29 Burst results for "Declan"

The Island Investor - Douglon TSE

Mosaic of China

01:52 min | 17 hrs ago

The Island Investor - Douglon TSE

"I'm here with douglas dc. Douglas and you are a friend of october. That's who introduced you. So let me play you the introduction. That octo said about you. From the last series i'm recommending. Very good guy called declan and he's from an interesting family. He's doing a very cool. Business is a small island next to shanghai with october. First of all tell me. How do you know actor. She designed my suit and my wife's dress either wedding through the contradiction for my father. Well there you go and she said that you come from an interesting unsure. We will discuss that as part of our discussion today. But before we do that the first thing i would ask anyone in that chair is what object did you bring that in some way represents your life in china I brought a very humble rock from sin silent. This rock is something that we try to incorporate in design for shops on silent and We try to use as much local stuff as possible and so local fishermen would use these rocks to way down the nets when fishing. So it's really cool. And it's very durable and i usually give this as a gift to all my friends who visit me. Awesome sloughing excellent. Oh as a gift. So what what do they use. Ideally i tell them to use as a candle holder. This raucous for you excellent. Okay thank you so much weight so this rock here has been at. The bottom of the ocean has it. Yes what they do is they would go out to see and Depending on the seasons there were fish for different things from fishes crabs to Shrimps the entire island for the past. Couple of hundred years is based off of fishing economy until recently after they may transportation more convenient Tourism started boom.

Douglas Dc Octo Declan Douglas Shanghai China
This top cancer scientist thought he knew a lot about cancer. Then he got it.

Science Friction

05:58 min | 2 months ago

This top cancer scientist thought he knew a lot about cancer. Then he got it.

"I wanted. I didn't want to have not only smoldering away in my pelvis. bit also small does away and you hit. It's always in your head as much as i could rationalize it and say i'm very scientific in my approach things and it wasn't a problem every day would come to me at three o'clock in the morning when i sat a worrying about all the other things worry about three o'clock in the morning you will saying parts of them and the body that they will never really say themselves. Also get tonight. It's an extraordinary thing that that was true kind of but it is still amazes me today. That people want to see the inside. Bids cannot have my video. I want to share it on social media. you know. i've seen all your videos on youtube. Can you make sure my prostate goes up in this episode. It's a franken. Feel this conversation about an experience. Men don often talked publicly about. So let's meet the scientist and the surgeon interested in nature. This is professor robe ramsey as a molecular biologist and kansas scientist and on the saudi also makes art. He's a black belt in karate rossi's by his husband father of two children but trying to understand how the natural world works was a i love of his and i've always been driven by trying to understand biology and i'm also a little bit inclined to like machinery and structures and the way things work and essentially sells Machines and i like the way they operate and they're really have siamese different facets to them and of causing disease machinery goes wrong for me. The very first day i was in an operating theatre watching people take cancerous. Lump sexually as it was then breast cancer. I was instantly captivated. This is professor. Declan murphy lading urologist and kansas surgeon. He's been in a for over a decade but you can he he's rh lilt and even though it's cancer he's dealing with everyday like rob. He's loved his job. Died dot. I was in the operating theatre was meeting these patients before and after as a medical student and honestly i just became almost overwhelmed by the idea that people will allow other people to do surgery on them. That it's such a huge privilege to be allowed to do surgery but i was fascinated by urology because it's it's quite a a big field work. In it's everything from the kidneys dancer. The bladder and the prostate and the pain is in. The testicles are all areas in the urology domain that can be affected by cancer. Now dick lennon rob happened to be call. Eggs at the pay to mccallum will pay to mac cancel santa in melbourne as a scientist rob's focused on amongst other tricky conundrums developing vaccines that target gastrointestinal cancers like colorectal cancer as a surgeon declines leading the way with us robotics in the operating theatre and often the cancer arena. You'll find that scientists and surgeons just don't traditionally makes much but robin declan like many others at paid amac a different because i want to do science. That reflects the needs of people with cancer and the clinicians trading them are remember being at a hospital where declan was doing a tag team robotic procedure on a patient was having some colorectal surgery plus a prostatectomy and i was there on saturday morning with my eyes pocket collecting some samples clincal trial without doing their in the operating room because these patients have agreed to be part of a trial in that case. That was a patient to kansas. Quite complex work but rob wanted some tissue as some cancerous tissue to take into the lab. And i was watching these two guys work. Seamlessly together is something is a of beauty in any group of people that do things well together and there's almost subliminal communication. What's coming next that i'm bumping to each other The theater staff all expert. They work as attainments really like a formula one team. It a stop and i'd never. I've never worked in the center where you will have a a professor of colorectal science in the operating room with you so and we get used to that at peter. Mac it's the same prostate the same for melanoma central breast and and i just find as an extraordinary environment. I've never worked in a place that has that. Degree of translational multidisciplinary care where people are. They're asking the questions taking the tissue doing trials etcetera etcetera. And it's just a extraordinary. I can do some cool things in my lab question. I of been geneticists for most of my research life and we can do cool things with jane's in cells and also indeed on animals and you can find great science out of that but does it always reflect what's going on in the patient and the answer is sometimes but not always and i want to the always it is relevant. What happens in a patient. It's all about the patient in the has always westbound lot that though so these two colleagues late in their fields in cancer but then kind of a sudden curve ball and a role change. The scientists in the surgeon were about to become the surgeon. And he's patient he's rob i have a great jp. I've been going to for quite a long time. Really thoughtful considerate kanda guy. We've we always have a great show. When i go to visit him. I have a checkup every six months. For basically blood blood pressure to have a level that cannot be controlled just by exercise and diet.

Robe Ramsey Declan Murphy Kansas Cancer ROB Dick Lennon Rob Gastrointestinal Cancers Robin Declan Franken Rossi DON Mccallum Youtube Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Declan Melbourne MAC Melanoma Jane
Kansas City Chiefs ban fans from wearing headdresses and face paint

Forum

00:47 sec | 8 months ago

Kansas City Chiefs ban fans from wearing headdresses and face paint

"Kansas City Chiefs have banned Native American headdresses and face paint. But Greg Declan reports that the team has no plans to change their controversial name. But Chase new policy comes the same week they decided to limit fans 22% of Arrowhead stadiums capacity for their season opener. While the team has banned Native American themed headdresses and face painting, the Chiefs say in a statement that the Arrowhead chop is still under review. It's similar to chopping gestures used at home games for baseball's Atlanta Braves and College football's Florida State. Seminoles. Also to be determined is the use of the war drum. Which invited celebrities beat on before the opening kick offs for NPR news. I'm Greg

Kansas City Chiefs Greg Declan Arrowhead Atlanta Braves NPR Florida State Baseball Football
"declan" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

03:15 min | 9 months ago

"declan" Discussed on Ideas

"It was actually in some ways. Borrow does language from the poetry of people caney who's often quoted by Clinton during the debates about the peace process. So yeah, this is another example of the future being what artists are. I think. That really is the answer that the. Borders, are. Necessary. Their held for as long as they're soft. I'm always struck when I go to the US by how much space is on how people don't even bother sometimes building hedges between one garden and the next you need a bit of a border though it's like what Robert Frost set that could. Fences make good neighbors, but if defenses get too high and too hard, that's bad. Are If they don't exist at all, that can be bad. I want. To end with. The world of the poets, and if Irish literature begins back in the dawn of time expect far back as we can figure it. The work of poets and so now in our own time, we're back with if you like the era of the poets and that the Great Irish poet of our time, shame? Zini. Who Remembers where he came from I? Mean he came from the north. But he's airlines poet, and in a way he has created kind as I. See it. Anyway he's created a kind of parallel universe. An invention of a kind of Irishness that has nothing to do with borders and nothing to do with anything that isn't in the imagination but yet it is as real as anything that is not in the imagination. Yeah, that's true His writing has always transcended the north-south border within Ireland and equally west one with Britain he's written about Eastern European poets in whom he finds an example an in whom he finds what he called beautifully and Australia for the future. But at the same time, any is country boy who grew up on a farm that was filled with hedges. And you know what? He calls clearings and little fences that made agriculture and also human community meaningful impossible. So I think he believes in the necessity for what his friend Robert Frost spoke about. But saw I, it's not hard ones..

Robert Frost Clinton US Ireland Britain Australia
"declan" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

07:04 min | 9 months ago

"declan" Discussed on Ideas

"Immigrant, Philip Cole turn talk to declan hybrid at his home in Dublin. This is inventing Ireland. At various times in your various risings about the making and unmaking of Ireland, you point to the contrast between. The Nation. That might have been in the nation that actually became in that particular instant. The question is, is that kind of process always doomed to failure? No, it shouldn't. Fail as abjectly as it did in a sense in our case, I, think when the border of the nineteen twenties was established. This created like what's the northerners called a Protestant parliament for Protestant people various senseless, very very micro and pure Ditto a Catholic parliament for a Catholic people by reverse effect in the south. And that was a disaster for the architects of our I mean if you were kind of radical libertarian, Republican thinker of a secular, maybe socialist spent. This was terrible having the border because you knew that politics for the next sixty years would be dominated by sectarian tensions are by the division spaced on the civil war which would never connect with social questions. But always with just whether your parents had supported the Tracy are not. In effect accepted the border are Nash And it became very very. You know disappointing as a result of these forces I guess that leads to what you point out two a very important. Point, in the telling of the story of making Ireland and that's the active union of eighty, nine, hundred and one when Ireland does in effect, become a subsidiary of the British parliament and you've said that. That was the beginning of what you call the terminal decline of Ireland. Can you talk a little bit but why you see that? Definitely declined as one of the great cities of Europe after the act of. Union. I think because basically the union had the effect of provincial icing. Is Add all of Ireland. people went to London now for the season and there was a sense in which were no longer Metropol metropolitan to ourselves I suppose you could put it. And it was also true. I. Think to say that phenomenon of absentee landlordism became rife in the period after the union. I mean compared with landlords in England landlords in Ireland where very negligent of their stock off their people they're caught years and so on. Actually this is one reason why the Brits had to introduce a unified central administration and a sophisticated form of local government much earlier in Ireland than in England because the landlords had failed. So this Maly in their. Apparent leadership. Roles. The English ones could still be trusted when the ones couldn't, and the result was a unified administration system to compensate for this failure, which was itself consequence the active union. So I, guess part of the consequence of that. Becomes. Essentially, a province directly governed. By Britain that that changes the entire ethos were no longer a nation where it's certainly not a nation once again but we're no longer and independent people and therefore in the mind of the people. We become something else the notion of who it is. We think we are has shifted ground. There's a notion that everything in Ireland is second race and to riveted and in imitation of something else that is prior and more splendid. And at the same time Armand has been used as a laboratory by the splendid people in London who are directing policy now. And sometimes, this means that very good things happen like A. You disestablish church and state, which the Brits have still to do in their own bit of land. Equally, you dismantle the landholding aristocracy in the later nineteenth century, which are still to happen in England. You Institute nationalized system of schools in eighteen, thirty seven before this happens in England, you have streamlined postal system before it happens. So not everything in the colony is bad. The trouble is that you have all these culturally rather advanced movements possible because laboratory existing side by side with dire undercapitalisation. You're you're creating in fact conditions cultural. Literary Revival Because you're educating the people to quite a high standard in quite rigorous system. And you have putting around certain elements of social and political policy. Dot are surprisingly modern. But the economy is still ruined. So you've got the archaic pulling out of the avant-garde in this case, and it's really one of the main problems of nineteenth century Ireland to try and stop this two-speed. Plays a make it once beat where where the modernizing elements would be more happily beside the Mar-. Traditional ones, I wanna get to the later part of the century and the whole cultural revival took place. But before we get there, there is what you describe as the lethal blow of the famine. Yes and talk a little bit about what the famine did to that sense of self in that sense of Irishness well, the have to remember that almost every fifteen years before the forty third been famines of greater or lesser severity right back into the seventeen hundreds and none of them had the lethal effects that degrade hunger as we call us of the eighteen forties dead. So my theory, is that something else some prior failure explains why the people were. So easily rolled over on this occasion and I think it's to do with the fact that they gave all P- speaking the Irish language they lost one of their key cultural holdings in who's name that could have fought and in whose name they did fight back against prior famines but it was as if they were now an empty shell. When the hunger came people will ask about, how is it that people none of whom was more than fifty or sixty miles from DC couldn't have got food from the sea just to keep themselves going if the land food had failed the potato and there has to be something to do with the death of the heart. Failure of will as as well as of course, dire British policy behind this. Failure and I think. It's a chasm really in the middle of the nineteenth century because The people come out of this for instance, very silent where once they'd been bubbly and articulate. Doesn't amazing contrast in Father Peter O'Leary's autobiography between the pre and Post famine child he said the pre-famine child talk donor throughout the winter..

