17 Burst results for "Deborah Solomon"

"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:51 min | 2 years ago

"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We look at whether New Jersey governors Phil Murphy's budget address was a sign of a new era of togetherness and compromise in the Garden State that is coming up in five minutes. You're listening to weekend edition here on WNYC considered to be Japan's most celebrated literary. You work. The tale of Ganji is sometimes called the world's first novel written around the year one thousand it has inspired artists in Japan for centuries and a new exhibition at the met museum presents the world of Ganji with works of art that in many cases, have never left Japan. WNYC's? Art critic Deborah Solomon spoke to Richard Hake about the show. Okay. Let's start with the actual story for those who don't know. What is the tail all about? Sure. Yeah. The tale of Ganji is one of the great masterpieces of Japanese culture. It tells the story of Ganji the so-called radiant prince who early on was removed from the line of imperial succession by his father the emperor. Because his mother was a concubine and spends the rest of his life trying to regain his position largely through amorous pursuits. He sort of the Don Juan Japan. It's not a short novel, it consists of thirteen hundred pages in English translate. Mission with five hundred characters very few of whom have actual name. So I wouldn't say it's a b tree. All right. So how does the exhibit though present the story? What's fascinating about the show. Is that it puts? I would say a feminist spin on the subject. Now, you can't put a feminist spin on Ganji was a seducer. He raped women. He's not really a model of political correctness. Don, Juan exactly he's not a model of a twentieth century masculinity. So instead the show focuses on the author. This book was written by a woman in the early eleventh century, which is like the middle ages. And her name was lady more Asaka Sheikhabad very little is known about her. She was married and after her husband died, she supposedly sat down and wrote this massive novel. She began in shrine it said while looking out over calm waters and many artists over the centuries have chosen to depict her in the. Act of conceiving the novel. So there were a beautiful portraits of her in the show, we see her seated on the ground at her desk with her scrolls of paper and her paintbrush. She wasn't writing with a pen. She was using a brush because she used calligraphy to compose her novel. So it's interesting that the focus is largely on her a writer. So if the focus is so much on the authored, you get a sense of the story of Ganji in the works on not that much. I felt like the novel is a bit short-changed. But on the other hand, the objects are gorgeous to look at the show gathers thousand years worth of work by fans in Mirer who are working in all different mediums from scroll painting to folding screens. You have KOMO news in the show embroidered with images of Ganji. And you also have some manga the show ends with contemporary comic books, which which lock a bit like Disney cells and and Disney action. Pinheiro's really? So we had a thousand years of interpretations of Ganci and lady Muir sake. So since we're dealing with a thousand years, what are some of the the works that stood out for you? Okay. Well, the show includes includes a lot of pop culture relics, including playing cards and a matching game composed from painted clam shells. They're interesting to see. But for me the highlight of the show was the folding screens, which or large scale they deliver a lot of aesthetic on their golden green. They're beautiful objects. And and you see from this show how essential the idea of the screen is to Japanese culture because Ganji is often looking at his love objects from afar, there's so much that remains hidden or screened in the novel. We don't see images of Ganji embracing his girlfriend's. It's more about the pursuit and the distance that separates lover. So the screen in the sense. Seems like the perfect symbol of the novel. So if you don't have time to read the book, and you go see the exhibit. Does it tell the story? I don't wanna make the exhibit sound like monarch notes substitute for the novel. It's now, but it is it doesn't stay on its own as a beautiful show in which you learn about Japanese culture over the centuries. The tale of Ganji Japanese classic illuminated is now at the met museum through June. Deborah Solomon is WNYC's. Art critic Debra thank you so much. Thank you. Richard WNYC's, Richard Hake right there, Bill de Blasio may be mayor of New York, but he will never put aside. His love of Boston baseball on WNYC yesterday host Brian Lehrer a Yankees fan. Gently teased the mayor for attending a Red Sox spring training game last weekend. The mayor was unrepentant every loyal baseball fan or any loyal sports fan appreciates someone who stays true to the team that they grew up with and does not change for political reasons or for expedient reasons. So real fans, I've talked to the city actually get it is that true there. There may be a few different opinions on that opening day is just three weeks away March twenty eighth and yes, according to the text written here. The Boston Red Sox are the defending world champions sunny skies expected today, we're going up to a high of forty seven degrees this afternoon tonight. Rain expected to begin overnight. We'll have a low of thirty seven degrees. Rain to start the day tomorrow. Mostly wrapping up before one o'clock. We'll have a fight high of forty three degrees tomorrow..

Ganji WNYC Deborah Solomon Japan Don Juan Japan New Jersey Boston Red Sox Richard Hake baseball Phil Murphy Disney Asaka Sheikhabad Richard WNYC KOMO Debra Mirer writer Pinheiro
"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:19 min | 2 years ago

