35 Burst results for "December"

San Jose Sharks fire coach Bob Boughner, assistants

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 16 hrs ago

San Jose Sharks fire coach Bob Boughner, assistants

"The sharks have fired bob buchner and his staff two months after the season ended the decision comes to San Jose remains in the market for a new general manager Coach the sharks for the past two and a half seasons after replacing Peter deboer in December 2019 They missed out on the playoffs each of the last three years following a run of 14 playoff appearances in 15 seasons Interim GM Joe will says the incoming general manager will select the new head coach Mike Greer ray Whitney and Scott Mellon B have been linked to the head coaching job I'm Dave

Bob Buchner Sharks Peter Deboer San Jose Joe Will Mike Greer GM Scott Mellon B Ray Whitney Dave
Bruins hire Montgomery as coach to replace Cassidy

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 16 hrs ago

Bruins hire Montgomery as coach to replace Cassidy

"Jim Montgomery is the new head coach of the bruins The 53 year old Montgomery spent the past two seasons as an assistant with the blues He was fired from his first NHL head coaching job by the stars in December 2019 with a team citing unprofessional conduct Montgomery replaces Bruce Cassidy who was dismissed following her first round loss in the playoffs Montgomery will open the season without at least two key components left wing Brad marchand and number one defenseman Charlie mcavoy will miss the start of the season due to injuries And Patrice bergeron is mowing retirement I'm Dave

Jim Montgomery Montgomery Bruce Cassidy Bruins NHL Brad Marchand Charlie Mcavoy Patrice Bergeron Dave
Trial for US basketball star begins in Moscow-area court

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 1 d ago

Trial for US basketball star begins in Moscow-area court

"American basketball star Brittany griner has appeared in a Moscow area court for trial about four and a half months after she was arrested on cannabis possession while traveling to play for a Russian team Krona being led to the hearing in handcuffs with photographers on hand to grab shots At a closed door preliminary hearing on Monday in a Moscow suburb grinus detention was extended for another 6 months to December 20 the Phoenix mercury center and two time U.S. Olympic gold medalist was arrested in February at a Moscow airport police say she was carrying veep canisters with cannabis oil granite could face up to ten years in prison if convicted of large scale transportation of drugs I'm Charles De

Brittany Griner Moscow Phoenix Mercury Center Basketball U.S. Charles De
Abortion, women's rights grow as priorities: AP-NORC poll

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 1 d ago

Abortion, women's rights grow as priorities: AP-NORC poll

"A new poll finds that more Americans see abortion or women's rights as a priority for the government to address following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn roe V wade The survey by The Associated Press and the norc center for public affairs research finds that 22% of adults in the U.S. name abortion or women's rights as one of up to 5 problems they want the government to work on That's more than doubled since December for women 9% in December said abortion was a priority right before the ruling it was 21% and after the ruling 37% Donna water Washington

Norc Center For Public Affairs The Associated Press Supreme Court Government U.S. Washington
Ghislaine Maxwell to be sentenced in Epstein sex abuse case

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 4 d ago

Ghislaine Maxwell to be sentenced in Epstein sex abuse case

"Socialite Ghislaine Maxwell is set to be sentenced in New York today for helping Jeffrey Epstein sexually abused underage girls Maxwell was convicted of sex trafficking in December prosecutors said Epstein who killed himself in 2019 while awaiting trial sexually abused girls as young as 14 over more than a decade and couldn't have done so without the help of Maxwell his longtime companion and one time girlfriend prosecutors say she deserves 30 to 55 years in prison Maxwell denied abusing anyone her lawyers asked for no more than 5 years Julie Walker New York

Ghislaine Maxwell Jeffrey Epstein Maxwell Epstein New York Julie Walker
Anna Dugger Wants to Stay With Pedophile Husband

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:58 min | Last week

Anna Dugger Wants to Stay With Pedophile Husband

"I'm struck by this story today. The duggars, the family on TV with all the kids. You know, last December, Josh Duggar, that was found guilty on both counts in his child sexual assault materials trial, okay? I was a few weeks before Christmas and nobody would have been the least bit surprised. Had his wife and a Duggar said, I wanted divorce. I'm done with this. Right? Who wouldn't? I mean, we all want to understand that. But she's now saying she ain't going anywhere. She said she would never leave this fucked up sick and twisted husband for nothing. You couldn't give her anything. She ain't going nowhere. Brainwashed much? Yes, of course she is. But I'm sure a lot of you ladies have good reason to complain about your husbands and this would clearly be one of those times. On the flip side, though, guys, what do you make out of a wife who promises to always be with you even if you're a convict convicted sex offender? I mean, this guy got a 151 months, a little over 12 years. In federal prison, that's not easy time. And then he was hit with 20 years of supervised released when he gets out of prison, and at that point he and allowed any unsupervised contact with minors, not even his own children. So how exactly do you make that work? What do you do? You're living in the same house. You can't be, I mean, come on. Come on, you can. Who's going to, who's going to police that? These people have 7 kids from 12 to 7 months. I've heard plenty of people who stay together for the kids. I understand that I did it for a while too. But this is a little insane.

Josh Duggar Duggar
Caller: I'm Troubled Trump Hasn't Provided Election Fraud Evidence

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:08 min | Last week

Caller: I'm Troubled Trump Hasn't Provided Election Fraud Evidence

"Mike, I'm pretty troubled because for 20 months since November of 2020, I sort of gave Trump the benefit of the doubt, I don't like Pelosi and I don't like what she did with this committee. And I'm not in favor of one sided committees, et cetera. Right. But what emerges is that by early December of 2020, Trump knew he had no factual no evidentiary basis to contest the election. Everything since then from Trump has been wrong. And this brings me no joy whatsoever. And I hear your point about Democrats stick together. But we must be adherent. We must be supportive. We must be embracing always the constitution. So in my humble opinion, Pence turned out the hero, Trump the goat, and I resent everything that Trump has done since. Yeah, I mean, let me push back gently because I respect your opinion. I don't necessarily agree with it, but I respect what you have to say, and I believe that many people are feeling exactly the way you're feeling right

Pelosi Donald Trump Mike Pence
The Problem With Bill Barr's Criticism of '2000 Mules'

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:49 min | Last week

The Problem With Bill Barr's Criticism of '2000 Mules'

"Bill Barr made his criticism of 2000 mules, he talked about the fact that he didn't see election fraud right after the election and he hadn't seen anything new subsequently that have changed his mind, including 2000 mules. And my thought was, well, I'm going to give him a pass on November of 2020 or December of 2020. He didn't see fraud because at that time there wasn't convincing evidence of fraud. But I am going to robot him on 2000 meals. So in other words, I'm going to blame him for now, but I'm not going to blame him for them. And his argument about now was downright silly. It was basically that, you know, and this is the kind of thing you'd expect from an ignoramus. Someone who didn't know anything, someone who was not the top law enforcement officer, to say something like this. Well, in Atlanta, you got tens of thousands of people milling around driving by walking by going past dropboxes. How can you possibly identify people at the drop boxes? And this has all the intellectual coherence of me saying. On January 6th, 2021, you attends a thousands of people walking around biking, Uber, cabs, runners going past the capitol. How can you possibly identify the January 6th defendants? How can you possibly put in their charging documents? So this guy was 8 feet, or approximately 8 feet outside the front door, and this guy was ten feet inside the door. How can you do that? So clearly this is just ignorance talking. But what about before? And Debbie reminded me, she reminded me that, well, maybe Bill Barr hadn't seen fraud before, but he was offered the opportunity to investigate it and he shot it

Bill Barr Atlanta Debbie
 Goodyear to recall RV tires 19 years after last one was made

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 3 weeks ago

Goodyear to recall RV tires 19 years after last one was made

"Is recalling nearly 175,000 recreational vehicle tires 19 years after the last one was made The company's G one 59 tires have been under investigation by the national highway traffic safety administration since December 2017 The agency says since 1998 95 people have been killed or injured adding that it pressured Goodyear into the recall Documents say the tire tread can separate from the body causing drivers to lose control increasing the risk of a crash Goodyear denies the tires have a safety defect and says few if any are

National Highway Traffic Safet Goodyear
What to Expect from Jan 6 Hearings

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:57 sec | 3 weeks ago

What to Expect from Jan 6 Hearings

"NBC and I parted ways after four years in December. And if I ever go back on, it will be to say, I told you so I told you so I told you so because yamiche saying it's a blockbuster set of hearings. Honest to goodness Jake, I was a junior in high school between junior and senior now between sophomore and junior year. I had to take American government in the summer of 1973 and I watched the Watergate hearing. You had no idea what was going to happen. I mean, you were edge of your seat. We watched that four hours a day for summer school, and it was the best summer school class I ever had. Because, you know, yeah, it really no idea what anyone's got Alexander Butterfield comes up and says, oh, there's a tape machine in The White House. You know, nobody, John dean got up there and lied. It just was wild, it was great. I don't think what do you think the rating? Do you think they'll get a one share for this thing? I have no idea what the ratings will be. I can just tell you from my reporting you my reporting is that they have a lot of stuff that we've never seen heard or knew before.

