20 Burst results for "Decolonisation"

Can land expropriation help heal South Africa?

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:44 min | 1 year ago

Can land expropriation help heal South Africa?

"In in addressing inequality. It seems a straightforward indeed elegant policy. Take stuff off people who have a lot of it and give it to people who don't have any of it however anybody certainly any government proposing such a measure would do well to heed the immortal wisdom of H L Mencken who once observed that there is always a well known solution to every human problem neat plausible and wrong nevertheless the idea Uh of land expropriation has returned to the public discourse in South Africa a panel assembled by President Cyril Ramaphosa to look into the idea It has returned a proposal recommending in limited circumstances these seizure of land without compensating the owners we should no longer be afraid of this process of having to change the land ownership architecture in our country it is here and it is here to stay it is is going to happen land ownership has been a persistent issue in post apartheid South Africa and not without reason a quarter of a century after the racist monstrosity of apartheid was formerly dismantled white South Africans who comprise roughly nine percent of the population still own seventy two percent of the farmland possessed by individuals as an illustration of the lingering effects of systemic injustice. It's hard to beat by lament. has rare opportunity to address on this past wrongs allow the natives who have lost so much to re came the ad dignity back by kissing our land back. No no I shall be treated as in our own land Never Ramos's panel has proposed seizing land which is held for speculative purposes land which is occupied and worked by tenants. and land that has been abandoned it has also suggested taking inner city buildings owned by absentee landlords the A._n._C. Lakota reaffirmed its position that a comprehensive land reform program that enables equitable access to land will unlock economic growth by bringing more land in South Africa to fool us and enable the productive active participation of millions more South Africans in the economy for obvious and understandable reasons. These measures will go over well. l. with a significant proportion of South African voters especially those who have lately been tempted away from President Ramaphosa's African National Congress now very much the Party of South Africa's establishment and towards the radical firebreathers of the opposition Economic Freedom Fighters Party who nearly doubled their parliamentary presence in last May's election the F. F. led by Julius Malema who might be charitably described as uncompromising in his general approach favors wholesale nationalization of South Africa's land you say I thought what colonialism we wanted decolonisation. He said yet your body Batas in Africa. What is being proposed by President. Ramaphosa's panel is significantly. less than that but it is nevertheless significant as it stands under section twenty five of South Africa's Constitution the government may expropriate appropriate land but is required to cough up just and equitable compensation there has long been chat about amending this close and or concocting getting some legal argument that in certain circumstances just and equitable compensation might amount to nothing they also a growing growing body of opinion in our country that the constitution as it stands does not impede expropriation Asian of land without compensation that expropriation will be popular in some electorally important demographics is beyond doubt and that is very usually usually the clinching argument in matters of politics although some polling in South Africa suggests widespread unease with the idea of no compensation facto less often subject to rigorous scrutiny is whether or not a given policy will actually work and where expropriation of land is concerned concerned there are some discouraging precedent and if you want to see

South Africa President Cyril Ramaphosa Party Of South Africa Africa President Trump H L Mencken Never Ramos Julius Malema Freedom Fighters Party African National Congress Seventy Two Percent Nine Percent
Can land expropriation help heal South Africa?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:20 min | 1 year ago

Can land expropriation help heal South Africa?