Ireland England London British parliament Europe Philip Cole Dublin declan hybrid Tracy Maly Peter O'Leary Ireland. Dot Britain Metropol Armand
"declan" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

08:16 min | 9 months ago

"declan" Discussed on Ideas

"Parking, based on what we've just been talking about, and that is is the making of the idea of country or I should say more correctly is the making of the of an idea of people essentially an imaginative acton and how does that relate then to the actual stones and mortar state nation that we come up with? What's what's what's the contrast in the connection between the two? Well, I think ideas of Ireland did the ideas I? Know, we're mainly invented in the nineteenth century by processes I've described particularly the process of migration. You know people going to Britain or Canada are the US on rubbing up against Italians and poles and suddenly being aware Oh, we we have should have an identity like they do too and we do have our own language after etc etc and I think it's very much like what Benedict Anderson has said that exile is the cradle of nationality. When he was quoting Lord Acton of course but he said it was like a black on white negative photograph. That you know an Irish person. Experiences in the streets in New York are critical. But they have to go home then to print the positive of the photo. And that's what some people call an nationalist movement or National Movement such as we had one hundred years ago in Ireland and many other places. But that in some ways these movements and begin elsewhere, you know like Michael Collins Works for the post office in London. Becomes a member of the Gaelic. League becomes aware of his Irishness in ways he might have done. Had He stayed in Cork? You don't know what your own country is fully like leaping out of for a while. I mean when I said that about inventing Ireland, I meant I I never thought of myself as Irish growing up here in Qatar I always thought of myself as adult but dubliner, but it was only when I went to England was told in Oxford that I was an Irish person on this at the height of the bombing campaign by the IRA and the one thousand, nine, hundred, ninety s that I began to. Carry in my head almost an abstract idea of Ireland now I think that's what all those revivalists did eighty years before me and it was a very in some ways immaculate idea. They carry a very pure ideas. National aspirational ideas often are what happened then was it had to take. Incarnate form in the flawed medium of an actual inherited state. To be honest truncated part of that inherited states. So the nation and the states are never completely perfect fish. And a great deal of our troubles arise from that discrepancy. Where we're going to hopefully end up with what you referred to as the revive list at the end of the nineteenth century and how that went into the shaping of an idea of modern Ireland. But I want to go back a lot further than that and this idea of other this idea sent them and what therefore dictate switches border. And how how that arises you go back to very early Irish book. The cattle rate of Cooley in which Colin. Goes to war or I should say Queen Maeve of Conoco's to war with colon and the king of the North and at the very beginning of the story you know who is facing these forces that are coming at him and he lays down I, think it's the horse's bridle in the in the pathway to more or less tell the army. This far you can go and no further. You Cross over that line and you're in my territory now we're at war. I. Don't want to go back to that specific example but just to go back as far as we can see about you know what it is that defines a people in mythology of being Irish and where the roots of that are well. Freud used at grace unhelpful the phrase, the narcissism of small differences what you've been talking about is really a kind of baffles stations between. Connacht. Ulster. Between Queen May and the forces defended by Cullen. There has always been a kind of provincialism. In a lot of virus cultural debate in fact, there used to be Gaelic Games every Saint Patrick's day call a railway cup where Lens Stir Monster Monster connick played each other out. Of course, in an attempt to shake this up I was part of a movement in the nineteen eighties called Field Day which tried to create what we call the fifth province of the mind and there had been in fact, a fifth province in ancient Ireland and the idea was to try and restore it, and that would be a province where these autism 's where relaxed and things could be more easy. But you know in the immortal words of tip O'Neill that for every Irish person, all politics is local. So, what you're talking about when you talk about, you know internal borders is something like a way of negotiating narcissism of small differences. I'm not so sure that the most deep cultural border in Ireland north south. One though. I would argue that it's more East West and I've always thought that the further west you went the more conservative with the people where on matters of what we would call personal morality. Now, I'm saying their objective behavior on the ground might not be in accordance with abstraction, but in voting terms, the same was true in votes in more recent times on divorce contraception, etc. If you're in Dublin devote to be liberal West. Mail. More old-fashioned but that is true within the north as well. Belfast, would be a lot more. Loose in general in terms of these sort of questions. Dan Donegal. And there wasn't ancient Ireland a dyke down the middle of the island separating east and west. They've been altis kind of borders not just an art south one and yeah, the had pretty obsessed about setting them up and sometimes they're just like. MOATS Doug because these people on the other side at different from us. So so I've just like saying that I think the border in Northern Ireland has become like a huge issue in the last century. But in almost geological time, the other border may be more important. You're listening to ideas on CBC Radio One in Canada across North America on Sirius, Xm in Australia on our in and around the world at CBC DOT CA Slash Ideas, I'm now I add pin-drop from Ted is a new podcast that takes listeners across the globe escape with host Salim. Russia Walla has he finds surprising stories and ideas from each place with local journalists and creators as your guides learn about a fun and fierce art movement in Nairobi. Kenya that challenges the common narrative of the region and find out why residents of Bangkok call a radio station instead of nine one one subscribe to pin-drop with you get your podcasts. I'm George the poet Maya part cost is an audio scrapbook of random diary entries from actual life I'm inspired by the world around me the world inside me. That's where things get interesting. Sometimes I close my eyes and I see things are way bigger than me things that it would be selfish of me to share. My story is all about what I hope to achieve on what I want to see next. have. You heard Georgia's port-cost from the BBC. Hope you enjoy. What makes a collection of people into a? It's a complicated soup of influences part shared history part the influence of our allies, neighbors and enemies part myth making by artists. Irish writer declan hybrid has been thinking about the question of Irish identity for a long time and across a number of books and other writings. Ireland he says, provocatively, he's an invention. And the Irish sense of identity is shaped in large part by what the British expect the Irish to be the stage Irishman in fact. Producer and Irish..

Ireland Lord Acton acton Canada Northern Ireland Benedict Anderson Queen Maeve Cork Michael Collins New York National Movement US Conoco Saint Patrick Britain Belfast Dublin Georgia Connacht
"declan" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

07:25 min | 9 months ago

"declan" Discussed on Ideas

"The he smashed pretty much every billboard and streaming record that matters. It has already been streamed more than a billion times. People still to this day point to this is the moment everything changed but whether you agree with those claims are not this podcast is it really about him either you're not an astute businessman or you're inherently racist when it comes to black music in his country? This is not a drake podcast available now on CBC listen or wherever you get your podcast. This is a CBC podcast. I. And this is ideas. If God invented whiskey to prevent the Irish from ruling the world. Then who invented Ireland. That's the question posed by declan keyboard in the introduction to his book inventing Ireland never talked myself. As Irish, I always thought of myself as a dubliner, but it was only when I went to England and was told in Oxford, that I was an Irish person on this up the height of the bombing campaign by the IRA in the nineteen seventies that I began to you know carrying my head almost an abstract idea of. The idea that a country at nation is something invented might strike us as a startling proposition but what he's talking about, of course is not so much the country of Ireland but the nation. And the idea that people have of themselves and who they are. Where does the idea of us who we are ourselves come from? And how is it constructed? Declan hybrid is an Irish writer. He's taught Irish literature for many years at universities in Dublin and around the world. In his many books about our land Irish culture, he circles around this question. What's the role of art and the arts in the framing of national identity? But he argues that art is not the only thing shaping culture and identity. In the case of Ireland he writes. If. England had never existed. The Irish would have been rather lonely. Each nation badly needed the other for the purpose of defining itself. And if that's true of Ireland something similar is probably true of every nation. That we're all shaped by our relationships with our neighbours. Ideas producer, Philip Coulter spoke with declan hybrid home in Dublin. This is inventing Ireland. You've written two books on the general idea of the making of Ireland of the imagination what writers have done and what artists have contributed to the development of an idea of of. Ireland. Not just modern but going back. To quite early times and. You make a point in the preface to your more recent book that when inventing Ireland was published the first book. I. Think it was your mother who objected strenuously to the title insisting that. Ireland was always there. So I know you're being slightly facetious having a little bit of you know fun at Mother's expense but on a more serious level, why was she wrong? Nations are relatively modern fictions ya they. Involve I think things like railways and the printing press and are bound into some kind of unity administrations on all of these words have just used Sir a BIOS relative modernity My mother probably told it was wrong of me to say that Ireland had been invented. I said it had been invented partly by the Brits at that Irish people went to. Britain. And we're told Irish and brought the idea back home as Bob Dylan say. But of course, Ireland is an island and my mother's generation generations before her believed that it had been. So made by God with these natural boundaries. To be if you like one And to have a singular identity but we know that our land even small though it was was a patchwork quilt of warring fiefdoms. Very, different forms of Christian practice. So the idea of a unified. Ireland is a rather English invention. I'm paradoxically in some ways British one even though we think of those working for Irish unity and fighting for it as nationalists well, you've said as much. She said, the English did not invade Ireland they actually seized a neighboring island invented the idea of Ireland can you talk a little bit about that? What is that invention of the idea of Ireland? It implies that we didn't figure it ourselves or the Irish didn't figure it out for themselves at the idea of Ireland was actually a fiction or joke if you like invented by the British well, I think that. The British have always needed to imagine another with a capital o sometimes don with the French sometimes with us. Irish. But you know if they saw themselves as rational we Irish where the opposites irrational if they saw themselves as analytical, we were the opposite impulsive. Etcetera Etcetera now I think what happened was that a generation rose at the end of the nineteenth century which didn't actually dispute those labels but gave itself the right to reinterpret them. So instead of irrational say. Healthily wrote it in emotion. Instead of impulsive saying natural you know it's a bit like the black is beautiful phase of African American life where badges apparent dishonor, which are often the opposite of who the author of the badge imagine themselves to be can actually be accepted and embraced and worn with pride. So I, think in some ways, there's an element of neurosis of what psychologists call slot rolling between two extremes of Irish. No sending listeners but I think a great deal of the neurosis was invented if you like by the Brits on projected onto an Irish other on Shaw. Meant this when he said that every English person should finally be sent to Ireland to learn flexibility of mind by which he meant to embrace their own shadow to come to terms with all supposed to what their daily south imagine themselves to me. But. Just to be argumentative for a moment, the implication in that is that there is no such thing as Irishness in itself or Britishness for that matter if we are so malleable that somebody else can invent a role for us to play like hamlet in a stage play or some actor who? Shows up and is told who he is here your side sitting here the performance that you have to give. Yeah I've often worried about this myself I remember asking. A, Jewish, intellectual greatly admired in New York what the essence of Jewishness was and he said it was the experience of being perpetually defined, decided and derided boy others. And I said that's very Irish. It's no wonder that choice made a semi Jewish man Leopold Bloom the center of the Grace Irish view seats because that experience of being you know at a discursive disadvantage where other people seem to.

