35 Burst results for "Decades Earlier"

"decades earlier" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 3 months ago

"decades earlier" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Back in time. Last week, I learned how to time travel. After I finished work. In the afternoon, my family drove to the coast from Santa Rosa via the bodega highway as we've done dozens of times. When we descended down to door and beach, everything was still familiar and current alone, eager it perched on the edge of the wetlands, fog resting above the ocean. The sand was warm and the Pacific was the color of green Sea glass. It was beautiful and normal. Then I did something I hadn't done and so long I tugged on a wet suit, Talk to Boogie board under my arm and headed out into the soft surf. I positioned myself with the base of a rising wave. The time traveling commenced. Suddenly I was stuck 35 years into the past. I was 8 10 and singularly focused on the way of building behind me. It pulled me back slightly, and then spit me forward. My small hands grip the top of the board and my skinny legs kicked furiously salty whitewash sprayed up my nose burning in a good way. I rode the waves the whole way to dry sand full of bits of broken shells. When I rested my head on the board, my minded wild somersaults from the past into the present and back again. Watching my kids swim in the ocean has always brought me joy. But this was happiness of a different kind. It was an old resurrected exhilaration, the pure pleasure afforded by siding down a swell of water on a cheap piece of Styrofoam. It was the joy of my grandfather chest deep in the sea, holding the study on my board with his navy tattooed arms. I am the horizon and gently crying out. Go, Jenny go when a perfect wave approached. It wasn't just that I was recalling when it felt like to be a child free in the sea for hours at a time. I was living it again and it was amazing. When I popped up to my feet. I did exactly what I had done decades earlier. I charged back for the next wave and the next one and the next With the perspective, this is Jennifer List Perspective Contributor Jennifer Lists is an education writer. She lives in Santa Rosa. Share your thoughts on her commentary online any time you wish at kqed dot org slash perspectives. Support for perspectives comes from Leaf, Cabraser, Heimann and Bernstein, seeking justice for the injured victims of fraud, whistleblowers, employees and investors in the Bay Area and nationally for over four decades..

Santa Rosa Last week Jennifer Lists 35 years Jenny Bernstein Heimann Jennifer List Bay Area 8 Leaf Pacific Cabraser over four decades dozens of times 10 decades earlier kqed dot org hours
"decades earlier" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:54 min | 3 months ago

"decades earlier" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Mm hmm. The first documented rod driven, two wheeled vehicle might not be the first one ever was the first one that's documented dates to 18 69. Thomas McCall of Kilmarnock was the inventor. But his design didn't gain much popularity as the front crank philosophies did, which were mostly three or four wheeled vehicles at that time, and they were easier to operate. Also in 18 69. There was a Frenchman named Eugene Meyer, who patented the wire spoke tension wheel for bicycles. Wire spoke wheels were first proposed decades earlier, back in 18 Oh, eight, in fact, by George Caley. But that was for a totally different type of vehicle. And this gives me a chance to talk about how wire spoke wheels work. Oddly enough, it's more complicated than you might imagine. All right, so Why would we even have a wire spoke wheel? What's the big deal here? It's largely to provide stability to the wheel and connect the rim of the wheel, which is the outer edge with the hub of the wheel. That's the Inner edge the part that rotates around an axle. These spokes help wheel support a load, such as a writer on a bike without collapsing. Now the wire spokes are just what they sound like. They're spokes made out of thin wire. You have a couple of dozen spokes connecting the rim to the hub, and each wire spoke has to be tightened carefully in a process called pre tension Ng Now. Ideally, you want each of the spokes to create the same amount of tension on the hub in the center. They're all pulling the hub but from different directions and at the same strength. So let's make an analogy to understand what's going on here. Imagine that you are standing in the center of a circle of friends, and each friend is holding a rope and that roped connects to a sturdy hula hoop. That's At your feet. You're standing right in the middle of that hula hoop. And a signal all of your friends pull on their ropes, and they all exert exactly the same amount of force. The hula hoop will rise up around you, but it won't touch you because everyone is pulling on it from all directions at the same amount of force simultaneously, So that's what a bicycle wheel is doing with the hub. Those spokes are all pulling on the hub simultaneously and with the same amount of force Now here enters a tricky question. When you place a load on a bicycle wheel, such as you know, when you get on a bike. Uh, so you and your regulators all mount up on bicycles. When you do that, that deforms the wheel slightly. The increased weight causes the bottom of the wheel to flatten out just a little bit. So the question is, Does the hub stand on the wire spokes that are below it, as in the ones that leads straight down to where the ground is? Or does the hub hang from the spokes that are above it, connecting it to the rim? Now, remember, each of those wires is tightened so that it has tension. Deforming the bottom of the wheel, which means that you're slightly pushing the rim inward reduces that tension because you are applying a compressive force. If this were a table and serve a bicycle and the spokes were the table legs would say the table legs were experiencing compression and we're holding up the table. And that the table was standing on its legs. But with wheels, it's not quite so simple. The wire spokes beneath the hub experience compression, but it's not enough to return the wires to their pre tension state. So in other words, the wires below.

Thomas McCall Eugene Meyer George Caley 18 69 three 18 Oh each friend each wire spoke first one two wheeled vehicle Kilmarnock four wheeled vehicles first documented rod decades earlier each of the spokes couple of dozen spokes each of Frenchman eight wires
"decades earlier" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

03:29 min | 3 months ago

"decades earlier" Discussed on Shedunnit

"Your copy today. Agatha christie's writing career began in nineteen twenty and last full length novel was published after her death in nineteen seventy. Six england changed a lot during the six decades in which she was writing and we can track that to an extent through the way she writes about the settings of stories in a facebook the mysterious affair at styles. We have a very typical english village of the early twentieth. Century styles sent mary. The village of the country house styles court is meant to be an essex but it could really be anywhere in southern england within easy reach of london. The big house has an expansive park around it and the lady of the house does good works in the village mostly innate if the war effort since this book is set during the first world war. There's a land agent who helps to take care of the estate and a home farm. Where tenants work the land part of the mystery that christie weaves is to do with shock people experience when this template is disrupted and how much this impedes their ability to disentangle. What is real. And what is not mrs. dingell thorpe's marriage to an inappropriate embiid at young woman is tantamount to a declaration of war on a way of life. Compare this to a book like third girl from nineteen sixty six which revolves around a flat share in west london and takes in the much freer lusa social mores of the time in which he was published normal restorick. The main character is nineteen or twenty and doesn't really know what to do with her life but she certainly craves a kind of independence that would have been unthinkable for her counterparts. In the christie novels of three or four decades earlier agatha christie has a reputation for portraying an idealized version of england in which everyone knows their place and the perfect villages untouched by progress. I don't think she really does this. Though i think it's a perception imbibed from serial television adaptations in which screenwriters flatten the chronology. In order to get around the problem of how far i will miss marple might not age. There's a cozy forever. England aesthetic to miss marples home village of saint. Mary mead in the various tv series. That isn't there in the books. After all miss marple is always telling the reader that there is no worse. Oh vicious and dangerous to live as a small village. She derives her detective skill. She says repeatedly from having observed or the worst vagaries of the human character in such a small rural. It'll and that village isn't static either. When we first visit mary mead there is a certain sense of permanence and unchanging. Nece about it that everyone knows everyone else inside out but then in post world war two miss marple novels. Such as a murder is announced. Things are changing mary. Meade is expanding with new houses and new people moving in people who don't come with foam letters of introduction and you haven't got grandparents who've always lived in this village it's a destabilizing force that's woven into the mystery. But it's not something that really comes through strongly on television where all of miss marples cases seem to occupy kind of timeless state somewhere between nineteen fifty and nineteen fifty five. Speaking of.

london Agatha christie west london facebook early twentieth. Century England england southern england mary mead today six decades Mary mead first four decades earlier third girl three nineteen fifty five nineteen dingell thorpe nineteen fifty
"decades earlier" Discussed on Never Not Funny

Never Not Funny

03:23 min | 4 months ago

"decades earlier" Discussed on Never Not Funny

"Because that's thank you. I feel like you wanna say something else. Never mind look good. I really appreciate your coming to my show voter but the dog has to run up on a hill all right. Let's check it over there at the dragon droppings behind video village. You've courses in palms california. What's having anything and palm going down that we need to know about what's going on the familiar familiar. Well is there anything interesting. I don't think so. I mean it's not that interesting. Somebody had a baby. I mean i don't know that doesn't help. Did you have to deliver the maybe no okay. You're reading your issue is right. Yeah i know this sweet little baby sweet. Maybe they have it in the elevator. No nothing interesting happens about it. There was nothing i i was. I was very sincere. You're the pandemic. The things were happening. I know it feel like it's like flip-flop because for me i feel like there's more stuff going on and he has. He's got nothing. But that did remind me al capone's vault. I got to be something here. No nothing all right geraldo nuts. That wasn't his fault. It was a risk you roll. The days claims him. Look at this fucking dummy but it was like he could have opened that thing and it would have been amazing and no. It is his fault because he used the mystery of it to keep people watching and keep them engaged and he knew that could have been a bust. You know he'd hoped of course it was going to be great. He knew it could have been a bust and he just teased it. And he's and he's it. So if i got i think he got greedy. I think he got agreed. If you were to do something with a big reveal you. Don't you build that up. i'd open and then do the show. Oh and pretend like you're doing yeah go feel backup you. What a put a gun in there or something. I was too young shot. Their whatever happened what people think like what was the hope. What were they hoping to find. Serena told of riches. Yeah don't really know body. Meet me old alcohol. I get often maybe volts decades earlier crash over the dimensions of that vault. Do you even remember. He walked the walk involved. I thought was walking. Volt okay. the two hour special including commercials was greatly hyped as potentially revealing great riches or ted bodies on live television. You go. that's on us for wanting to see dead by the presence of a medical examiner should bodies be found from the irs to collect any of capone's money that might be a super pretty. I don't like they definitely. They definitely had meetings where they're like. So if there is nothing but you know what are we going to do. They didn't go into a going. Oh i know well we only have one plan in. Its to reveal the greatest thing. You've everything in the end. They lost really. I remember them. That's terrible purdue that harley terrible producing how do you plan. I remember no but i didn't and.

two hour Serena one plan california harley capone geraldo decades earlier
"decades earlier" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

03:28 min | 4 months ago

"decades earlier" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"Sinologist sometimes loss. And you're right to suggest that now in the modern era of might might be harder to lose knowledge. Not necessarily a not for everyone and not always for example. Just think about the y two k problem all right when we are all struggling electric tale of a sudden all these fortran programmers. The knowledge was last. We couldn't find. These guys were brought out of retirement bait wages to deal with these. You know this code code base that had been written decades earlier and the knowledge was almost lost and how to deal with that code that was at the basis of many machines. Yeah it was a programming language called like cobol or something like that. i think. yeah portrait. Yeah well you could be right. I think i'm. I'm not sure i'm not. I'm not super confident on that that. Yeah i was reading in zero. I think it was that when we shake hands. We often sniff our hand. And we don't notice it and that might come from pre humans using smell to evaluate and i noticed. Well i didn't notice. Somebody told me an ex girlfriend told me that after i shake hands i often touch my nose and i try not to now. But she noticed it she goes. You always do the shake hands and you do that. Like one finger on the knows she notices before you read about in the book. Oh yeah this is like fifteen years ago. She noticed this habit. That vindicated your former girlfriend that she thought i had like a nervous tic and i thought maybe not nervous. I don't really understand what it's four. So i didn't know it was a primal thing that a lot of people do. Yes apparently according to some studies chimpanzees do something similar so there is a sense in which we don't you know human beings it culturally. We don't sniff each other. In other words it would not be considered normal behavior when you encounter a stranger to sniff them like dogs do for example that would be odd but a certain chimpanzees do that and we apparently is claimed through this surreptitious observation of human beings done by these other scientists. You know that we smell our hands after. We shake hands with other people. And that's a way of assessing sampling. Gilfach should factories signals of other people switching gears. A little bit go into a little bit of the knowledge from connected as well. You make an interesting point in that humans have only been able to choose where they live and not actually modify their environment up until the last few thousand years speaking of peers and aqueducts and things like that what we can modify our our social groups and connections so genetically we in the past have been rewarded for things like kindness the ability to connect well with others. And i'm wondering have you read rutger bregman. Yes yeah. I couldn't recollect a right over there. I can look over and see his book. Yes he was on episode four ninety four and his point was the same that look yes. It looks like psychopaths and sociopaths. Whatever are rewarded in society but much more so do we reward people who are kind in connect well with others in its quote unquote always been that way. Because of the way that we evolved to live in groups. I want to talk a little bit. About how behaviors spread because this is fascinating and it's different than say like habits spreading through a network and this is the milgram sidewalk experiment for example. If you wanna take us through a brief example of what this might be. Because i think we all we pick up habits from friends but we don't know that we pick up mindsets and habits and behaviors of all kinds from from people. We don't even know. Yes that's right. I mean in a way. It's just the claim that all kinds of bananas spreads new networks not just germs for example.

fifteen years ago one finger rutger bregman zero four episode four ninety four decades earlier Gilfach last few thousand years two k
"decades earlier" Discussed on 4 Things with Amy Brown

4 Things with Amy Brown

01:32 min | 4 months ago

"decades earlier" Discussed on 4 Things with Amy Brown

"Meteorologist. Alex completely changed my life as he did for everyone who ever met him. Everybody was so conventional and like no one did anything ever like. Shake it up. And then alex cable on he really shot got my whole world. Ten years later in twenty nine. Alex shook up our worlds again when he sent out a handful of scheduled emails saying he had ended his life. This person who had changed my whole world was suddenly no longer in it. And i couldn't understand how it had happened or why. But he left something behind for me a small detail near the end of his email that at first appeared random and trivial of link to private soundcloud page. When i opened the link i found to audio files of him talking to someone he had met in a britney spears fan forum almost a decade earlier someone who went by the name alice and who happens to sound just like britney spears ever said her name. Y'all would alex was obsessed with britney.