Yamiche NBC Alexander Butterfield American Government Jake John Dean White House
Biden to appear on 'Jimmy Kimmel Live!' during Western trip

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 3 weeks ago

Biden to appear on 'Jimmy Kimmel Live!' during Western trip

"President Joe Biden will mix in a little pleasure with his business during a trip to Los Angeles this week It's Jimmy Kimmel Live Tonight Joe Biden makes his first in person appearance at a late night talk show since becoming president He'll be doing a guest shot on ABC's Jimmy Kimmel Live Biden will do the show on Wednesday while he's in Los Angeles to host the 9th summit of the Americas and like many visitors to LA he'll end up on Hollywood Boulevard where any number of celebrities are honored with sidewalk stars and weird Kimmel tapes his show last December Biden did The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon except he did that show remotely not in person I'm Oscar bell's

President Joe Biden Jimmy Kimmel Los Angeles Joe Biden Biden ABC Hollywood LA Kimmel The Tonight Show Jimmy Fallon Oscar Bell
U.S. Jobless Benefits Fell Last Week

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last month

U.S. Jobless Benefits Fell Last Week

"Fewer Americans applied for jobless aid last week I'm Ben Thomas for the look at the data The number of Americans collecting unemployment benefits remains at an historically low level The Labor Department reports applications fell by 11,000 for the week ending May 28th to an even 200,000 The four week average for claims which evens out the weekly ups and downs dipped by 500 and the total number of Americans collecting jobless benefits is also down for the week ending May 21st It came in at 1 million 309,000 the fewest since December 27th 1969 The government's may jobs report will be released tomorrow economists surveyed by fact set project employers added 323,000 jobs last month That would be the fewest in about a year and a half Ben Thomas Washington

Ben Thomas Labor Department Government Ben Thomas Washington
The Latest Exploitation by Joy Reid & MSNBC

Mark Levin

01:00 min | Last month

The Latest Exploitation by Joy Reid & MSNBC

"Since Comcast's MSNBC and MSNBC's joy Reid enjoy Reid's guest the two of them brought it up The police chief of the Yuval school district Donated money to act blue in December 2017 that was earmarked for beto o'rourke A man who pretends to be Hispanic So what we believe to be the Hispanic police chief donated money to the Irish candidate beto o'rourke who pretends to be Hispanic And all this is relevant to joy Reid and her guest over at MSNBC Not the slaughter now the politics that they try to project on top of it These are truly sick people And they're given a platform Why They shouldn't be given any platform Whatsoever

Msnbc Joy Reid Yuval School District Donated Rourke Hispanic Police Reid Comcast
Judge John Gleeson on Taking Down John Gotti

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:56 min | Last month

Judge John Gleeson on Taking Down John Gotti

"Talking to the author of the brand new book the Gotti wars taking down America's most notorious mobster. You wonder, hey, who took him down? Who was the determined young prosecutor who took him down? Of course, we don't know. We don't know nothing about that. We was just in the olive oil business. No, actually, we do know. He's sitting right here. His name is judge John gleeson. You were that young prosecutor. Yeah, I was. And I didn't do it alone. Look, I was the lead prosecutor when we took him down, but I had great people helping me prosecutors in my office who worked under my supervision and the FBI, FBI knows what it's doing when it comes to organized crime. Also, there is something they know their way around. I'm glad to hear that actually. Because I thought that they were all like Paige and struck and all those evil bad people. But you're telling me, listen, we know who the good guys are in this story. And when I think about going up against something, because listen, let's be honest, people didn't think you could take down the mob. And so the fact that that even happened is extraordinary. It's amazing. But you were talking about how you found yourself, your prosecutor, and you find yourself being assigned to this case. So the first case, because most of us don't remember these details, was going on at the time that in 1985, John Gotti decides to make a name for himself brutally murder castellano and broad daylight and is there any other kind of daylight they always say that in broad daylight? I think there might be narrow daylight, but I think the medium with daylight, but this was in broad daylight. It was also 6 o'clock in the evening in December. So there's no daylight. It was broad dark night. All right. I'm a human being. I make mistakes. So, but in the middle of this, this murder happens. So take us back because we have to say too for people who don't know. He was known as the Teflon Don, because many efforts were made to get him that failed. Correct. He beat that case, the one that we had him under indictment for at the time that killed Paul castellano. Then there were two other cases in state court that he beat one fair and square. One kind of scared the witness off the witness stand. Intimidated the witness? Well, the witness, it was a little dopey assault case, really. It was a very small case. But the witness produced that famous headline on the post, I forgot, 'cause he got up on the witness stand and said he couldn't remember the first slapped him. I don't remember that. What year was that? That was 1987 or so. Yes. And then there was our case. So yes, he had earned one way or the other. The nickname not only the dapper Don. But the Teflon Don.

John Gleeson FBI Teflon Don Paige Castellano America Paul Castellano DON
Jeff James: We Can Use Patterns to Train Students for Shootings

The Dan Bongino Show

01:27 min | Last month

Jeff James: We Can Use Patterns to Train Students for Shootings

"Do you know the last time a child died in a school fire in America It was December 1st 1958 was the R later the angel school in Chicago fire breaks out And I'll make the long story short The nun is pretty much said hey let's just stay here the firemen will rescue us Well that went tragically wrong 92 pupils and three nuns lost their lives At that point was when they started to mandate changes about the biggest thing is fire drills monthly fire drills You'll take a kindergartner who starts school in September by Christmas They've been through three or four fire drills and they would know where to go if the teacher wasn't in the room And the fire alarm still goes off It doesn't mean they're not scared It means they've learned a pattern You can't really train elementary students like you can't high school kids to react to these kind of shootings But you can have a little touch points with them that say hey we're going to practice we're going to practice where to hide if a bad guy gets in here Or I used to tell the gym teachers If you have a wood line around your school play a game a couple of times at the beginning of the year with the kids saying hey I'm going to time you running to the woodline and back So you see who does it in under a minute So if that shooter is outside will those kids are outside for recess or for gym class and someone says run to the wood line and hide in the wood line They know where to go They've heard it a couple of times So while we can't train them to the level of adults we can certainly give them touch points that are going to that they can pull on again in the future in those moments of high stress and high anxiety and fear

Angel School Chicago America
Is the Amityville Horror House Actually Haunted?

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:13 min | Last month

Is the Amityville Horror House Actually Haunted?

"Even though these stories of the amityville horror house being haunted or subject to debate, there is very little doubt that Ronald defeo was there for the mass murder of his family in that home. But the question still lingers, is that house really haunted. Because in December of 1975, barely one year removed from the horrifying murders, a guy named George Lutz and his wife Kathy Lutz, they buy the house, which is 4000 ft². They buy it for a reasonable sum of 800 grand. Now, George Lutz never once called the amityville police department to report any suspicious happenings, but these people quickly left the house without their belongings at the living there only 28 days. Because they swear, it was haunted, and that's what spawned the movies. The amityville horror house movies. Now, the fails attorney William Weber is a lot more involved in this fairytale or lore than you may expect. He says that George and Kathy Lutz approached him about an idea for a book and said, we created this horror story over many bottles of wine. It's all a hoax. So those of you who think it really is haunted, according to William Weber, they created this, but wait, it gets weirder. Weber eventually brings a lawsuit against the Lutz family for taking the story of the haunting to another publishing partner and he demands a share of the profits of a cool $60 million. But they settle out of court for 2500 bucks plus 15,000 for his services connected with the book and subsequent movie. Jesus Christ, did he get robbed? That's all he got? What a movie they made 60 million. Wow. So whether you choose to believe the amityville house is haunted or not, some interesting information is still out there.

George Lutz Kathy Lutz Ronald Defeo William Weber Amityville Police Department George Lutz Weber
 More Americans apply for jobless benefits last week

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last month

More Americans apply for jobless benefits last week

"The number of Americans collecting unemployment benefits has reached a 53 year low The Labor Department reports 1 million 317,000 people receive jobless benefits during the week ending May 7th That's the fewest since December 27th 1969 Applications for unemployment rose by 21,000 last week to 218,000 Weekly unemployment applications have been consistently below the pre-pandemic level of 225,000 for most of this year even as the overall economy contracted in the first quarter and

Labor Department
David Gergen Shares His Experiences in the Nixon Administration

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:46 min | Last month

David Gergen Shares His Experiences in the Nixon Administration

"David, I want to start because there's some people in the audience. I get new affiliates every month, and we get 400 and right now. I want them to know that you work for RN, you work for Gerald Ford, you work for Ronald Reagan, you work for Clinton. But you have different sort of styles and roles for each of them. Let's start with president Nixon. What'd you do in the Nixon White House? Nixon White House, I came in, I've been in the navy. I went to law school and I went in the navy for three and a half years. My last year, you know, I was assigned to come back to come to Washington to work on draft reform. That was the time when Nixon had launched a random lottery to determine what draft number you got and whether you're going to go to Vietnam or not. And we tried to clean that up, they ran a bogus in some ways, I ran the moderator first year out. I'll tell you, you have time for a little story. We got lots of time. We can go a long time today. Okay, super. Well, so the next one out of The White House orders a random lottery to determine who goes to Vietnam. The Lewis Hershey was then head of the draft. He was sort of the J. Edgar Hoover of the drafts. And so Hershey did something they did back in the Second World War, which was a very popular war. They got a bowl, they got capsules, and they put January 1 in the first capsule, put it in a bowl, and then January 2, all the days of January, then February, all the way up through the days of December the last ones into the boat. Got a spoon started up a little bit. Put it in the closet. And then on the day on the random monitor, they brought it to bowl, reached in for number one, you ought to Vietnam. And it was like November 15th. And then all of the early all of the early numbers and all of the early draws were from late in the year. So the whole thing was tilted.