"In addressing inequality quality it seems a straightforward indeed elegant policy. Take stuff off people who have a lot of it and give it to people who don't have any of it however anybody certainly any government proposing such a measure would do well to heed the immortal wisdom of H L Mencken who wants observed that there is is always a well known solution to every human problem needs plausible and wrong nevertheless the idea of land expropriation has returned to the public discourse in South Africa a panel assembled by President Cyril Ramaphosa to look into the idea has returned a proposal recommending in limited circumstances the seizure of land without compensating the owners. We should no longer be afraid of this process of having to change the land ownership architecture in our country. It is here and it is here to stay. It is going to happen land. Land ownership has been a persistent issue in post-apartheid South Africa and not without reason a quarter of a century after the racist monstrosity of apartheid was formerly dismantled white South Africans who comprise roughly nine percent of the population still own seventy two percent of the farmland possessed possessed by individuals as an illustration of the lingering effects of systemic injustice. It's hard to beat this by lament is rare opportunity unity to redress on this past wrongs to allow the natives who have lost so much to reclaim the dignity. <MUSIC> BIC by kitching our land back no law shall. We be treated as life in our own land. Never Ramaphosa's panel has proposed seizing land which is held for speculative purposes land which is occupied and worked by tenants and land and and that has has been abandoned it has also suggested taking inner city buildings owned by absentee landlords for obvious understandable reasons these these measures will go over well with a significant proportion of South African voters especially those who have lately been tempted away from President Obama poses his African National Congress now very much the Party of South Africa's establishment and towards the radical firebreathers of the opposition Economic Freedom Fighters Party not who nearly doubled the parliamentary presence in last May's election the F. F. led by Julius Malima who might be charitably described as uncompromising uncompromising in his general approach favors wholesale nationalization of South Africa's land. You'll say I thought what colonialism we wanted decolonisation yet yourself party or Lord Boorda's in Africa what is being proposed by President Obama poses panel is significantly less than that but it is nevertheless significant as it stands under section twenty five of South Africa's Constitution and the government may expropriate land but is required to cough up just and equitable compensation there has long been chat about amending this his clothes and or concocting some legal argument that in certain circumstances just and equitable compensation might amount to nothing they is also a growing body of opinion in our country that the constitution as it stands does not impede. beat expropriation of land without compensation that expropriation will be popular in some electorally important demographics is beyond doubt and that is very usually the clinching argument in matters of politics. Although some polling in South Africa suggests widespread unease with the idea of no compensation factor less often subject to rigorous scrutiny is whether or not a given see see policy will actually work and where expropriation nation of land is concerned. The are some discouraging precedents and if you WANNA the inroad of what you want to do today most infamously in the early years of the twenty th century Zimbabwe's then President Robert Mugabe ordered the seizure of white-owned farms and they're transferred to black ownership good have looked at what happened in Zimbabwe. Remember signor Robert Mugabe went down the same road was he also did in so doing was effectively <unk> demolish. Zimbabwe's agricultural infrastructure femme production plummeted by two thirds in less than a decade and Zimbabwe's economy collapsed alongside to the point where the country had to abandon its hyper inflation stricken currency in two thousand nine. Zimbabwe issued a one hundred trillion dollar banknote note which wouldn't buy a phosphate. They're actually doing the opposite non Zimbabwe. 'cause they realize the folly of their ways. South Africa is not Zimbabwe's and Cyril Ramaphosa Hosa is not Robert Mugabe but the <hes> some similarities many years after the end of white minority rule things remain extremely tough for many among long South Africa's black majority the unemployment rate in South Africa is a staggering scandalous twenty seven point six percent even higher among youth who. Who are increasingly drawn to the E. F F and South Africa is as Zimbabwe was an apparently attornal one party Democracy Ramaphosa a post has big problems and the means always tempting of making big gestures in response. If this Kevin was serious about restitution and redistribution we would speed up the hundreds of thousands of land claims that tremaine unprocessed in South Africa that is what it serious party would do if it was kid about land performer land redistribution the trouble is that property rights matter they are along with free and fair elections a free press judicial independence and the rule of law one of the crucial differences between functional society and a shambles property rights are also in this specific instance crucial to the foreign investment which South Africa urgently requires. Nobody is going to buy something if they're not sure they will be allowed to keep it and in fact we have said to those who are investing in no country that they shouldn't have no fear that the land property is going to be expropriated while the proposals of the presidential panel panel commendably constrained they will prompt concerns about these slipperiness of this particular slope they are of the ways to redress economic imbalance and historical injustice. The President Ramaphosa will be wearily aware that they are often more complex and long term than understandably impatient poor people would prefer he could of course set a personal example his own farm. The in Taba Neo near state in Malaga Province is reckoned at five thousand one hundred Hector's plenty to go around for monocle twenty four. I'm Andrew Moolah

South Africa Zimbabwe President Cyril Ramaphosa Signor Robert Mugabe President Trump Party Of South Africa President Obama Africa H L Mencken Cyril Ramaphosa Hosa Freedom Fighters Party BIC Andrew Moolah African National Congress Taba Neo Lord Boorda E. F F
News in Brief 21 February 2019