"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Steve Inskeep. In Washington DC. And I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. President Trump's former lawyer Michael Cohen will be speaking to congress next week Trump's former adviser Roger stone has been ordered not to speak at all not publicly about his case. Anyway, that's the order from a federal judge. They are two of the Trump associates. Charged in special counsel Robert Muller's investigation, which reportedly could wrap up sometime soon. Kimberly Ueli is with us. She's a lawyer who worked for the independent counsel during the whitewater investigation. Good morning. Good morning. So there have been these reports that Muller's investigation could be reaching an end at some point soon having been through this yourself. Are you seeing signs of that? Well, I'm hearing signs of that. I think in today's day j-, it's difficult to have any confidence unless we actually have an official announcement from the Justice department or a public filing. But that is what we're hearing both informally as well. As reportedly the lawyers are packing up and going back to their sort of home jobs at the department of Justice and other places. Oh, you know that. I mean, you've actually spoken to people who are who are packing up. And I haven't personally spoken to people. But that's my understanding. And you know, it's been two years I would actually expect based on my experience that the investigation would continue Ken Starr's investigation was four years with him. And then additional years on either end with other independent counsel that either preceded him or came after him. So I would think this is actually a pretty quick job. I'm such a widely ranging investigation that Mr. Mueller has under his under his tutelage. And I guess I guess it's worth saying. I mean, a lot of the legal activity in cases could go on even when the special counsel's investigation itself. Has closed. How will we know that it has closed? I mean will there be an announcement from the Justice department? Will there be a report that goes to congress? And or a report that we made public does, you know, that's the that's a really important question. Under Ken Starr. There was a statute in place that required that there'd be a report to congress that statutes expired, and so what we have is an internal regulation, which isn't as powerful in terms of the law as a statute and under that it says that the report the one that I think most people are interested in is confidential. And that goes from Mr. Muller to the attorney general, and then it would be up to the attorney general to make that public and pursuant to DOJ guidelines which governs at typically, it would not be made public. So Mr. bar has a tremendous amount of discretion going forward as to how much if any of the actual facts that independent counsel gathered are made public to the American public order, congress, which was something Democrats are very concerned about when he didn't make a promise that he would make all this public during his. Information hearings last week. Can can I just ask you Michael Cohen set to publicly testify on the hill next week. This is someone who was President Trump's lawyer knew him. So well what what do you expect? What are you looking for their? Well, I think it's going to be an interesting thing for the American public to watch someone actually tell his story about what his relationship was with with Mr. Trump. I think this is such a complicated scheme, so many sort of subplots going on that it's important that people understand in common sense terms. What at least one person's experience wasn't. I I think that will be really important especially to the if there's going to have to be a political solution. If any to any problems at at the up, upper echelons of the White House, it's going to have to happen in congress and not through the independent counsel, and very briefly, the gag order on Roger stone. What what are the implications of that? Well, if you violates at a second time, I think his he will end up in jail. But it's really stunning that he would so brazenly flout the thorny of the court. Put this particular judge in potential harm. I think we are in an age where there are very few boundaries, and people are acting in ways that are just unacceptable, and I. Time so much to talk about Kimberly weather. Thanks, my pleasure. It's morning edition on WNYC. I'm Richard Hake. Giovanni Battista Moroni was an Italian painter in the sixteenth century who made extremely naturalistic paintings of his subjects. What is it here? Insta- reality instead of focusing on beauty often, let others to criticize his work a new exhibit of Maroney's work. That includes nearly two dozen paintings is now on view at the Frick collection. It's the first time a major show has been dedicated to him in North America and WNYC's. Art critic Deborah Solomon has been there to see it. And she joins us now. Hi, deborah. Hi, richard. I give us a little background on Maroney Maroney is somebody you have not heard of. He's the renaissance artist who had the misfortune to live during the kind of quiet gap after Leonardo died, and before Caravaggio came to prominence. It was kind of a dark ages the late renaissance, and how would you describe his style of painting, and who do you paying well? The main thing you need to know about him is he never went. To Florence or Rome, the art capitalize. Instead, he stayed in his native Bergamo, oh in the hills north of Milan, the Alps the Alps the Italian Alps, exactly. So he was a little bit isolated from the mainstream currents of renaissance are and chose to work in what is largely considered a naturalistic style. Meaning avoid an idealization and painting the local Lombard elite with a fair amount of directness and realism. So can you give some examples of what they look like? Well, most of them are society portrait's that depict people with often red hair. Okay. Dressed in pink clothes, and I learned that pink was actually the favorite color during the renaissance just the way blue is now considered appropriate for boys. The figures are often described as realistic. Although I didn't find them completely convincing a lot of the faces have the same expression from one. Portrait to the next many of the sitters kind of looked to the side and is a little suspiciously. And to me, they look like characters in a mystery novel. Why did they all look so suspicious on though, the most famous painting is of a tradesman? It's called the Taylor and is on view at this show, a considered his best. The Taylor is a true masterpiece. It is now here from London the National Gallery in London, and it's completely different than all the other works in the show. I think because it depicts somebody who is working at his craft rather than just posing in his silks. We see him in. What is probably his shop. It's a little bit dim their shadows around him. He's holding a giant pair of scissors and about to cut a piece of cloth, and his expression is different than all the others. He has we psychological depth. And to me he sort of a stand in for the artist he has to clothe the town almost like a self portrait. It is. They don't know who the. Sitter is I actually asked the curator if this could be a self portrait. And she said, we don't really know what Moroni look like. Wow. So there are many unknowns. But I think the Taylor is a true masterwork. It's worth seeing the show for that one gripping painting, which I think can hold it. So next to a Caravaggio is so intense. It really rises above the kind of gentility of the other work in the show over the years. Some critics have dismissed his work while others have praised his style. How does this exhibit want us to consider Maroney? I think the show would like to rehabilitate him as a loss. Genius a genius. He was not. But I think it's fair to re- rehabilitate him as an okay painter who occasionally really hit it big up in the Alps? The exactly let's go. We're only the riches of renaissance portraiture is now at the Frick collection through June second and Deborah the frigates closing for renovation. Yes. Can you believe it they'll be moving their works next year into the space that is now known as the Matt Royer three? Three blocks away, and which was previously known as the Whitney museum. And which no doubt will have a new name. Once the freight moves in we seem to be in a state of permanent museum expansions museums in a constant state of movement. Really? It's too much camped anyone sits down, Deborah Solomon WNYC's. Art critic, thanks so much..