Ireland Irish Dublin England Declan hybrid CBC declan keyboard Oxford Irishness Leopold Bloom Bob Dylan Philip Coulter New York Britain writer producer declan Shaw
"declan" Discussed on I Run Because

I Run Because

03:35 min | 11 months ago

"declan" Discussed on I Run Because

"We'll listen to any of the band's I just mentioned you probably won't want to run with me more because it's all heavy metal music all right. Well listen declan I really want to I WanNa thank you for your time today. I really appreciate it. You really are Your good friend. You're an inspiration to others and We're so glad that you are part of our Achilles family in We're excited that soon will be out there. Running run the streets of New York City in the roads of Central Park again. Just like that in that World Times right now. Stick training stick to running. Get OUT THERE. Do what you can when you can. And now we know why declan roadster on canal. Let's kick it over to our local running. Select Hello Sediba will share his running journey to run every day with us and he may even have a challenge for you to join a long. What's.

declan roadster New York City Central Park World Times
"declan" Discussed on I Run Because

I Run Because

05:50 min | 11 months ago

"declan" Discussed on I Run Because

"I don't know who I was with but I was like on the other side and I overheard a conversation that you had with the daredevil. I'm not sure of his name but I know he's another visually impaired athletes. Neil Neil and I remember Somebody said there's declan over there and then Neil said hey declan and use you were him one of you said Oh. It's good to hear you and I that took me. I said 'cause we're always oh it's good to see you. It's good to see you so I don't even know if you know. I overheard your conversation but I went back to school and I work with children with them. I work with special needs children and we were having a discussion. I said you know just something that you don't realize how other people talk to each other or other people view each other and sometimes it's nice just to sit back and overhear the conversation and for me my takeaway was you know I say. Hey It's good to see you but both of you said it was good to hear you and I don't. That's something that I took away from that day. It's not actually how we say it. It's what we say. First of all time telling everyone. Hey It's good to see you. Even though they know I can't change. But in that instance both of you weren't able to see each other so when you said that it took me like that was that was a takeaway as an educator that sometimes like when when I'm with the children I work with WHO are hearing impaired. Can you hear that in like sometimes you just have to watch how you say things because it's not always true for Each situation Hey Declan. What is their race like? If you could have a dream race bike right now we can get on a plane we can go. Would there be a race that you are reading about doing. These are finish line questions. We've got some finish line questions that were going to ask all of our guests..

declan Neil Neil
"declan" Discussed on I Run Because

I Run Because

05:34 min | 11 months ago

"declan" Discussed on I Run Because

"Can do four miles comfortably but after that tends to get a little difficult and I get winded so I gotta work on that on a personal goal show with running. I'd love to break Seven minute mile at some point. You'll do that. You'll do that by summertime. I'm watching it. Do you have a favorite distance? I of all the races. That you've done is like the five k the half the full. You've done them all now. So is there one that really speaks to you to marathon or because not that many people go the full twenty six point two so for me felt like an accomplishment in itself that I was able to run twenty six point two miles and somebody else couldn't which I know sounds kind of mean but android personal satisfaction and being lake. Topdog absolutely listen. That's you know you're not considered a five K. You're you're not considered a ten K. Or you're not considered a half marathoner. You know you finish the marathon. Your forever a marathoner. That's something that they can't take away from you. Yeah that's that's really cool. I got it a visually impaired runner for the Chicago. Marathon in their medal had Braille on Gurgle. Very cool After I we ran an I was beat up. I was not as prepared as I should have been. And we were in the recovery tent and we all had our medals and they gave the special metal to Jenny and I'm to see her like sit in her chair. And she had her recovery bag and she had ice and she sat there and she was Reading her medal and she was even telling me that they misspelled One of the words on the Meta which I found funny but she was The look on her face when she was holding her medal was worth every twenty six point two miles from me. Are you interested in running the Chicago Marathon and possibly Getting one of those medals or maybe we should tell New York City that they need to get on their game and get themselves some metals Braille on it. Now I'd rather the road trip. Everybody pack packing the sober Ellie Machine in Chicago. It was a nice gesture. Really wasn't sure I remember you talking about that. Now that got you choked up. It did go and Boston are definitely on my wrist along with all the other major. Okay Declan so what is the reason? Why do you run so the reason I run is because I run for those who can't whether it be someone who's battling cancer or someone who just feels intimidated by seeing everyone else run and they don't think they can do it every race? I do is for them. I don't do it for myself..

Chicago Jenny Declan Boston Ellie Machine cancer New York City
"declan" Discussed on I Run Because

I Run Because

04:07 min | 11 months ago

"declan" Discussed on I Run Because

"I swear you must have paid somebody to put out that. Those cones the potholes the sandbags. Man I want to hear the story of the homeless as we as we were running through. This this obstacle course on I think we were on. What's the road right outside of Central Park? Have you are? Were running up Fifth Avenue and as we were going to this obstacle course. Unfortunately that's where I lost the bet and ran declan into A homeless man. It might have been a sandbag. We're not too sure but we didn't. We didn't turn around. We just kept. That's where I lost my bet with declan just as a guy declan when I when I am with you or if I'm with any of the other visually impaired runners first of all it's safety but sometimes I get a little nervous with Can I keep up with your pace? My holding you back Am I dragging you like you know how do you? How do you work that out with the guide ahead of time? Of course we know each other's pace but like do you find yourself sometimes pulling back because you guide can't keep up with you or do you sometimes feel like you have to run. Faster is What's your experience with guides for the most part ninety? Nine percent of all the runs. I've had the guys have been phenomenal. There were one or two instances where they've been first time guides and they haven't really been exposed to what it's like having to guide visually impaired person so they're a little bit hesitant but other than that in terms of pace-wise typically with Achilles and a lot of the other running groups if you ask for someone to run with you. It's suggested that you put down what your pace is that way. You can be best match for some. That can keep up with your ability declan. I don't WANNA I don't want to harp on us but I guess it's something that I'm curious for myself and that is are. You considered a blind runner or visually impaired runner. And what's what's the correct terminology. I'll be honest with you. I mean and we've been. We've been friends for over a year now and I don't I don't know what's the proper. What's the proper terminology? First and foremost is runner. Yes he's one hell of a runner to my goodness. You've been dropping times left and right. Thank you yeah. There is no correct term own. It's up to each person himself whether they like to be called visually impaired or blind like some. Choose one over the other for me. Personally I could care less what you call me as long as you don't come for their. You know you really have. I just remember my first time. I don't think you're my The first visually impaired person but I was petrified the first time so I had somebody alongside me another guy that helped Because it was I was nervous about Just a little dips in the road or if somebody throws off their glove gloves on ground or somebody threw a water bottle. And that's on the ground There's a pack of runners in front of us. There's somebody behind us like. I felt like as I was running. I really had to keep a my head on a swivel just to make sure that you know who? I'm running with. Stay safe you make it very easy though. Declan you have a great sense of humor so you kind of put me at ease when I do guide you but I don't.

declan Central Park
Wacky Khakis: Looters and Polluters

Pants On Fire

05:20 min | 11 months ago

Wacky Khakis: Looters and Polluters

"This week. Another thrilling addition of everybody's favorite game lackey Khakis. And now here's your host in an identical clone of devil theme. No Deborah Goldstein. I'm Deborah Goldstein. Not a clone. How do we know that? And here with me. As always unless he's a clone is our sound effects robot Liza whose name stands for live in studio audience. Lisa how about a little sound effects pizzazz? I'm not really in the mood for pizzazz. What are you in the mood for I can do this out of a tree. Falling the forest. When nobody's around to hear it. What does that sound like? That's what it sounds like. You weren't around for it. So how do you know? It doesn't sound like that okay. Good Point Now how about giving us the sound of a robot telling us how our game works and it here all right okay. Every time we play Wacky Khakis Deborah. We tell one wild story about the world. There is a baby. Only one of those stories is the truth and the other one is a lie. And it's the job of two human children to figure out which one is. Which and would you please introduce those human child contestants? Everything okay our human child contestant. We got this kid named Toby. He was on the Blacksmith episode. We got this. Other named declan from our gymnastics episode. Welcome guy also with us today to be our Wacky Khakis. Timekeeper referee is our producer. No welcome back Noah. Hey guys good to be here Okay real heads will know that in Wacky Khakis Deborah Lisa. Each change to tell their stories for the timer sounds. We flipped a coin which later found out was a trick. Coin from both sides were heads and so Lisa has chosen to go second. That's how you do it. Well Debra means you're up first feeling good. I'm feeling rate okay. Our topic this week is looters and polluters story of money hungry business ventures. That were no friends of mother. Nature listen up carefully declan and toby. Deborah your timer will begin. Now they say that money can't buy you happiness and I suppose that's mostly true but an underground perfume shop in Miami between one thousand nine hundred eighty two and one thousand nine hundred eight. It could by perfumes and colognes extracted from federally protected. Endangered Species Ronca Thurman. The mastermind behind this criminal enterprise referred to her fragrances. As Ex tinctures tinctures for fragrances made from species that were going extinct though. Ex tinctures generally didn't smell any better than the much cheaper less destructive sense available legally they served as a status symbol for Miami's rich and powerful throughout the eighties. The most famous variety was called Miami blue named after the endangered butterfly. It was made from today. There are fewer than one hundred. These butterflies still living though it was incredibly difficult to find and capture. The vulnerable species used in perfumes. The business was made profitable by the exorbitant sums. People would pay for them sometimes. Up to fifteen thousand dollars for a two ounce bottle Thurman extinct. Were an open secret among southern Florida's money classes for years but an expose by the Miami Herald brought down the multi-million dollar operation in October of Nineteen Thurman Served US eleven months in prison before securing an early release Thurman went on to make millions more dollars offer confessional autobiography fragrance endangered panther must prairie clover. See turtled wearing that stuff. Just made you feel like you were somebody. An anonymous customer was quoted as saying in the book. We all know it was wrong but there was something so cool about knowing your sent. Who's going extinct? It was the ultimate limited edition. Pat Is time oil done deborah. Well what do you think of that story? L. Is Pretty Nice. Yeah I liked it except for the except for the danger. Save all endangered animal. You would. You wouldn't buy perfume from an animal that was going. You know what I didn't like about the story what I didn't like the animals being killed. No it's terrible deborah. I wish you would. You wouldn't talk about that. I would not like to but it's important that people know that these things happened and that people actually paid money for such a thing which is disgusting. It's shameful shameful for what you guys said. Yes I agree. Yes fully times two million. I appreciate your

Deborah Lisa Deborah Goldstein Ronca Thurman Miami Declan Toby Liza Miami Herald Producer Debra Florida PAT
'Do Skunks Like How They Smell?' And Other Silly Questions