UN News

03:20 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 21 February 2019

"This is the news and brief from the United Nations. The use of a snake by Indonesian police during the interrogation of indigenous Papuan boy amounts to torture. You at appointed rights experts said on Thursday, an online video released earlier this month shows the handcuffed youngster arrested for allegedly stealing a mobile phone screaming in fear as officers pushed the snake's head towards his face. The case is just the latest in a widespread pattern of violence alleged arbitrary arrests and methods amounting to torture by the Indonesian police and military in Papa the rights experts insisted representatives of the Indonesian police have publicly acknowledged the instant and apologized for it. But the UN experts appealed for prompt and impartial investigations to be carried out. I think that such tactics are often used against indigenous Papuans and human rights defenders the development comes amid an ongoing military operation in Papua. Which became part of Indonesia in nineteen sixty nine and has seen an increasingly vocal pro independence movement. U N secretary General Antonio guitarist has called for the international process of decolonization to be brought to a successful conclusion as he addressed the special committee on the subject at union headquarters in New York on Thursday, mister Gutierrez reminded his audience that decolonization is one of the most significant chapters in the US history. Propelling the growth of the organization today's total of one hundred and ninety three countries. But he added there is still work to be done as seventeen. Territories around the world are waiting to attain itself. Government the U N G specifically mentioned the case of New Caledonia which 2018 held a referendum on independence from France. Who's corporation in the process? He said was commendable. Countries around the world have been celebrating international mother language day on February the twenty first, but for Ben goalies, it has a particular significance. The day was officially recognized by the general assembly in two thousand eight following lobbying by Bangladesh, but the origins stretch back to nineteen fifty two when Bangaladeshi was still a part of Pakistan Bengali students protested, a government older imposing or do as the sole national language and the widespread unrest that followed led to the Bengali language been granted official status for years later. Speaking to pulling a grip from your news. I'm Bassett Masud been moment. Pummit Representative of Bangladesh to the UN explained what his country is doing to ensure linguistic diversity worldwide in Bala dish. We have set up an international mother language center to research languages, which are vanishing and also out to protect them, promote them, preserve them. We should all strive to. Protect whatever you have from the past and languages is the most significant manifestation of any such culture identities on the basis of language than we have songs and lullabies and other cultural forms, and you can hear the full interview with embassador moment on our website, news dot U, N dot org. Kodo leadin U N news.

Mister Gutierrez UN Bangladesh Language Center United Nations Indonesia Papua Papa U N Bassett Masud Bangaladeshi Embassador United States Secretary BEN New Caledonia General Antonio Bala Dish
"decolonisation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"decolonisation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's may nine hundred sixty three a first wave of decolonization has swept through africa and in the ethiopian capital addis ababa the continent's leaders gather in one place for the first time they're meeting to decide if they're nations should now become united if we fade i let this historic opportunity slip by the people the masses of the people of africa would never forgive us there was a passion for africa liberation and african unity because we felt that unless africa confronted the world with the united voice the exploitation would continue the division with continuing so that that's the starting point doc to barricade have to selassie was ethiopia's rather young attorney general supporter panafricanism since the nineteen fifties he worked on the draft charter for the summit among those arriving to attend where leaders synonymous with the struggle against colonialism the likes of the ghanaian president kwame nkrumah the first black african leader to win independence secretary from guinea julius naree from tanganyika ben bella fresh from algeria's war of independence against france it's difficult to describe the excitement of people that have never seen anything like it before these african leaders grandma and what sort of colorless shirt became known as the nearest shirt apparently in cooma was advised to put on a bulletproof plate because i could see stiffness in the way he moved it's obvious there have been some attempts on his life but the the most dramatic scene told was actually when nasa emerged airplane very charismatic tall handsome man smiling the entire airport exploded i could feel the ground shaking underneath my feet and they shouted nassar nassar nassar lhasa apparently country folks come from jim from her from from everywhere because he was a hero but when it came down to business leaders was split getting them all together had been an achievement in itself they were a device there was the french francophone anglophone divide the franck africans under the influence of french policies then of course the the ideological divide africa was divided into two groups the monrovia group which are the majority in nigeria were the most important and liberia and then the smaller but more dynamic group called the casa blanca group in secretary ben bella and nasser of egypt leftleaning socialistic so africa had actually become an ideological battleground between the east and the west is the height.