Nixon White House Navy Gerald Ford President Nixon Ronald Reagan Vietnam Lewis Hershey Clinton David J. Edgar Hoover Washington Hershey
"december" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:16 min | 6 months ago

"december" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"A former justice of South Africa's constitutional court, will share his memories of Desmond Tutu. We'll also find out about new plans to teach Britain about the Holocaust and about the country's response to Nazi Germany, plus China dialogs Isabel Hilton explained Beijing's attempts to get Hong Kong's Catholics to tow the Communist Party line, and finally I'll be goring uselessly into my crystal ball to make some doubtless hopeless predictions about what fresh hells might await in the year ahead. That's all coming up right here on the briefing on monocle 24. Welcome to today's edition of the briefing with me Andrew Muller. The state funeral of archbishop Desmond Tutu will take place tomorrow at saint George's cathedral in Cape Town. South Africa has been mourning Tutu's passing since he died last Sunday at the age of 90. Church bells have been ringing across the country at midday every day and Table Mountain has been lit in purple. Will joining me now from Cape Town is someone who knew the late archbishop two two very well justice I'll be sax dedicated much of his life to the anti apartheid struggle after surviving years in exile and an assassination attempt by South African security services sax return to South Africa in 1994 and was appointed to South Africa's constitutional court by president Nelson Mandela. I'll be first of all, do you recall your first meeting with archbishop Tutu? He seems like somebody who would have made a failure immediate impression. I think I think I shared a platform with him in the antibiotic struggle days in London, and he was not very well known clinic, and I was a not very well known PhD student at Sussex university. And I remember, it's very clever, very thoughtful person, impressive, but not necessarily destined for the huge role that he was due to play. And then later on in the exile, I read more and more and more about him. So he became one of those figures that we knew about through the television through the stories through the legends about him. And they were all positive and good. And he occupied a very, very important space. He wasn't in the struggle. He's.

Desmond Tutu South Africa Isabel Hilton Andrew Muller saint George's cathedral Cape Town South African security service Communist Party archbishop Tutu Beijing Britain Tutu Hong Kong Table Mountain Germany China Nelson Mandela Sussex university London
"december" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

06:05 min | 6 months ago

"december" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

"Like this. Most of the west learn how Moscow work, not from going to college and taking Stanley Hoffman or Henry Kissinger or anyone else who is talking about how the Soviets worked. And most of what they thought was wrong or they read the long telegram by mister actually turned out to be George cannon early on in the Cold War. No, they weren't Nixon. They weren't studying the briefing papers. They weren't Jimmy Carter who had an inordinate fear of communism. None of that, all those years of the Cold War, that's not how people learn in America. They read time, newsweek, and U.S. news and World Report, and they would routinely report on what was going on or so they thought or some correspondence in Moscow thought. And now people have watched the Americans and they get a view of how sleepers work, which isn't right. That's not how sleepers worked in the United States. They had lots of spies in the 1980s. That was one of my earliest jobs. If you're looking to hear it for the first time, I'm going to give you the quick bio in a second. But after the wall came down in the Soviet Union crumbled, people sort of put their communism studies away, thinking, oh, well, the Chinese are simply evolving to a market capitalism society and we will help them get there and everything will be comfy, hunky Dory in the world. Bill Clinton let them into the world of free trade, we accepted them into the world's institutions. And in fact, they're still letting us. And the country's difficult to understand. It's so big. It's so numerous in the billion people. And so opaque, that very few novelists have dared to try and describe how the country works. Your new year's resolution ought to be to read never, which is a fine. It's a rollicking good novel. It's a great read. Ken fallit never disappoints. Can't follow came to this to the IO wasteland studio. Many, many years ago. And if you don't know what the IO wasteland is, that means you haven't read The Wheel of Time. And if you haven't read The Wheel of Time and yet, even if you've watched the first series of The Wheel of Time, which will go on, I think, for 30 years, I don't think you get to the IO wasteland until season three or four. I don't know how they're writing it. But the wasteland is basically my studio in the west. And it's where you learn how to do radio in the IO wasteland. It came down to the IO wasteland a few years ago and we had a great rollicking three hour conversation. I'm going to ask Harley to post that over today as the last interview of the year. And so Ken Follett is a, I mean, he's a genius at narrative. He tells good stories. Good stories make for great novels. And he ranges all over the human canvas, and now he's ranged to the present day and he's ranged to China and African to America. And in China's actually, I am hardly a sinologist, but I know a lot of people who stayed out of holiday and speak Mandarin. I know. O'Brien and Pompeo, Secretary of State, Pompeo. There are about 25 people running for president. And the two people who are most knowledgeable about the Soviet Union are Mike Pompeo and Robert O'Brien behind them is Matt pottinger, Mary kissel. There are a lot of people who know about the Soviet Union. I mean, I'm not the Chinese Communist Party, and the People's Republic of China. The one who knows the most who is running for president is Mike Pompeo. The one who knows the most who is in the Congress is Tom cotton. So I think if China becomes the menace in people's mind that I suspect it will over the next two years because they are unleashed this virus, which is everywhere and killing everyone and doing terrible things. It's not going to kill you. You've had your vaccines in your booster shot. You wear your mask on an airplane. If you do normal things, it's not going to kill you. If your children get it, it's very, very unlikely. Your children are much more likely to get hit by a car playing in the street than they are to dive COVID. They're much more likely to have a rare form of a terrible cancer and lots of kids get sick and it's very terrible. And I've been to the children's hospital here in Southern California often enough there to great ones in LA and Orange County to know how Saturday is how terrible it is, how awful it is. To have a child who's genuinely deeply sick, but it's very, very unlikely that it's going to be COVID that puts them there. So the Chinese did this to the world. And they don't care. They don't have a better have a regretful bone in their body. And the middle kingdom thinks that they got screwed by the west for 200 years. And by the way, they did. I got screwed by the west for 200 years. And so they are about becoming the most powerful country in the world. And issuing orders to the rest of the world. Doctor Kissinger himself told me they will never invade another country. For the purposes of occupying it, they do invade when they need to, like, Vietnam, they invaded 79 or 80. I can't remember. And they took over Tibet because they thought it was theirs and they're going to kill everyone and Jian Jiang until they get rid of their Muslim problem. And they'll exploit Afghanistan and they'll push the Russians back eventually they'll push the Russians around. And they'll take over some islands and they'll lay pressure on Japan, and they'll try and prop up North Korea. We know what they're going to do. Ken Follett explains how they do it and how we are now in a second Cold War. And how it is very, very dangerous. So my reading yesterday was not news. There is no news. I have here one article. U.S. hit with record number of new COVID-19 cases. One article Wall Street Journal. And I have an invitation for you to call one 805 two O one two three four. It's the last live show of the year. Tomorrow December 31st, we play doctor Larry's of hillsdale college, his part one of the march through the history of ideas, which we've been playing for years, and then on Monday we play part two, and then we begin the new year. There will be some.

Soviet Union Stanley Hoffman George cannon Mike Pompeo U.S. Moscow Ken fallit Pompeo Henry Kissinger Robert O'Brien Matt pottinger Mary kissel Jimmy Carter Chinese Communist Party Ken Follett mister China newsweek Tom cotton Nixon
"december" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