Alex alice Ten years later soundcloud britney a decade earlier first twenty nine britney spears alex
"decades earlier" Discussed on Female Criminals

Female Criminals

07:39 min | 4 months ago

"decades earlier" Discussed on Female Criminals

"Back to fighting. That wouldn't happen right away though soon after gene ceremony. Charles and the burgundian. The truce until after easter in march fourteen thirty john was getting impatient. Her time was running out so she made herself a promise. Whenever the peace ended. She vowed to be somewhere near paris. She was determined to take back. Francis capital no matter the cost up next jeanne to arc's closest allies abandoned her when she needs them the most. Now you're firmly outside your emotional comfort zone. How about a trip outside base jumping canyoneering mountain biking or maybe just anywhere but home wherever you go. The broncos sport is built wild with seven available modes that go over any type of terrain it also features cargo management system for all your gear interior bike racks molly straps and more. So you're never not prepared for an adventure. Broncos port built wild learn more at ford dot com. This episode is brought to you by progressive. What's one thing you'd purchase with a little extra savings weighted blanket smart speaker that new self care trend. You keep hearing about well. Progressive wants to make sure you're getting what you want by helping you save money on car insurance drivers who save by switching to progressive. Save over seven hundred dollars. On average an customers can qualify for an average of six discounts when they sign up discounts like having multiple vehicles on your policy progressive offers outstanding coverage award winning claim service day or night. They have customer support. Twenty four seven three hundred sixty five days a year when you need the most. They're at their best. A little off your rate each month goes a long way. Get a quote today. Progressive dot com and see. Why four out of five new auto customers recommend progressive progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates national annual average insurance savings by new customers surveyed in two thousand twenty. Potential savings will vary discounts vary and are not available in all states and situations now back to the story in the winter of fourteen thirty john to arc. Waited out a truce between the french. And the english in france's loire valley. She celebrated her eighteenth birthday and vowed to be near paris whenever the war resumed unsurprisingly. The truce did little to quell. The tensions between french and english forces after decades of war and francis citizens didn't appreciate being pawns in the game. So frustrations started to boil over in a small town located fifty miles. North of paris. Compagno was one of several towns king. Charles the seventh handed over to the burundians in the truce. The town citizens however wanted to stay loyal to the french monarch. They started strengthening their walls and collecting weapons to fight. The burgundian 's and john couldn't wait her one year. Expiration date with the french army was quickly approaching. But there was just one problem in mid april. John received another angelic message. But this one was disturbing. The saints didn't predict a victory for the french. No this was a warning. John would be taken prisoner that summer. Naturally john was scared. She begged the angels to do something to save her. But the saints said they couldn't stop it. This was her fate however we need to remember. That message could have been caused by a mental illness or another sickness but over time it seems. Her illusions evolved from simple war predictions into persecutory delusions. A two thousand fourteen study in social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology defined this as a belief that others are planning to cause you harm. It's also a severe type of paranoia. That may be associated with psychosis and schizophrenia. While it's impossible to know of. John had either. She did seem to experience some of the typical after-effects of persecutory delusions anxiety and depression. She was distressed and terrified for weeks. After this vision to john god had always helped her out of her hopeless moments but now he seemed to be leaving her into her darkest one even worse. It seemed to confirm her prediction that she'd only serve one year in the army. That time was almost up even still. She didn't tell anyone about what the angels had told her. So everyone was surprised when she withdrew from strategic meetings. And stop talking to the captain's she'd always been so passionately involved still traveled north with the army but she wanted nothing to do with fighting anymore. It seemed like she was losing her faith until one moment made her feel more connected to god. Then ever as the story goes. John ended up in the town of lonnie sur marne with her squadron in late april one day. A few frantic young girls ask john to follow them to a church. They needed help and quickly. John thought this was a curious request but enjoyed helping the townspeople so she obliged inside the church. She saw large angelic statue and next to it. Lay a dead baby. The girls explained that the infant died when it was just three days old before it could be baptized because the baby didn't have a christening it meant that the child wouldn't get into heaven. The baby's distraught mother was hoping for a miracle and here was jaw. Famous for being blessed. With god's favor the mother begged john to pray with her and bring the baby back to life for just a minute just long enough to be baptized. This wasn't just a religious request. It was also one that had likely helped the mother come to terms with her baby's steph. A two thousand fourteen studied by sociologists. Deborah kerr and shane sharpe in the journals of gerontology stated that those who believe in an afterlife find comfort in knowing their late loved one lives on in heaven. Even if sean wasn't aware of that she did see how much this meant to the mother and agreed. She knelt down and prayed with the group within minutes. They noticed the infant yawn three times immediately. Genre up the baby and poured holy water on its head welcoming it into the church and then when the blessing was complete the baby died again at least so they say if the story's true it likely wasn't the phenomenon that john and the villagers thought it was. It's possible that the baby moved as a result of rigor mortis which we now know can cause. Movements and muscle stiffness several days after death but for john. The event was just the sign she needed to get back to the war. She resumed strategizing and.

Deborah kerr fifty miles Charles mid april one year ford dot com shane sharpe John eighteenth birthday march fourteen thirty six discounts over seven hundred dollars today Progressive seven available modes two thousand each month paris english Twenty four seven three hundre
Ten Years On: Inside the Bin Laden Raid

News, Traffic and Weather

02:17 min | 6 months ago

Ten Years On: Inside the Bin Laden Raid

"It was, in fact, 10 years ago this very weekend when Joe Biden was vice president that U. S Navy seals killed Osama bin Laden in a secret and daring raid on a compound in Pakistan. That raid coming after one of the most intense manhunts in history. There is one report. As of yet, unconfirmed that a plane Has hit the World Trade Center Osama bin Laden was the most wanted man on earth, escaping from the mountains of Afghanistan, even as U. S intelligence and military scour those rugged mountains, But on May 1st 2011 10 years after hijacked airliners brought down the world Trade towers. And a chunk of the Pentagon, Geronimo and Geronimo meant We got that Locke killed him. Admiral Mike Mullen was the chairman of the joint Chiefs at the time. That's him behind President Obama in the White House as they watched the Navy seals descend on bin Laden is compound in real time. There was a lot of risk. We felt comfortable that we could get in and out of Pakistan without being detected in a timely way. We felt we could get into the compound. And for Mullen, it was personal. He was in the Pentagon a decade earlier, when one of the hijacked planes slammed into it. The plane flew in under Basically under my office, My two assistants looked out the window and saw 7 57 fly in under their feet. The Navy lost 42 people that day among the nearly 200 killed in the attack on the Pentagon. 10. Years later, it was the Navy that would dominate that raid on the bin Laden compound. Mullen meeting those seals before they headed into Pakistan. Sort of the final dress rehearsal that I went to it involved upwards of 48 to 50 seals. And then I specifically met and shook hands and looked every operator in the eye to one express my gratitude to You know? Are they ready to go? And I was very confident that they were,

Bin Laden U. S Navy Seals Geronimo Admiral Mike Mullen Pentagon Pakistan Joe Biden World Trade Center Navy Joint Chiefs U. Mullen Locke Afghanistan President Obama White House
The Mystery of the Treasure at Rennes-le-Château

Conspiracy Theories

01:33 min | 6 months ago

The Mystery of the Treasure at Rennes-le-Château

"In nineteen fifty three eighty five year. Old marie dinar. No lay on her deathbed. She spent her entire life in a tiny hilltop village. In the south of france ren lucia cto penniless and never married. Marie had no one to care for her except the family that had bought her home years before the core booze in return. She promised them a deathbed confession for much of her life. Marie was the housekeeper of the town's former priest. Baron jay sewn year decades earlier son. Years struck it rich overnight but never disclosed the source of his sudden wealth except to his ever-present confidante marie. Marie had hinted to the core booze. That when the time was right she shared the of sonya's fortune making them rich beyond their wildest dreams. They recalled her saying quote. You're walking on gold. You could feed the village for one hundred years and they would still be some leftover sadly. Marie suffered a stroke. That left her unable. To speak or write she died on january twenty ninth nineteen fifty-three taking sauniere secret to her grave. Ever since hundreds of thousands of travelers been drawn to ren lucia toe in search of ancient mysteries and one very elusive treasure

Marie Dinar Marie Baron Jay France Sonya Stroke Ren Lucia
Biden to give prime-time address before signing $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 7 months ago

Biden to give prime-time address before signing $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill

"Aid package when he makes the first prime time address of his presidency tonight to mark the one year anniversary of the covert 19 lockdowns. The president, First Lady vice president and others will also be hitting the road to sell the bill. The administration is looking to avoid repeating mistakes from more than a decade earlier when President Obama's administration did not fully educate the public about the benefits of its own economic Coverage plan. President Biden has directed his administration to order

President Obama President Biden
"decades earlier" Discussed on Coronavirus Daily

Coronavirus Daily

03:17 min | 8 months ago

"decades earlier" Discussed on Coronavirus Daily

"Six. The only weapon we have is bodies supplied is is charisma. His commanding presence. And i came to him after he completed his address. Asking what i do to help the rest as they say was history. It was the beginning of a career and activism for norman. But what he didn't know was that decades earlier when fired dressing. I arrived in new york. He'd also stumbled into a life of activism. Now every train to washington brings us cargo of experts to join the greatest saw on the depression. Economists sociologists statisticians agronomist idealist will save each panacea a your phone system to save the country. Somebody writes now. The nineteen thirties in the middle of the great depression and buyer d- who is experiencing the feelings and the awareness that he was gay that he was attracted to men decides to move to new york city. He thought it would be a safe place to be. Both a racially and in the context of a city to explore is sexual desires. Fired moved in with his aunt harlem harlem at that. Point is by far the largest african american community in the united states. It was a big change from the small town in pennsylvania where he grown up. You know he can walk along. One hundred twenty fifth street in harlem and see major theaters and black owned businesses and see women and children Completely occupying the streets and the sidewalks by the way. This is john demilio. I published a book titled lost profit the life and times of buyers reston so who was.

new york john demilio pennsylvania harlem washington united states nineteen thirties Six decades earlier One hundred twenty fifth stree each panacea harlem harlem Both african american norman
State Trends In Employer Premiums And Deductibles