attorney egypt casa blanca liberia monrovia nasa algeria kwame nkrumah president africa selassie ben bella nigeria jim cooma france secretary ethiopia
"decolonisation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"decolonisation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's may nineteen sixty three a first wave of decolonization has swept through africa and in the ethiopian capital addis ababa the continent's leaders gather in one place for the first time they're meeting decide if they're nations should now become united if we fade i let this historic opportunity slip by the people the magic of the people of africa will never forgive us there was a passion for african liberation and african unity because we felt that unless africa confronted the world with the united voice the expectation would continue that division would continue so that that was the starting point barricade have to selassie was ethiopia's rather young attorney general a supporter of panafricanism since the nineteen fifties he worked on the draft charter for the summit among those arriving to attend where leaders synonymous with the struggle against colonialism the likes of the ghanaian president kwami in krumer the first black african leader to win independence secretary from guinea julius nyerere from tanganyika ben bella fresh from algeria's war of independence against france describe the excitement of people have never seen anything like it before we know these african leaders in chroma what we are in a subtle collarless shirt became known as the nearest shirt apparently in cooma was advised to on bulletproof plate because stiffness in no way he moved it's obvious attempt on his life but the most dramatic scene of it all was actually when nasa emerged to airplane very charismatic tall handsome man smiling the entire airport exploded i could feel the ground shaking underneath my feet and they shouted nasa nasa nasa nasa apparently county folks come from jim from from from everywhere because he was a hero but when it came down to business leaders was split getting them all together had been an achievement in itself there were a device there was the french francophone anglophone divide the francophone africans under the influence of french policies then of course there was the ideological divide africa was divided into two groups the monrovia group which are the majority pr and nigeria were the most important and liberia and then the smaller but more dynamic group called the casablanca group in crevasses bella and nasser of egypt left leaning socialistic so africa had actually become an ideological battleground between the east and the west was the height of the cold war but everyone felt the urgency of africans talking to themselves and facing the.

africa ethiopia secretary france cooma selassie attorney president algeria nasa monrovia nigeria liberia egypt
"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"So they gave after they gave central africa double middle fingers and said fine will leave but you'll regret it you want us back and they re invaded in the nineteenth nineteen sixty and that's the famous line and billy joel of belgians in the congo because the belgians left and then they re invaded congo in order to run it again the british will do the same thing in the suez the british and the french cook with the israelis and say egypt is kicking us out against out of the suez canal well f them we're going to we're going to go back in and we're going to run the show we're not done yet and in both cases the united states got involved and said get out get out we don't want you in africa anymore and belgian and britain france were too poor to defy the united states they needed the united states more than they needed the empire until he left but this is the world that we have today this is the world that i inherited a you have inherited that our grandparents and great grandparents gave us they had the chance to completely scramble the map would have been messy but they had the chance to create lots of countries based on ethnic nationalities just like your was and they didn't they continued created new countries that completely reinforced the economic systems that helped europe so that we still live in a world affected by imperialism affected by colonization we still are affected by that world and so when people go oh africa's so unstable those africans and then they throw in some racist stuff they can't run themselves they're uncivilized it's like no man they haven't had a chance to make their country yet they're figuring it out now that's what's going on in the middle east in syria and iraq where you're having minority ethnic minorities and majorities fighting it out over what kind of country they going to have.

congo suez canal united states france africa syria billy joel egypt britain europe iraq
"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"And if you don't have any bureaucratic experience the country by definition can't function now the exception to this was india pakistan and that's because the history of the pakistan was different one india any pakistan or british india the raj was one an independent country going back to three thousand years so they had a long history of government of independent government to is that to run a place as big as india britain needed to bring in and create a domestic bureaucratic group and we talked about that with imperialism in test one point one of our class that after the see poi muny that britain was going to run india as a part of britain but at the same time to do so in any kind of fish inside it was going to have to coopt it was going to have to hire it was going to have to create a native pro english pro british group that could run it that could do the work and so india pakistan is the exception to that there was a need a group now the interesting thing is when we talk about any pakistan is that native group was heavily muslim more than hindu even though the hindus with the majority of the population was heavily muslim because the muslim part the of india what will become bangladesh what will become pakistan was the richer part the better educated part the more economically developed part and that goes back all the way to founding of india as a civilization three thousand four thousand years ago.