08:04 min | 6 months ago

"december" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"The unusual treats enjoyed by reindeer and other animals such as elephants and bison. Those are the days headlines, now back to you Andrew. Thank you, Reese. Now, Donald Trump was in one key respect a lucky president appointing three Supreme Court Justices in a single term more than either Barack Obama or George W. Bush did in their two each, though it has been gratifying gratifyingly rather hilarious watching Trump's appointees to the supreme and other courts declining to take an interest in his ludicrous claims of election fraud. The current bench did come through for Trump's base on one of their animating obsessions. Abortion. In the last months of 2022, the court took a sympathetic view of the efforts of some states to restrict access to abortions. For a look at this and other looming cases I'm joined now by Stefani Obama, U.S. legal and enforcement correspondent for the Financial Times in Washington, D.C.. Stefani, first of all, before we look at the individual cases, what have we learned about the general character of the post Trump bench with those additions of Gorsuch a Kavanaugh and Barrett? I think it became quite clear, especially when looking at the abortion issue, which you have just brought up that there definitely is a level of openness to potentially considering appearing back abortion rights. So I think specifically with these cases, if up until that point, there might have been a bit of doubt, especially with someone like justice Barrett on how she, for instance, was going to land on more politically sensitive issues. These were kind of the first arguably the first cases where we really got a glimpse into where her stance may fall. So I think it really does give us a very insightful and very precious look into how the courts will be setting itself up for such contentious cases going forward. There is a lot of concern afoot obviously that the court is poised to completely overturn roe V wade, which was the 1973 decision which has protected abortion in the United States until now, of course, early this week as Sarah weddington, the lawyer who bought that case died at the age of 76. Is it a foregone conclusion that if it comes to that this Supreme Court bench would toss roe V wade? Well, when hearing oral arguments in the case involving this 2018 Mississippi law that bans abortions after 15 weeks, which have been earlier this month, it was quite clear that the justices were open to the idea of restricting abortion access and abortion rights. Now, we do not know for sure what form that will take. Mississippi, in this case, has openly asked the court to overturn roe V wade completely. But there are other ways in which the court may decide on the matter. It could look at, for instance, the viability rule, specifically, which basically points to the moment in time at which a fetus basically can no longer live outside the womb and was obviously central to the roe V wade case. It might shift that viability line. The chief justice looked to be giving quite a few questions on that. Matter pointing to the fact that perhaps he might be more inclined to focus on that part of basically the legislation. We really do not know, but what is for certain is that there was a signaling thoughts, especially the conservative conservative justices might be very sympathetic towards the Mississippi case. We will only know for sure when the ruling will come out and it's expected by June 2022. Do we know as a general rule how much public opinion factors into Supreme Court deliberations? Because as you'll know, polling has consistently shown hefty majorities in favor of roe V wade and the rights at guarantees. Absolutely. I mean, ironically, there were also some pew polls that actually focused specifically on American Catholics. And maturity was actually in support of weight and didn't want to see it overturned. This is definitely and over the years and over the decades has definitely become as you also pointed out a very political master and a very time effective tool for some parts of the sort of more conservative wings of the American political spectrum to rally up their bases. But others actually argue the fact that this could actually put the party apps potential danger during midterm elections next year. Especially because, as you point out, I mean, the public opinion is not overwhelmingly in favor of overturning roe V wade. And another point that was also raised during oral arguments for the Mississippi case from some of the liberal justices, especially just as social major, which was the most vocal in these terms, she wanted out the fact that she was bringing in the issue of public opinion in the sense that she said one of her quotes largely said something around sort of the line stops if the Supreme Court is seen to be swaying to and fro with the change in the political landscape in the U.S.. It would not be able to get rid of this stench. This was the word she used. If it were to be perceived as a political institution by the public. So I think that is definitely on some of the justices minds when it comes to these types of cases that are going to be absolutely consequential in the U.S.. We should look at one other consequential case, which is looming, which is the beginning of oral arguments on January 7th about vaccine mandates for large employers and healthcare workers. And again, if we think about the current character of the court and what is widely perceived to be a 6 three conservative majority, is there any indication on which way they might go on Biden's vaccine mandates? It's a big question. I think many people are trying to answer, but it really will sort of come down to one of the big topics that actually keeps coming up again and again also in the abortion cases, which is the whole issue of federal power versus state sovereignty. So to what extent are these mandates that obviously have been put forth by The White House and the Biden administration impinging on the encroaching upon states sovereignty. Where the court lands on that issue, really, I think will help determine where it's going to land more broadly on the vaccine mandate question. And I think what's important also to underscore is that this could have really sort of important implications in general for the power that the executive branch may or may not have in the future to sort of act quite sort of unilaterally on issues beyond the pandemic. So how much flexibility would agencies at a federal level then have to respond to any threats? Without necessarily waiting for a go ahead from Congress. That is one of the big issues at stake here. Stefani Obama, thank you for joining us. You are listening to the briefing on monocle 24..

roe V wade Supreme Court Stefani Obama Washington, D.C. Gorsuch Mississippi Barrett Sarah weddington U.S. Kavanaugh Donald Trump Stefani Reese George W. Bush Financial Times Trump Barack Obama Andrew Biden administration
"december" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:28 min | 7 months ago

"december" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Americans and probably this administration in particular would tell you that American democracy is not perfect. And we can all see it. We can all agree, you mentioned a very real ethnic and racial tensions that are in the U.S. the January 6th insurrection is showing also a very deep polarization deeper perhaps than in many countries, and certainly the best in many, many years in the United States. But Biden is trying to remind also heat people and the U.S. citizens that democracy is the founding principle on which the United States has been built. That's the domestic aspect. And of course, after four years of Trump, the administration needs to show that U.S. is back in the leading position. And even though it's not a perfect democracy, it's one of the oldest democracies in the world. And it's also showing this dichotomy and contrast between the democratic. Let's put it as a west, but very much a broader west would include Japan, Korea, Australia, and democratic authoritarian Chinese led and Russian led camp that is of ideologically different competitor to the democratic quest. So I think that's the key. The key principles behind this move. How you mentioned China, how much is this about the U.S. taking on China by assuming the arguably the higher moral ground here? I think it's very much about China, but not only in this basic or the very important strategic competition kind of way. I think it's clearly China and Russia too. I mean, but let's focus on China. Has adopted an authoritarian regime, especially under president. But that is very successful economically and is growing in power. And if you from the position of Europe, United States and democracies in Asia just make this struggle about power, countries might have a different opinion on their interest you have to then weigh in economics, you have to weigh in many other aspects. But if you talk about struggle of ideas, if you talk about struggle of in many ways, almost ideology and the way of thinking of who we are, I think then the case for those two camps it's much greater. And I think frankly, this is how Biden sees the world and he's trying to make a case that this is in fact the moment to take a side at least when it comes to democracies and support for democracies. And in terms of where this sets a course for the future, it has been often said by foreign ALF foreign policy experts that there could one day be a grand alliance of democracies that try and rebalance the world order to ensure that democracy prevails over autocracy. How much is this actually on the cards? Or is that just something far, far too far down the line? I would very much agree with you that this is the idea and that idea that has been discussed for a very long time, frankly. Others have referred to, I think it was. I know it was another John McCain who was talking about league of democracies and when the contrast wasn't as great. Whether it's going to work is proof is in the ring. I mean, we are facing a very clear competition, certainly between U.S. and on one hand and China on the other. But increasingly countries are aligning with one or the other camp, even though China actually has global problems with collecting their allies. So whether this will produce, I would not expect for the summit to produce an institution, but it is already producing not only the summit but the politics around democracy. Camps that go of like minded countries that go beyond the immediate economic or security reasons. And I think that's something that is very much in our future. And it's frankly the test for Biden and his administration when it comes to this whole endeavor of putting democracy in the center of American foreign policy. Michael baranovsky from the German marshal fund, thank you so much for joining us on monocle 24. The time here in London is 7 14, 8 14, if you're listening in Paris and still to come in the program will at about ten by India's prime minister finally put an end to the protests by the country's farmers and will catch up with what we've learned and we will get the latest cinnamon news as well as Karen cruzan joins me in the studio. Yeah, with the globalist. Just how many parties were held at Downing Street or by members of the Westminster government? Everyone else in England was in lockdown last autumn and winter. Whatever the number, it has led.

United States China Biden Trump Korea Japan ALF Russia Australia Asia Europe John McCain center of American foreign pol Michael baranovsky German marshal fund Karen cruzan Paris London India Westminster government
"december" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:45 min | 7 months ago