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

06:52 min | 1 year ago

'Do Skunks Like How They Smell?' And Other Silly Questions

"We'll start out with a question from Lilly she asks. Why do pickles and cactuses like each other? I will admit lily. I've never thought about the fact that pickles kind of resemble some CACTI but now that you mention it they do and if you've ever picked a cucumber straight from the garden you might know that some varieties of cucumber have little spikes on them just like a cactus. If you're wondering. Pickles are cucumbers that have been pickled in vinegar brine. You can make other kinds of pickled vegetables too but let's just keep it simple and assume lillies talking about pickled cucumbers to make things even more confusing. There's actually a cactus called cucumber. Cactus and I think that cactus looks less like a cucumber than some other kinds of cactus but back to the question cucumber and CACTUS are both plants. But they're in different plant families. They're not very closely related. Cucumbers are in the Gourd family related to things like pumpkins squash and watermelon CACTI. That's the plural of CACTUS. Cacti are succulents plants that store water not all succulents are CACTI. But that's the family there in so I guess the fact that both of these plants look of alike is random but there are actually in nature a lot of reasons that things that aren't related lookalike. Sometimes it's because there are patterns that repeat through nature and we see them in all kinds of objects. Another reason is something called convergent evolution. We're different organisms like plants or animals develop similar traits similar. Looks or ways of doing things even though they're not related often it's because they have had to adapt to similar environments and they both did it in the most effective and efficient way even though they were doing it separately. I don't know if that's what's happening with pickles. Cacti but I think it could be. I'm GONNA keep thinking about this and maybe we can circle back around to it in a future episode. If we find out anything interesting at any rate really good observation lily. Hi My name is Jesse. I live in Charlottesville Vermont Annoying Sheldon I would like to know what our googlers made out of you declan. Don't tell anyone but I actually don't think your question is all that gross. It's always good to know what's in your body right. Put simply buggers are just dried or congealed snot. So what's not? Snot is more politely and scientifically known as Mucus Producing Mucus. Is One of the ways. Your body stays healthy. Your body produces a leader of mucus every day in your nose your sinuses and your digestive tract mucus sticky and it helps to keep all the dirt dust and pollen out of your lungs so the mucus in your nose likes to hang around and stick to the little hairs on the inside of each nostril. That's how it can catch some of that dust and dirt that you're breathing in so you don't get it deeper into your body and sometimes that Mucus Kinda dries up there and it forms boogers. Mostly it's okay to just leave the boogers alone. You know but if you need to get rid of them user tissue. Here's a question from Bennett. Employers now eleven San Carlos Santana California in my question is. How do you fish C. Underwater without goggles? Our answer comes from Joe Blasi of the New England aquarium in Boston so animals have. Is that our builds in a way that is best for their environment. So your eyes designed to see an air. And that's the way that they work best so with you. Swim underwater with no goggles. Your is can't see really well so what happens when you put on goggles. There's a little teeny tiny bit of air. That's trapped in the goggles with your eyes so you can still see underwater. Now Fish. Don't need goggles. Because there is designed to work under water they still have the same parts that you do. There's a cornea an iris and pupil The way that the light gets in and bounces around. And then transmits a signal to their brain so they can see things. I'm and some fish can actually see really well considering the refresh But there is designed to work much better in a water environment rather than an Air Environment. One of the reasons that humans blink is to keep our eyes wet so do fish need to blink at all. They don't fish. Don't have eyelids blinking necessary. Whoa fish don't have eyelids cool now onto skunks hi. My name is enchanted. Seven years old. I live in Melbourne California. My question is like the smell of themselves. That's a good question and we found just the right person to answer it. Mary Holland is a naturalist and she was actually the very first guest on. But why more than three years ago discounts like the smell themselves as often as I've encountered skunks and even been spray by one. It has never occurred to me to wonder how the smell affects the skunk. I've always been more concerned with how it affects me. According to Dr Jerry. Tegu an expert on skunks and head of the Dragoon Institute for the betterment of skunks and skunk reputations skunks. Do not enjoy the smell of their own spray or the spray of other skunks. Skunks rarely spray each other or other animals. They only have a certain amount of spray inside them and once it's all used up. They must go several days without it while their body manufacturers more during this time they are defenceless so they only spray another animal. If they are seriously threatened. So if you don't WANNA get sprayed. Mary says it's best not to scare a skunk. They don't want to spray you. Prior to spraying a skunk will give ample warning to its enemy by stamping his front feet. If this is ignored then skunk will spray as a last defense when Scott Spray. They rarely get any on themselves though. They can tolerate their own smell. They do not appreciate getting it in the face and is from another skunk. A Scott. Sense of smell is even stronger than humans so if anything the skunk suffers more than anyone who has had the misfortune of being sprayed if a skunk does encounter counter the spray of another skunk. It will rub its face in the dirt sneeze or try to groom itself to get rid of the sprays odor

Scott Spray Mary Holland Lilly San Carlos Santana California Jesse Joe Blasi Charlottesville Dragoon Institute Bennett Boston Vermont Dr Jerry New England Melbourne California
Of Mice and Men: This top cancer scientist thought he knew a lot about cancer. Then he got it.

Science Friction

08:53 min | 1 year ago

Of Mice and Men: This top cancer scientist thought he knew a lot about cancer. Then he got it.

"On science fiction. Today really special story for you. It's about what happens when life throws you a warping curve ball and win roll escape appended. I wanted gone. I didn't want to have not only at smoldering away in my pelvis but also small does away and you hate it. It's always in your head as much as I could rationalize and SAM. I'm very scientific in my approach to things and it wasn't a problem everyday would come to me at three o'clock in the morning when I started worrying about all the other things worry about it. Three o'clock in the morning. You'll sing parts of them and the body that they will never really say themselves or get to know. It's an extraordinary thing that that was true kind of but it is still amazes me today that people people want to see the inside bids you cannot have my video. I want to share it on social media and I've seen all your videos on Youtube. Can you make sure my prostate goes for new in this episode. It's Franken feeless. Conversation about an experience. Men often talked publicly about so. Let's meet the scientists and the surgeon interested in Nitro. This is Professor Ramsey as a molecular biologist and elating in Kansas scientist on the Saudi also makes art. He's a black belt in karate rides. His bike is a husband father of two children but trying to understand how the natural world works was a I love of his and I've always been driven by trying to understand understand biology and I'm also a little bit inclined to like machinery and structures and the way things work and essentially excels machines and are like the way they operate. And they're really have Siamese different facets to them and of causing disease machinery goes wrong for me. The very first day I was in an operating theatre watching people takeout cancerous lump actually. It was then breast cancer. I was instantly league captivated. This is Professor Declan Murphy. elating urologist and cancer surgeon. He's been a strategy for over a decade. But you can he. He's Irish lilt and even though it's cancer he's dealing with everyday like rob. He's loved his job. Since died dot I was in the operating theatre. I was meeting these patients before and after as a medical student and honestly I just became almost overwhelmed by the idea that people will allow other people to do surgery on them that it's such a huge privilege to be allowed to do surgery but I was fascinated by urology because it's it's quite a a big field that we work in. It's everything from the kidneys. Down through the bladder. And the prostate in the penis and the testicles are all areas in the domain that can be affected by cancer. Now Dick Lyneham enrolled happened to be colleagues at the pay. McCallum will pay Domecq Cancer Center in Melbourne as a scientist Rob's focused on amongst other tricky conundrums developing developing vaccines that target gastro intestinal cancers like colorectal cancer as surgeon Dickens leading the way with using robotics in the operating theatre and often in the cancer arena. You'll find that scientists and surgeons just don't traditionally meeks much but robin declan like many any others at paid Amac a different because I want to do science. That data reflects the needs of people with cancer and the clinicians trading them. I remember being at a hospital where declan was doing. A TAG team robotic procedure on a patient was having some call rectal surgery Torri plus prostatectomy and I was there on Saturday morning with my arse pocket collecting samples clincal trial with doing there in the operating room because these patients have agreed to be part of a trial in that case that was to Kansas quite complex work but rob wanted some tissue as cancerous tissue to take into the lab and I was watching these two guys work. Seamlessly together is something is a corner beauty in any group of people that do things well together and is almost subliminal communication. I know what's coming next that I'm bumping into each other. The theta staff all expert. They work as attainments really like a Formula One tame it a pit stop and I've never worked in the center where you will have a professor of colorectal rectal science in the operating room with you so And we get used to that Peter Mac. It's the same for prostate is the same for melanoma skin for breast. And and I I just find it an extraordinary Jordan Environment I. I've never worked in a place that has that degree of translational multi-disciplinary care at where people are they're asking the questions taking the tissue doing trials Etcetera Etcetera Cetera. And it's just an extraordinary. I can do some cool things in my lap not question I have been a geneticist for most of my research life and we we can do cool things. Jane's in cells and also indeed on animals and you can find great science out of that but does it always reflect what's going on in the patient and the answer is sometimes but not always I want to do the always. It is relevant. What happens in a patient? It's saw the patient in the end has always been like that though has already close so they to a colleagues ladies in their fields in cancer but then came a sudden curve ball and a role change the scientists in the surgeon were about to become the surgeon. and He's patient he's Rob. Why have a great? JP being going to him for quite a long time really insightful. Consider Kanda Guy. We've we always have a great chat when okay visit him. I have a checkup every six months. For basically blood blood pressure to have a level that cannot be controlled just by exhumed diet and he's chosen to have PSI tastes to PSI stands for prostate specific antigen. It's a protein which can be elevated in Maine for various reasons prostate cancer being one of them. Some guys avoid testing. They pay CY levels. But as we've heard rob is a lover of information. Summation looks forward and he lanes into it so overtime every couple years get it tested and it just kept rising a little bit one stage. It got to a level. We're thought maybe it's getting a bit high. And I actually was referred to declan. We had nothing to say about that. Spe- keep an eye on it and then about two years ago now. The test Monday morning test Tuesday morning. Phone Call My JP said Rob. It's about time he got back and see. Declan are not happy about this. Psi Level so rob's colleague paid a Mac dikla Murphy becomes he's urologist. So should I have look and and progressively we went through all the tests initially an MRI that I remember sitting next to declan looking at his laptop to the imaging obtaining lots SUV meetings are obligated images before thought that shadow very much. Either any say well I think we need to get a boxy. And then he did. I remember it was during Christmas. Wasn't isn't it. Yeah so we could. You Know Ho- prostate. Think I knew I was on this journey as soon as I saw the image. I thought this looks wchs suspicious at least need to find out what it is and then phone call or message saying squeezing stage seven the doubt I had prostate cancer and that meant I had to make a decision about which direction I went after that so suddenly rob the Kanta Hansa scientists becomes. Rub The cancer patient. Then he went through the whole process. We did the pet scan and then we discussed whether surveillance might be an option is. Is this a cancer. We can leave alone because a tradition of Invasive procedures early on in this process and Maine have suffered the consequences of their lifelong off long impotence urine re problems the whole beat shifted now. Oh totally went on. When I started training a diagnosis of prostate cancer equalled cold treatment for prostate cancer there was no concept of? You could leave the cancer there you know whereas now it's the polar opposite it means as a process will start got to figure out. Is this a threat to this patient. And how will he and his loved one balance up the success of surgery or radiation or other treatments in terms of cancer versus the predictable side effects so for us. The first thing is always doing to do anything. We found a

Cancer ROB Robin Declan Declan Professor Declan Murphy. Domecq Cancer Center Kansas Maine Scientist Professor Ramsey Franken Dick Lyneham Kanda Guy Amac Torri Jane
"declan" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"declan" Discussed on Ideas

"Meaning insofar as that can give give reassurance to those who need reassurance from having US yeah must be recognized to the border is like what was quiet for the last twenty years semi quiet before that but still at times an awful nuisance and at times rather hard and at all times. It has been an admission of a failure of British and Irish political elites to solve a problem. It's almost like a scar that erupts from time to time and shows that it hasn't fully healed and it gets a bit angry if you like time and again in your rating talking about what happens and what goes wrong when we don't listen to and don't pay attention to the artists. At this crucial moment. We are kind of looking at this border in particular and thinking about you know what the future holds. What's what to your IRA or the artists telling us what should be listening to? Artists will always say bolt and when the ninety. The ace Belfast Agreement went through Ian Paisley complained and said he had grave objections and he was what was the main objection and he said it's too poetic. It's too vague jake. It's not clear like legal language. It was actually in some ways borrow does language from the poetry of people caney who's often quoted by in Clinton during the debates about the peace process so yeah this was another example of the future being. What are? I think that that really is the answer that that borders are necessary. They're helpful as long as they're soft. I'm always struck when I go to the US by How much space there is on how people don't even bother sometimes building building hedges between one guard and the next? You need a bit of a border though. It's like what Robert Frost set. That could fences make good neighbors but if they fences fences get too high and too hard. That's our if they don't exist old that can be bad. I want to end with the world if if the poets and Irish literature begins back in the dawn of time as far back as we configure it with the work of poets and so oh now when our own time. We're back with if you like the era of the poets and that the Great Irish poet of our time Shaimaa who remembers where he came from. I mean he came from the north breath but he's Ireland's poet and in a way he has created a kind. I see it anyway. He's created a kind of parallel universe. An invention one of a kind of Irishness that has nothing to do with borders. Nothing to do with anything. That isn't in the imagination but yet it is as real as anything that is not in the imagination. Yeah that's true. His writing has always transcended the north-south border within our land and equally the east West one with Britain. He's written about Eastern European poets in whom he finds an example an whom he finds what he calls beautifully Ostoja for the future but but at the same time any is country boy who grew up on a farm that was filled with hedges. And you know what he calls clearings and and you know little fences that made agriculture and also human community meaningful impossible. So I think he believes in the necessity for what his friend Robert Frost spoke about but soft versus not hard ones.