pakistan india britain bangladesh three thousand four thousand y three thousand years
"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"And so that's africa that's the middle east it's lots of places and so when europeans leave the might majority says hey democracy in a democracy the majority wins but you see the minority has the guns and in democracy the minority loses and then they had to give up their guns and they weren't so happy about that and so what you get is civil wars and this brings in the united states in ussr because you once i can go to one side and once i could go to the other so once i goes to u s and says hey we're the majority we want the moxie and us says that's great we want you to have democracy you're the majority here's some guns and the minority goes the us as aren't says hey the us is funding the other guy can you help us and us are says of course we can and so in all of these civil wars they spread to get more violent they become more entrenched as outside countries get involved so what's the effect of this a lot of wealth is pulled out we already talked about this white colonists leave the wealth is pulled out there's low education there is no bureaucracy or experienced the exception with this indian pakistan and we'll talk about that but the whites the europeans to white countries did not prepare africa four for independence which was criminal because that was the argument which tells you that the nineteenth century argument of the white man's burden we're going to bring civilization to africa is bs as law.

united states ussr pakistan africa
"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Africa doesn't get that when the europeans leave they draw up lines and they say here's your country there's nothing natural about that in sub saharan africa sub south of the sahara darrelle based upon where europeans happened the control and then who they had allies with so that you have ethnicities that are divided on different sides of a border and this is at our smushed together nigeria is a perfect example of this so let's go nigeria in west africa central and west africa is has a christian south and a divide on religion it's got christian south and a muslim north but those two parts are actually historically different than nigerian north is connected to nizhny air it's connected to the empires of of the fourteen fifteen sixteen hundreds it's connected to the trade routes that go north across the sahara while southern nation nigeria is connected to the ocean is connected to sees connected to oceanic trade has looked south.

Africa nigeria west africa nizhny
"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"They don't want england and france running the world because it makes people upset in these other places and makes them go to soviet union we'll talk about that a moment and so if you wanna win the cold war you can't have european empires and if you wanna make money you can't have european empires so we're going to change the nineteenth century economic system with a system today of markets with the system today of free trade now that doesn't mean so as europeans in the fifties and the sixties begin to retreat that doesn't mean europeans withdraw everywhere equally white colonists for examples try to stay in charge in rhodesia south africa kenya we have large white populations those white minorities try to stay in charge in rhodesia you in that with a civil war that's going to last into the nineteen eighty s until nineteen eighty excuse me and you get the country of zimbabwe and the results of that is that whites many whites will flee to south africa and take their wealth with them zimbabwe we'll have a a powerful white minority that will continue to own some of the best land in zimbabwe up to the present day but they are they were increasingly especially in the late nineties early two thousands increasingly plundered by a they're corrupt government in south africa you'll have apartheid until nineteen ninetytwo apartheid is separation.

france rhodesia zimbabwe south africa africa
"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"And so what started out as to one country that had ethnic problems broke into multiple countries of which one is now dominant and it's not the historically dominant part and that's all about economics now about education stability democracy india has more of all of those things than pakistan does sri lanka will have twenty five years of civil war ethnic civil war and actually have one group win two sri lankan garment will eventually conquer northern sri lanka which rarely happens in carrillo wars they will actually conqueror in win it to to reform a unified sri lanka you'll have a maoist prochinese civil war low levels of war going on the paul for what is it twenty years now which of course will make the government of the paul more dictatorial because to hut down carrillo's the government needs more power to spy on its people which of course makes people more angry with the government but nepal has the himalayas and so makes can make up some of that money in tourism burma became a military dictatorship and basically disappeared from the world for twenty five thirty plus years it's only recently re entered world economic and political life and india pakistan continue to as countries hate each other now here's the interesting thing muslims in india do better than muslim pakistan muslims in india despite problems of of racism for lack of a way of calling it do succeed much of the actors in india much of the great actors are muslim.

india pakistan paul carrillo burma sri lanka twenty five years twenty years
"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"And china has nukes which means india has nukes in the house to get nukes in the gets nukes which means pakistan says will then we need nukes because india has nukes and getting nukes is a way of saying we matter because india just doesn't need the care anymore and this is our last piece on on this what has happened to the economy the gross domestic product in nineteen sixty india was slightly better than pakistan mostly because it had more people but if you did per capita in nineteen sixty s nineteen forty five nineteen forty what becomes pakistan would have been higher in per capita what you get is this growth especially after nineteen seventy five where india keeps rising and rising and rising and pakistan doesn't and one reason is pakistan continues have military coups and so it has a weak state which is a reversal of forty seven when nineteen forty seven haven't pakistan look the better of the two countries muslims were better off life was better you would have picked pakistan to live in historically but india has become much larger much bigger and especially after nineteen ninety where it's now six times larger there is no competition between any impact in its impact sins mind if pakistan didn't have nukes india really wouldn't even have to care about it if pakistan didn't harbor terrorists that continue to bomb places in kashmir india just wouldn't care it's that much bigger it's six times bigger and will continue to get bigger.