congress Robert Muller Maroney Maroney President Trump special counsel WNYC Ken Starr Kimberly Ueli deborah Frick collection Justice department Roger stone Taylor Caravaggio Trump associates Michael Cohen Richard Hake Steve Inskeep Deborah Solomon WNYC Washington DC
"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Spent time checking out the sculptures. She is with us now. Hi, deborah. Hi, richard. So how would you describe the work check? It is known for Arlene check, it is known for her use up ceramics, and you might not think of ceramic as a material for large scale or even medium-scale sculptress. Right. You may think of teacups instead and delicate things, but she has elevated ceramics to the prestige that older materials like marble and bronze once commanded. Okay. Let's talk about the sculptures that she did create for Madison Square park. I wear in the park. Are they are by the shake shack? The shake shack is its own sculpture installation is called full steam ahead. And it's at the northern end of the park beside a nineteenth century statue of Admiral, David Farragut. The famous navy leader who once said damn the torpedoes full. Steam ahead. So this was the site. She was given which is not an easy site for a contemporary artist. Put into any kind of context she hasn't really done public art before. So can you describe what the works? Look like. Yeah. Well, what's really interesting is public art often consists of some hulking monolith. That makes us feel dwarfed in scale, but she went for human sized pieces and assembly or a group of six separate sculptures around the reflecting pool. And you think of them as a kind of family of objects each one is very different has its own personality. You would think they were done by different artists. One sculpture consists of a female nude ten feet long hand carved from wood. She's a stable as a ship. She looks like a big boat stating sitting on the steps in front of Admiral Farragut, whereas some of the other sculptures are more abstract and fragile one of them alludes to the statue of liberty, and is missing an arm, and you get a Rubio range personalities the way you do in any family, and you think about the pieces in relation to each other. And may even experience a sense of almost domestic intimacy, which is very unusual for public sculpture. So are they abstract or are they more figurative? Oh, what's interesting is a lot of contemporary artists. Don't see that. It's a clear cut distinction anymore. The works are figurative and their abstract. They see the line between them as a false one. So this piece is both very abstract and very figurative and one of my favorite parts of it is is that it includes twelve stools each a different color, a different height. They're called skirted seats. They have fake drapery along the sides like old nineteenth century chairs. You can actually sit and linger. It's an a piece that encourages you to stay you can touch the sculptures. You can climb on the sculptures. I saw a lot of kids in the park the day. I was there climbing into the lap of the woman seated on the steps who looks like Admiral, Farragut girlfriend have enormous charisma. So you seem to really like this installation. And you're telling people to go out in the cold and spend some time there. Absolutely. There are certain advantages of seeing public sculpture in the winter. And one thing is you can see the installation against a backdrop of their winter tree branches reaching for the sky. It's a beautiful Tableau. And today is winter solstice. There will be a special ceremony at the site of the sculpture at five complete with music and free hot chocolate. Well, that's nice warm way to spend the day, exactly. All steam ahead is now on view at Madison Square park through April. Deborah Solomon is WNYC's art critic and the author of several books on American art, Debra thank you. Thank you. Richard support for WNYC comes from the.