"december" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"And it was not a socially distanced. Now you might say all of this isn't that big a deal, but this party of course took place at a time last year where people across London were being told to stay at home and not socialize due to the coronavirus pandemic. Johnson himself has been evasive about all of this, but he is going to find that pretty hard to do when he faces off against opposition leader kier starmer during the weekly session of prime minister's questions, which is getting underway in the House of Commons. Let's get more on all of this now with George Parker. He's political editor of the Financial Times, and he joins us on the line from parliament. George, first of all, the Scottish national party has called on Johnson to resign over this. Could more such calls be on the way do you think? Well, I'm sure other people from opposition parties will call on Boris Johnson to resign. But I don't think there's any chance that he'll do so. I mean, this is a disaster for the government on many different levels. In the first instance, it plays extremely badly with the public because the one thing they really hate about governments is when they say one thing and do something else behind closed doors and that's particularly relevant on COVID. And the second reason it's very bad for Boris Johnson is that we're expecting him sometime later today to announce new COVID restrictions. Now there will be a lot of people in the public. And indeed, in the Conservative Party, you say, well, why does Boris Johnson have a right to tell us how to live our lives when he's not sticking to the rules himself or people in Downey street on sticking to the rules? So he's in a double bind, but that's me. It doesn't necessarily mean that Boris Johnson is going to resign far from it. He'll try and brazen it out. Well, I mean, I guess one question then is opposition criticism is always to be expected as he's saying also lawmakers calling on him perhaps to resign. The only thing that would maybe make him move, of course, is his own party. What are Tory MPs saying? Well, Tory MPs are furious. They think this is the latest episode of self inflicted damage by the government. Lots of conservative MPs don't like COVID restrictions in the first place. But they definitely don't like the governments imposing COVID restrictions on the country and they're not obeying them themselves. I think it makes the public look foolish. And it creates real anger. So Tory MPs are very angry and I think we're in a very febrile situation here at the moment because if as we expect Boris Johnson is about to announce new COVID restrictions, well, Tory MPs will probably have to vote on those restrictions. A lot of them are very skeptical and the events of the last 48 hours won't make them any more likely to want to go out and support Boris Johnson on them. So what then do you expect from today's prime minister's questions? As you say, there might be restrictions, new restrictions announced. Before that or after that, is there any way you think that Johnson can talk his way out of this or will he be forced to apologize to give him some measure of credibility? The labor leader will pin two things on Boris Johnson for the first that he's been lying to the country in his view. And the second that he's laughing at the country and those are two very strong, powerful political messages that 7 premises lying and laughing at the country at the same time. So I think kiss down will make life very difficult for Boris Johnson. I think Boris Johnson really has too clear alternatives here either he apologizes for what happened in Downing Street. I think there are very few people in the UK who don't think that the party did take place against the rules last December. Or he can say that we stuck to the rules and then try to move the base on to new COVID restrictions. And I think it's the latter of those two options he's going to choose. You think it's actually the latter of the two options. He's going to get follow-up questions, everything. Can he really hold that line, I guess, is one question, and maybe ask it in a slightly different way. I mean, there's been so many tipping points that we've spoken about even with you on this show when it comes to Boris Johnson. Could this one in any way do you think be different? I think this is probably as bad as the episode last year with but when Dominic Cummings Boris Johnson's aide went to Barnard's castle on a trip to test design eyesight breaking the COVID rules. I think it's I think it's that bad. I don't it's always hard to tell importance when you reach a tipping point. But certainly accumulation of evidence is amounting against piling up against Boris Johnson. And at some point, conservative MPs will look at the opinion polls and the last themselves is this person still a winner. Some are we still want to lead us since the election. At the moment, people get Boris Johnson the benefit that's on that front. A lot of conservative MPs over their seats to Boris Johnson's unique appeal in the British country. But if that starts to turn, I don't think we're necessarily there yet. Then the moment of reckoning for Boris Johnson could come quite quickly. And then just George to end with, I mean, what would normally be the headline for a day like today? The new restrictions that Boris Johnson is due to announce. What is your sense of what's going to happen? And to your point from earlier, I mean, whether the public in any way is going to follow, is there an acceptance of the rules that you expect him to announce today? Well, I think Boris Johnson will want the headlines to be about the new restrictions, even though these are restrictions. I should say that he was hoping he would never have to reintroduce. I think the big question here is whether he finds himself if he has a press conference as we think he might do later on this afternoon. Being asked questions about whether he's basically bringing forward public health measures to distract attention from his domestic political problems. And if that allegation starts to stick on Boris Johnson, that's very serious indeed. Well, then finally on that, then, do you expect other ministers perhaps to take the lead? Because there is at the same time, there is a health crisis going on. As much as this is a political distraction, there needs to be some strong communication for us to get through this. Well, absolutely. I mean, such a job at the health secretary didn't appear in any media scheduled media interviews this morning..

Boris Johnson kier starmer Johnson George Parker Scottish national party House of Commons Financial Times Conservative Party George parliament Dominic Cummings COVID London Barnard UK
"december" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

07:06 min | 7 months ago

"december" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

"That of course is the sort of music that makes you absolutely obliges you to think of sunny bunch. Sunny bunch of course hosts the across the movie aisle podcast and the bulwark goes to the movies, the official film critic of the huge Hewitt show. And he is here, Sonny, let me give you the quick rundown. Ghostbusters after life, 5 stars from Hugh Hewitt and the fetching misses Hewitt. Belfast, 5 stars from the fetching misses Hewitt and Hugh Hewitt. One and a half stars, but the small grandkids liked it. Oh gosh, that was like razor blades in my thigh. What do you have to say about anything else that's out there? Yeah, and kanto, I haven't seen it does not look very good. I'm probably going to skip it, which is one of the nice things about only having to review a movie or two a week. You can skip some of the ones that aren't aren't that great. It's a weird, it's a weird tough year, as you mentioned as the Christmas music suggests that as Christmas time, which means it is awards season time. I saw somebody on Twitter joke that it's very cruel that they jam all of the movies that they make for adults in the last 6 weeks of the year. But this is where we are. This is where we are and what we're dealing with right now. So I'm going to run through a few titles. It's funny, like I said, we're in kind of a weird time because there's a weird lull this week where a bunch of the smaller movies are rolling out in platforming. I still haven't seen the new Paul Thomas Anderson movie, licorice pizza. It has an open end Dallas yet, but I hear good things was named the best movie of the year by the National Board of Review. So if you were if you're out in LA or New York, you should check that out. But yeah, there's no huge releases this year this week because of because of award season stuff. Next week we'll get west side story of Steven Spielberg, adaptation of the Sondheim play and then the week after that Spider-Man: No Way Home. So things are going to pick up again here. In a bit, but let's pick up a movie we didn't talk about last week because we were off. House of Gucci, House of Gucci from Ridley Scott. It's Ridley Scott's second movie this year, the last tool being the first, I quite like the last as you might remember. House of Gucci not nearly as good, not very good. So it's about a woman named Patricia regini, who finds the son of the scion of the Gucci empire at a party. And decides that she's going to marry him, because she is kind of a gold digger. So the girls played by Lady Gaga and the guy played by Adam Driver. And this movie is full of very good actors who are doing a very, very handy job Al Pacino plays Mauricio Gucci that's Adam Driver's character. Al Pacino plays the uncle his name is Aldo Gucci. Jeremy Irons plays Adam Driver's father, rodolfo Gucci, Jared Leto plays, Adam drivers, a cousin, how will Gucci, et cetera, et cetera. There's a lot of good actors here. There's a lot of hamming up. The problem with the movie simply is that it's just not very good. It is a mess. It is a narrative mess. I can't I can't really describe to you exactly what was at stake in this film for moment to moment. I couldn't tell you. She get the gold. That's the question, right? That should get the gold. Well, so don't tell me, but that's the question. In the so she marries Mauricio. Trying to resurrect the Gucci empire. She's kind of power behind the throne. The evil, it's almost the stereotype of a Roman Emperor, right? The evil woman behind the queen manipulating cousins and nephews and uncles and grandfathers, et cetera to get to get what she wants. But the problem again, the problem is the movie just goes off the rails. I couldn't, it's two and a half hours long and it feels either needs to be. It either needs 90 minutes and much more streamlined or like 5 hours long and all right. Sexist question coming up, sunny bunch. Sure. Women like this movie better than men. You would think so. I don't have the polling data in front of me. It's like, say, for sure. But here's another big problem in the movie, honestly, is that it doesn't really have any interest in the world of fashion co fashion. There are a couple of runway shows and there's one very funny sequence where Jared Leto plays Gucci, the kind of idiot nephew of the Gucci empire. Gucci empire, the Fredo character. He's basically the Fredo of the Gucci empire the way of putting it. He shows a bunch of drawings of his designs to his uncle rodolfo. And Jeremy Irons just has this wonderful moment where he says you can't show these to anyone. And we think, well, he's saying they're so good that they can't control anyone. But no, he's saying, if you show these 91, people will laugh Gucci out of the world of fashion. People will realize we have idiots in the next generation. But that moment is funny and I really really like Jared Leto in this. I think he does a very good job as the kind of over the top manic man trial that is Paolo, but the whole thing just doesn't work. I can't recommend it, sadly. Not going. Okay, off my list. Anything else that I haven't seen. I love Belfast. I just love Belfast. I went with a couple, of course, I'm in northern ire of Northern Irish descent from saint field, and I went with another guy of Northern Irish descent who wants to move to Belfast in his retirement. So yeah, Belfast got me, but then I talked to an Irish an in law who was Irish of origin. Once nothing to do with Belfast, just too close to home. Have you seen it yet? I have seen it. So Belfast is from Kenneth cronic. It's written in co written and director by Kevin burron, who is a very good Shakespearean actor and director who also does Hollywood stuff he made the murder on the Orient Express film. You directed the first the first Thor movie, et cetera. It is as you say it is a love letter of an expat to Belfast. It's set in the late 1960s during the troubles. But it's told from the perspective of a child from the perspective of a young boy who is essentially the Bronx figure who moves away. And it is a lovely actor showcase. It is a very nice actor showcase. I really like Jamie Dornan and the sum of place to dab. And I really like the mom whose name escapes me at the moment..