china india pakistan
"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Meanwhile india says it's ours we got it we took it it's ours so there's a brief warren fortyseven over this in nineteen sixty five pakistan is help starts to help insurgents in kashmir there are there are loss brothers we got to bring him back they need guns they need money sure we'll help them out in nineteen sixty five that caused an indian invasion in the wins again the result of this is that pakistan doubles down on terrorism pakistan becomes a supporter of terrorism it cannot fight india in a army against army state now that's weird you should understand that because when the partition happens pakistan was the better country pakistan got the better part of the military pakistan had less people that's true but they were better educated the are more tied to international trade they had had a long history of the last two to three hundred years of being part the better part of the british empire they got more of the wealth pakistan should be the richer of the to india was saddled with five hundred million poor peasants who could barely make to to to rub two sticks together i make any money because they were poor peasants and had been toiling in poverty for centuries so the fact that india starts winning these wars is a big deal it's it it it's unusual it shouldn't happen and yet it does and it's part of india's rise as a as a major country so pakistan can't fight.

india warren fortyseven pakistan kashmir three hundred years
"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"So even within their states to make a modern country there's a bit this shortterm civil war where a hindu government is invading a hindu state in order to absorb it into a larger hindu nation so more people getting murdered and finally pakistan is separated by two thousand miles of india stan it's not unified and in fact the people of pakistan have very little in common with the people in of west pakistan have very little come with the people of east pakistan they've been separated by two thousand miles forever they are the only thing they have in common is they are vaguely muslim but they're not necessarily even the same kind of muslim so you can see this is going to be a trauma and it's a trauma the world hasn't woken up from yet and surly south asia hasn't woken up from yet what then happens over the next thirty years as a series of wars and in those wars india wins in nineteen forty seven india takes and then keeps kashmir now cashmere is northern state the northernmost state of india that's majority muslim state it should be part of pakistan if you're just going by which religion the majority is goes into which country the idea of the partition kashmir should be part of pakistan the problem is that the government in kashmir said no we want to be part of india and so there's now this problem where pakistan the people impacts in the muslim pakistan look at the people in kashmir as lost cousins as people left behind we have to get them back we have to save them from oppression.

pakistan kashmir india south asia thirty years
"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"As people try to get to one side or the other before the lines hard add to that now death squads why would there be death squads well here's the problem with the nation if you have a minority the minority going to want things they're gonna want voting rights they're gonna want rights they're gonna want stuff they might even win elections but if they're dead then they won't and so what you get is these death squads who go to murder the other side so in pakistani muslim death squads murdering hindus but you also have hindu death squads in india murdering muslims remember in the moxie the majority wins one way of becoming the my jor majority as we can discuss in rwanda for example is you murder we did in turkey is you murder the minority you murder the other side until you are definitely the majority so they're death squads there were some states have cracked up even more like the pakistan india sri lanka bhutan makes it look like it's clean but even then sri lanka broke into pieces in indian hindu stan in the pendant states said whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa we're in the pendant we were in the pendant when the british showed up the british treated us is in the pendant we wanna be independent we're not part of india we haven't been part of indian five hundred years the british said we were in the pendant and so what happens is you get the invasion of conquest by a central government of these independent states.

murder india rwanda bhutan pakistan sri lanka five hundred years
"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"And if falls apart very heavily along religious lines and you get new countries you get pakistan which has an eastern and a western part it is muslim in its majority it has the indus river and the ganges basin separated by about what two thousand miles it has india old hindu stand it has free lunka it has boot thanh it has burma though burma was maya moore was considered separate from the indian piece it's getting gains independence as well and that's buddhist country so basically with a buddhist people are so if you're hindu there or you're muslim there you're in trouble and that is currently going on today with a with genocide in burma myanmar the partition is a trauma if you were hindu in the new country pakistan you've got a problem because now you're the minority and if you're the minority you're going to be oppressed and if you're muslim in hindu stan in the new india you've got a problem because you're going to be a minority and you're going to be oppressed and then so this trauma as people try to leave if you're muslim in one section in the in the hindu section you try to get to the other section if you're hindu in pakistan you're trying to get back to india you're trying to get any now you've live there hundreds of thousands of years as a family and what the partition does is crack india into these pieces just like india has cracked before but this time you get massive refugees.

