3 Burst results for "Deborah War"

"deborah war" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"deborah war" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"The Seattle Police Department is in a staffing crisis. A lot of officers have left, but the City Council has rejected a plan to spend the millions they saved because of those departures to keep the remaining officers on the job. Let's go live now to Cairo radios. Hannah Scott, What's going on here? Hannah? Right. So this actually married very closely. A lot of the discussion. We heard back when the protest over the death of George Floyd was going on, and we heard so much about defunding the police. This was the supplemental budget that mid year budget that the council was dealing with yesterday and what they're Talking about his $15 million in savings that was budgeted for the Seattle Police Department for 2021, but is now savings because they've lost hundreds of officers all told in the last 18 months. The Seattle Police Department has lost 300 officers Now they've hired 100. So that's a net loss still of 200. It's really had a huge impact on so much of the public safety in the cities. Uh, we had just a couple of months ago We got to release of The from the SPD about the response times that they were having a for priority one calls, which are your most serious types of calls. They had double digit increases to how long it took to get to some of these cars more than 12 minutes for priority to calls that still like somebody breaking into your house or something like that. There was 60 minutes in some areas of the city that it took. For those 911 calls to be responded to. So this staffing crisis is a huge problem and the crisis But at the same time you've got the city working to move certain parts of the things that used to be under the control of the police department out of the police department That's so far included your 911 calls and some of the traffic operations things. And then also, there's this effort to invest a lot of public safety dollars in human services instead for things like you just care program to, um, also addressed things like gun violence, invest in alternatives like community passageways, various different programs that they're looking to, and then, eventually, more mental health workers so kind of following what some of the other states like Colorado and Oregon have done with similar programs like Korkut's where you Have Mental health workers who respond to the calls that maybe don't need to go to police. I think there was an analysis done that. The council member Andrew Lewis cited yesterday that said 75% of the calls that Seattle police go to Don't need to be Seattle Police go into them right, so that But the but the deal is is that that's going to take a long time to get taking alright? Those services in place right now, So we're waiting for that. Who do you call? Exactly. So what we have on the table yesterday was a few different possibilities for this. $15 Million.01 was to use three million of it for hiring and retention. Part of that would have been a couple $100,000 for $15,000 retention and hiring bonuses for officers to keep those we have. That was from council member Alex Peterson supported by Deborah Wars, and it was rejected. Then he had another one. Another version that was just one million for similar similar spending. And that also was rejecting this time. This time, 72. It was just one vote shy. And then I'm sorry, 54. It was one vote shy. Then Shamas want wanted to take more money from the $15 million and not leave as much that was going to be in there that failed. In the end. What we had was a hybrid passing $15 million in savings about 10 million will stay with the Seattle Police Department. But it's going to take things like technology and some other kind of procedural stuff that they need to do not for that hiring and retention bonuses, so no extra money to give bonuses to new hires and or retain the officers that they have. Mayor Durkan had before this vote yesterday, and the police chief had put out a statement really strongly encouraging the Council of Super Pass this Because they again as we talked about the need to have a solid Seattle police force and tell some of these other programs are put up. And at the same time, the mayor has pointed out that she's been able to put millions of dollars into some of these alternatives. Already so they just aren't up and running yet they haven't been brought to scale so that you can do both was appointed. But as you workers by the police departures continuing or they're still going on then so we're still there are the offices. The police are defunding themselves essentially well, The police are there. They're leaving because they're you know, they don't feel supported Essentially because of the climate here, and right now you have. I believe it's about 100 officers who are basically burning up their their vacation and sick time and all of that kind of thing, and the belief is that about half of that number will leave at the end of that time. So that we're still going to see this really big influx of officers leaving And the problem is that even though we've hired 100 new officers you have It takes a long time for the new cop to get up to speed right and to be the same as, say the veteran cop who's leaving the force. So it's not, you know apples to apples comparison. It's not the same thing. When you're losing a lot of long time officers so make you know there is definitely a crisis going on within the Seattle Police Department seeing that show up in crime statistics. Well, and that's the thing..