The Hospital Finance Podcast

05:32 min | 8 months ago

State Trends In Employer Premiums And Deductibles

"Recently. The commonwealth fund examined the extent to which people with moderate incomes in employer health plans face high premium and deductible costs relative to their income to discuss the results of the study and the implications for policy holders going forward. I'm joined by sarah collins vice president of healthcare coverage and access at the commonwealth fund. Sarah welcome to the show. Thank you so much. Mike so sarah watches. Start out by telling us why you initiated this study and what you're looking for well employer health coverage is really the backbone of the us health insurance system more than half the population of the united states about one hundred sixty million people get their coverage through an employer so the purpose of this study was to look at trends over the last decade and the amount that workers and their families are paying for their employer health insurance and the size of their deductibles in all fifty states and the district of columbia and we compare these worker cost to median income in each state in order to get a sense of the economic burden of these costs on middle income families. And how did you go about conducting the research. We've been conducting the study nearly every year since twenty ten Using the latest data From what's known as the insurance components. Federal medical medical expenditure panel survey This survey is the most comprehensive national survey of use employer. health plans In twenty nineteen Which is the latest year of data. That's available This survey interviewed more than forty thousand business. Establishments With an overall response rate of fifty nine percent we computed from the survey reported statewide average premiums so we take the premiums reported by business establishments and average them across the state and we do the same deductibles and then we compared those averages to the median income in each state so this provides a rough measure of the affordability protectiveness of employer coverage and allows us to track changes over time. And what did you find after you conducted this study. We found that premium contributions and deductibles in employer plans took up a growing share of workers incomes over the past decade those costs together so premium contributions and deductibles accounted for eleven point five percent of meeting median household income and twenty nineteen. This is up from about nine point one percent a decade earlier the this cost burden in employer. Health plans has increased over the past decade because cumulative growth in median income has been slower growth in premium contributions deductibles. We also find that these contributions premium contributions deductibles as well as needing income vary considerably across the country the total cost of premiums and deductibles across single and family policies ranged from a low of about fifty. Five hundred dollars in hawaii. Too high of more than eighty five hundred dollars in nine states. Meet an income ranged from a low of about forty nine thousand and mississippi in mexico too highs around ninety thousand or more in massachusetts minnesota new hampshire new jersey what workers pay towards their premiums and deductibles comprised about ten percent or more of median income in thirty seven states in two thousand ten and twenty nineteen. This is up from about ten states Twenty ten in nine states workers combined costs were fourteen percent or more of meeting income workers in new mexico and louisiana face the highest potential cost relative to their income more than seventeen percent and we actually also find that people living in states that have lower meeting incomes like new mexico are doubly burdened on average workers in states where the median income is lower than the national median income face higher premiums and deductibles compared to people in states with higher median incomes. Also find that. Many people employer plans across. The country are insured Because their deductibles are high. Relative to their incomes tacoma fund has found that insured people who have high out of pocket costs and deductibles relative to their income are more likely to face problems accessing care or paying medical bills Than people who are not under insured. We've we've defined someone with insurance as under insert at their health plans. Deductibles deductible equals about five percent or more of income or if they're out of pocket costs reached similar thresholds in this study across the country. Many people employer plans are underinsured by this measure average deductibles relative median income or five percent or more in twenty states and ranged as high as seven percent in mexico.

Commonwealth Fund Sarah Collins United States Sarah Mike Columbia New Mexico Hawaii Mississippi New Hampshire Massachusetts
"decades earlier" Discussed on The Mary Mac Show | Grieving After a Loved One's Death

The Mary Mac Show | Grieving After a Loved One's Death

05:22 min | 8 months ago

"decades earlier" Discussed on The Mary Mac Show | Grieving After a Loved One's Death

"In the future right happy birthday with your name attached and the date in the sand and take a photo. What do you care what people think maybe sure milestone birthday and you've decided to treat yourself to vacation to a special place you've always wanted to visit. You might decide on a tour so you're with a group of others or if you're adventurous like me you'll go it alone for my last milestone birthday. Several years ago. I went to washington dc where i hadn't visited for several decades earlier. I planned the entire trip when i got there. I used the map to lay out each day visiting museums and monuments and places. I had wanted to see for a long time. It was one of my most memorable vacations and each day. When i go to dinner. I share that it was my special birthday and i'd have lovely conversations with people from all around the world for me that made it so special. I picked a different restaurant each evening. And i just love learning about others culture and experiences from places idea to visit so don't be afraid to venture out whether for line dinner or even tea or that lovely vacation for just a few days or longer or to invite others to your home to treat them to dinner or dessert or favorite movie with you to celebrate your special day. But i want you to know this. You might feel like you wanna spend the entire day in bed pulling the covers over your head and begging the world to go away yet. None of that or praying. Your loved one back to you. This is your birthday your birthday even if you cry your eyes out for a part of the day because you miss them so much do take the rest of the day and night to honor yourself. You've been through a lot this year and you deserve to start treating yourself with care. Get something that will make you happy. A candle a book a new haircut your favorite chocolate. You know what you've been longing for so go treat yourself and on your birthday you can raise a glass and toast to them and tell them how you wish they could join you in person but you know they are right there with you in spirit you can do this. Trust me i know you can. I'm sending you my love.

Several years ago this year washington dc one each evening each day several decades earlier
"decades earlier" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

05:53 min | 9 months ago

"decades earlier" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Rod driven, two wheeled vehicle might not be the first one ever was the first one that's documented dates to 18 69. Thomas McCall of Kilmarnock was the inventor was designed didn't gain much popularity as the front crank velocities did, which were mostly three or four wheeled vehicles at that time, and they were easier to operate. Also in 18 69. There was a Frenchman named Eugene Meyer, who patented the wire spoke tension wheel for bicycles. Wire spoke wheels were first proposed decades earlier, back in 18 08, in fact, by George Kayleigh, But that was for a totally different type of vehicle. And this gives me a chance to talk about how wire spoke wheels work. Oddly enough, it's more complicated than you might imagine. All right, so Why would we even have a wire spoke wheel? What? What's the big deal here? It's largely to provide stability to the wheel and connect the rim of the wheel, which is the outer edge with the hub of the wheel. That's the Inner edge the part that rotates around and Axl the spokes help a wheel support a load, such as a writer on a bike without collapsing. Now the wire spokes are just what they sound like. They're spokes made out of thin wire. You have a couple of dozen spokes connecting the rim to the hub, and each wire spoke has to be tightened carefully in a process called pre tension in Now. Ideally, you want each of the spokes to create the same amount of tension on the hub in the center. They're all pulling the hub but from different directions and at the same strength. So let's make an analogy to understand what's going on here. Imagine that you are standing in the center of a circle of friends, and each friend is holding a rope and that roped connects to a sturdy hula hoop. That's At your feet. You're standing right in the middle of that hula hoop. And a signal all of your friends pull on their ropes, and they all exert exactly the same amount of force. The Hula hoop will rise up around you, but it won't touch you because everyone is pulling on it from all directions at the same amount of force simultaneously. That's one of bicycle wheel is doing with the hub. Those spokes are all pulling on the hub simultaneously and with the same amount of force now here enters a tricky question. When you place a load on a bicycle wheel, such as you know, when you get on a bike. S so you and your regulators all mount up on bicycles. When you do that, that deforms the wheel slightly. The increased weight causes the bottom of the wheel to flatten out just a little bit. So the question is, Does the hub stand on the wire spokes that are below it, as in the ones that leads straight down to where the ground is? Or does the hub hang from the spokes that air above it? Connecting it to the rim? Now, remember, each of those wires is tightened so that it has tension. Deforming the bottom of the wheel, which means that you're slightly pushing the rim inward reduces that tension because you are applying a compressive force. If this were a table and several bicycle and the spokes were the table legs, we'd say the table legs were experiencing compression and we're holding up the table. And that the table was standing on its legs. But with wheels, it's not quite so simple. The wire spokes beneath the hub experience compression, but it's not enough to return the wires to their pre tension state. So in other words, the wires below the hub still have tension on them, just not as much as they did before the wheel had to carry a load. Some argue that if the spokes still have tension Which means technically, they're still pulling on the hub there, just not pulling his hard as they were before the compression was applied. They cannot be said to support the hub. So the hub cannot stand on those spokes. You can't stand on something that's pulling downward. It's it was standing on references like a push so you can't push if the forces of pole So these folks argue, you have to say the hub hangs in place from the spokes around it rather than stands on the spokes below it. Other people argue that this stance doesn't make any sense and that the hub does, in fact, stand on the wire spokes beneath it. And some of them have used a lot of math and computer simulations to back up their arguments. In some cases, I think you could just say that this is semantics that one side and the other aren't really arguing opposites, but rather they're working from different perspectives and definitions in an attempt to describe the same thing. I think it is fascinating that something is seemingly simple. As a wire spoke Bicycle wheel could evoke such a fuss in the first place. And there really is a fuss if you wanna go down a rabbit hole. You could start doing searches on how wire spoke wheels work and see the incredible arguments between people who insist that the hub stands on the spokes or that the spokes hang the hub. Now. We really need to know is that the wheels work and that they made bicycles lighter. That's Really important because they're using these thin wires. You don't have to use massive amounts of materials to build working wheels that reduce that way to the bicycles and made them more attractive. Because up to this point you were still talking about bicycles that weighed £50 or more. I was incredibly heavy. Reducing the amount of materials you needed to make your.

Wire Eugene Meyer Thomas McCall George Kayleigh Kilmarnock Rod Axl writer
"decades earlier" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

05:54 min | 11 months ago

"decades earlier" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The first documented rod driven, two wheeled vehicle might not be the first one ever. That's the first one that's documented dates to 18 69. Thomas McCall of Kilmarnock was the inventor but is designed didn't gain much popularity as the front crank velocities did, which were mostly three or four wheeled vehicles at that time, and they were easier to operate. Also in 18 69. There was a Frenchman named Eugene Meyer, who patented the wire spoke tension wheel for bicycles. Wire spoke wheels were first proposed decades earlier, back in 18 08, in fact, by George Kayleigh, But that was for a totally different type of vehicle. And this gives me a chance to talk about how wire spoke wheels work. Oddly enough, it's more complicated than you might imagine. All right, so Why would we even have a wire spoke wheel? What? What's the big deal here? It's largely to provide stability to the wheel and connect the rim of the wheel, which is the outer edge with the hub of the wheel. That's the Senator Edge the part that rotates around and Axl the spokes help a wheel support a load, such as a writer on a bike without collapsing. Now the wire spokes are just what they sound like. They're spokes made out of thin wire. You'll have a couple of dozen spokes connecting the rim to the hub, and each wire spoke has to be tightened carefully. In a process called pre tension. Ing's No. Ideally, you want each of the spokes to create the same amount of tension on the hub in the center. They're all pulling the hub but from different directions and at the same strength. So that that's making analogy to understand what's going on here. Imagine that you are standing in the center of a circle of friends, and each friend is holding a rope and that roped connects to a sturdy hula hoop. That's At your feet. You're standing right in the middle of that who loop. At a signal all of your friends pull on their ropes, and they all exert exactly the same amount of force. The Hula hoop will rise up around you, but it won't touch you because everyone is pulling on it from all directions at the same amount of force simultaneously. That's what a bicycle wheel is doing with the hub. Those spokes are all pulling on the hub simultaneously and with the same amount of floors now here enters a tricky question. When you place a load on a bicycle wheel, such as you know, when you get on a bike. S so you and your regulators all mount up on bicycles. When you do that, that deforms the wheel slightly. The increased weight causes the bottom of the wheel to flatten out just a little bit. So the question is, Does the hub stand on the wire spokes that are below it, as in the ones that leads straight down to where the ground is? Or does the hub hang from the spokes that air above it? Connecting it to the rim? Now, remember, each of those wires is tightened so that it has tension. Deforming the bottom of the wheel, which means that you're slightly pushing the rim and word reduces that tension because you are applying a compressive force. If this were a table and several bicycle and the spokes were the table legs, we'd say the table legs were experiencing compression and we're holding up the table. And that the table was standing on its legs. But with wheels, it's not quite so simple. The wire spokes beneath the hub experience compression, but it's not enough to return the wires to their pre tension state. So in other words, the wires below the hub still have tension on them, just not as much as they did before the wheel had to carry a load. Some argue that if the spokes still have tension Which means technically, they're still pulling on the hub there, just not pulling his hard as they were before the compression was applied. Cannot be said to support the hub. So the hub cannot stand on those spokes. You can't stand on something that's pulling downward. It's it's because standing on references like a push so you can't push at the forces of pole. So these folks argue, you'd have to say the hub hangs in place from the spokes around it rather than stands on the spokes below it. Other people argue that this stance doesn't make any sense and that the hub does, in fact, stand on the wire spokes beneath it. And some of them have used a lot of math and computer simulations to back up their arguments. In some cases, I think you could just say that this is semantics that one side and the other aren't really arguing opposites, but rather they're working from different perspectives and definitions in an attempt to describe the same thing. I think it is fascinating that something is seemingly simple. As a wire spoke Bicycle wheel could evoke such a fuss in the first place. And there really is a fuss if you wanna go down a rabbit hole. You can start doing searches on how wire spoke wheels work and see the incredible arguments between people who insist that the hub stands on the spokes or that the spokes hang the hub. Now. We really need to know is that the wheels work and that they made bicycles lighter. That's Really important because they're using these thin wires. You have to use massive amounts of materials to build working wheels that reduce that way to the bicycles and made them more attractive. Because up to this point you were still talking about bicycles that weighed £50 or more. I was incredibly heavy. Reducing the amount of materials you needed to make your.

