswick in Camden. You would earn twenty percent less. A lot of the requests on the part of the union are tied to more spending does Rutgers have the resources it needs to meet the requests union officials point to about seven hundred eighty three million dollars of what's called unrestricted reserves that Rutgers has they basically are saying that that's a pot of money that could be spent on teachers salaries, but at the same time records has defended itself, basically, saying those unrestricted reserves are up for the taking that money's being held for financial aid for construction improvements research student. Services records, president rapper. Archie said at the university is in what he said is a vulnerable financial situation and increasing the funding for professor salaries could signal further tuition increases Cory Booker is expressing support for the faculty union on Twitter. But he is a Senator on Capitol Hill a federal job so Rutgers is a state school. And that makes me think about say governor, Phil Murphy and his administration, maybe the state legislators what about that has governor Murphy said anything about these negotiations. He has kind of danced around the issue a little bit. He said he supports the sentiment behind them. But I asked him directly a couple of weeks back, and he wouldn't comment on the negotiations as they were ongoing a lot of it lies at seek government and with the individual universities to negotiate contracts and to put these things in play, Leslie, I do want to ask you about the students is this having an impact on. The campus culture life any student response to the looming potential strike yet. So very recently. We're starting to see a lot of student groups in students coming out in support of their professors picketing right alongside them taking to social media to let their pinions being known, which is important because part time lecturers and these contingent faculty members teach more than thirty percent of the courses at records. And so because most of those classes are large core curriculum lectures, most if not all the students at Rutgers will encounter on one of these contingent part time faculty at some point during their college experience. So for them to be able to come out and say, my professor is going through this. And I support them is actually a pretty big deal. Corley Citron is a reporter for nj spotlight. Thank you very much Carly. Thank you so much for having me..

Rutgers corley Citron Rutgers University Union professor Jamie Floyd governor Murphy WNYC New Brunswick Newark reporter Camden Dr Deepa Kumar Tina Koller president Cory Booker Matty Carly ty Twitter