Madison Square park Admiral Farragut deborah richard Deborah Solomon WNYC Farragut Arlene navy Rubio ten feet
"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Than three hundred fifty works of art from the complex and controversial artist that investigate his prolific career and influential life, the show was the first of its kind at a major US museum since one thousand nine hundred eighty nine and officially opens this Monday, Richard. Hake spoke with WNYC's. Art critic, Deborah Solomon about the exhibit. So Andy Warhol he's so well known most people even if they're not big art lovers. Noah's work what's new about this exhibit, and what what more can people. Learn about him. It's an excellent question. I myself was feeling reluctant about the show thinking, we know so much about him and also his whole persona the gadfly in the silver mop like wig going around socializing with celebrities didn't necessarily seem perfect for this time. He's not somebody known for his moral, compass. Let's put it that way. But I thought the show does manage to reinvent him. It's very sober serious. Elegant and gorgeous show that really plays down the celebrity aspects of his career and plays up his darker impulses. What really helps the show is that his famous society pictures. Many of people we admire scientists, Deborah, Harry and Liza Minnelli and artists including Francesco Clemente are put off in their own space. They're not in the main part of the show, and I thought that allowed us to concentrate on his larger themes and Deborah war homemade so much art in his lifetime. And this is a big show. What works you're on view in. How's it organized? Well, one thing that struck me as the scale of the paintings by now, we know the images we've seen them on thousands of postcards and refrigerator, magnets, right? And they're all stamp size. But to see these massive paintings. Some of which are fifteen feet tall. His portrait of Mao stands. Fifteen feet tall is is to be reminded of his ambition and the way in which his art connects to the heroic scale of American painting and that began in the nineteen fifties artists like Pollock Barnett Newman Rothko worked on what is known as a heroic or monumental scale their painters paintings hovered over you, you weren't peering into them as a window. They weren't environment and wore whole worked on a similar scale. But of course, instead of aiming for transcendence, he's giving a soup cans or SA greens dams or dollar bills. Among other subjects clearly, you know, Warhol's work. So for you seeing this show, really what stood out or surprised you? I still love the early work from the sixties when you see him transitioning from the illustrator that he had been in the fifties. Into a major American artist any achieved this largely through the repetition. Of images. I don't mean repeating from one painting to the next, but within each painting, he repeats the image. So you get thirty Mona Lisa's. For instance, you get thirty six image. Suit cans, exactly lots of soup cans, and that was really profound because I think in repeating images he did capture something essential about America. Both the bounty of this country. It's a land of plenty right? It's a land of plenty. But also the kind of motion numbness that can come from seeing the same image again. And again now, of course, Warhol's known for that comment about everyone being famous for fifteen minutes. He was a regular at studio fifty four he hung out with celebrities. How does that embrace of celebrity and culture fit into his work? And this retrospect, I think what's great about the show is it takes us away from the question of celebrity and looks at his darker themes, death disaster, the electric tram shootings the assassination of JFK, and we have become more violent world since Andy made those paintings. So he was prophetic insane. Not only the consumerism of this country that would come to define. But also. The violence. Sadly, but the upside is I don't think we've become inured to violence as he suggested in his work by repeating images again. And again, I think I think each tragedy in this country still registers very deeply right now. Andy Warhol from a to b and back again is now at the Whitney through March of next year. And Deborah Solomon is WNYC's. Art critic Debra thank you so much. Thank you. Richard WNYC is supported by Columbia, Pictures and stage six presenting the front runner starring Hugh Jackman based on the story of presidential hopeful, Gary Hart's rise and fall in American politics directed by Jason Reitman now playing in select theaters swangalleries with literature on view now auction November thirteenth, including signed type scripts from Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit, four fifty one. An unbound preapproved copy of Stephen king's it more information at swangalleries dot com. Next time on.

Andy Warhol Deborah Solomon Noah Deborah Richard WNYC Pollock Barnett Newman Rothko WNYC US Hake Mona Lisa Stephen king Jason Reitman Hugh Jackman Mao Ray Bradbury Francesco Clemente America Liza Minnelli Columbia
"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Art from the complex and controversial artist that investigate his prolific career and influential life, the show was the first of its kind at a major US museum since one thousand nine hundred eighty nine and officially opens this Monday, Richard Hake spoke with WNYC's art critic, Deborah Solomon about the exhibit. So Andy Warhol he's so well-known most people even if they're not big art lovers. Noah's work what's new about this exhibit, and what what more can people. Learn about him. It's an excellent question. I myself was feeling reluctant about the show thinking, we know so much about him and also his whole persona the gadfly in the silver mop like wig going around socializing with celebrities. Didn't necessarily seem perfect for this time. He's not somebody known for his moral, compass put it that way. But I thought the show does manage to reinvent him. It's very sober serious. Elegant and gorgeous show that really plays down the celebrity aspects of his career and plays up his darker impulses. What really helps the show is that has famous society pictures. Many of people we admire scientist, Deborah, Harry and Liza Minnelli and artists including Francesco Clemente are put off in their own space. They're not in the main part of the show. And I thought that allowed us to concentrate on his larger themes and Deborah Warhol made so much art in his lifetime. And this is a big show. What works are on view. And how's it organized? Well, one thing that struck me as the scale of the paintings by now, we know the images we've seen them on thousands of postcards and refrigerator, magnets, right? And they're all stamp size. But to see these massive paintings. Some of which are fifteen feet tall. His portrait of Mao stands. Fifteen feet tall is is to be reminded of his ambition and the way in which his art connects to the heroic scale of American painting and that began in the nineteen fifties artists like Pollock Barnett Newman Rothko worked on what is known as a heroic or monumental scale through painters paintings hovered over you, you weren't peering into them as a window. They weren't environment and Warhol worked on a similar scale. But of course, instead of aiming for transcendence, he's giving a soup cans or s and eight green stamps or dollar bills. Among other subjects clearly, you know, Warhol's work. So for you seeing this show while really what stood out or surprised you? I still love the early work from the sixties when you see him transitioning from the illustrator that he had been in the fifties into a major American artist any achieves this largely through the repetition. Of images. I don't mean repeating from one painting to the next, but within each painting, he repeats the image. So you get thirty Mona Lisa's. For instance, you get thirty six image. Soup cans, exactly lots of soup cans, and that was really profound because I think in repeating images he did capture something essential about America. Both the bounty of this country. It's a land of plenty right? It's a land of plenty. But also, the kind of emotional, numbness that can come from seeing the same image again. And again now, of course, Warhol's known for that comment about everyone being famous for fifteen minutes. He was a regular at studio fifty four he hung out with celebrities. How does that embrace of celebrity and culture fit into his work? And this retrospect, I think what's great about the show is it takes us away from the question of celebrity and looks at his darker themes, death disaster, the electric chair shootings, you've staff Saination of JFK, and we have become more violent world since Andy made those paintings. So he was prophetic in seeing not only the consumerism of this country that would come to define a but also the. The violence. Sadly, but the upside is I don't think we've become inured to violence as he suggested in his work by repeating imitates again. And again, I think I think eats tragedy in this country still registered very deeply right now. Andy Warhol from a to b and back again is now at the Whitney through March of next year. And Deborah Solomon is WNYC's. Art critic Debra thank you so much. Thank you. Richard support. For WNYC comes from doc NYC film festival tomorrow through November fifteenth with more than three hundred documentary premieres and events and hundreds of filmmakers, attending tickets and info at NYC dot net. The.