Wire Eugene Meyer Thomas McCall George Kayleigh Kilmarnock Axl Senator writer
Twenty years of climate extremes

The Science Show

06:35 min | 11 months ago

Twenty years of climate extremes

"The year two thousand and twenty was always going to be a tantalizing horizon for future thinkers even at symmetry conjures the clear-sightedness and precision of twenty twenty vision. Too which policymakers in resist manages. Always aspire twenty years ago. Most of southern australia was still in the group of the millenium drought. The dry conditions broke records around the nation. Perth stems where their lowest. Since the first world war and the southeast of the country was on its way to the dryest shania period since recordkeeping began as the bureau of meteorology. Put it at the time. This was the nation's first climate change drought. That observation came hot. On the heels of the third assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change which made headlines around the world with this conclusion that there is new and stronger evidence that most of the global warming observed over the last fifty years is attributable to human activities if suburban households become complacent about the household woody's than the drought was a wakeup call across the nation. Education campaigns and water saving devices joined water restrictions in an effort to ease pressure on limited urban water supplies in melbourne for instance the voluntary target. One five five campaign aimed more than half the daily water consumption of residents by encouraging shorter showers while imposing strict limits on watering gardens washing the car. Brisbane went even further aiming to reduce residential would consumption to one hundred and forty liters of water per person per day. The rain water tank in grey water. Recycling became suburban. Must haves offering the means to keep gardens green in trying conditions as the damn levels so lower and lower state governments turned desalination with perth leading the way in two thousand six a prospect that was unthinkable just a decade earlier other states took notice and before long desalination plants were on the drawing board for the gold coast sydney melbourne and adelaide. But for the most part by the time those projects were completed. The rains had returned to the east coast and the plants built. There were dismissed as wipe elephants journalist. Chris noticed this change in the weather himself as he reflected in the updated edition of his book on the murray darling basin in two thousand and ten browsing through his local bookshop. He'd realized that he's book. The river somehow migrated from the environment and ecology section where. It's just six months ago to a new place on the history shows even so this record linear rainfall that broke the millenium. Drought did not turn back the clock. A drying trend continued across the south of the continent particularly in the southwest. Where winter rains had been in decline since the nineteen seventies julian part to human induced climate change indeed while eastern australia record high levels of rainfall in late twenty ten and in twenty eleven perth and much of southwestern austrailia experienced record dry weather. This is just some of the challenges of planning for both climate variability and climate change on a continent of extremes. It's been looking ahead into the future. That's being one of the ways in which ustralian have long tried to come to terms with this continent of extreme climate variability in twenty eleven. The climate commission released its first report declaring that australia was facing the critical decade back. Then of course. The climate commission was a federal government body established under the gillard government but it was dissolved under the abbott government. Soon after its election in two thousand thirteen the decade to twenty twenty. The climate commission's report argued was critical in terms of meeting the two degrees celsius guardrail by curbing emissions of carbon dioxide in the decade to twenty twenty global emissions had to be well on track to reaching by twenty fifty to limit the planet's warming taking the temperature on the nation's progress towards this goal in twenty seventeen the climate council the independent body that rose from the ashes of the climate commission declared that australia was now known as global climate lagged already the concentration of carbon dioxide emissions had tipped over four hundred parts per million higher than at any other time for millions of us and the planet's temperature was over one degree higher than temperatures before the industrial revolution of the eighteenth century. The report warned that the window of opportunity to limit worsening climate impacts is closing and already climate events were getting worse pointing not only to bush fires and hate waves but also to drought and drying across the south of the continent. Just as the gun. I report of two thousand. Eight and countless other scientific studies had predicted two thousand and nineteen was the driest year since records began in one thousand nine hundred and it was the country's warmest year in fact all these since two thousand thirteen are among the ten warmest on record australia. The impact of climate changes lead to longer more intense fire seasons and an increase in the average number of elevated fire weather days as measured by the forest fire danger index twenty nine thousand nine so the highest cumulated index on record fires have burned before an australian but never like those we saw over the summer. It's called comfort knowing that this disaster was nice surprise after all the two thousand eight garner report warned that fire seasons will start earlier and the slightly lighter and generally be more intense. This effect increases over time but should be directly observable by twenty twenty in another ten to twenty years time 2019 white. Be so unusual. Although this use emissions might be lower thanks to the covid lockdowns and the air might be cleaner. The concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere like carbon dioxide continues to rise and the period two thousand sixteen to twenty twenty looks set to be the warmest five year period on record. Unfortunately a few months of slowing down can't make up for the decades upon decades of greenhouse gas emissions that have accumulated in the atmosphere. He street is weighing heavily on the planet's climate future.

Bureau Of Meteorology Climate Commission Southern Australia Melbourne Southwestern Austrailia Perth Intergovernmental Panel On Cli Abbott Government Eastern Australia Brisbane Australia Adelaide Gillard Government
"decades earlier" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"decades earlier" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Castles made of sand and little wing compositions by Jimi Hendrix with a delicate touch. He was a songwriter. He would've pushed much further in this direction, and he may have been pulled deeper into jazz. Many musicians have always heard the jazz potential in the songs created by the guy. Known best for his searing rendition of The Star Spangled Banner at Woodstock and for being one of the great flash guitarists and flamboyant rock personalities of a particular time. Jimi Hendrix is an artist for all time. 50 years after his death will honor him with more jazz accented interpretations sprinkled through tonight's new standards on W. N. Y. C. There's something that's drawn from classical music. It's a melody that has come around a couple of times in pop songs. I'll play for you the one that you know well and follow it with one from a decade earlier, that was its first use in this way. What? The famous melody of Bara dean from Pahlavi, etc. And dances, Boy, do I sound like that old TV commercial now settled into Tony Bennett's hit record of stranger in Paradise. Take my stranger. A stranger in paradise. Story. I say That's a day during.

Jimi Hendrix Paradise Tony Bennett Pahlavi W. N. Y. C.
Who Is Activist, Ella Baker

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:57 min | 1 year ago

Who Is Activist, Ella Baker

"From Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny. Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica. Very. Excited to present our. September. This month we're talking about activists. Women who stood up and fought against injustice and for a better world today, we're talking about a woman who doesn't often receive the recognition she deserves for her behind the scenes activism. As a prolific activist, she had a hand in society changing work major civil rights leaders turned to her for her organizational skills. Let's talk about Ella Josephine Baker. Sisters in the struggle for human dignity and freedom. I am here to represent. The struggle that has gone on for three hundred years. Ella Baker was born on December thirteenth nineteen o three in Norfolk Virginia. She grew up in North Carolina on the very same land where her grandparents were enslaved a few decades earlier. Ella's mother was part of the Local Missionary Association. She helped feed their hungry neighbors and encouraged women to be a force for positive change this activism and kindness stuck with Allah. Ellis studied at Shaw University in Raleigh North Carolina and graduated as Class Valedictorian nineteen twenty seven shortly after she moved to New York City in Nineteen thirty ELA joined several women's organizations and served as national director of the Young Negroes Cooperative League that organization focused on supporting the economic development of the black community in nineteen forty Ella started working as a field secretary for the N. Double A. C., p. she moved up to work as director of branches after just three years. She later also served as the president of the New York. City branch. Then in Nineteen fifty-six, Ella Co created the organization in French. Which bought the oppressive Jim Crow laws in the south. The following year a move to Atlanta to help with Martin Luther King Junior's Organization the southern Christian Leadership Conference. At that time, the SC L. C. was a brand new venture. It was created after successes like the Montgomery bus boycott black leaders including Martin Luther. King Junior created the organization to assemble more boycotts and. Throughout the south. But for the venture to be successful, it would take a masterful organizer while Martin Luther King Junior took the reins as the SEC's public figurehead Ella worked behind the scenes setting the organization's agenda and framing the issues. She organized the crusade for citizenship a campaign to support voting rights. For African Americans, she also helped Rodney Atlanta s ELC headquarters and even served as a temporary director for several months after the resignation of the previous office holder, Ellis desire to focus on the issues and to have influence over the. Direction often clashed with the group's main. Right, as ellos considering resigning in nineteen sixty radical act of civil disobedience inspired her to take a new direction on February first black college students in Greensboro. North Carolina where I'm from refused to leave a lunch counter. Worth's where they'd been denied service for Joseph McNeil Franklin McCain and their to college dorm mates that time was February first one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty. The day they walked into a Greensboro. Woolworth's and sat down at the segregated lunch counter. Ella wrote a letter that encourage students across the south to join forces and take similar acts of protest. She also organized a meeting at Shaw University for the students who spearheaded the citizens from those meetings, the student nonviolent coordinating committee or Snick was created. snick would have a profound impact on the civil rights movement. Ella encourage snack to focus on practicing group centered activism rather than leader centered activism in contrast to the SE L. C.'s leadership style with Mlk at the forefront. Under, this method, of Leadership Snick ran many successful initiatives including the nineteen sixty one freedom rides and the nineteen sixty, four freedom summer and Mississippi L. continued her activism through the sixties. She was also a consultant for the Southern Conference Education Fund and organize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic. Party she later returned to New York City and continued her work until she passed away on. December thirteenth nineteen eighty six. She was eighty three years old. Ella Baker was an incredible driving force behind much of the public civil rights work. We learn about in school while she never sought the spotlight she was committed to improving life for future generations

Ella Ella Josephine Baker Ella Co Consultant North Carolina New York City Greensboro Martin Luther King Shaw University Ellis Martin Luther Kaplan L. C. Southern Christian Leadership Raleigh North Carolina Woolworth Joseph Mcneil Franklin Mccain Atlanta Montgomery
A Brief History of Staphylococcus Aureus