Alex Peterson Hannah Scott $15,000 George Floyd $15 million Andrew Lewis 75% 60 minutes 100 Hannah 300 officers Deborah Wars one million 200 2021 100 new officers Seattle Police Department yesterday Seattle Police 54
"deborah war" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"deborah war" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Dave Ross 36 year Old Morning news. It's crisis that one unnoticed or ignored for years, but the issue of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls. Is finally being bumped up on the priority list, largely because of the efforts of some local Native American women with the report here is Cairo Radios Hannah Scott Violence against Native American women and girls is no secret to tribal communities, but from law enforcement to media and beyond. That disproportionately high number of Native American women to go missing or be murder has never been given the attention it requires, until now, from the local to the state and national level. This year's national missing Murdered Indigenous Women Day of Remembrance was surrounded by announcements highlighting fresh efforts to address this issue, including President Biden, announcing this week. He was making, addressing missing and murdered Native American women and girls a priority. And then the news yesterday from our state attorney general that he will be coordinating a new task force that will look into why these rates are so high, especially in Washington state attention now going toward missing and murdered indigenous women and girls, a direct result of years of efforts from Native American women. Including local leaders here in our state. It's no accident that the three Debs got this done. Deborah War is Debra Licking off in Interior Secretary Damn! Collins may being in a city level and being elected an indigenous dead lechon off being in a state level and being indigenous and Secretary of Interior Dept. Collins. Who took to the national level, so we have three native women, two of which are lawyers, all of them elected. Lived experience advocates lawyers educators involved in Indian country This is why REPRESENTATION matters. Seattle City Council member Deborah War is among those leading efforts for systemic change in this area and how missing and murdered native peoples are handled. Eiji Ferguson With GENERAL ECON off Is doing the statewide task force with a budget provides self so they're actually funding it. So we we did all this and fall of 2019 at the city level, getting all of our information from the grassroots organization trusted messengers that is the sale Indian Health Board the Urban Indian Health Institute, which is Abigail Echo Hawk. I just can't tell you how natural how organic the progression has been in which it's the native women. Like I said advocate scholars, lawyers, leaders, mothers, daughters even before we were elected. We were involved in this process into this struggle back in 2016 the first real attention this is you got came from a Canadian report that first drew widespread attention to the issue. And in 2018, Seattle's urban Indian Health Institute, published a report detail ng the issue Our end around the U. S. Urban Indian Health Institute, then presented that report in war is his committee at the City Council, revealing that in their work of 71 major cities, Seattle ranked number one with the highest number of cases of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls, along with syriza of recommendations that were presented in that meeting. Then in September of 2019 War is sponsored a resolution acknowledging the responsibility to address this issue, and in November when the budget passed, $200,000 was included to specifically address the issue of murdered and missing endangered women and girls. Including for a specific position within the Seattle police Department. But other than that there hasn't been much funding at any level. And then this week as we said the Biden administration declared a proclamation on missing and murdered indigenous person's awareness Day on along with that yesterday we heard from a J. Ferguson about this new statewide task force. You name it. Bring them around the table with a common purpose. Compiling all the information of folks out and a total individual stories from families from tribes from long first maidens. He's bring all that together. For the very first time. We're seeing the voices of families being elevated the voices of survivors and we're working towards the change that our community has been shouting and crying. For Abigail Echo Hawk was Seattle's urban Indian Health Institute that published that initial report back in, 2018 says. This is a long time coming. We have to address this crisis. We cannot continue to let people die. This task force is going to be one of the ones that is truly representative and it's going to be led by the need. Of tribal communities or, as is thrilled to have all of this attention coming towards this issue and looks forward to what comes next. One thing that sticks out at her, though, here we are again, starting with Missing and murdered, saying government when our women go missing are girls When they go missing, you have to go looking for them. They can't just disappear. And this has been going on for decades. There is Hannah Scott. The problem here, of course, is that It's sometimes unclear as to whether tribal or non tribal authorities investigate these things, and it goes back to sexual assault in the U. S. Native American women are more than twice as likely to experience violence at any other demographic group, One in three native women is sexually assaulted during her life. 67% of those results are perpetrated by non Natives. 8 41 traffic coming up on Seattle's Morning news. Get.

Dave Ross Eiji Ferguson 2018 2016 $200,000 September of 2019 November Abigail Echo Hawk One Indian Health Board U. S. Urban Indian Health Inst yesterday 67% J. Ferguson Washington Urban Indian Health Institute 36 year Deborah War Seattle police Department U. S.
Seattle City Council votes to cut Seattle Police Budget, transfer 911 and parking enforcement out

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:59 sec | 2 years ago

Seattle City Council votes to cut Seattle Police Budget, transfer 911 and parking enforcement out

"With the week off and in the news cuts forced by covert and major changes to the police department. Among the big issues on the 2021 Seattle City budget, which come was Ryan Harris says. Was approved by 8 to 1 City Council vote just a little bit again. The cuts proposed for Seattle police amount to nearly 20% and include moving 911 and parking enforcement out of SPD, which the council approved in a separate bill. Many public commenters aligned with council member Shama Sawant are unhappy. The cuts aren't bigger. But council member Deborah War is calls 50% police de funding a slogan When you undo these type of racist institutions, it doesn't happen because you have a chance in a T shirt. It's being in the trench. She's in. Some of us have been there a long time moving forward Marchi towards a plan to do right by everybody. The council did have to make cuts to different departments because tax revenue has dropped during the pandemic. But it also approved an increase in the city's $20 tab. Feet of $40 to go toward transportation improvements.

Seattle City Ryan Harris Shama Sawant Deborah War Police Department City Council Seattle Marchi