Deborah Warhol Andy Warhol Deborah Solomon WNYC Noah Deborah Richard Hake US Pollock Barnett Newman Rothko NYC Mona Lisa Mao scientist Francesco Clemente America Liza Minnelli Saination Harry fifteen minutes Fifteen feet
"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Clones running for congress Montclair. Okay. Well, that's covering just about all the bases bringing Pelosi in there, also attacking a Montclair, Mikey that semi key Cheryl getting that all in and just ten seconds, Nancy, right? And Montclair is sometimes I to as the Republic of Montclair because there it's so liberal. But I really I find it interesting that this new tactic calling democratic women unhinged comes at a time. When women are peeling away from the Republican candidates in big numbers. The last poll in the nj eleventh. That's the Weber Mikey Cheryl race found that fifty seven percent of women in the district prefers, Cheryl. And of course, it's not just in New Jersey suburbs. But we're seeing an enormous amount of activism among women all across the country unhinged seems to me to be suggesting don't listen to these women. Don't listen to the metoo movement. Don't listen to Christine Blasi Ford when women get angry they're perceived in our culture as shrill. Or out of control and unhinged. Seems to be the latest iteration of that New Jersey public radio managing editor Nancy Solomon, thanks for joining us. Thanks. David election day is November sixth for more of WNYC's election coverage. Visit WNYC dot org. Over the course of a fifty year career artist. Bruce Nauman has made sculptures photos prints, drawings films, videos, and even more with so much to consider in some of it monumental in size. The museum of modern art is turned over its building in queens MoMA PS one as well as the entire six floor of the main building in midtown to present the first retrospective of now one's career in twenty five years WNYC. Art critic Deborah Solomon has been to both locations. But she's here in the studio with this morning. Hey, Deborah, good morning. I richard. So first let's start with a bit of nouns biography. Well, Bruce Nauman is one of the legends of twentieth century, art. He's he's lean. He's laconic. He's now seventy six years old. He's from California, and he was originally seen as a artist of radical experimentation who made works that look unfinished. Okay. Unfinished and artless that what's his look. So you might see early on a strip of rubber leaning against the wall. Like a broom. And think what does that is that a cast from something that hasn't been finished yet? So was this a part of some kind of art movement. Well, I would say that it was a response to minimalism, and he was trying to get away from the clean. Chris polished surfaces that we saw in so many minimalist geometric pieces, and he was also trying to add a psychological edge to his work, many of his pieces referred to debasement or entrapment or psychological disquiet. And that's something you didn't find it all minimalism, which was completely purged. It seem of psychology and emotion. And what I found fascinating about this show as though he made his reputation in the late sixties and seventies and was originally seen as a Beckett like figure of distress and somebody who was conveying the pain of life when we look at his work. Now, it seems to be prophetic social criticism. It seems to be saying a lot about how we live. Now it touches on the themes of surveillance imprisonment menace by the government. And I feel like he has new meaning for a new generation. I loved the show the exhibits divided between MoMA in midtown and MoMA PS one in queens on why did the museum choose to do that. And what's on exhibited each place? Right. He s one offers more of a history of his work, especially in video. So for younger artists, for instance, would very much need to see the PS one show, which which contains such classic now when pieces as clown torture. Video of a screaming cloud. Okay. That sounds pretty scary. Okay. Exactly. So again, the mood is one of menace. There are also a lot of noisy sound piece. There's a piece of PS one. And it just consists of a male voice screaming get out of my room get out of my head. He's he's clearly not interested in ideal forms of beauty and some of his pieces kind of feel like an adolescent tantrum. I'm back at the main building at MoMA in Manhattan. Right. The sixth floor show at mama's fabulous its own. Self contained show, the interior walls have been taken down to create a law flake space that displays many major Nauman sculptures. In addition to a great sound piece called days, and it consists of voices reciting the days of the week Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday Thursday to create incredible cacophony and disorder. And I feel like only Bruce Nauman, can you? Something as simple and nursery rhyme, like as the days of the week to create total chaos brilliant sound piece. I it sounds like it might be one of those shows that could leave some viewers puzzled. Yes, I think the work is difficult, and it is the kind of show where some people who don't keep up with art might walk in and say, why do I wanna look at this pile of cardboard boxes hanging from the ceiling? But the important thing to remember about Nauman is he's funny. Try to see his bleakness as eumerus and you'll love everything and sometimes he's very corny. There's one piece for instance, called from hand to mouth, which might seem like a reference to the poverty with which artists live, right? That's a traditional cliche living from hand to mouth and the piece consists of an arm a wax arm hanging on the wall get it from hand to mouth detached from the rest of the body. Now, that's kind of a corny joke. Right. Yeah. So there is a mix. There's a mix in his work of of. I would say. Corny humor an unbelievable bleakness. And scary clown scary clowns, and he pulls it off Bruce Nauman disappearing acts is now at MoMA and MoMA PS one through February. Deborah Solomon is WNYC's. Art critic Deborah, thanks a lot. Thank you, Richard. A new play on Broadway. Starring Daniel Radcliffe cherry Jones, and Bobby kind of all a centers on a controversial magazine. Article WNYC's theater critic Jennifer finance says, it's a polished drama. But it's not how journalism works. So there's this diva SAS played by kinda folly. And he's written an article about a suicide in Las Vegas. Only thing is the fact checker that's Radcliffe discovers that dozens of facts that are wrong beginning. But the first sentence the play is then centered around this question because the essay is so well written should it run. Anyway, even if most things in it are not quite right now, that's a no brainer. Either an editor would fix it. Or the magazine would just pull it and pull. It is exactly what Harper's did in real life when faced with this exact article, the performances are wonderful. But it's tough to swallow play that supposedly. Debate about facts when it gets journalism completely wrong. WNYC's theater critic Jennifer vanass, co WNYC's supporters include the New York state health department, reminding overseas travelers that there are measles. Outbreaks in parts of the world,.