The Anthropocene Reviewed

09:41 min | 1 year ago

A Brief History of Staphylococcus Aureus

"Years ago. I acquired an infection in my left eye socket caused by the bacteria. Staphylococcus Aureus my vision clouded and then. My eye socket swelled shut and I ended up hospitalized for over a week how I experienced the same infection anytime in history before nineteen forty. I would've likely lost. Not just my I but my life then again I wouldn't have ever lived to acquire orbital so you lights because I would have died of the staph infections I had in childhood. Stella Aureus is not a normal part of the human microbiome but many people perhaps around a third are like me. Nonetheless hosts two colonies of it on our skin or in our nasal passages or in our digestive systems. These colonies are usually harmless but while anyone can get sick with staff those of us who live omitted. Every day are more likely to suffer infections. When I was in the hospital the infectious disease. Doctors made me feel very special. One told me you are colonized by some fascinating Lee. Aggressive Staff He told me I wouldn't believe the petri dishes if I saw them and went on to call my continued existence. A real testament to modern medicine. Which I suppose it is for. People like myself colonized by fascinating. The aggressive bacteria there can be no harkening back wistfully to pass Golden Ages. Because in all those pasts I would be dead in. Nineteen forty one. Boston city hospital reported in eighty two percent fatality rate. For staph infections. I remember as a child hearing phrases like only the strong survive and survival of the fittest and feeling terrified by them. Because I knew I was not fit or strong. I didn't yet know that when humanity protects the frail among us and works to ensure their survival the human project as a whole get stronger failing to understand that has held our species back for Millennia and in fact still does because staff often infects open wounds. It has been especially deadly during war near the beginning of world. War One. The English poet Rupert Brooke Famously wrote if I should die. Think only this of me that there's some corner of a foreign field that is forever. England Brookwood indeed die in the war in the winter of nineteen fifteen but not in some corner of a foreign field but instead on a hospital ship of a bacterial infection by then there were of course. Thousands of doctors treating the war's wounded and ill among them was a seventy one year old. Scottish surgeon Alexander Ogden who decades earlier had discovered and named Staphylococcus Ogden who sported a magnificent moustache throughout his adult. Life was a huge fan of Joseph. Lister WHO's observations about post surgical infection led to the use of carbolic acid and other sterilization techniques these dramatically increased surgical survival rates. In fact after visiting lister and learning from Him Ogden returned to his hospital in Aberdeen and tore down the sign above the operating room that read prepare to meet the God. No would surgery. Be a desperate last ditch effort. It could be safe and clean and survivable. Ogden was so obsessed with listers carbolic acid spray that his students wrote a poem about it. The spray the spray the antiseptic spray. A would shower it morning night and day for every sort of scratch where others would attach a sticking plaster patch. He gave the spray. It's all right but it's no Rupert Brooke. At any rate Ogden had good reason to give the spray. His first wife Mary. Jane had died after childbirth a few years earlier at the age of twenty five. There's no record her cause death but most maternal deaths at the time were caused by postpartum infection often due to staphylococcus aureus and dogs had hundreds of his patients die of post surgical infection so no wonder he was obsessed with antiseptic protocols. Still he wanted to understand not just how to prevent infection but also what precisely was causing it by the late. Eighteen seventies many discoveries were being made by surgeons and researchers about various bacteria and their role in infection but staphylococcus was not identified until Austin lanced a pus filled abscessed leg wound belonging to one James Davidson. Under the microscope. Davidson's abscess was brimming with life. Ogden wrote my delight may be conceived when there were revealed to me beautiful tangles tufts and chains of round organisms in great numbers. Ogden named these tufts and chains staphylococcus from the Greek word for bunches of grapes and they do often look like grape bunches plump and just a little bit oblong and also quite yellowish green. A few years later a German scientist noted that there were in fact several species of staphylococcus and named the one Ogden had found Staphylococcus Aureus or the golden staff but Ogden wasn't content with just seeing the bacteria. Obviously he wrote the first step to be taken was to make sure the organisms found. In Mr Davidson's pus were not there by chance. So he set up a laboratory in the shed behind his house and began trying to grow colonies of staff eventually succeeding by growing them. In the medium of a chicken egg he then injected the bacteria into guinea pigs and wild mice which became violently ill. Ogden also noted that staphylococcus seemed to be quote harmless on the surface despite being quote so deleterious when injected I have also observed this in so far as I am not much bothered by having my skin colonized by Staphylococcus Aureus but find it. Dilatot serious indeed when it starts replicating inside my eye socket. James Davidson by the way went on to live another forty years after his staph infection. Thanks to a thorough deriding and Ogden's liberal use of the spray the spray the antiseptic spray but staphylococcus aureus remained an exceptionally dangerous infection until another Scottish scientist Alexander. Fleming discovered penicillin by accident. Actually one Monday morning in nineteen twenty eight Fleming notice that one of his cultures of Staphylococcus aureus had been contaminated by a fungus penicillin them which seemed to have killed all the STAPH BACTERIA. He remarked allowed. That's funny Fleming. Then used what? He called his mould juice. I wish I were making that up to treat. Couple patients including during his assistance. Sinus infection but mass production of the antibiotic substance secreted by. Penicillin proved very challenging. It wasn't until the late nineteen thirties. That a group of scientists at Oxford began testing their penicillin stocks. I on mice and then in nineteen forty one on a human subject. A policeman named Albert Alexander who'd been cut by shrapnel during a German bombing raid and who was dying of bacterial infections in his case both staphylococcus aureus and streptococcus. The penicillin caused a dramatic improvement in Alexander's condition but the researchers didn't have enough of the drug to save him. The infections returned and Alexander died in April of nineteen forty one. His seven-year-old daughter Sheila ended up in a local orphanage. Scientists began to seek out more productive strains of the mold and eventually found one on a cantaloupe in a Peoria Illinois grocery store that strain eventually became even more productive after being exposed to x rays and ultraviolet radiation. But essentially all penicillin. In the world descends from that mold on that one cantaloupe in Peoria. That's not the astounding thing about the story though the astounding thing is that after scraping off the mold that became the world's supply of penicillin the scientists in question eight the rest of the cantaloupe

Staphylococcus Ogden Staphylococcus Penicillin Stella Aureus Rupert Brooke James Davidson Sinus Infection Albert Alexander Scientist Peoria Boston City Hospital Fleming LEE England Brookwood Peoria Illinois Aberdeen Sheila Joseph Oxford
'Supreme Inequality' Argues That America's Top Court Has Become Right-Wing

Fresh Air

08:29 min | 1 year ago

'Supreme Inequality' Argues That America's Top Court Has Become Right-Wing

"Us my guest is Adam Cohen he's a lawyer and a journalist and author of the new book supreme inequality the supreme court's fifty year battle for a more unjust America it's about how the Supreme Court has grown more conservative often ruling against the poor against workers rights against voting rights while favoring corporations and the wealthy overall contributing to income inequality you read that in the five decades since the Nixon presidency there've only been three Supreme Court chief justices and they've all been conservative burger Rehnquist and Roberts yes and they've had a conservative majority behind them the whole time and that's really stunning right because if you think about going back to nineteen seventy we've had so many changes in the White House right we've had conservatives we've had you know we've had Reagan we've had George W. bush and we've had Clinton we've had Obama Congress has switched parties multiple times right back and forth back and forth we have just had a right wing court for sixty years so do you think that's kind of coincidence that justices tend to to leave or die during Republican presidencies or it do you think that Republicans are better at getting Supreme Court justices appointed well the game the whole system much better than Democrats do in many ways so one way is that they do tend to step down in strategic ways that Democrats often don't so Anthony Kennedy stepped down at a time when he knew that trump would be able to replace him and get his nominee confirmed by Republican held Senate with Peter Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer did not step down towards the end of the Obama administration's that's one part of it but another part of it really is that they just do the skulduggery a little bit better to write so when Obama nominated Merrick garland it's garland had been confirmed that would have restored a liberal majority to the court for the first time in half a century and look what the Republican Senate did they just said we're not interested what I can do anything so you're actually say in the book that these are kind of two book ends on the the half century that Nixon steals for this is C. and Mitch McConnell refuses to allow a Democrat to fill Scalia's seat and the both propped up the current conservative majority there's something about the process of nominating and confirming Supreme Court justices that seems to have changed now you mention the McConnell blocking the Merrick garland nomination but you know trump named his potential justices during the campaign that that's kind of unheard of isn't it's gotten much more political and just the way in which trump is saying you know I we were putting together this list and we're consulting with the federal society and and I think it's pretty much acknowledged that you know trump in many ways was not very traditional right wing presidential candidate by background by temperament to many other things one thing he clearly did to solidify his support from the right wing from fundamentalist Christians and all that was to make it clear to them we're going to choose the kind of justices you walked and they've been very emphatic about doing that it used to be the was not supposed to be a litmus test for Supreme Court justice but now both Democrats and Republicans seem to be boldly mentioning their support of a litmus test I mean some democratic candidates have said that yeah they would choose you know Supreme Court justice who supports abortion rights at that would be essential so I think that's something that's changed too with that you know intentionally stating to the public yes this this judge is coming in with you know certain points of view in advance I think that's right the mask is falling off right everyone can see what's really going on you know in theory if the court is the sort of legal body we like to pretend it is what present should be saying is I'm gonna look for the best interpreter of the law I will look for someone who maybe got very good grades or road very good lord you articles or who is a fabulous teacher or who has shown just a general you know excellence in the craft but that's not what they talk about it all is as you say they talk about the politics because everyone's pretty much admitting now that the court is a political institution you read that the area in which the Supreme Court has changed the most is in the area of economic class give us an example of that sure during the war in court which we were talking about the court really embraced poor people and their problems so we began to see them being very active around issues like the poll tax but also really about welfare right I mean welfare used to be something that was kind of disparaged and embarrassment people didn't talk about it we looked out the people who are on welfare well the Warren court comes along and says no welfare is an important thing in our society that allows people to subsist and the and actually right after the Warren court ended with the momentum of the Warren court in nineteen seventy the Supreme Court did an amazing thing in a case called October versus Kelly they actually ruled that under the due process clause localities cannot remove people from the welfare rolls without giving them a formal hearing first chance to be heard so that's that's something that is you know it would have been unheard of a decade earlier so that was the kind of new approach the court took to the poor but then when the burger court rises and when the Nixon justice is really begin to take control the quick very quickly turned his back on the poor and and it's actually just a couple weeks later that the court issues a ruling that really sounded the death knell for the poverty law movement case called energy Williams where the court not only said that they were going to uphold really discriminatory unfair local welfare rule but he basically said you know we're washing our hands of welfare law cases where it's you know it's the this is something we're pretty much going to leave to the government to do as they want and after that Dandridge case although not in on the court began to rule against the poor and to make clear that they didn't care about things like whether welfare was fair by the controversy over whether the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment should include poor people as a group with special protected status yeah this is one of the most fascinating things that was going on during the war in Europe so there is this notion of a suspect class is there certain classes that the court says I have a higher standing under the equal protection clause so it it's mainly you know racial minorities religious minorities non citizens groups like that and the idea is that if you're a discreet and insular minority that is unable to really effectively protect itself through the political process which is often true of the groups I just mentioned the court will give you extra care so the court had been for years identifying different groups it considered to be in this class and if you get in this class the court is that much more likely to strike down any laws that puts a burden on your disadvantages you and for years the court was edging close to putting poor people in this category they would say things like you know what lines with the government draws against poor people are very similar to lines of the drive against racial groups and you know everything but actually calling the suspect class and we don't know what the Warren court would have done if it had been allowed to continue but one of the first things the burger court did in that dentures case as I mentioned was really make clear no the poor not could be a suspect class and they're not getting any special attention from us so if the court had ruled differently and said poor people were a protected class how might that have changed things the poor would then be given a very powerful legal tool to use in a lot of different context to challenge a lot of ways in which their heartbeat so right now we have very unequal distribution of of welfare around the country there are some states that if you live in California New York not that welfare is munificent because it is not but with the other states where you get almost nothing you know if you're if you're in Wyoming and you need help so things like that could have been amenable to being challenged by under equal protection for people to say look we're not being treated equally by the federal government how it distributes well for so there are a lot of categories like that we're we're populars would've been able to step up and say this is a way in which a law is really hurting the poor and remember there are a suspect class my guess is Adam Cohen author of the new books of freedom and

Adam Cohen America Supreme Court
"decades earlier" Discussed on Thunder Radio

Thunder Radio

14:09 min | 1 year ago

"decades earlier" Discussed on Thunder Radio

"The couple got it happened yesterday the welcome my name is the let's call him John and what just just got a job there were there why the things to do it one being the this you his the great legendary Jimmy dean do next from nineteen sixty eight Johnny Cash and June Carter long legged guitar pick in my hair just the way the in the local is in plastic luxury cruise is and that's right we are studying Andriy music this week on coffee county hootenanny with me professor Michael Gee this is your free weekly masters course in musicology where I get Joe Hart of opening your blood pumping every Sunday afternoon at four AM Monday morning at ten that from nineteen sixty eight I should say and I want to say and I'm going to say that was Johnny cash in the lovely June Carter do a long legged guitar pickin man on Columbia Records let's go back one decade earlier so one of Johnny cash's best brains this track also on Columbia Records the legendary Johnny Horton the this the team this thank you she's thank you these **** I'm looking junior rolled down south of Dallas right here on my food in here France with me professor Michael T. and still want to see the community jukebox was it which I host Monday through Friday from ten to noon on W. M. S. R. thunder radio live in the studio taking your phone calls your request your.