Adam Driver House of Gucci Hewitt Hugh Hewitt Belfast Ridley Scott Jared Leto Al Pacino Patricia regini Mauricio Gucci Aldo Gucci rodolfo Gucci Adam drivers Jeremy Irons National Board of Review Paul Thomas Anderson Sonny Steven Spielberg Lady Gaga Dallas
"december" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:10 min | 7 months ago

"december" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"11 enduro 7 11 here in London. Now this week, the U.S. Supreme Court has been hearing arguments that could change a woman's rights to an abortion in the USA. The case examines a law passed in Mississippi, banning most abortions after the 15th week of pregnancy, and at the end of Wednesday's session, conservative justices hinted with their comments that the majority backed upholding this new law. Or joining me to discuss this is duly Norman, whose Electra in politics and international relations at UCL, good morning, Julie. Good morning. Now this is a big challenge, isn't it to an existing local roe V wade? It gets mentioned all the time. Would you be kind enough to recap it please? And also to explain the challenges that are happening now in the Supreme Court. Absolutely. So for about the last 50 years, U.S. abortion laws have rested on a case from 1973 called roe versus wade, which guaranteed a constitutional right to an abortion, essentially up to viability. And that was confirmed in a second case Casey versus Planned Parenthood in the early 90s, which also again guaranteed the right of abortion through viability. And so viability is what's kind of in question in this current case, viability usually means about 20 to 24 weeks. So if you just could survive outside of the mother. So in the U.S., abortion laws that have tried to restrict abortions before that point have generally been struck down. With this Mississippi case would do is move that back to 15 weeks and potentially undo the constitutional right itself. So that's essentially being debated right now. And yesterday, there was a hint from the conservative justices that they would be delivering a ruling, which won't be out until next June. But nonetheless, there was a suggestion that the Mississippi case could actually set a new legal precedent and could effectively upturn 50 years of women's abortion rights in the United States. Well, that's right. We currently have a Supreme Court that has a majority of conservative justices. There are a total of 9 judges and currently 6 are considered to be conservative. So this is the first time that roe was seen as being potentially viable to be overturned. And again, what that might look like, we are not sure. It's suggested from the comments yesterday at the hearings that a majority of the justices are open to upholding this Mississippi law. It could be a narrow ruling where just that 15 week mark is appalled, but also the right to an abortion is still upheld, or it can be a complete overturning of row in which even the constitutional rights is overturned. This wouldn't mean that abortion would become illegal in the United States. It just means that it would go back to states to make whatever law they saw fit. So you would have some states who were abortion would stay going others where it would be subject to many restrictions or even effectively not available. And this case has come at a time or because the makeup of the Supreme Court has changed in the last few years, hasn't it? And we have the ideological makeup of the court moving further to the right and creating a new opening for those people who would like to restrict abortion rights. That's right. So this case has not been taken up by the court in the past when there was more of a balance between more liberal and conservative leaning justices. So just the fact that the court took up this case this time was an indication of how the courts ideology, if you will has changed a bit. The court has three justices who were appointed under a president Trump and who lean conservative on this issue. And so this is a slightly different makeup for the court to take up an abortion case than we've seen in years. And that's one reason why it's probably moving in the direction that it will. And we now have a liberal justice Sonia Sotomayor warning that the Supreme Court won't recover if Americans moving into the status as a political body overstepping the mark of being of judicial independence. And is worried that the court would survive the stench. This becomes a sort of an all or nothing fight in America, doesn't it? Well, it certainly does. I mean, this is obviously a very emotive issue in the United States. And there's wide divides on it. And what justice said to my order is indicating is that this case is bigger than abortion in some sense in that many see it as reflecting on how people will view the court as an institution. And if the court is seen as looking back at past precedence and changing them just because ideological or political makeup, then that could undermine the legitimacy of the court itself. Of course, the court has reversed other opinions in the past, but that's usually when there's really been a gross indication that a ruling in the past was morally wrong or was leading to a worse situation. And liberals that we started has not been the case for abortion. One thing that has been mentioned is that we now have a abortion laws being lifted and relaxed across the world now in places where arguably you would have found it impossible to conceive of it a few years ago. If the United States were to move in the opposite direction, it would place it as an outlier, wouldn't it? What would that do for the U.S.'s reputation? Well, the U.S. has always been a bit of an outlier on abortion rights as it is just with our current system having it be largely through the states. But you're right that we've seen a lot of movement on abortion laws, of course, and Ireland several years ago in Latin America, just in the last several years. So the world is certainly moving in a different direction on this. At some point out, however, is that most of Europe, for example, has most abortions restricted after 15 weeks as well or after that first trimester. So some conservatives in the United States are actually pointing to other countries and Europe in particular as having a similar benchmark as this Mississippi law with that said, there's a lot more exceptions that are available afterwards in Europe, which are not available with this Mississippi law. So we can look to international comparisons for support on both sides, if you will. Why has Congress, however, never enshrined the right to terminate a pregnancy in or like so many other countries have? Well, this is one of the big questions and many feel that abortion should be handled through Congress, through legislation and not through a court ruling. And that's one of the arguments of Mississippi on this. But again, this issue is so divisive that this is just not done possible to get a codify law through Congress. The House of Representatives did actually pass a bill that would protect a federal right to abortion. But with our Senate currently split 50 50, there's no way it would pass that or even come close to a vote. And that's been the case really for the last 50 years. Some Democrats are pushing Biden to undo the filibuster or unroll the way our processes are done in the Senate to allow a law like that to pass, but that also seems quite unlikely at this time. This is an incredibly difficult moment for Joe Biden, one of many his experienced ugly arguably in the last few months. He is a Catholic, however, he has always maintained that a right for a woman to have a termination is absolutely sacred is important. For this to happen on his watch, something which arguably had its roots in the Trump era with the appointment of justice Bret Kavanaugh. What would this do for Biden's reputation if this were to happen while he was president? Well, it'll certainly be difficult for Biden in some ways. And Biden himself was pretty quiet yesterday on the hearings on the proceedings. So obviously be pushed to make more public statements when the actual cases is discussed in the spring. But what is clear is that this will probably be a very galvanizing issue for Democrats next year in the past abortion has been more galvanizing for the right. I'd suggested that if this passes and or if there's restrictions and any kind of way on row or of course if it's overturned, that will actually probably embolden much of the left and maybe give Democrats a bit of an injection next year where they're currently worrying about voter enthusiasm. It's important to note that again, this ruling won't come out until next spring, probably in June. And so we're going to be in the midst of the gear up to midterms, the Europe to elections that fall. So it will become a very politically active issue then. And Biden will certainly be caught up in that truly Newman lecture in the politics and international relations at UCL. Thank you so much for joining us on monarch 24. Still to come on today's program, a flick through the mornings papers, a check in from the slush festival in Helsinki and the reaction to this year's Turner prize. Stay with us. UBS has over 900 investment analysts from over 100 different countries. Over 900 of the sharpest mines and freshest thinkers in the world of finance today. To find out how we could help you contact us at UBS dot com..

U.S. Mississippi Supreme Court roe V wade UCL Norman wade Julie Biden Casey Europe Sonia Sotomayor Congress London Trump mark justice Bret Kavanaugh Senate Latin America Ireland
"december" Discussed on Sawbones: A Marital Tour of Misguided Medicine

Sawbones: A Marital Tour of Misguided Medicine

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"december" Discussed on Sawbones: A Marital Tour of Misguided Medicine

"They like to joke about this a lot that you ask for better wages or like paid vacation or like Parental leave and things like that and they give you a party. I mean i'm actor like a pizza party. December knew that sounds like a joke. But it's it's really what it feels like so there's not a pizza party. Well i mean. I've never had a pizza party but like they do give you like. Here's a gift certificates to a fancy restaurant. I mean i've gotten that but like we'll do your laundry or we'll give you gift cards for meals or spas or massages or something like that right like we'll do something basket of snacks out during I thought this was an end. This was very kind. But i thought this was a good look. During the pandemic a lot of the medical students started volunteering to like run errands for the physicians to help them out since they were so stressed and overwhelmed Which like it probably did help during the pandemic but like this is the kind of thing that we're usually offered. The classic example is how can we make this workplace better you provide. The healthcare workers provide a list of like. We need more people in this job. We need hire more this kind of person. We need more of these services the weekends. It's so strict. We need more support on the weekends. We need more social workers. Whatever right like we asked for all these different things that would make the facility run better.

December
"december" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"december" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"December of 2015 Bear County Judge Nelson Wolff thought he was announcing a new era for San Antonio soccer. We're going to join the world we're going to be part of advanced destroying sport in the United States as we move forward to bring Major League Soccer San Antonio Wolf was speaking at Toyota Field, the city's soccer stadium. Commemorating a partnership between the city of San Antonio Bear County and Spurs Sports and Entertainment, the business operation behind the NBA Super successful San Antonio Spurs. Their goal was to bring Big League Soccer to San Antonio. We are MLS ready at the time. Major League Soccer consisted of 20 teams, but it planned to add at least four more. San Antonio seemed like a decent bet to get one of them. The city and county put up $9 million each to buy Toyota field, which they plan to expand to accommodate the number of fans MLS officials wanted at the league stadiums. But despite all of that San Antonio's years long quest for an MLS team Did not have a happy ending. I wouldn't have a damn thing to do with MLS. That's Judge Wolf again from an interview last week, the city and Bear County Bull spent significant time and money to bring a team to town. There's no MLS team in San Antonio. Instead, there's 1 80 miles up the road, where pro soccer was never part of the public docket. Frankly, at the time, I was more focused on Transportation issues and land planning issues and affordability. That's Steve Adler, who's been mayor of Austin since 2015 rather like the idea of Major League soccer, but it wasn't a priority like in San Antonio. Any city that just wants to be considered for an MLS franchise has to submit an application to the league. Austin didn't even do that. Despite that really kept showing up here. Both San Antonio and Austin have been on MLS's radar for a long time. Here's the league's commissioner, Don Garber, talking about potential expansion back in 2013, and there are a number of other markets that we don't have teams in that are large swaths of the country. The Midwest is one of them. It's why we've thrown Minneapolis out. There are a number of cities in Texas, which are intriguing to us. San Antonio is one Austin is another. And here he is again in March of 2017. Speaking about Austin during south by Southwest, It mirrors the incredible value and dynamic that exists in soccer in America. It's what's driving MLS. This young this diverse this energetic this tech focus this global Sort of globally connected group of people living in a city so it ought to be a pretty good MLS market. Adler and Garber talked a few times over the years about soccer in Austin. But The mayor thought these conversations are more big picture and exploratory than anything else. But in October of 2017 just a few months after Garber praised the city at South by those abstract talks suddenly became concrete. The future of the Columbus crew still unknown tonight, the owner threatening to move the team to Austin. Thank you for staying with us at five. That's from NBC four in Columbus, Ohio,.