Robert Frost Ian Paisley US Belfast Clinton Britain Shaimaa Ireland
"declan" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

09:14 min | 1 year ago

"declan" Discussed on Ideas

"What my friend? The poet Brennan Canetti called an awful absence. moping through the land a land that he'd been filled with the people over nine thousand who formed a very large sub fraction of the United Kingdom of Britain Ireland as a whole were now very much a minority dirty croup because of death our migration and you know the kind of paintings that had been done of Rural Ireland in the eighteen twenty s are filled with people. And and you know articulate human voices but now there's suddenly a terrifyingly open space after the eighteen forties. Forget into the idea of the of the role of with the artists and all of this and the making of modern Ireland you. Actually you have a line win books where you talk about what happens with that transition in language when you say that the Irish people who in the eighteen thirties at thought in Irish what using English words had by the one thousand nine hundred learn to think in English while using Irish words. That's right can you. I mean that's how we got what we call Hibernia English which is a hybrid language between Bolt Irish in English. I mean it's basically You have to use English now. After the mid nineteenth century far commercial educational even religious purpose but the the English we use is based on Gaelic Syntax and even rhythm so for instance. If I want to achieve emphasis on word in standard Oxford English I simply vocally underline the word for instance. Are you going to town tomorrow. Are you going to town tomorrow. Are you going to town tomorrow but what you have to do. An Irish is bring the keyword phone worked in the sentence is it. You go into town tomorrow. Is it tomorrow that you're going the town is it to town that you're going to tomorrow and this is basically bur no English. which is the kind of desperate result of the desperate bargain struck between two languages as one APPS and the other flows Irish people rerouting the energies of English while still thinking and Gaelic Syntax intex? I'm saying it's a desperate bargain but to an ear that has become bored by standard Oxford. English it can seem very poetic at can seem same to be an unleashing of energies hidden. Maybe almost lost an English since Elizabethan Times. This is how people like Joyce Yates Gates. All the great revival writers achieve such international acclaim. Because it's as if they're injecting toxins of great energy she back into an English language which seemed in the eighteen ninety s to be fading in the age of decadence and losing its vital energies and suddenly these energies are ripping injected. Back in. From the periphery but the source of the energy is often the last losing Irish language. You talk at the loss of the Irish language would what I hear you saying something slightly contrary and as well which is this new hybrid. Yes that's created is not all that it's cracked up to be well it it should have been more than it was Could have been more than it was actually allowed to be rather than cracked up to be For instance in nineteen to Yates wrote an editorial in the the Journal of the Irish Abbey Theatre arguing that this Hibernian English which was still regarded as a despised patois. Ah Spoken by country. People struggling with the transition between languages should and could have been used in newspaper. Editorials University Lecturers Church sermons on Sundays and that it was a sign of how colonized the people were that they couldn't recognize that they had in effect almost perforce our son without intent invented and you intra language between Irish English which at its best could often be more expressive than either of the official coats between which it sprang up and that because it was in a way a road on official plant. Here's a huge question. Then to a degree imagine what was lost here but what was lost in that transition from the Irish culture sure of even what was left in the early eighteen hundred something I mean there was hundreds of years of the destruction of the culture underway by then but some things there that it has changed profoundly one hundred years later gates and lady Gregory Douglass Hydro involved in the creation of a new kind of culture. It's been said that a language is a way of being in way of thinking what what is lost to. What can we imagine but what is lost in that way of thinking and being when the language is lost? It's very hard to know. Exactly what was lost in the famine and in the erasure of the Irish language as a living language and most places because as has sometimes sometimes been said the famine destroyed the very instruments that could measure this. It was one of those type of cataclysms but I do suspect I mean I studied Gaelic. CLINCHER PRE-FAMINE I look at pictures of the country site and I see a place filled with people invoices where the sense of community was on one. Problematic was easily assumed and where there was a sense of shared almost common culture. Sure of a kind. That's modern. Does he has never been able to achieve. and which in ways modernity signaled the end of modernity he for us of course being in the form of the English language so yeah I think there's There was a culture where although there were grave differences the class in terms of wealth nevertheless people had a shared language and could admire the same poems or songs. And that's an interesting the thing in itself There there wasn't a sense of high culture a few more different slow culture for the others. In a sense there was an Oral culture heavily oral which everyone shared. And all that Gosh Ended I think by these forces what comes out the other end. Among among other things is print culture of course which helps to like I say with the railways create a united Ireland but it also displaces those Orlando Orlando. That got lost that chuck a little bit about that crucial moment at the end of the nineteen th century when things start to speed up in the the creation of modern Ireland for better for worse with that cultural revival and this hybrid culture comes out of it. How is that then starting to shape ape? What happens next which is after the cultural quote unquote revolution? We know have another more realistic feet on the ground kind of revolution. And you've you've so you've just put that in a bit more context you've talked about the fact that many of the leaders of that Irish revolution were influenced by the artists and the poets time so to put that in a little bit of context as to how what happens next is shaped by that cultural revival. Well I mean it's you can say that someone like Patrick Pierce who read who led the Easter Easter rebellion of one thousand nine hundred sixteen stead that this was only happening because he had been to school in the Gaelic League. So there's a sense in which there those formative cultural cultural experiences help to achieve and create a political effect. In fact all this was predicted by an Anglo Irish gentleman named Standard Show Grady. WHO's the one who recovered colon far? The modern generation in a kind of novelist English language version of the Kuku stories and he went walking one day in Bray Gray a holiday resort on the south side of Dublin County and he heard man preaching the return of the Gods and who who is lifting. I'm from his texts. Basically Grady Pot. Mike are the genie's out of the bottle. Now and he made a prediction. He said I. It'd be a cultural movement amount which won't be terribly important but it'd be interesting. Then there'd be a political movement it'd be a bit more important and then there will be a military movement and it would be very important indeed so he got a kind of dialectic of history foreseen arising out of his rediscovery of those harrowing tales of Colon. Yano no no you. Yates is thinking of an independent Ireland twenties writing. All those plays about colon in the early century does even one of the plates about Colin about how he will be managed after the moment of freedom because he being a kind of paramilitary will then be helpful in gaining freedom will not be a problem to the merely timid administrative elites wants freedom has been gained. Does the sense in which Yates imagining. All these questions. Even in plays as of Nineteen Zero five nine hundred ninety six questions that would only become fully real in the nineteen twenties and I think there is a sense of cause and effect behind all that you know if you think of American culture. American culture in a way has a political declaration of independence in seventeen seventy.

Joyce Yates Gates Ireland Irish Abbey Theatre croup United Kingdom of Britain Irel Rural Ireland Brennan Canetti official Oxford Gregory Douglass Hydro Elizabethan Times united Ireland Yano Dublin County Colin Grady Pot Bray Gray
"declan" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