Large Parts of Pacific Ocean Reopened for Trawling

Environment: NPR

02:22 min | 1 year ago

Large Parts of Pacific Ocean Reopened for Trawling

"Decades of overfishing destroyed much of the fish stocks off America's west coast hardest hit were species known as groundfish trawlers dragged up in their nets in the year. Two thousand thousand large parts of the Pacific Ocean were declared disaster zones and close to trawlers devastating the industry now nearly two decades later fish stocks. It's have rebounded and come new year's Day. Thousands of square miles of ocean will reopen. It's a success story. Being celebrated by both fishermen and environmentalists mental. Ists who worked together to bring back the fish Brad petting her is a longtime trawler. Captain who operates off the coast of Oregon. He worked the seas. When Rock Fish Sole Ole and perch were abundant basically had industry that arose bringing up to two hundred two hundred and forty million pounds of fish across the docks and that was dropped probably by quarter interesting a couple of years after the government declared the area a disaster zone conservationist fishermen and fish processors worked through council to save the fish and the the fishing industry initially the different groups? Were at loggerheads says petting her. Who served on the council? But they worked out a plan. Fish quotas were cut. Dramatically trawlers colors went from pulling in nine million pounds of fish down to one hundred thousand pounds per year. It put many out of business. It was just. It was a bad bad environment No one's making money. It was a dark time would be the best way to put it. Those fishermen who stayed in the game had to change how they fished their nets dragged in unwanted wanted fish and sea life that had to be tossed overboard. Discourses probably anywhere from twenty to forty percent depending on the species and really no one one of that bottom trawlers crawlers modified their nets to allow small fish to escape they avoided rocky areas. Where fish breed that their nets could permanently damage and they stuck to quotas that are strictly monitored server or a camera on the vessel assures that the Fisher accounted for? And there's no discards happening that that uh-huh or being seen and so really. We got a science right early on chance Chad. The regional director for the Environmental Defense Fund Ocean Program says as a result fish stocks rebounded decades earlier than expected. He called the efforts a conservation homerun according to Judd. It's the biggest environmental story that no one knows about and now you

Pacific Ocean Environmental Defense Fund Oce America Oregon Ists Regional Director Judd Brad
Jack Dorsey Wants to Decentralize Social Media

Techmeme Ride Home

04:23 min | 2 years ago

Jack Dorsey Wants to Decentralize Social Media

"So I guess my running joke about who put the be in Jack. Dorsey Bonnet is kind of running stale at this point this this morning Jack released a pretty ambitious twitter thread outlining how twitter intends to fund the development of project known as Blue Sky an independent in an effort to develop an open and decentralized standard for social media. Let me just quote. Twitter is funding a small independent team of up to five open source source architects engineers and designers to develop an open and decentralized standard for social media. The goal is for twitter to ultimately be a client of the standard. Twitter was so open early on that many saw its potential to be a decentralized internet standard like SMTP the email protocol for a variety variety of reasons all reasonable at the time we took a different path and increasingly centralized twitter but a lot has changed over the years I were facing entirely new challenges centralized centralized solutions are struggling to meet for instance centralized enforcement of global policy to address abuse and misleading. Information is unlikely to scale over the long term without placing far far too much burden on people second. The value of social media is shifting away from content hosting and removal and towards recommendation Algorithms. Directing one's attention unfortunately these algorithms are typically proprietary and one can't choose or build alternatives yet third existing listing social media incentives frequently lead to attention being focused on content and conversation that sparks controversy and outrage rather than conversation which informs and promotes health. Finally new technologies. These have emerged to make a decentralized approach more viable blockchain points to a series of decentralized solutions for open endurable hosting governance and even monetization and much work to be done but the fundamentals are there and quote skipping down a bit quote. Why is this good for twitter? It it will allow us to access and contribute to a much larger corpus of public conversation. Focus our efforts on building open recommendation Algorithms which promote healthy conversation and and will force us to be far more innovative than in the past. There are many challenges to make this work that twitter would feel right becoming a client of the standard which is why the work must be done transparently in the open not owned by any single private corporation furthering the open and decentralized principles of the Internet. We'd expect this team not only to develop develop a decentralized standard for social media but to also build open community around it inclusive of companies and organizations researchers civil society leaders. All who. You're thinking deeply about the consequences positive and negative. This isn't going to happen overnight. It will take many years to develop a sound scalable and usable decentralized standard for social media that paves paves the path to solving the challenges listed above our commitment is to fund this work to that point and beyond and quote Jack went onto name Parag Agarwal as the lead of the project so a few ways to look at this number one. I've I've said for years that twitter is really just a protocol disguised as a company and frankly smarter minds than me have said for years that social media hadn't been invented a decade earlier would have been a protocol. Things would be a lot more efficient at this point if it had been and of course you can still built massively successful businesses off of protocols I mean just look at Amazon and Google and second you could look at this as twitter's version of Libra Gra but in a way a more ambitious and radical project. Also you could see this as Jack's version of Zack's vaunted pivot to privacy as Alex. Alex stamos pointed out on twitter. Both companies want to be out of the controlling what people say business. Lots of folks including the official mastodon twitter account pointed out that projects like this already exist but it is super interesting that it's one of the existing platform plays that is inspired to blow up the status quo of massive platforms parenthetically strangling the open Internet. Sort of reminds one of this scene from. HBO Silicon Valley. Kahad there's billions of phones all around the world but the same computing power

Twitter Jack Dorsey Bonnet Blue Sky Alex Stamos HBO Parag Agarwal Official Silicon Valley Amazon Google Zack
Why Do People Still Use Fax Machines?

BrainStuff

05:07 min | 2 years ago

Why Do People Still Use Fax Machines?

"In eighteen. Seventy eight Alexander. Graham Bell filed patent for a history altering device called the electronic telephone. But what you may not know. Is that the patent for another amazing communication tool. The simile machine or fax machine was filed by Scottish. clockmaker named Alexander Bain three decades earlier. That's right fax machines predate even rudimentary telephones and with a cockroach-like likes survivability that makes very little sense from an evolutionary standpoint. The fax machine lives on beeping and wheezing up sheets of paper. The world over for example vaccine is big in Japan even today about half of Japanese families use a fax machine in their homes. The question is why to understand. Dan Helps to know a bit about the facsimile machines place in history. Although the technology had been around for decades it wasn't until the nineteen thirty nine New York world's fair that fax machines. I seized mainstream recognition in the United States there attendees stood slack jawed in amazement as they viewed images and text arriving from around the the world at eighteen sheets permit. The machines were simply too expensive for everyday use though even by nine hundred eighty two one standalone fax machines sold for a whopping twenty thousand dollars far too pricey even for most businesses much less individual consumers. It wasn't until later in the nineteen eighties that the cost of the machines dropped to a point that businesses and offices found them useful notably documents that required legal signatures copied signatures. As you can probably guess were a source of controversy for years as legal professionals argued about the validity of documents that arrived via phone lines however as court after court confirmed armed the validity of faxed signatures doctors lawyers financial gurus and other professionals began to rely on faxes to transmit paperwork all over the place thus thus entrenched in the workflow and minds of countless millions of people the late nineteen eighties saw dramatic rise. In the number of fax machines. America had only around three hundred thousand contraptions in the middle of the eighties by nine hundred. Eighty nine there were more than four million. The Fax Machines Heyday was at hand. They even featured prominently in pop up culture. The one thousand nine thousand nine Scifi comedy back to the future part two explorers a future where the mic fly family had a fax machine in every room so the facts in process is one that billions of people have ingrained into their consciousness place assigned document in the machine punching the destination phone number. Hit the green button and minutes later. Your paperwork is in the hands of a colleague on the other side of town or on the other side of the world assuming that the fax machine has paper the cartridge is not out of ink and nothing has gotten stuck in the transmission transmission process but in the mid nineteen ninety s another history changing technology exploded and use the internet which provided people with ways aged instantly. Send text pictures and documents without these of paper with the coming of widespread e mail. It seemed that fax machines were doomed. Only they weren't aren't in two thousand seventeen study from market intelligence firm. IDC showed that the four major industries that are still using faxes Those industries being manufacturing factoring healthcare finance and government all predicted increased use of faxing over the next two years averaging twenty five percent increase. So why is that hat. Faxing is familiar technology that people trust the complexities of the Internet and its many offshoots technologies along with endless headlines about hackers spyware aware viruses and data breaches create in many people's minds. A sense that the web just isn't secure. In addition government policies still encouraged faxes and legal processes like discovery of evidence. Lean heavily on paper documents. Doctors backs prescriptions and private documents and patient records fax machines. are a habit and it's a habit that is hard because it's a simple low tech interoperable system that anyone can use just a few minutes of training also fax x machines like the aforementioned roaches are evolving with the times the people surveyed by. IDC said that the biggest reason for the increase in faxing was axing was now integrated. I graded with email as digital faxing and so was easier to use A. We spoke by email. Todd Johnson DR at Access Family Medicine in Lincoln Nebraska. Aska he said `I office notes prescriptions lab data orders and consultation requests affects anything else. It's requested I would email just as easily but I don't have a general email account to send the requested information to typically usually. I'm only provided with fax number to return requested information. Johnson Johnson says that the newest generation of digital faxing mixes workflow fairly easy quote. I don't use a feed and fax paper machine. I can facts from any of my computers tablet habit smartphone. I use them because I'm requested to use them by other facilities they're easy to use and now electronically configured into my phone system. I just drag and drop a pdf into the fax x Portal and away. It

IDC Graham Bell Johnson Johnson New York United States Alexander Bain Todd Johnson DAN America Japan Aska Lincoln Nebraska Access Family Medicine Twenty Thousand Dollars Twenty Five Percent Three Decades Two Years
Henry Ford's Rubber Utopia

Past Gas

07:38 min | 2 years ago

Henry Ford's Rubber Utopia

"It all started in in nineteen twenty five. Henry Ford was having lunch and his Dearborn Michigan Mansion with his good friend business partner entire magnate Harvey firestone Harvey. RV and Ford had been friends and partners since Ford started building cars decades earlier. So yeah just remember like he invented the model t which I like cheap car and basically he brought the car to the mass. Exactly Mr Firestone had begun ranting this time primarily focused on the impending rubber cartel that had been proposing England by one Winston Churchill. I am not a crooked. You know that payments de Yeah with a cigar and he's like on this day I I am not a crook and it will live in infamy. Yep that's him. The purpose of also the was Churchill. The king no the purpose of the rubber cartel was to limit the export of rubber in order to not overextend national resources. In case there was another World World War One thousand nine hundred eighty five probably a good idea but harvey firestone didn't like that idea. He believed that rubber prices were going to spike in the US as a result and therefore negatively affect firestone tires. Not some things never change Harvey firestone was not alone in this fear even even presidential candidate. FDR feared the effects of a rubber tariff. Remember was viewed. As the automotive industry's chokepoint seen as even more crucial than oil it's crazy. The the automotive industry relied on vulcanized rubber for literally everything from tires to hoses gaskets. A price increase of any kind could sink the young business so there there was a legitimate fear of turtles. Pain passing seems somewhat reasonable. Also it's it's it's kind of like okay here newsflash guys. If you're listening to this this might lose some you know in. I believe in climate change. And it's SORTA like yeah making some changes like you know not dumping tons of poisons into rivers and stuff might be more expensive for some people but in the at the end of the day. It's good not to have poisoned rivers and it's also probably good to have like rubber to defeat the Nazis. Yeah Germany was totally destroyed and they were afraid of something all of Europe. Yeah they're afraid of something like that happening again because those wounds had not been healed all and Churchill was just saying like hey fellers hello. Hello how does he talk. Talk like this is how are we talk again elegant. Listen listen fellows. That women's of all are still fresh insulting. I say that maybe we just save some of US supplies in case of fruit bikes out to again rubber. Blow Hurrah. Yes that's always saying always saying. Hey guys the whole world was just at war four. I think it might happen again. Maybe we should just like chill and be ready and these guys are like a money so harvey firestone was fed up with living in constant fear of their so he decided the best course of action would be to grow his own rubber smart. This wasn't the first time he had some some crazy idea. In fact Harvey tried to declare economic independence from the UK and fly rubber under the American flag. A few years earlier but that was truly the ramblings of a madman who doesn't seem to understand that you can't just not claim another country's resources by saying this cheaper so I'm just going to say it's it's American now although now that I think back on it that's kind of how we did a lot of stuff so yeah but harvey actually had a plan. He decided that he was going to start his own plantation in Liberia where the conditions were almost perfect for growing rubber trees by keeping the production in house he could avoid all the access fees associated with importation from other countries. Henry Ford had also tried growing his own rubber a year earlier. In one thousand nine hundred eighty four he had purchased this large quantities of land in the Florida everglades only to eventually do nothing with them. It was cheaper for four to import. The rubber. The idea of dramatic price is increase was still only speculation. But Still Harvey's plans had peaked and reports interests and after the lunch meeting was over. He requested that it's personal aide aide Leopold would find out where the best place to grow rubber Leopold come over here boy. Where's the best place to go? Rob A AH go find out how Liberia was the obvious choice. Harvey firestone discovered. It had the perfect climate when he put his plantation there but unfortunately Henry Ford word was very very very racist and he would not dare step foot in such an uncivilised and African society so they came to the conclusion. I mean that the rubber should be grown where it originated in the Amazon. So rubber comes from both vines and trees and you let it grow and then when you chop it you squeeze the vines and Latex Literal Latex comes out trees yeah so it's a liquid and then they they put out onto like big flat drying areas than when it dries. You can pull it up like a sheet of Latex and then you take a bunch of latex yeah stack stack into bales. And then that's what gets shipped out to like Volkan Ization plants and stuff like that. So these plantations are really only concerned with drawing the vines and extracting latex from okay okay and Liberia had the per client. But what about the Amazon Amazon also. Very clearly great. Climate only problem. It's a lot harder harder to get into the rainforest than it is in Africa. Got You throughout the nineteenth century. The Amazon River Basin supplied all of the world's rubber and made up forty percent of Brazil's exports sports at the height of the rubber boom in the second half of the nineteenth century but the Amazon's rubber room quickly turned to bus as plantations in Asia and England. Were able to go. Rubber and much denser populations and much more efficiently in Amazon many natural species that are not present in other countries limit the growth of trees so but organizing united plantations and other countries the efficiency was greatly increased. Henry had another incentive to go to South America besides his racism in End Theodore Roosevelt's book through the Brazilian wilderness. He accounts his experiences traveling through the Amazonian rainforests. One of his most significant observations is that many fast-flowing rivers could provide an almost perfect power source for any industry bold enough to be born there. He claimed that the right kind of senators such his enterprising businessmen of foresight coolness and suggest city who would be willing to put migrants to work for an advantage that would be mutually beneficial will give rise to a a great industrial civilization money. If anyone thought they could fill that description it was Henry Ford art now. Henry Ford did not really make cars. Henry Ford thought that he made men the maker. Men's like me. This builder of meant the cars they produced produced were simply a byproduct of his training. He was praised as a sociologist manufacturer. If anyone could reshape the native Brazilians into prosperous factory workers it was Henry Ford. They don't want to be or so he thought they don't want that.