Bruce Nauman WNYC Deborah Solomon Montclair Mikey Cheryl New Jersey Deborah Nancy Solomon museum of modern art congress Daniel Radcliffe Christine Blasi Ford Pelosi David Las Vegas Beckett editor California
"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The news from NPR BBC all of this is made possible with your support coming up in just a couple of minutes here on WNYC is our out with this week in politics segments. I had a chance to speak with WNYC's Nancy Solomon this week. That's we're going to be listening to what she's talking about. How national GOP talking points are filtering down to the New Jersey congressional races. And then Richard we're going to hear a conversation about art that that's right? If you're a regular listener to morning edition, you know that Deborah Solomon. We have another Salomon comes in weekly with me and shots about some of the exhibits and the art shows here in New York, guess what? Because it's the pledge drive in. Came in on a Saturday. Deborah Solomon will be here with me talking about art here on weekend edition. Okay. I coming up. I Nancy Solomon the back to back solid album. Then Deborah Solomon, the King Solomon in the next hour. Still ahead. Stay tuned. But right. You know, the right now we are raising the money that keeps WNYC coming to the. So that we're able to produce all of this radio all of the news from NPR weekend edition, all things considered. This is all supported with one phone call right now to eight eight eight three seven six nine six nine two or one online gift at WNYC dot org. Hey, what's up with Shelley from accounting? You mean her warm glow? That's what it is. She finally became a member of WNYC and got a warm glow. As a thank you gift a warm glow. Are you making that up? No, it's a term from economics describing the positive emotion. Some people feel when they help others. I'm a sustain her. So I get a warm glow. Every month. Become a member of WNYC's right.

WNYC Deborah Solomon Nancy Solomon King Solomon Shelley NPR BBC NPR GOP New Jersey Richard New York
"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:30 min | 2 years ago