Steve Adler Adler Don Garber 2013 October of 2017 March of 2017 Garber America United States Texas December of 2015 20 teams Bear County Bull San Antonio Spurs last week Toyota Field 1 80 miles Columbus, Ohio 2015 NBC
"december" Discussed on The MC Nel Podcast

The MC Nel Podcast

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"december" Discussed on The MC Nel Podcast

"So swags don't burda we get say. Get a bigger on our loan. Y- why censure bicentennial benzoate came class. i'm taking my wife. Don't think i said avenue. Hey i can see my december. They didn't come up.

december
"december" Discussed on The Unstoppable Woman®

The Unstoppable Woman®

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"december" Discussed on The Unstoppable Woman®

"Like. Why is she. plays well new on that. You cook but what i was going to say was Hey listen you've just had a big health scare. Is it worth sacrificing your life continuing to. I forget what her challenges were continuing to like. Face these blocks. Like if not now. When right i mean you have to be nuanced about that But there's something in there. Yeah definitely which which. I sense from other changes. They have her and why she was thinking of joining the My retreat in december which is where this all started I think she's she has an awareness of that and it's fueling her but it's that stuff start Yeah and the thing that you need to remember there. Is that Just because you had this really powerful conversation. don't make this shin. That she's still in the emotional place. Okay right and on either of these calls. It doesn't mean that you have to insist on the questions like some people are. Yes um you like. Let's go right right Right if there's some hesitancy go back to you know okay. Let's agree with them. I totally get that. That makes sense to me. 'cause you do there's some truth in right like you're not bullshitting them but you don't wanna put them. You don't wanna be like you're making a really fucking wrong decision with someone on on their Defense right right. So you're right. You agree with them that and cheer the agreement has to be conceptual. Not in agreement with no okay. Again with exhaustion aren't being met with something. Okay And then it's like it depending on what they've said you know you. Have you use your judgement here. But something like totally. Get that and what i remember. So it's a yes and so what i remember is that you were saying. That excellency was super important to you. And you really wanted to play blah blah out. How does that sync up. Like where i don't say how does that think like stand on that right now Just shift it's like the election. It's like you're shifting the conversation. Okay but you and that. I'm just made that up but like there's something that you can go back to what they've said previously and you have to figure out what that is based on the conversation right there's no script here and then back. Yeah i keep going. That's okay and then you go then you're back in the sales questions. What are you okay. So you really want blank. Yeah i really do and you know that seems like it's really.

december
"december" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"december" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Yeah. The snow is snowing. The wind is blowing, but I can't weather the stone. What do I care how much it may star? I've got my love to keep me what? I can't remember a worse December. Just watch those icicles or what do you like your hair is I sickles for I've got my love to keep me off with my old code off with my gloves. I need no over code I'm burning with fire. The flame grows higher so I will weather the snuff. Stomp Storm. What do I care how much it may stone? I've got my love love. Do keep me war. When love go up with my girl I need no go burning burning.

December
"december" Discussed on Christ United Methodist Church - Plano, TX

Christ United Methodist Church - Plano, TX

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"december" Discussed on Christ United Methodist Church - Plano, TX

"Relighting that candle. You know for me that that faith They helped carry me through a really hard time when i struggled. So i'm forever grateful for those. That group You know. I never really told them that. I was struggling veg the way they love scripture and how they would dig deep and they love god which is it was it was powerful. So yeah you just never know. Yeah you're right you never do know and the thing is for me. Christmas eve is one of those like high holy moments when we can remind ourselves not a not just of what god is unimpressed. Although that's really important but also what our responsibility is to to make. Sure that with the world. And i'm not talking about ten on each corner street corner preaching about pal. Fire and brimstone knocking on doors smiles do that. Of course i. I'm talking about the more the subtle the carnation or wherever just. We're bears of graceful. Another individually and i mean we should just reiterate either one of us could give one hundred instances of our spouses doing that but so much of our lives of our public that You know most of that stuff. I like to keep myself. I can't open it. And so i don't know if i believe this right now. Gourgeon like listen to you. Well that's how. I grabbed me. I okay christmases kind of done marquardt. Now storage for next year. Okay yeah so yeah you know now. It's it's interesting as somebody who's always loved christmas as much as i do that. It's a work now. Mitts to interesting shift that all of us have to go through as clergy clergy spouses and clergy families that You know the the christmas like family like the the celebration of the holiday can't really begin until the last services done on christmas eve and there's that comes cost. Who probably shouldn't underestimate. That's you know our families put up with that Our kids put up with that It's just such a like an honor and a joy to to To be the in that moment the proclaim errs of the good news. That it's worth. I think that and i think our families would probably say the same thing So you know yeah. Christmas eve's over We still have a pithy. Talk about madge. I guess we'll morte and you know the decorations are still up. It becomes real for me when the declarations go away for another year. But then you know it's january like arc. My both play basketball and we love basketball season. And so that's you know that's something to look forward to and then before you know it. Acts wednesday will be here now. February seventeenth coming soon awesome. Alright y'all well listen we are going to take. We're going to be back in a couple of weeks. Yes we're not gonna do off and off script on your december twenty seventh sermon right but give people a shot out what he preached on. I am preaching about simeon simeon. Awesome give us a preview what you preach on simeon. I'm talking about if you don't know it's a. He's a man when marriage is present jesus at the temple..

February next year january christmas jesus Christmas wednesday both december twenty seventh each corner marquardt seventeenth one hundred christmases Gourgeon simeon Christmas eve one sermon ten
"december" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"december" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Later today lufthansa cargo flight from frankfurt will touchdown doncaster sheffield airport bringing of food supplies to forestall shortages caused by the recent severing of land and sea trade routes between the uk and europe with jew recognition that this is more to do with covid nineteen than brexit. There is something piquant about britain entering the last week of its transition period reliance on a reverse of the berlin airlift. The uk's present difficulties due to a new and highly infectious variant of covid nineteen heavily concentrated in london and the southeast on joined with more by monaco. Twenty fours health and science correspondent dr. Chris chris this or something like to be expected because all viruses mutate. Don't they indeed covid nineteen already has once or twice at least before andrew say actually the uk's victim of its own success in this because we do as jones san accurately said have a world class in fact one of the best in the world screening systems set up to detect precisely this sort of thing. It's called coke. Uk their job is to scrutinize genomes of corona viruses collected from patients who are diagnosed with the disease so far. They've looked through the genetic codes of more than one hundred and sixty thousand viral sequences. They're all being to find things precisely like this and of course then we. We say we found one this and then the whole world says we don't want you of course they don't want us all the all the virus but not surprisingly just to cautionary stage but yes <hes>. It it's likely that this sort of thing is a bit of an inevitability and it may well be it's farther afield. Things like farther afield than anyone knows yet because they just haven't detected e. Yeah so what do we know about this mutation will. It's not a single mutation. It's a variant the calling it variant because rather than just a mutant which is one genetic change. This one's actually got a constellation of genetic changes there are seventeen independent genetic differences in this new variant that seems to confer opponent the ability to spread a bit better and they're peppered throughout the genetic code of the virus they affect v aspects of how the virus works but there's a big cluster of these changes all centered on what's called the essel spike protein. Which is the key part of the virus. That's all of these out coats that it uses to infect ourselves and so this is why researchers think that it may be more transmissible. Something has changed in the way the virus behaves in terms of its its ability to engage with our cells its ability to penetrate and jack cells and then cause disease and then spread to another person <hes>. We don't know exactly how it's doing that yet. And we don't know for sure that it really is more transmissible but based on the numbers that we're seeing the the epidemiology the pattern of spread. It seems like a likely reasonable supposition. Is it possible that this variation is a response to the measures that we have undertaken to defeat it is is the virus adapting to survive ovar adapt to survive. And that's really what charles darwin point out. And that was his big breakthrough his grand unified theory of biology. If you like that everything responds in a dynamic way. All the time to pressure applied from its environment and where we think. This may have arisen. This new variant is actually in the blood of an individual or individuals with poorly functioning immune systems because individuals. Who don't have a good immune response to the virus. Tend to hang onto the virus fa- longer. They have a chronic infection with the virus. And this means that as their immune system limps along trying to control it the virus is getting a chance to see inner workings of the immune response and it can see where the chinks in our alma and therefore it can adapt and shift in that direction a bid to take advantage of those changes to cling onto survival in that person. Now if that person then transmits a virus which has adapted in this way it's basically passing on a more weaponized or more tooled up version of the virus. The reason that such as a putting forward this hypothesis is because when we have treated patients and documented what happens in them when they have an impaired immune system for various reasons. Were genetic reasons. There are also acquired reasons why people's immune systems might not work very. Well they've seen very similar changes happening in the viruses in those people to this variant that circulating suggesting that it may will be homegrown as it were <hes> and borne out of the fact that some people can't can't fight it off as well as efficiently giving the varsity insight into how our immune system works and enabling it to adapt accordingly. I mean we have talked before about the fact that it's not in the interests of viruses whose only interest eads the perpetuation replication. It's not necessarily in the interest of any virus. To kill its hosts. Is it possible that viruses variation to become more transmissible but perhaps less deadly. Well we don't know at the moment and <hes>. That's one of the key questions that people are going to want to be asking. It's a relatively new discovery first appeared as a blip on the radar of kochi uk. The consortium that founded back in september and the cases them were just a few and far between become a lot more common sense obviously rising to one in four cases in november perhaps as many as sixty percent of cases in december in some parts of the country that means that we've now got the chance to see firsthand in greater detail in greater numbers. What is impact on people is and so people will be asking this very question this thing if it does transmit more efficiently which it appears it does does it as we believe not cause such severe disease or cause any more severe disease than the standard parent from which its rose the moment it doesn't look like it translates into getting more severe disease. It doesn't look like it's currently beyond the reach of the protection conferred by the immune response <hes>. In response to the vaccine but we don't know that crucial question has it surrendered some of its violence. In order to optimize. In this way time will tell you partially answered what. I'm sure is now the key question because the the glimmer of optimism in which we have all been basking these last few weeks is the approval and roll out of the vaccine. Several hundred thousand people here in the uk have already received at least the first injection. Is it possible that nineteen could mutate or very this quickly <hes>. Out of the reach of the vaccine. Matt hancock rishaad everybody when he made the announcement last week about the discovery of this new variant. That it didn't look like it would be able to sidestep the immune response conferred by the vaccine the experiments to prove that that is the case. Though are still ongoing. Thankfully they're very easy experiments to do. And that's what porton down will currently be investigating. And i would hope that they will provide that reassurance. Quite soon the way you go about this is you. Grow the virus in the lab and that's actually very easy to do and you add to it samples of the antibodies that a person makes when they're vaccinated and if the antibodies still work against the variant. And you do this with samples across the country. Then you can say these neutralize this virus even though it's the variant and therefore these people will be protected if they have the vaccine. So that's that's kind of what we're waiting for now to to see that data. It's very easy the experiments to go to do them properly though. That will give us reassurance to answer that question what the future holds. Though we don't know and that's why some researches saying this could be a stepping stone on the part of the virus towards a more comprehensive ability to sidestep our immune response including the response to the vaccine and for that. It's a sort of shot across out immunological bowels. We have to keep it onto surveillance. Keep searchlight trained upon it so that we can see where it's moving anticipate is next. Move and try to head off