Harvey Firestone Harvey Firestone Harvey Henry Ford Amazon Winston Churchill Liberia Ford Firestone United States England FDR Amazon River Basin Dearborn Michigan Mansion Partner Florida Everglades Germany Europe Africa
"decades earlier" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"decades earlier" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"About nine forty five in Phoenix so subsequently am you've got more than twenty three gas stations of closed in San Francisco since two thousand ten and there's also I think it was forty percent your gas stations in that overall city a day and then a decade earlier so pure gas stations mean obviously less access for drivers and a lack of the competition amongst retailers this call awful it's killing me three weeks I've had this I hate it so you got more than I like ninety percent of California's ten thousand gas stations are affiliated with major corporations this is according to a two thousand fifteen report that's the last time we had numbers on this and the day of the independent is all but over and go figure for whatever reason I bring that up it's because it's the independent is always the first historically to be rezoned I guess it's because they're easier to get out we also have a state is very antagonistic apostle fuels and has a lot to do with this your San Francisco Oakland San Matteo open and lawsuits to the pile of five oil companies including Exxon and chevron and this is also going to send the price up they want huge sums of money from these companies for contributing to the so called man made global warming that's with the lawsuits are all about and who pays for that of the pump we do we do and we're gonna face a real tough situation if the lawsuits miss their mark nearly forty percent of the state's crude oil is produced outside no inside of California even though we lack refineries so you got Exxon chevron and all the others being sued with with almost certainty they're gonna put out to pull out of California if the litigation is successful they're going to be gone and then and then what it's not hard to draw the conclusion on that from point a to point B..

Winnie and Nelson Mandela's Marriage Survived Prison but Not Freedom

Retropod

04:33 min | 2 years ago

Winnie and Nelson Mandela's Marriage Survived Prison but Not Freedom

"Hey history lovers. I'm mike rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered nelson mandela's extraordinary. Mary life is filled with unanswerable questions. What would he have accomplished around the world. If he hadn't spent twenty seven years behind bars would the course of apartheid in south africa which he fought so vehemently against been halted decades earlier and and what his epic love affair with his wife winnie have survived they met at a bus stop in soweto south africa she was twenty two and as the nation's first black female social -ocial worker her life had already taken off. He was forty married and had three children. He was fixated on a seemingly only impossible goal to end south africa's systemic policies of racism a week later. They got indian food together. He was smitten. He wrote in his biography. I cannot say for certain if there is such a thing as love at first sight but i do know that the moment moment i first glimpsed winning. I knew that i wanted to have her as my wife mandela divorced his first wife and then he and when he got married the relationship was passionate. They held hands publicly and went to jazz clubs occasionally. They fought though about the little things other couples oral about every day like when nelson tried to teach winnie how to drive they were emerging as the ultimate power our couple powerful voices against apartheid in south africa and racism around the world but their happiness and their power was short lived a few years after their wedding mandela was convicted of a treasonous plot to violently overthrow the government and sentenced to life in prison meanwhile when he faced her own struggles as she fought a racist political system she was was arrested harassed and forbidden for most social contact in one thousand nine hundred thousand nine. She began serving an eighteen month prison sentence in solitary confinement. She was tortured in her memoir. She wrote the whole experience is so terrible because i had left little little children at home in bed and i had no idea what had happened to them but throughout all the pain both emotional and physical when he stood by her husband in his absence she took up leading the resistance against apartheid she fought for her husband's release in the end though it was a marriage that survived prison but not freedom in one thousand ninety moments after mandela's release iconic hanako photos were taken of him. His right hand raised clenched in a fist. His left hand claps when he's hand the appeared. Still i'm very much in love but the cameras didn't capture the toll that mandela's long imprisonment took on the couple they they were only allowed to see each other during brief prison visiting hours the great depth of their early. Love affair drifted off when he wrote in in her memoir. I had so little time to love him when he also got caught up in political scandals and was even connected with kidnapping in murder she was unfaithful and she didn't deny it two years after mandela was freed. They separated four years later are they divorced. Winnie madikizela-mandela died earlier. This year and mandela always is acknowledged. His ex wife's strength. When he announced their separation. In nineteen ninety-two he conceded that his estranged wife had suffered greatly early and praised her efforts fighting apartheid while he was in prison. He said her tenacity reinforced my personal respect. Don't love and growing affection.

Nelson Mandela Winnie Madikizela-Mandela South Africa Mike Rosen Soweto Africa Kidnapping Murder Twenty Seven Years Eighteen Month Four Years Two Years
"decades earlier" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"decades earlier" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Through phone calls are sweet for each system we called all our citizens and let them know about a precautionary shelter in place that's been lifted thirty seven people were treated for non life threatening injuries air monitoring has found no concerning contaminants of French environmental group is taking the city of Paris to court over widespread the lead to dust released in the fire at the historic Notre Dame cathedral in April locations near the fire site registered contamination up to eight hundred times the official safe level three months later triggering the indefinite closure of two local schools and a halt to all work on the cathedral the lawsuit accuses Paris of neglecting public health what's got it was finally got around to picking up boxes of his childhood stuff from his mom's Reno Nevada attic find and intent game cartridge and there was no surprise finding an un opened at Nintendo game cartridge for kid Icarus still in the bag from JC Penney's catalog department three decades earlier was a surprise the cult classic video game is expected to sell at an online auction for ten thousand dollars helpings of change used to be baseball cards now it's electronics be careful when you clean your attic out good lesson for all of us lay about stuff thanks are also coming up a special program for aging shelter dogs Michigan is one of the best places in the country to do business but you don't have to take our word for it take pity poppies president and CEO of consumers energy instead all of the innovation is occurring around robotics a I it's happening here in Michigan we have chemical companies.

Paris Notre Dame cathedral JC Penney Michigan president and CEO official Reno Nevada Nintendo baseball ten thousand dollars three decades three months
Forgotten Nintendo game worth $10K found in attic after 30 years

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Forgotten Nintendo game worth $10K found in attic after 30 years

"Once got it was finally around to picking up boxes of his childhood stuff from his mom's Reno Nevada attic finding and intent game cartridge and there was no surprise finding an un opened at Nintendo game cartridge for kid Icarus still in the bag from JC Penney's catalog department three decades earlier was a surprise the cult classic video game is expected to sell at an online auction for ten thousand dollars how things have changed used to be baseball cards now it's electronics be careful when you clean your

Jc Penney Reno Nevada Nintendo Baseball Ten Thousand Dollars Three Decades
Bats beat out dogs as the main cause of rabies deaths in the U.S.

Dr. Drew

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

Bats beat out dogs as the main cause of rabies deaths in the U.S.

"And government, researchers say, most rabies infections in the United States come from bats. That's a change from decades earlier when dogs 'cause most cases of rabies, the CDC's is the change follow nationwide efforts to mandate pet vaccines and implement leash control laws rabies deaths in the US are still rare from one to three cases a year.

United States CDC
"decades earlier" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:30 min | 2 years ago

"decades earlier" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In nineteen sixty five. But about a decade earlier gospel legends. The staple singers that this song. In two thousand three interview Keith Richards acknowledged the staple. Singers version. But he claimed quote. Luckily, the song itself goes back into the mists of time. On says it to 'cause NPR news. Okay. What do you do to celebrate your five hundredth birthday curator's at Washington's National gallery of art or doing that, for the Italian painter Tintoretto? The sixteenth century Venetian is less famous than Michaelangelo, but the exhibit Mexico, the Tintoretto belongs in his league. Here's the renaissance master of radio NPR Susan Stanford. The well he certainly was ambitious. He never saw a wall that he couldn't envision covered with a large Tintoretto curator, Robert echoes, the canvases are huge jammed with hunting men, some women to writhing reaching rushing in myths, or biblical scenes Jaka. Oppo Tintoretto painted them all over the ceiling of the Scuola granddaddy, son. Rocco in Venice. It took ambition and yes, d. Deviousness in fifteen sixty four there was a competition. He was one of four artists invited to submit drawings. Tintoretto doesn't have a drawing co curator Federick instrument. Instead, he has pulled aside from the ceiling, a big piece of cardboard to show the fully completed oil on canvas painting installed in its intended position. Wait, there's more Tintoretto announces. It's a donation knowing that they have regulations that they must accept all gifts, large or small devious and brilliant. He went on to do some sixty more paintings for the place. Tintoretto competed for work all his life. Ambition was in the air money to Venice in the sixteenth century was about the largest city in Europe and easily the most cosmopolitan teaming with artists who had to fight for work was cutthroat environment. You had to paint quickly in order to get your Commission's in order to fill them, eventually Tintoretto got so many commissions, he had to hire a. Vast number of assistance. They worked so fast that critics thought the pieces looked unfinished, some do the young Tintoretto got lessons in painting ambition and toughness from Titian, thirty years, his senior, and the master artist of Venice at age twelve Tintoretto apprentice in his workshop legend has it that the boy once made a group of drawings there. And when Titian who've been away for a few days came back and saw these drawings and said, who did this? And the young to Dorado was nervous thinking he had done a bad job withdrawn. It was going to be corrected. No, it would bad. They weren't too good. Kitchen, the master felt threatened, he kicked the kid out if that wasn't bad enough as years passed Titian tried to blackball Tintoretto to prevent them from getting commissions, and all the while the rivals were painting, their heavenly religious scenes think how many lasts uppers you've seen. The best known by Leonardo Davinci his alarmed apostles, sitting in a row at the table. Jesus serene in the center, some sixteen years after Leonardo Tintoretto puts the apostles in a blender and spins them around painting their reactions. When Christ says, one of them will betray him some of them are practically falling out of their chairs backwards, again co curator Robert echoes summer, reaching forward gesturing towards Christ. The Pentagon's full of action push and pull drama. And this is typical Toronto is payments are always dynamic full of energy and action. They are cinematic. You can almost hear the soundtrack John pulsar to the philosopher said that Tintoretto was the first film director, speed competition. Success took its toll a self portrait at the beginning of the National Gallery exhibit made when he was around twenty eight with dark curly hair moustache beard shows an intent. Sense. Almost fierce Tintoretto glaring viewers demanding that we pay attention. The exhibit ends with another self portrait made when he was around seventy his hair and beard are white his stare is Stony and the impetuous aggressive younger artists in that early self-portrait. Now the fires were they've gone out of his eyes. He's now tired to settle very long career. It's been very successful, but boy is he weary, put your of the Venetian artists as a young and old man, they Beckett a lifetime's work in Tintoretto is very first US retrospective in Washington. I'm Susan Stanford. NPR news. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Noel king. Of the program, just ahead at five on K Q, E D public radio. The Tuesday morning commute..