10:36 min | 1 year ago

"declan" Discussed on Ideas

"A physicist and mathematician addition but he said House here clump tarf not just with the wife but with a mistress America tois and nobody but he again really bothered anointed. In fact things went from interesting to more interesting because shredding her began affair with one of the leading actresses in the theatre for in town. The Menasheh became well apply. became a cat does always been a kind of yeah secret liberalism. I actually wonder if it's an exception are. It's not actually the normative part of Iris Life. And here's the reason I'm I'm John. McGuire hearn the writer always said to me and he was my teacher in the local school here Tarf. He always said that. The official version of Ireland diversity verson shrines in law and in prescription was really just an ideal that almost nobody lived up to I and that's people lived in bubbles in which they run with their own lives which were often quite raffish unofficial and in breach of if you like the prescribes labs laws. And and he was talking in this instance about nineteen forties and Fifties Ireland which most people would think of very narrow on injunctive but and he said every time he went past you know when he came out of Dancehall on Saturday nights he said the whole homeland. That wasn't a haystack. Safe if this was how he put us. There wasn't a haystack. Safe for three miles around but the whole place with couples going off like alarm clocks. It is wonderful phrase to describe it and and this is what he sees this as kind of bubble within the official Puritan Ireland. You've described to me saying that objective actual behavior on the ground was very very very different. Doesn't upset to all of this. We're going to arrive back at that upside. I hope you know in a while. But the doesn't upside to all of this which is of course that that kind of Malleability is a profoundly human act you know. Humans are built to be contradictory. Yeah if you like rather than ideological so I'd I want you to go the ability to hold opposed ideas and ahead and Scott Fitzgerald. who was half Irish anyway? He the other half of that the ability to hold the post ideas and head without losing the capacity to function. That's what those Irish people on the haystacks had but also the ones who voted for gay marriage. And the the ones who believed in the android Oscar Wilde Bernard Shaw at what they all have in common. Really WanNa ask you a big fat question. Partly based based on what we've just been talking about and that is is the making of the idea of a country. I should say more correctly is the making of the of an idea of of the people essentially an imaginative acton. And how does that relate to the actual stones and mortar state nation. That we come up with. What's the what's the what's the contrast in the connection between the two? Well I think ideas of Ireland did the ideas I know were mainly invented in the nineteenth century by processes described particularly the process of migration. You know people going to Britain are Canada are the US US and rubbing up against howdy and polls and suddenly being aware. Oh we have or should have an identity like they do too and we do have our own language after et Cetera Dr Cetera. And I think it's very much like what Benedict Anderson has said that exile is the cradle of nationality when he was quoting Lord Acton of course but he said it was like a black on white negative photograph that you know an Irish person. Experiences in the streets in New New York are critical would but they have to go home then to print the positive off the photo. And that's what some people call a nationalist movement or a National National Movement such as we had one hundred years ago in Ireland and in many other places but that in some ways these movements often begin elsewhere. You know like Michael Michael Collins Works for the post office. In London becomes a member of the Gaelic League becomes aware of his Irishness in ways he might have done had he stayed in Cork. You don't know what your own country is fully like. Aunt looping out of for a while I mean when I said that about inventing Ireland I meant I I never thought of myself as Irish growing up here and I always thought of myself as adult but dubliner but it was only when I went to England and was told in Oxford that I was an Irish person on this at at the height of a bombing campaign by the IRA and the Nineteen Seventy S. That I began to you know carry in my head almost abstract idea of Ireland. Now I think that's what all those revivalists did eighty years before me and it was a very in some ways and mccullers idea. They carried very pure ideas national. aspirational ideas often are what happened. Then was it had to take incarnate form in the flawed medium of an actual inherited state and to be honest truncated part of that inherited state so the nation and the states are never a completely perfect fish and a great deal of our troubles. Arise from that discrepancy. Where we're going to hopefully end up with what you referred to as revive list at the end of the nineteenth century? And how that went into the shaping of an idea of modern Ireland but I wanna go back doc a lot further than that and this idea of other this idea of sent them and therefore dictate switches op order How how how that arises go back to very early Irish? Sherlock the TARN book the cattle rate of Cooley in which Colin goes to war or I should say Queen Maeve of conduct goes to war with Hulan and the king of the North and at the very beginning of the story you know facing these forces that are coming at him and he lays down. I think it's the horse's bridle in the in the pathway. To more or less tell the army this far you can go and no further you you cross over that line and you're in my territory now. We're at war. I don't want to go back to that specific example but just to go back as far as we can see about what it is that defines a people in the mythology of being Irish and where the roots of that are. Well Freud used at grace as unhelpful the phrase the narcissism of small differences. What you've been talking about is really a kind of bottles stations between Connacht and Ulster you know between Queen Maeve Forces defended by Colin? There has always been a kind of provincialism in a lot of of Irish cultural debate. In fact there used to be Gaelic Games every Saint Patrick's day call a railway cup. Where Lester Monster Conduct played each other out of course in an attempt to shake this up abyss I was part of a movement in the one thousand nine hundred called Field Day which tried to create what we call the fifth province off off the mind and there had been in fact fifth province in ancient Dr Than the idea was to try and restore us and that would be a province where these optimism's where relaxed and things could be more easy? But you know in the Marta. Words Tip O'Neill that for every person. All politics is local. So what talking about when you talk about you. Know internal borders is something like a way of negotiating that narcissism of small differences. I'm not so sure your that. The most deep cultural border in Ireland is a north south one. Though I would argue that it's more East West and I've always thought that the the further west you went the more conservative people wear on matters of what we would call personal morality. Now I'm saying their objective behavior on the ground might not be in accordance with that abstraction but in in voting terms The same was true in votes in Maurice Times on divorce contraception etc if you're in Dublin. Devote tended to be liberal West male more old-fashioned but that is true within the north as well. Belfast would be a lot more loose. In in general in terms of if these sort of questions than donegal under wasn't ancient Ireland a dyke down the middle of the island separating east and west. They've been all kind of borders. Not Just an art south one and yeah. The artists had pretty obsessed about setting them up. And sometimes they're just like Moats Doug because these people on the other side are different from us So just like saying that. I think the the border in Northern Ireland has become like a huge issue in the last century in almost geological time. The other border maybe more important. You're listening to ideas on. CBC Radio One in Canada across North America on Sirius. Xm In Australia on our end and around the world at CBC DOT CA slash ideas. I'm NULLA IOT for years. Men were disappearing from Toronto's Gay village. I feel terrorized I. I'm Justin Lee this season on uncover. We see this happening. How can you not see this? They suspected a serial killer and and they were right. Police arrested sixty-six-year-old Bruce Macarthur. But this wasn't the first time village was targeted. You don't start killing at sixty six sued. Start killing when you're in your late teens. Early twenties uncover the village available. Now wherever your podcast. What makes a collection of people into a nation? It's a complicated soup of influences. Part shared history part the influence of our allies neighbors and enemies part myth making by artists Irish writer declan hybrid has been thinking about the question of Irish identity for for a long time and across a number of books and other writings Ireland he says provocatively invention and the Irish sense of identity is shaped in large part by what the British expect the Irish to be this stage Irishman. ID's producer and Irish immigrant. Philip Coulter talked talked to declan hybrid at his home in Dublin. This is inventing Ireland.

Ireland Fifties Ireland official writer Puritan Ireland Tarf Dublin Northern Ireland Iris Life McGuire hearn Michael Michael Collins physicist Benedict Anderson Canada Lord Acton New York America acton
"declan" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"declan" Discussed on Ideas

"I'm not I and this is ideas. If God invented whiskey to prevent the Irish from ruling the world then who invented Ireland. That's the question posed by Declan Khyber in the introduction to his book inventing Ireland. I never taught myself as Irish. I always thought of myself the dubliner but it was only when I went to England was told in Oxford that I was an Irish person on this at the height of a bombing campaign by the IRA in the nineteen seventies that I began to carry in my head almost on abstract idea of Ireland. The idea that a country at nation is something invented might strike us as a startling startling proposition. But what he's talking about of course is not so much the country of Ireland but the nation and the idea that people have of themselves and eh who they are. Where does the idea of us who we are ourselves? Come From and how is it. Constructed declan hybrid is an Irish writer. He's taught Irish literature for many years at universities in Dublin and around the world in his many books about Ireland Irish culture he circles around this. What's the rule of art and the artist in the framing of a national identity but he argues that art is not the only thing shaping culture and identity in the case of Ireland? He writes if England had never existed. The Irish would have been rather lonely. Each nation badly needed the other for the purpose of defining itself. And if that's true of Ireland. Something similar is probably true of every the nation that we're all shaped by our relationships with our neighbours ideas producer. Philip Coulter spoke with declan hybrid at his home in Dublin. This is inventing Ireland.

Ireland Declan Khyber declan hybrid England Dublin Philip Coulter Oxford writer producer
The Pod Village at the European Radio Show impresses

podnews

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

The Pod Village at the European Radio Show impresses

"The European radio show is currently underway in Paris race in France and it has a surprisingly vibrant Paul village an area with exhibitors from mainly French podcast companies. The area also has a demonstration theater When we walked past yesterday we saw? podcast demonstrating Leah Magic. magic subscription links who was also a conference track of podcast topics is open to everyone with speakers and panels we saw declan more from wondering explained their strategy and Paul News is Edison James. Critics may gave a keynote on ten things. Radio can learn from podcasting. It's very good. You should get him to do it yours anyway. The event continues today and tomorrow

Edison James Declan Paul Paul News Paris France
Best Bets for British Champions Day

The Final Furlong Podcast

05:30 min | 1 year ago

Best Bets for British Champions Day

"Rightly so Steve Jones welcome back to the final Furlong podcast my friend thank you I told you you wouldn't be quiet for long nice late yet healthy you enjoy ten percent which I am waiting for with great anticipation in my bank account any day soon stuck in the Irish say that's probably what it is yeah that's probably a brexit situation don't mention the B also speaking of Billy five jobs one of the most in demand men in racing he was covering for Tony Kanaan on at the races just the other day in terms of Arash racing he also does plenty pieces for racist dot com and you can read them every weekend in the Irish field of these excellent column it's the return of Roy Dot Org good afternoon and welcome back to the show my friend and always a pleasure to have you on so we get to Richie Kevin and had a discussion about champions day on Tuesdays final fallen podcast which was ridiculous because we didn't have a clue what was going to run we didn't really Oh what the state of the ground was going to be what they were going to do with the track but now on Thursday we have a much closer picture of what we will get to see on sky sports racing on Saturdays so roy let me start with you by saying they have changed the track and there is going to be a slight change to the layout of the racist so just explain that for a little bit if you're not aware already they they mentioned but we could go that there was a chance of using the inner coast which is the hurdles course for the rhymes track races at the weekend which means you could two different courses in use it with night decided what's the state of the grind standing water on the Rhine course it'll be the hurdle trying to be used for the a long distance and the mayor's race so under champion stakes so you got to bear that in mind uh-huh citing shorter distances for those two races the first few races mentioned so many say same trip but different Tarim not not only have you a different line than we've been seeing all season at ascot which throws any sort of analysis you've done the Ryen try we're pretty much into the been to be honest but this is the hurdles try which hasn't been watered all season so until very recently that would have been would have been firm on the hurdles stripe laws of the last fortnight so why the track will be heavy on the street track for those races run up to over a mile the races on the Rhine crucial part of your own grind it's not much worse than good to soft and there's a big big difference between the so I could look even more stupid than normal here but those who've been backing at a for example thinking it's going to be a bog happy days will back him are how potentially screwed well we're not we're unlikely racing on the weekends so day was oppressive winner at the royal meeting on grind that was good until the morning of the risky Raanan so given good assault of the moment and this Rian forecast tomorrow there should be enough and also how is it going to affect your your tipping for the Mirror on the day like how's it GonNa Affect Your punting the fact that we're going to be looking at this on a different track and ask well I'll probably go for the moral handicaps but different but I think with statler group one races you don't want it on the heavy granted I know that people to concentrate solely on flat racing look down their nose anything knits remotely concerned with jump racing but at the end of the day it's going to be a better surface it's not gonNa be applied failed that They seem to let these jumpers go round on and not looked after as well but it's GonNa make it fairer and you can see by the field sizes that a lot of hoses turned up here when the hats they might not have done on the grind old certainly not been encouraged to very much so I'm eminently successful at it sensible and the Reiko for me I did like Declan Rex's tweet and Glenn by the way a regular on the final furlong podcast is today making his sky sports racing debut long overdue in my opinion and he looks very dapper on the telly please don't swear declan hopefully he won't by the time this podcast has gone out but he he did tweet during the week saying everybody Camden the week we might need extra noculars if you're actually there but I think it's the it's the right

Steve Jones Furlong Ten Percent
Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe Preview & Best Bets for Paris Longchamp

The Final Furlong Podcast

10:37 min | 1 year ago

Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe Preview & Best Bets for Paris Longchamp