indus river ganges basin myanmar pakistan india maya moore
"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Islam came through india originally in the six hundred's as part of the first wave of arab conquests it would retreat in the in the after the fall of the about not the bassett's the mayans and then it would come back from muslim what we call afghanistan but it wasn't afghanistan at the time but afghan turkish conquerors mahmoud the mughal 's these various conquerors that emanate from afghanistan come down the indus conquering northern india in this in the ganges rivers and there are times when they le live in relative peace and harmony and there are times when they do not but the relationship between islam in hinduism is one of conflict it's a foreign invader coming into india and imposing its will and so the history of india is one where in the breaks up we've talked about this in history wanna one india is united in india it breaks up it breaks up the pieces because of the geographic these religious these cultural divides and what happens is islam becomes entrenched in the indian middle and upper classes which makes complete sense does it in the middle east the idea is is on probably isn't going anywhere the government is is lamin and so if i wanna make money or i wanna be important i wanna be a mayor i want to be governor i've got to be muslim and so places with a large middleclass places that are tied to international trade which is now every everyone who surrounds india is now.

india bassett ganges rivers afghanistan
"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Changcai shack we help them flee to taiwan and set a completely separate country that is called china taiwan's is the republic of china it is china how do they lose their democrats they will win the second world war on our side we help them well it was massive corruption incompetence there was the question who lost china and republicans blamed democrats and democrats plate republicans and everybody blamed can't changcai shack in a famous book called the man who lost china it's like you ran china and then you lost to the communists so china immediately became because the nationalist were on the us side so the communist went to soviets so the chinese communist became soviet friends which makes sense they're communists and so this creates a crisis in the united states who lost china this creates early nixon mccarthy that must be commies in us government that are this is the original deep state if you are watching fox news today this is the original there are comey's in the government that are secretly working with the soviets or the chinese to undermine united states and we've got to go find them nixon made his his name by being part of the house unamerican activities committee you'll get the blacklists that come out of this hollywood writers will get blacklisted for being communists back in the twenties and thirties when communism wasn't yet seen as bad or it wasn't known how bad communism it was seen as an economic system rather than a pro stalinist dictatorship system.

Changcai shack china taiwan china united states nixon mccarthy fox news comey taiwan changcai shack hollywood
"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"But their argument because that argument is unjust that argument is you live in poverty but i get rich is a tough one to argue so their argument was we are making you better we are getting you ready to enter the league of nations we are what would have been set in the nineteenth century civilising you and so the entire argument was based on ethical morality that europe is better and that it's our job like the white man's burden from kipling to make you better and to be fair india is probably the best or the british raj of what we call india south asia is probably the best example of the application of that idea unlike the congo unlike many places in south africa in central africa where that was the argument and they may no pretense of educating anybody of creating a middle class in india they did following the c point mutiny in eighteen fifty six that was a determination there india was too big to rule on on your own it was way too big to occupy british army and so they were going to have to create a indian middle class a pro in a pro british british educated englishspeaking indian middle class and gandhi is part of that.

europe india south asia congo british army kipling africa gandhi
"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"decolonisation" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Hulo back my name is dr christopher generic this is great big history podcast thank you for coming by today we talk about decolonization and the british raj and india and the making a pakistan bangladesh sri lanka south asia the british raj was huge it stretched from southern afghanistan from the desert of iran all the way to the jungles of burma a held some three hundred million people and one of the oldest civilizations on earth the indus river valley and the ganges river valley civilizations go back for five thousand years which brings us to gandhi there were independence movements of course before gandhi before the second world war but gandhi was the man who was able to take the british constitution and our use it to argue for indian independence he was a british train lawyer and he used the british constitution and the european alignment those ideas we talked about of lock of freedom and self determination to argue for independence his methodology of this was nonviolence now that's a misnomer because it's not just you don't you protest and you don't commit violence is that you allow violence to be done onto you that you gain a moral victory the british argument for holding on to india was a moral one even though it was an economic situation the idea was india the subcontinent south asia was a colony and britain was extracting the resources at of low price manufacturing those resources into high value goods and then making the profit.

british raj afghanistan burma indus river valley gandhi india asia dr christopher pakistan iran ganges river valley britain five thousand years