"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition on WNYC. I'm Richard Hake. In the years after the Russian revolution of nineteen seventeen a small city in. What is now Belarus became a home for avant garde art and instruction at its center were three major figures of twentieth century, art. It's a chapter in the history of modern art that is little known, and is the focus of a new exhibit at the Jewish museum WNYC's. Art critic, Deborah Solomon checked it out. And she is with us this morning. He Deborah got morning richer. What was called the people's art school? What's the history behind it? How was it created? I found this show fascinating. Because everybody knows the bow house as the famous modernist art school, and here we learn about the people's or school, which was founded before the bell house a few months earlier in veto. Russia which was the hometown of Marc Chagall, and he was the first head of the school immediately following the Russian revolution. And it was an ecstatic time for him the show opens with pictures in which gall and his wife are drinking champagne and flying and celebrating. And it's a remarkably upbeat moment in avant-garde, art. So Chagall was its first leader. And then later these other well known artists joined his teachers how they all work together. Well, Chagall invited L exit ski his friend from his childhood who was also Jewish and L Lositski churn invited me and that is when the problems began Malaysia. Rich. It was better. Malaysia is the founder of Suprematism a movement that began when he painted a black square. He was Mr. geometric obstruction. You've seen his works black and red and very spare and suddenly Chagall. We know it Chagall painted, right? The goats and the cows and the upside down houses in his village. Suddenly Chagall found that all the students were leaving his Clough boy and signing up with me and more popular teacher. Exactly. They saw him as the artist of the future. So the students who were involved with them had little black squares on their sleeves. It was you know, the boy scout movement avant-garde are everybody participated. So how does the exhibit tell the story of this art school and this period in Soviet history? Well, it's a very short period. That's what's so fascinating about it. You have this incredible clash between Chagall who believes that. No, very personal and lyrical art and me the abstract artists who believes in the future who takes over the school finally and presides over its first graduating class, but it's first class is also it's last in the show. Of course, we see work by Chagall, we see work by Malaysia. And also, many of the other teachers and students who are at the school whose name will be completely unfamiliar to most viewers. I learned a lot. I learned that Zizi Chagall both studied with the teacher named Yuri Penn who was an academic realist. And you would never guess looking at his work and his beautiful portrait of Chagall that that's how much radical art would come out of this town. So Chagall leaves? So what did the the other teachers and the students believe that they could accomplish now? Well, then suddenly Suprematism or abstract art takes over the school and Milosevic, of course, believed in social revolution. He thought art could actually change the world for the better. And what's so tragic about this show? Is it takes place in the moment right after the Russian revolution. And before the rise of Stalin, and he's going to come in and crush, all major creative expression, and you feel you feel the intensity of their dreams. But also the futility of the artists dreams in this show. So what happened in the end to the school into the artist the school shut down in one thousand nine hundred ninety two when Malaysia left and most of the orders suffered fairly tragic fates Chagall? Of course flourished he came to New York, you know, he did the murals Lincoln center, and he lived to the ripe old age of ninety six or seven. But many of the other artists died in the. Forties from disease one was shot by by Stalin's hacks. And I think the school stands as a reminder both of artistic dreams and and political realities that have so often crushed innovation in our time. Really seems to enlighten us at this period in history, very much, you will learn names that you have never heard of before. I promise Chagall Lazinski me, which is at the Jewish museum until January sixth. Deborah Solomon is WNYC's art critic and the author of several books on American art, Deborah, thanks so much. Thank you, Richard. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. The old saying goes don't mess with Texas to be clear Texans are allowed to mess with each other. And one of this year's surprisingly tight Senate races is in Texas where tonight is debate night. We are about to hear just a bit of the challenger democrat better. Followed by Republican Senator Ted Cruz face some real darkness. Found disappointment that our fellow Texans and our fellow Americans are experiencing right now. We brought a power, and they Choi to this moment. Comprise not of political action committees or special interest and Heidi. And I are so proud to stand shoulder to shoulder with the men and women here fighting to defend our liberty fighting to defend the constitution, the Bill of rights freedom and the future of Texas together. We will keep Texas. Right red Ted Cruz, better Rourke. And now we bring in Ashleigh Lopez political reporter with our member station K U T in Texas. Hey, they're actually morning. I'll take cruises right hasn't. It been bright bright red for a while. Yeah. Well, at Texas democrat hasn't won statewide it state-wide here for at least two decades a little more. So yeah, it has been a conservative state for a very very long time. Well, what makes people think that that could change? I recall when Bittu rock I declared his candidacy people said, hey, really interesting congressperson really attractive candidate. But really low odds. Well, the campaign has just been really strong. Better works campaign has not just raised a lot of money. It's kept a lot of excitement and a lot of excitement that's been building for the past several months. So, you know, what do you go to his rallies? It's like a packed house. You have to get their super early. If not you're not going to get in there. So I think it's just like, you know, kind of is Obama ask is just like a lot of a lot of energy a lot of momentum behind him. And how close is it? Oh, it's very close a lot closer than anyone expected. All the polls have them within the margin of error. So it's a pretty much toss-up. Well, okay. So we should remember though. Ted Cruz has certain strengths in the state of Texas. Right. Yeah. He's a conservative. You know, Texas is a conservative state. You know, there's a lot of evangelicals here who tend to vote in high numbers like this is a state that for years has been dominated by Republican voters for the most part. This is a nonvoting state, but the people who do show up. The polls are Republican wait a minute nonvoting mean that turn turn out can be very low and a midterm election. Like, Texas has historically some of the lowest voter participation in the nation. I think we're either at the bottom or next about an okay? So let's talk that through for a minute because people are aware, I think that Texas demographically, like the rest of the country has been changing, there's a very large Latino population. There's an Asian population there other populations groups that historically have voted democratic which is why Democrats think sometimes they have a chance to turn it into a blue state. Is there any sign that those Democratic-leaning constituencies might be inclined to show up in this midterm election, yet Democrats have been using this term demographics is destiny for a long time. Like that basically. People of color going to swing the state in their favor. But that takes mobilization it takes massive voter, registration drives and like just a lot of investments, and I personally have not seen them. I don't see like in our urban counties. I don't see voter registration growth that seems significant enough to suggest that quite honestly. Okay. Appreciate that insight as we prepare to hear the first debate between veteran rock and Ted Cruz actually Lopez of K UT, thanks so much. Thank you. Support.

Marc Chagall Texas Chagall Ted Cruz Malaysia Deborah Solomon WNYC Zizi Chagall Deborah Richard Hake Belarus Russia Stalin Steve Inskeep Senate Rachel Martin NPR New York
"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:36 min | 2 years ago