"The dulcet tones of John Hunter who will be joining us on the final broadcast in the near future one of a number of new voices who will be appearing on the show in the coming months we're also gearing up for national hunt podcasts as well by the way of jumps fans. You can get excited about that but you can't not get excited about the ARC. It'll be live on sky sports racing at five past three assuming the French actually the out of the race to the correct time it's her second time running para longchamp and she bids to make history as John said in that fantastic Promo but become the first horse to win three in a row rick see. She is the queen of the turf. If she wins this race the publicity alone will be invaluable but in your mind as we look at this from from a pure punting perspective. What's your thoughts on the Ark currently look. I think the the market is near. The TAUPE is pretty accurate. We're able enabled his concern. Look she's odds-on she. She deserves to be outs on she. She is the these the the most likely winner but look I think in terms of a bash what I'd be doing in this race is probably taking her out of the equation and I'm playing a horse in the without Marcus at the moment which were recording on Thursday at the ground is soft at Longchamp and Dan. I don't think it's GonNa get too much quicker. I'd say the quickest it's GonNa get as is good ground for me that means. I'm just just tended to stay away from south staff. He would it be in the bed. I think for me without enable if the ground was good too farmer that but I just I'm not sure your he's going to be as good on this kind of ground. The price differential between Japan and the two to three older horses magical Michael Guy Eighth and wild is is colossal in my eyes vile cost in terms of pure ability alone. I think he can get eighty into one. They're about what is his chance. This is a proper made one twenty s horses east coming here on the back of lobby prepped eh before that were common here in the back of a career-best bind enabling the King George. I just worry about the ground for him. So we're concerned. I'm wondering the belt him balancing which I think peace can tell us more but I think the balances is a real American term. Suggest is a horse comes comes back after a long lay-off through injury or a setback and then runs a massive race and has a career based and that's exactly what gifted Abadan Badin Adin when he won the race out there a few weeks ago I just wonder will he be at the same level again and after all that then the more solid horse for me and at the prices is magical and I think magical is the best without without enable look she. We know in four star start against the neighbors. She hasn't beaten are but to collect the bet here. We can finish second to her again so that that's that's where I'm GONNA go. I think magical without is the is the date the most solid play in this race as a former ballydoyle employees all this talk on social media but how magical is not going to run in the ARC. She's she's. She's not going to run their because look at bet fair. Look at the prices. She is the not going to run. The exchange prices for ballydoyle horses are completely and totally totally useless. It's about as useful as a MARZIPAN DILDO. It's no guide wants so ever as to whether or not a horse is actually going to line up in erase the lads make decisions at the last minute but also Aidan O'Brien had state categorically that after she won the champagne stakes yet the planning planning the arc unless something changes exactly so I don't get it. I'm not trying to be a smart ass here by the way but like you could take advantage of of a massive price about her. During the week you still can to a certain extent it. Just it's beer baffles me. You need to put that in perspective as well. It's a win only market and and she's being beaten four times by the favorite so you know and people on bed fair whatever you know have a lot of money they can have strong opinions and put those kind of racism altern. That's probably what they were doing what they were doing Bush. The first mistake you may day or Kennedy is listening to people on social media and thank you you to all of our listeners who interact with us and say very kinds of Roy. Moore's not the number one writer about Eliezer. Don't you know so according to social media. I thought yeah look she's being. She's being declared for the race. I don't think unless you suggest they are less went wrong. She had a setback. She was always going to run here that would that was. I think aiden has been saying that since the start of the season the main the main goal at the second part of their campaign was the act can talk now she's here and they wanted an awesome campaign for that's what she was always being aimed for and and here she goes he says having b-actor at a big price price selfishly and then was being made to panic with all this talk on twitter about the fact that she wasn't. GonNa run screw you people. You had me panicking. She's going to get possibly ably thrashed by enable but Vanessa before we started recording this podcast you were doing in-depth analysis by yourself with no help from anybody else about the he drove bias at Longchamp so take us through that because the draw has come through enable is entrapped nine. Japan comes out of ten so tests comes out of one. There's a lot of talk from various different pundits and experts about the positives and negatives about this so your view on the draw for the leading leading contenders in the ARC. Yeah we'll just this sort of before we so tipoff any horse or anything just to really paint a picture of how this race is likely to unfold obviously chaos plays a huge huge pot and whether enable wins a third arc because what does will directly affect what Frankie has to do the neighbor and has had the worst possible. Essentially he is drawn on the wide outside. Install twelve and sought Saas is is drawn on the inside install one which is also the worst case possible for him so for both of those two leading challenges to enable they have the worst case draw immune while enable frankie perfectly happy android nine magical. Giovanni the side. That'll be absolutely fine salsas. Obviously we'll watch him. Draw aw back and he'll be called on the rail. We've seen him be stuck in traffic issues before that's going to be a huge problem for him. A meanwhile gear is going to have to use up a whole load of energy. Komo stole twelve gets the front and get across to lead which is what we know. He's GonNa try and do so that is a massive negative for him because he's used up valuable petrol and the tank just get to the front and soft light. Hughes who saw sausage pace bank has a much better drawer said he'll also be going into the front gate has overcome all these hurdles that's even before the races properly properly got going meanwhile enable will be dropped him probably a couple of off the rail hacking along with Frank. Here's we know and sought SAS is probably GonNa be dropped out and like I say have to come the traffic issues now one of the things just this also of note here is that Sea of claws last year essentially teed up what we are going to witness on Sunday which is of the CNA Guca because last year we all night with a little bit last traffic problems and having got rocking rolling a little earlier sea of claws house could easily have beaten enable. Now we know all the facts we know that enables eight seven eight five cents fit comes here this year much but a form Yada Yada Yada fought without and outside of class last year meeting that traffic and having to overcome many at the hurdles that sought size is going to have to come she. She essentially set the blueprint trip for how you beat enable yes. She didn't but she sat how you do it. If that makes sense because she with another stride she would've got there as we all know. There's no denying line not so. C- classes now laid down the blueprint about how to be enabled. We look salt. SAS who takes loads of the boxes but see of class loss yeah. He's a progressive three year old. He comes here off. The back of impressive wins. All season 'cause recco times. Yes that Glen I tait. You'll know about the ground that is touch concerning but essentially he's got a very similar profile. Obviously gets the way to allowance from enable as well. Now's how's cools. He's GonNa have to step up massively and he's going to have to overcome that draw the traffic problems but sought sizes connections will be looking at last year's his race and we'll be looking at cf class and we'll be learning from that and we'll be taking from that and working out a way to not get in the soda trouble Chic and because because that following that blueprint is going to be the best way to beat Santa Claus assaults us me while I think yet in a worst case scenario draw for both I mean what what connections of gas and salt sauce with due to swap the drawer they give a million for that because it would it be an ideal the other way around but they have like gauze played around and they've had an absolute shocker both of them gas is I'm with you. Declan worried a bit about about the bounce also obviously the former that German race you couldn't take away by how visually impressive it is it will aw and as they turn into the straight I imagine gas to be about four lengths in front enabled to be heading up the leading pack. Franchi will be sat is cool waiting to press the button gas will start coming back to them and frankie will press go butter and with a furlong to go the stands will erupt will -rupt it'll be wonderful for all of about six seconds and then the petrol gains will start to flicker enable. Hey Bill will suddenly not like winning quite such impressive fashion and out the back. Salt Saas will come with Ratto accuracy of cross but he went eh this time.

ARC Frankie Japan John Hunter SAS Punting Abadan Badin Adin ARK Aidan O'brien Rick King George Michael Guy Vanessa Marcus Eliezer Twitter Declan
"declan" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"declan" Discussed on Amanpour

"Remember to create an ad like this one visit pure winning dot com slash. CNN The MLB postseason one pitch struck one swing of the bat turned ties of October. It is the home of the two thousand Nineteen National League postseason this October Wednesday October second on TNT. All the lead wrestling wrestling hits harder flies higher and bricks. All boundaries is a rustling a new League Wednesdays starting October second date on TNT. Not as the president's contentious political actions called into question so too who is his disdain for the press as he and Republican congressman beat up on journalists over this and many other issues not to mention the constant stream of abuse about out so-called fake news that journalists journalism is now facing an unprecedented threat in two thousand eighteen at least fifty three journalists were murdered in the course of work according to the committee to Protect Journalists and the publisher of the New York Times. Ag Salzburger believes the president's anti-press rhetoric has been contributing meeting to the targeting of journalists by oppressive governments around the world and he's raised the possibility that the trump administration actively withheld information that one of his his reporters faced arrest while reporting in Cairo Declan Walsh was that journalists and he's joining me now from London Declan Walsh welcome to the program. Thank very much. you know what before. I get to your specific question I want to play the latest Republican and presidential attack on journalists and that came right in the beginning of these congressional testimonies. We've just been reporting on this is what the ranking member told the world about how the press was going to treat this very very serious issue unfolding on Capitol Hill. I want to congratulate the Democrats on the roll out of their latest kissed information warfare operation against the president and their extraordinary ability to once again enlist the mainstream media in their campaign. This operation began with media reports from the prime instigators of the Russia collusion hoax so declan there seems really no no limit to the abuse the press gets from this administration and at this time I what do you make of that statement at this time given what we he just said and given what you know very well the dangerous surrounding journalists. I think it's another example of this phenomenon. That's been building really since since the two thousand sixteen presidential election where rhetoric rhetorical terms like fake news particularly the use of the term enemy of the people people by the president of the United States or accusations that journalists are treasonous or somehow acting improperly is creating this atmosphere that has not only I think dangerous for politics many countries but there's also in certain countries around the world placing journalists safety risk well yours has been placed at risk just by reporting Cairo bureau chief from Egypt amid all sorts of political crackdowns and upheavals that so let's start with your specific story which you've written about and also the publisher of Your newspaper has written about it was about two years ago. I believe that a a confidential call was made by an American official in Washington about your safety in Cairo. Tell us what happened. Who was that official? What happened so as you said. This was about two years ago at the New York. Times magazine had just that day published a story that I had written about Julia Reggiani. He's an Italian student who had died in brutal circumstances in Egypt and the story that I wrote cited some American officials who who linked the Egyptian authorities to that death so hours after that story was published. I received a call from my editor the international editor Michael Flagman and he told me that the paper had received a confidential tip from an official inside the inside the administration in Washington and the third official was warning that the Egyptians were furious with the story and that they were considering quite severe action up to and including Maya rest in debt and obviously what's what leaks out there is confidential call as if he was under pressure not to warn you or the or the New York Times and what was going on I mean why was it so confidential. Why wasn't it just like pick up the phone. The Administration knows get your journalist out of there. That's tried it with this. kind of warning in and of itself is not particularly unusual. What was unusual with that. This official felt obliged to do it under the cover rep.

president Declan Walsh official Cairo Egypt TNT Administration New York Times publisher CNN Nineteen National League MLB Ag Salzburger Washington New York Times magazine Michael Flagman
Judge rules the Affordable Care Act unconstitutional. What does it mean?

Bill Handel

06:23 min | 2 years ago

Judge rules the Affordable Care Act unconstitutional. What does it mean?

"Collective health care system. So you're gonna have to pay a fine. And then we can use that money to offset. The fact that you're not participating properly. And it went to the street pre the supreme court and people said congress cannot force somebody to buy a product. Well, you can make people have a driver's license. Yeah. Only if they wanna drive nobody is required to drive though. Well, you can make people have car insurance. Yes. But only if they want to own and operate a car on the public streets. You don't have to do that. If you don't want to and for the most part. Governments can't charge. You just for living. And they can't charge you for not buying thing. They can charge you if you buy it. But not if you don't want to and the supreme court. Really, quite honestly and chief Justice Roberts in particular. Twisted themselves into knots in order to save it. Deciding that the individual mandate was in fact, a tax and congress can in fact, Levy taxes, and therefore, it's cool. And it's kosher. Fine. Well, as you may remember last year with the tax cut legislation that the Trump administration passed they zeroed out the financial penalty for the mandate. So they let the mandate stand. And they absolutely let the Affordable Care Act stand. So now, you have a real dilemma. Because arguably the only reason that the Affordable Care Act was upheld. The first time is because the mandate came with a penalty, and that allowed the supreme court majority to say therefore, it's a tax and therefore it's cool. Well, now there's no penalty what is a mandate without a penalty. What happens when you tell your kid? It's time to go to bed. But they know that you can't do anything if they don't go to bed. Well, for one thing they probably don't go to bed. But the other thing is what kind of an order is that. And so I think it's sixteen states. No, I think it's eighteen states, including Texas filed another lawsuit, and they said guess what it's unconstitutional because now it's not a tax because it can't be tax. If there's no penalty if can't be attacks. If nobody will ever have to pay a penny for not having health insurance. How is that attacks? And this judge said that is absolutely correct. All right. So that's the first part of the decision and a lot of people agree with that part of the decision. One hundred percent. And it does make sense. It can't be a tax. If nobody ever pays a penny. Then the judge found that without the mandate. You can't have any of the rest of it. If one part of a law is unconstitutional, then you have to look at whether it can be separated from the rest of the law or not. And if it can't then the entire law goes down, if it can then you can say, well, we just don't have the mandate anymore, but we have all the rest of it. Well, this judge decided that without the mandate all the rest of it fails. And it's an interesting thing because. I think we all know the mandate really was the foundation of ObamaCare based on the idea that if everybody either has insurance or pays this money. They'll be enough coverage, and they'll be enough money. For everything to be paid for now. That's a that is structurally true. In other words, if you don't have a mandate, that's enforceable. And a lot of people decide they're not going to carry these small health insurance plans anymore, and they don't have to pay anything into the system. It makes sense that the whole thing could collapse. Economically, for example. But that's very different than saying. You can't take the mandate away from the rest of the law that it's impossible. You can take the mandate away. And then you have to see if the system falls apart or not. So the idea that they're inseparable from a constitutional standpoint. That's where a lot of legal scholars say that basically this judge went through the same kind of tortured twisting of things to get the result. He wanted that the supreme court went through when the majority there wanted to save it. This guy did the same thing in order to kill it. Right now. There's no effect. It's just a Declan declaration decision. There's no there's no consequence to anybody. The judge did not impose. An order preventing ObamaCare from continuing. He just said I find it's unconstitutional, and he's leaving everybody else to figure out what to do next which will be an appeal to an appeals court and a fairly high possibility that either at the circuit court level, or at the appeals court level that this guy will be overturned. I don't think I've ever seen this much speculation that a decision would be immediately overturned. So that's what's happening there like for right now. Really nothing's different on the street when we come back. Hey, some pensions here in L A. We know pensions are big some police former police fire in particular getting big pensions. Some of them are so big. They violate IRS rules, and what's happening to deal with that. You are not going to like it one little bit unless you're one of the people getting one of those pensions, and you're gonna like what's happening a lot. We'll explain we come back KFI AM six forty Bill Handel show. Jennifer Jones Lee high surf advisory in effect between San Diego and Ventura counties farther north and San Luis Obispo county forecasters are predicting waves as