libya gadhafi russia Tom edwards Tycoon jimmy lai moscow Colonel moammar gadhafi nato Mary fitzgerald mary hong kong andrew giuffra donald trump monaco turkey buenos corona Monaco benghazi
"december" Discussed on Ghoul Gaming Gals

Ghoul Gaming Gals

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"december" Discussed on Ghoul Gaming Gals

"Owns like fog is fog is or fortnight or role or i don't know who knows but take a look at the store anyway because there's a ton of deals happening now okay so just take advantage of it and i'm not gonna say any of the games here only because it's probably going to change by the time this comes out that's anyways so my last thing which was the game. Awards is coming on thursday december tenth. Unbeliev so i'm not going to go through all the categories but i just wanted to list some of these here just as a precursor to talk about like maybe what we predict might be for some odd. Yeah i think. I want to talk about some predictions. Not there's like fifty thousand categories. But we'll start with the biggest and most exciting one game of the year so the nominees for game of the year is maternal. Final fantasy seven. The remain goes Sa- shema ghost of tsushima. Thank you. I literally can't pronounce that either so haiti's animal crossing new horizons and the last of us part do i'm kind of torn about who what i think is going to win. I think it's going to be between animal crossing or the last of us part too. But this is i see i hard. I wanna say animal crossing only because it came out at the right time and it was literally savior. I met people. And i had friends that had never picked up an animal crossing team. Play this one. Yeah so yes. And it's because we're animal crossing freaks. I promise it has nothing to do with that. I just think it touched how many people i think. I think it touched so many people in it came at at such. I want to think that that game would have been as successful as it is without the pandemic in quarantine. But i don't think it would have been nearly as successful as it is without everybody going into quarantine like a daily but yeah it definitely helped so i guess with that said that it came out was the week that i went into quarantine so i.

thursday december tenth fifty thousand categories ton of deals one game Final fantasy seven many people Sa- shema
"december" Discussed on Ghoul Gaming Gals

Ghoul Gaming Gals

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"december" Discussed on Ghoul Gaming Gals

"Name of kathleen and other than that small bit was on like a ton of information about his early for his personal life. Like i couldn't even really find a birthday. So without any of that will just hop right into his story on december nine th so. This is actually coming out very close to the anniversary of all of this happening on december nine. Th two thousand eighteen edwards was arrested outside of a walmart in west melbourne. Florida and arresting officer is alleged. He had assaulted a charity worker out front of the store. Kathleen his wife told reporters and officials that he was actually experiencing an episode of ptsd which he got obviously from being from his time as a combat soldier and he was like formally diagnosed officially diagnosed with that disorder so during his arrest during an after his arrest edwards kinda struggled and. He tried to resist arrest and tried to resist being booked in the county jail. In sharps florida. Which is about thirty five miles north of the aforementioned walmart after he was gonna jail. He was placed in the cell for holding and went without any medical attention for twenty nine minutes and sixteen of which he was alone unattended. He was found unresponsive in hardly breathing by prison officials in paramedics called and he was restaurant nearby hospital where he died early. On the morning of december tenth twenty eighteen except for i wrote december oath like zero. Yes back December zero we always add t h s things. That don't make sense to make up a whole new one Jeez mugabe he died early on the morning of december growth. So i'm getting on the morning early on the morning of september tent. So what the hell happened to gregory at words this question. That question is plastered on signs flyers and billboards all over provide county at that because i live in brevard county and like those little fliers and signs are actually what prompted me to look into the story a little bit because i saw it on the curling on..

Kathleen kathleen december nine th florida december nine Florida twenty nine minutes walmart sixteen Jeez mugabe December zero december tenth about thirty five miles two thousand december zero melbourne brevard county gregory twenty eighteen
"december" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"december" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"The holiday shortened week and the partial government shutdown means we'll see a lighter economic calendar. This week all leading up to the release of the December jobs report on Friday, a final snapshot of the twenty eighteen employment picture joining us now from Washington with more details on the data is Wall Street Journal reporter, Sharon, none. Sharon Lister with the jobs report out on Friday twenty eighteen was a really strong year for the economy. Do you anticipate any surprises in last year's final jobs report? Yeah. Absolutely. We've continued to see really solid jobs growth and the unemployment rate is kind of hovering out of multidex low. But as you know, we've seen market volatility kind of increase in recent months. So if we're if the picture were to change because of that market volatility, I feel like this report would would be the first signs of employers. Pulling back on hiring as a result from that market volatility. But if you look at business and consumer sentiment gauges things seem to be. Pretty elevated still so remains to be seen whether or not businesses are actually going to start pulling back their hiring at the same time. There are also concerns about the tightening labor market. The journal has been reporting that job seekers across different industries or quitting in search of better opportunities, which is making it tougher employers to keep in retain talent. Yeah. I think the average American would probably say who cares? I have a great job with finally wage growth. But you're right employees are now able to command in some certain sectors and certain parts of the country higher wages than they had previously because you know, employers are essentially begging for talent and some and some places and because we've seen this wage growth. There have been concerns that maybe would see inflation flare at the same time. But that just hasn't been the case, in fact, actually inflation is kind of cooled in a little bit in some areas in recent months, and finally Sharon, we have an important appearance to note this week on Friday the same day that will see the December jobs report Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell. Will will take part in a panel. That also includes his predecessors former fed chair Janet Yellen, and Ben Bernanke that should be an interesting gathering. Oh, yes. All of us here in our little bubbles will certainly be watching it very closely. I will it'll be very interesting. I think a lot of people will be watching particularly for any talk of the fed pulling back its pace of rate increases since the recent global market route that we've seen now, of course, chairman Powell certainly isn't went to come out and say, we're we're thinking we're gonna raise rates, you know, fewer times, but you know, any kind of potential utterances that could could signal that maybe they're thinking this way. And we we've already seen that in the dot plot that they released that a lot of officials think that they'll probably be just two or three rate increases and so far Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell has reserved commenting more than necessary on recent criticism of the Fed's rate hikes despite criticism from the president, do you anticipate that he might get some support in that regard from his predecessors. Who may be able to speak more freely perhaps on the president's criticism of the fed. That's a really interesting question. I mean, I definitely think that Yellen and Burnett Anki have been known to kind of stay out of the political foray. And I think they'll probably continue down that path. I don't know they they may not necessarily mention President Trump by name, but they'll certainly probably go on about the importance of an independent fed and how that it should be. How should be free from political influence, which of course, would be would be alluding to the recent Trump comments. That's Wall Street Journal reporter, Sharon, none. Joining us from Washington. Thank you so much Sharon happy to chat. And that's what's news. I'm Anne Marie for totally in New York for the Wall Street Journal.

Sharon Lister Wall Street Journal Jerome Powell Federal Reserve chairman president reporter Janet Yellen Washington Anne Marie Trump Ben Bernanke New York Burnett Anki