Oppo Tintoretto Leonardo Tintoretto Tintoretto blackball Tintoretto Titian NPR Venice Keith Richards Susan Stanford Leonardo Davinci Robert echoes Steve Inskeep Michaelangelo Noel king Washington Europe Rocco
What Was the Emu War?

BrainStuff

05:44 min | 2 years ago

What Was the Emu War?

"The story of the EMU war. It begins after World War One. When soldiers returned home to Australia. The government was eager to show its support for veterans take land, the government said grow wheat, and we'll pay handsomely for it. It was a mission for the bright and hopeful for men eager to, cultivate, their futures as they cultivated the soil in Western Australia. You could say the plan was flawed from the start the government had ninety thousand hector's that's two hundred twenty two thousand acres to go around. But that wasn't enough for the nearly five thousand veterans who wanted it land was doled out as it became available and the choicest lots were given away. I the remaining veterans Gotland in Perth, which was not ideal for farming. What's more in the years that followed the initial land handout in the early nineteen twenty s Western Australia, combated drought frost and a significant rabbit investation while veterans labored against the elements and the wildlife mounting financial challenges from the great depression. Threatened to undercut all they'd been promised the trillion government had initially pledged to pay the veterans four shillings per bushel of wheat. But the Bill tied to that son was killed in the Senate another Bill proposing three shillings per bushel actually passed, but the veterans were never paid at last in nineteen thirty-one the wheat bounty act made good on the government's promised to pay for wheat at the staggeringly low price of four and a half Pence per bushel. Let's put this in perspective Pence equivalent to pennies a shilling twelve Pence into their twenty shillings in a pound in today's market one. British pound is worth about a buck fifty. So these veterans were being promised smallish sums of money to start and delivered way. Less originally promised a fifth of a pound per bushel and settling for just one twentieth of a pound per bushel ten times less than what was promised. However, by this point, the veterans were desperate to make money off their wheat crops, and the stage was set for modestly fruitful harvest, no one could have anticipated. What happened next in the analysis of history? There's perhaps no stranger Afo. The Australian IMO a flightless bird. The can stand about six to half feet. That's two meters. Tall and weigh close to one hundred pounds. That's forty five kilograms and at an even stranger battle of man with machine-gun versus giant bird, the giant bird one. But in warfare. It's essential to know the enemy, so let's pause and examine the bird the dogs. The veterans. We spoke with Eric Slovak bird keeper at the Smithsonian national zoological park, he said ammos are solitary for the most part. They do get together in breeding seasons, but emus would prefer to be by themselves. The exception is when their foraging Slovak lichens that behavior to humans going out solo to a fast-food lunch. He said, you're at McDonalds around lots of people, but you're not socializing. You're just there for the food. Okay. So they're big solitary hungry birds. Not much of a threat. Right. Multiply that Emilia envisioning by twenty thousand that's how many descended upon Western Australia in nineteen thirty two until a decade earlier in nineteen twenty two emus had been a protected species. After that time they were reclassified as vermin Slovak explained. They'll eat anything. They can get their mouths on without hunting. They're grazers. They like nuts and berries baby grasses, which brings us back to wheat yet. They'll eat that faced with a seemingly endless buffet of it. The opportunistic birds homed in on the veterans plots beaten down by weather at a volatile financial market. The veterans leaned hard on the government help us they implored so one major GP w Meredith bound up leading a military offensive against the emails, but there were a few conditions. The veterans head to foot the Bill for the munition Lewis machine guns were used in EMU combat and the veterans had to provide food and lodging for the men assigned. To this curious mission as a side note as cinema tougher from FOX movie tone, accompanied the military to film, the Email effort historians assume the footage would have been used in propaganda films to illustrate how the government was aiding its veterans, but spoiler alert the mission didn't go exactly as planned armed with the knowledge that had slingshot can take down an ordinary bird, you might hazard, a guess that a machine gun could wipe out Imos easily, but you would be wrong Imos are made to run and win shot out. They're going to panic and they won't move at any reliable direction and Imos legs had neck move with elegant fluidity while their bodies. Stay parallel to the ground Slovak explained the body looks like a wave legs. Good left. The head goes to the right, and they run in all different directions like dropped marbles Meredith and his men couldn't get a straight shot at the emus who stayed out of range of machine guns. Even when enterprising veterans justed putting them on vehicles and pursuing the birds as they ran the military wasted a ton of ammunition. Only. Two hundred birds of the twenty thousand were actually killed and not only the emails evade the troops. They destroyed even more farmland in the process tearing up the ground wherever they ran the veterans were dispirited and their land was devastated. Meredith had a lot to answer for why had so much ammunition been wasted. And was the effort, even humane. Then there was the matter of money veterans promised to pay for the IMO, but the mission ultimately failed could be forgiven. This example, ridiculous history. Can't be tied up conclusively with a tidy bow and some details such as who was ultimately held responsible. For the cost of the munition are unclear we do know that the veterans learned painfully from past performance that rifles not machine guns or the best way to handle nuisance EMAS. They continued their war in a one to one battle veteran against bird. And the Australian government later place to bounty on EMAS to help control the population. But finally, we do suspect that the FOX and Matale gopher gots epoch B-roll while on location.

Australia Western Australia Meredith Australian Government Pence Mcdonalds Senate Imos Smithsonian National Zoologica Gotland FOX Perth Emilia Ammos Two Hundred Twenty Two Thousan Forty Five Kilograms
Dunkumentary: the first dunk in women's college history

30 For 30 Podcasts

05:29 min | 2 years ago

Dunkumentary: the first dunk in women's college history

"Of perhaps the first women's dunk in college basketball history. It is also a bit of a mystery caper as well, I'll say that there is lots of controversy and lots we don't know about who the first woman to dunk is certainly Cheryl Miller is in the conversation. There is reporting that she did. So in high school. Cool. But this is about a college dunk about someone far less famous than Cheryl Miller and about something that was caught and lost on tape. Kate feagin, one of our favorite reporters tells the story. And again, if you like this one, you can check out the whole donkey memory series at ESPN dot com slash documentaries. Let's get to Kate story. This one is called missing milestone. It was two thousand nine in a sports reporter named read Albert Godley was researching a story for the Wall Street Journal. This is read talking to sportscenter that year, and the theme was that women's college basketball going above the Ren. And of course, he can write that without, you know, Google searching the first woman to slam dunk. He learned that the first dunk can happen twenty-five years earlier. I notice, you know, researching it in fact checking that there just wasn't that much information about it. And then it was sort of shaky and you'd read, you know, one story, and it would have won facts. And then a contradicting factor and other story read decided to find out what he could from someone who'd actually seem the dunk and I ended up talking to kitty blakemore kitty blakemore former coach at West Virginia university. It was a player on kitty squad who threw down that first dunk in a game. And I kind of asked her, you know, kiddie lake WI fi. Is it so shaky like aren't there no photos of this thing? And she said, well, there was this video. And I said great where where's that? Can. We get a hold of inch said, well, I tried to get the tape. And that's a whole nother story. Do you want to hear that? Kagin and MRs documentaries of podcast miniseries from PS PIN at celebrates the dunk in all its glory. This episode is the story of an early milestone in women's basketball in how it was lost to history. We'll get back to read Alber Gotti, the reporter in a few minutes. But our story of the first in the missing tape actually starts in nineteen Eighty-three. Coach blakemore was building her women's basketball team, the mountaineers at West Virginia university, a friend tipped her off to a tall teenager from Ohio who she might want to recruit. Her name, georgeanne wells. I kind of was like course to playing basketball because my height and being probably at in fifth grade six feet, maybe that was pretty tall by senior year of high school georgeanne was six foot six and still growing. In fact, she was about a head taller than most of the other players on the court and West Virginia wanted a really tall player in the back of coach blakemore is mine was the idea that maybe her little team could make history they can have the first female player to ever dunk blakemore successfully recruited georgeanne, she'd never dunked in high school the blakemore new the coaching staff could train her slam dunk, slam dunk slam done after a while. I mean, you're slammed up you're not used to doing that. I it can wear and tear almost like blisters on your hands with all this hard work and practice that I was doing better happen soon. Practice was no problem. But games were different. Every time. She tried to dunk in the game. They would grab hold over shorts or. Hold of her. So she couldn't dunk. Let's the back for minute and understand why at this point in women's basketball. No one had ever dunked. First of all the WNBA didn't exist yet and wouldn't for almost another fifteen years, but even college ball which had been around for a while. It was still developing. In fact, this was a critical moment because title nine had passed about a decade earlier so title nine states that any educational institution that receives federal funding is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of sex. This is Cheryl cookie in associate professor of American studies at Purdue in practice the new title nine law requires public schools have proportional funding athletics. So for example, if you've sixty percent girls in your school girls, receive sixty percent of funding as a result girl started playing more sports after the law passed when you have more girls more women playing sport and more access. There's an increased talent pool and the level of of competition is raised as a result. I think it also. So shifted the cultural expectations around what girls and women were capable of. Jan was part of that very first generation of girls witting creased access to playing sports. It was a moment. When women's basketball was developing and growing away at hadn't previously enjoyed gen she played her own small part and pushing the game forward. In her sophomore year with the D one mountaineers her squad traveled Elkins West Virginia there they played the university of Charleston golden eagles a detour team.

Basketball Cheryl Miller Coach Blakemore Georgeanne West Virginia University Reporter Kate Feagin Elkins West Virginia Espn Google West Virginia Wall Street Journal Alber Gotti Wnba Albert Godley University Of Charleston Golde WI Ohio Purdue Associate Professor
"decades earlier" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"decades earlier" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Donald Trump was running. Recall. He was perceived by much of the left as a joke much of the country as a joke. Arianna Huffington didn't even cover his race in politics. She said because it was such a joke. She covered him in entertainment. Oops. He won the nomination. Trump was called a racist. He's called a bigot. He was called ignorant. Called fascists. And he was called Dead Man Walking because he was gonna lose by a huge margin is going to be a landslide. How could anybody possibly elect somebody this incompetent inexperienced? This person who makes so many gaffes mistakes he'll never ever ever win. Consequently when Trump tried to get people to assist him. He couldn't go to the A-List. He couldn't go to the be list. He had to go to people like Paul Manafort. Manafort with relevant decades earlier when he was being countered during the convention fighting nineteen seventy six, but I hadn't heard his name years. He pops up. So frankly, the media is in part complicit for some of these people that Donald Trump had to rely on. Maligned him as a bigot? You characterize him as a bigger. So therefore anybody who worked for him his shamed? It's working for a bigot. And you call him a dead loser. And then you're shocked. They can't get a less people to join his campaign with better reputations. Now, I was watching in vain this morning for some pundit or some host on CNN and MSNBC to mention when they were talking about this being the first real evidence of collusion. I thought that sooner or later somebody would mention that Trump fire this guy. Never heard it. He worked for Trump a very brief period of time. Are he lied to vice President Mike Pence about his ties to Russia? He got fired. Wasn't even mentioned. Now pelosi. Literally dared Trump to put a Bill on the floor because after all your caucus not behind you on the wall it won't pass. She said to him. The.

Donald Trump Arianna Huffington Paul Manafort Mike Pence pelosi CNN vice President MSNBC Russia
A look back at Pearl Harbor

Investor's Edge

00:31 sec | 3 years ago

A look back at Pearl Harbor

"Young listeners maybe call asking others where they were when they learned of the nine eleven attacks. Those were around decades earlier, we're asking friends and loved ones where were you? When you heard of the Japanese tack on Pearl Harbor hours later, president Franklin D Roosevelt made one of the most famous radio addresses ever to Americans. Little lamb. It drew America into World War Two.

President Franklin D Roosevelt Pearl Harbor America