Supreme Court Congress Bill Handel Justice Roberts KFI San Luis Obispo IRS Levy Texas Jennifer Jones Lee Declan San Diego Ventura One Hundred Percent
Marriott's Starwood hack hits up to 500 million customers

The Tech Guy

01:09 min | 2 years ago

Marriott's Starwood hack hits up to 500 million customers

"The gold medal goes to Yahoo for three billion breaches silver. And bronze shared by who. And now Marriott for half. A billion Starwood guests records, including some cases, credit card numbers, passports, actually, pretty bad too. I think I would think you know, what that to leak out to you. You get two silvers for a tie. Thank you Declan. There is no Prins awarded. We just have a gold and two silver. So in this particular competition Yahoo wins both the gold and the silver and Mariette just gets the silver. Somebody saying don't forget the equifax breach. Oh, that's nothing compared to this. Although what was breached and equifax was much more secure, you know, serious information because it was your entire credit card data, but that was one hundred fifty million people at nothing that's small potatoes at nothing compared to half a billion. Has nothing. That's barely a breach. Eight ask Leo that's the phone number. We're going to actually talk about travelling bit. Johnny jet is queued up our travel guru. I bet he has a Starwood preferred guest group number, but he does I think I do if I could remember the password. Oh, I know. I could just ask Aker he'll know. And we'll take more of your calls. Eight ask Leo. Leo laporte. The tech guy.

Leo Laporte Gold Medal Equifax Yahoo Starwood Marriott Johnny Jet Aker Declan Mariette
Yemen: a man-made catastrophe

Here & Now

04:08 min | 2 years ago

Yemen: a man-made catastrophe

"To Yemen now, the country neighboring Saudi Arabia that's on the verge of collapse despite calls for ceasefire fighting actually escalated in some areas over the weekend more than one hundred and fifty fighters from both the rebel and government bat sides were killed as we've reported. Yemen was first racked by internal struggle when the rebel who 'this toppled the government. But it's now a proxy war with a Saudi led coalition backed by the US fighting the who the's who are supported by Iran and are also fighting the former government forces and that fighting hasn't lit up despite a recent photo of starving. Seven-year-old? Her ribs, stretching her skin a week ago readers were profoundly affected by her picture on the front page of the New York Times the end of the week. They learned she died. Tyler Hicks took that picture for a story by reporter Declan Walsh who joins us now on Skype from Cairo and Declan. You only knew this girl in her family briefly. But I still feel the need to say, you know, sorry for your loss. But what was it like? To see the impact she made over this very short arc that she had with readers. Well, we were overwhelmed by the reaction from readers, so many people who rode in. They wanted to know more about her. They wanted to help her directly if they could they wanted to follow up on her case. And as you said when we did that tragically we discovered that Hussein had actually died just around the time, we published the original story, and for me, really, you know, this was a sign that. I'm Lou Hussein story is just one among hundreds of thousands in in Yemen. But I think that certainly for our readers, and for many people the scale of the suffering and of the catastrophe in Yemen is often hard to grasp. So when it is filtered if you like through the one very tragic story of one child who really helps people to understand what's going on with so many other people in Yemen at the same time. Well, this is what least you set said on Friday as well that this, you know, this has happened. Traditionally a refugee child gets washed up on the show. Roar and suddenly is are focused their you know, the fear is that then is will then turn away. But right now, people are still questioning what is going on in Yemen. Remind us how this happened. She was a displaced person. That's right, almost parents are almost family had come from another part of the country, and that was one of the first areas to be subjected to the Saudi led coalition's campaign of aerial bombardment. When it started about three years ago. That's also the homeland of the who the the Hootie movement that now controls northern Yemen that the that the Saudis are fighting against so her family were displaced from their home about two or three years ago when their area was bombed. They were forced to move to this other area where we found her and there they found refuge in part by all accounts was a very shabby refugee camp with very poor facilities. They don't live in a tent they live in a sort of a shelter. That's made from sheet, plastic sheeting and sticks. And. And and so on and you know, like many people in that area. There resources have become progressively more and more strained. So you had both the impact of the war over the last couple of years bringing evermore people into these areas and placing evermore strain on the very meagre Associes at that are there to COPA refu cope with refugees. And then over the last while you had this really severe economic crunch in the country where the prices have been skyrocketing and really pushing food beyond the most basic foodstuffs beyond the reach of many people, and what that means is for people like her family who were already living on the edge that starts to push them over that. Thirteen million people are in danger of starving. That's thirteen million Amal's. But in reading your recent reporting on what happened. It's sickening because she made it to a hospital because of this. Imminent death in her illness and her obvious starvation that hospital wanted her to go to a Doctors Without Borders hospital about fifteen miles away. But her mother told you what they couldn't Gus right?.

Yemen Lou Hussein Saudi Arabia Doctors Without Borders Hospit Declan Walsh United States New York Times Tyler Hicks Iran Amal Skype Reporter Associes Cairo Three Years Seven-Year
"declan" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

The How-To Heretic

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"declan" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

"The church and i assume of most other churches all of which have a patriarchal bent to them that i know of they're still buying into this this patriarchy which to to wit i actually interviewed you know the three of us will all remember some of our listen listeners won't have been aware of this but just a few years back there was this whole there there was in an ordain women movement that was really that really gained some traction trying to get the church to ordain women to the priesthood and one of their first big events that they had was a this was their their big rebellion was to wear these women were going to wear trousers to church yeah rather than dresses which there's no prohibition against just it it's all cultural though it was just this cultural in the year of our lord twenty fifteen women wearing pants to church just about blue state into smithereens because everything yeah i actually went and for for thank god i made the i went to general conference more general conference that year and i interviewed people about that movement about the ordain women movement and these women had just they had literally these are the most innocuous rebellions possible wearing pants they asked to go to general priesthood meeting and were politely declined and they politely accepted at the declan and they they were like okay thank you very much but they went to asked and i was asking all these people about it and i asked women you know do you think women should have the priesthood and they all almost across the board the women were the ones who are like no that should never happen some of the men that i interviewed were like maybe maybe that's the thing but the women were all the women it there's it's so inured it's it's so deep in in their day have.

declan
"declan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"declan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Declan harvey telling you what's happening in the world in the next half hour will take you to peru with russia the central african republic and egypt but we're starting in liberia where voting is underway for the second round of presidential elections polling stations have just opened in the last six minutes the choice is between the current vice president joseph bolci and international football legend george wear the bbc's marvel faina is at a polling station in the capital monrovia and joins us they're not give us a sense for the ludi tomorrow however while i am voting has just started here at a polling station in that some yeah that's unfortunate we uh we were hoping that line would stay up force we will try and get him our back as quickly as we can and then continue or coverage of that election in liberia unimportant won the first time the power will be democratic he passed one presidential candidate to another for the first time in sixty years will bewilder to that as quickly as we can bolt in the meantime its go to russia where the main opposition figure alex seat in the valley has been barred from running against president putin in next year's presidential election because of his corruption conviction for which he was given a fiveyear suspended sentence now he's cold for all opposition groups to boycott the election later today vladimir putin supposes will meet in moscow to begin the formal process of nominating him as their candidate four presidents in next year's election i've been speaking to the bbc's sara raynsford in moscow and also refer you almost listening to mr novelli's called for a boycott yes i think a lot of people listening to him but the question is whether it's enough people to really worry the kremlin and i think the answer is probably know because otherwise the results of of the ruling by the electoral commission yesterday would probably have been different said the fact that he's being barred from the race suggest that i think the kremlin has decided that the risk of of mass protests and a mass boycott is small enough for them to weather at them for.

Declan harvey liberia presidential elections joseph bolci monrovia russia president putin bbc sara raynsford moscow kremlin peru egypt vice president football mr novelli six minutes sixty years fiveyear
"declan" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

Sodajerker On Songwriting

02:04 min | 4 years ago

"declan" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

"Beyond hi folks welcome to another edition of the so dejected podcast this is simon jones is always by brian and on the show today we have one of the most exciting young songwriting talents to imagine to the uk seen in quite some time as reflected by his inclusion on the bbc's recent sound of 2017 list alongside the likes of rugged mboma as this episode reaches you the release of his debut album what you think about the car is eminence and look set to become one of the most talked about records of the year we're very excited to welcome the excellence declan mechanics of the show declan was born in hoffa cheer in 1998 in grew up in the commute to town of chechens he's from a musical family and began writing songs round the age of seven taking classical guitar lessons h nine before going electric at secondary school to does it was as the ends of the seas they began to take music more and more seriously and whilst waiting for his gnc's answered and in the 2015 glastonbury festival emerging talent competition with the animates housing him wants once watch in august the same year declan released his first single brazil which not only amply demonstrated his precocious sung rising abilities but also brought into the attention of the why the public with its withering criticism of the powers behind the 2014 well cope the truck precipitated something of a record label bidding war two with columbia records emerging the bloodied victor declan sold extensively through major of the year unreleased is second single paracetemol which tackle the evils of transgender conversion therapy in november 2015 continued raising his profile throughout 2016 unreleased said single the politicallycharged is embroiled in august of that year he also made some notable tv appearances it was a great solo performance of brazil on koehnen in the us the on a particularly memorable turn on bbc two's lacey which chose holland even the uk as rice econ kind of broke free from the show's stagemanage formats and available on the round the audience up in committee sunk air went out live to which mehta because he will he bowls move yeah i think i was the first time we.

simon jones uk bbc brazil victor declan holland mehta brian hoffa glastonbury lacey
"declan" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"declan" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"And so all that was a thunderous he also commented at some length on the declan nation of the clinton are on prosecution which you should not normally a you shouldn't do uh policies a been historic if you're declined you declined and you don't talk about it there are other things that are had happened that indicated to me a lack of discipline and it caused controversy on both sides of the aisle and i'd come to the conclusion that a fresh start was appropriate in any discussion and with visas outlet to firing of james comey did the question of the russian investigation ever come up i cannot answer that because it was a i communication by the president or if any such occurred it would be a communication that he is not wave so a number of people gesture willing were struck by the fact that they attorney general would not talk about these conversations he had with the president well i i to me that makes perfect sense the privilege belongs to the president that it wouldn't be up to a subordinate official to take it upon himself to waive it by answering the question at that that time and place otherwise the president loses the inability to assert or preserve that privilege and and you and i were discussing this earlier walter dellinger we were trying to trying to understand to what extent is there a precedent i for not answering some of these questions we heard the attorney general's say he may at one point he said i think there's even a piece of paper at the justice department that refers to.

declan nation clinton president official walter dellinger james comey attorney