"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition on WNYC. I'm Richard Hake. This week marks the forty fifth anniversary of the landmark battle of the sexist tennis match between icon, Billie Jean King and challenger Bobby Riggs kings victory in the three set match is considered a milestone in the history of women's sports. Joining us now is Caitlin Thomson, founder of racket magazine and a former editor here at WNYC Caitlyn. Hello, welcome back to WNYC. Hi, richard. So the battle of the sexes was between twenty nine year old Billie Jean King and fifty five year old Bobby Riggs, and it was a huge nationally televised event. Why was the battle of the sexes? Such a big deal when it happened because of what was happening culturally and legally politically in the country at the time title nine something has that has defined an entire generation of female, athletes, female Olympians, even myself as a collegiate athlete on scholarship was one year old the idea that the government had to equally fund men and women and especially in the sports context. People were very nervous about the application of this. And obviously the larger cultural conversation, especially in the tennis realm was that women were second class citizens and only a year after this was the chance to give an airing to the idea that women could or could not compete on equal footing with men. So how did the world react to this match? Did king get any kind of backlash for winning certainly the male tennis establishment was displeased this became a real touchdown and Billie Jean being able to beat him. So holistically so resoundingly caused backlash in this sort of male chauvinist pig realm that was sort of self proclaimed rigs fan, but women finally had this unleashed energy kind of similar to what's happening politically in our world right now. Actually, we're all of a sudden they had a standard bearer they had somebody to sort of focus their energy and become a symbol and Billie. Jean has become that symbol in tennis and far far beyond and women's tennis. Also made headlines this year at the US open when Serena Williams called out an empire who penalized her during the championship match after she called him a thief for a sexist behavior for me to say fief infirm, you take a game. It made me feel like it was a sexist remark. How he's never to gain from a man because I said so what limitations do women in tennis still face. It's a good question. I think Serena was interestingly involved in this conversation about the application of the rules. The idea that women face harsher penalties, even though they act out less. They might be in France. Acted upon more. And so what I would love to see as a publisher of an independent tennis magazine is somebody who wants this sport to keep evolving along with the wonderful rich and at times contentious conversations that go on around. It is let's study actually what women are getting penalized four and how the rules are being applied. And let's crack open the idea that women are still not getting paid equally at all the tournaments. So that we can make that change Caitlin Thompson, founder of racket magazine. Caitlyn good to see you. In the years after the Russian revolution of nineteen seventeen a small city in what is now Belarus became home for avant-garde art and instruction at its center were three major figures of twentieth century, art. It's a chapter in the history of modern art that is little known, and is the focus of a new exhibit at the Jewish museum WNYC's. Art critic, Deborah Solomon checked it out. And she is with us this morning. Hey, Deborah got morning, Richard. So it was called the people's art school. What's the history behind it? How was it created? I found this show fascinating. Because everybody knows the bow house as the famous modernist art school, and here we learn about the people's or at school, which was founded before the bowel house a few months earlier in Russia, which was the hometown of Marc Chagall, and he was the first head of the school immediately following the Russian revolution. And it was an ecstatic time for him the show opens with pictures in which gall and his wife are drinking champagne. Flying and celebrating. And it's a remarkably upbeat moment in Avalon corridor. So Chagall was its first leader. And then later these other well known artists join his teachers how they all work together. Well, Chagall invited lss it ski has friend from his childhood who was also Jewish and L Lositski turn invited Malaysia me. And that is when the problems began Malaysia. It was better. Was better. Milosevic is the founder of Suprematism a movement that began when he painted a black square. He was Mr. geometric abstraction you've seen his works black and red and very spare and suddenly Chagall. We know it's Chagall painted, right? The goats cows and the upside down houses in his village. Suddenly Chagall found that all the students were leaving his cloud boy and signing up with me and more popular teacher. Exactly. They saw him as the artist of the future. So the students who were involved with them had little black squares on their sleeves. It was the boy scout movement avant-garde are everybody participated. So how does the exhibit tell the story of this art school and this period in Soviet history? Well, it's a very short period. That's what's so fascinating about it. You have this incredible clash between Chagall who believes in a very personal and lyrical art and me. Vich the abstract artists who believes in the future who takes over the school finally and presides over its first graduating class, but it's first class is also it's last in the show. Of course, we see work by Chagall, we see work by Malaysia. And also, many of the other teachers and students who were at the school whose names will be completely unfamiliar to most viewers. I learned a lot. I learned that in Chicago studied with the teacher named yori pen who was an academic realist. And you would never guess looking at his work and his beautiful portrait of Chagall. That's how much radical art would come out of this town. So Chagall leaves a what did the the other teachers and the students believe that they could accomplish now. Well, then suddenly Suprematism or abstract art takes over the school and Malaysia, which of course, believed in social revolution. He thought art could actually change the world for the better. And what's so tragic about this show? Is it takes place in the moment right after the Russian revolution. And before the rise of Stalin, and he's going to come in and crush, all major creative expression, and you feel the intensity of their dreams. But also the futility of the artist dreams in this show. So what happened in the end to the school into the artists the school shut down in one thousand nine hundred ninety two when Malaysia left and most of the artists suffered fairly tragic fates Chagall, of course, flourished he came to New York, you know, he did the murals at Lincoln center, and he lived to the ripe old age of ninety six or seven. But many of the other artists died in the forties from disease one was shot by Stalin's hacks. And I think the school stands as a reminder both of artistic dreams and political realities that have so often crushed innovation in our time. Really seems to enlighten us at this period in history, very much, you will learn names that you have never heard of before I promise Chagall legit schema, which is at the Jewish museum until January sixth. Deborah Solomon is WNYC's art critic and the author of several books on American art, Deborah, thanks so much. Thank you..

Marc Chagall tennis WNYC Malaysia Billie Jean King Deborah Solomon founder Richard Hake racket magazine Deborah Bobby Riggs Billie Jean Caitlin Thomson Serena Williams Stalin France US Caitlyn Russia
"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:00 min | 2 years ago

"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Frequently investigations of sexual abuse inside city jails are poorly done and take too long to complete. What's more, the majority of those who file complaints never learned the outcomes of investigations WNYC city. Rodriguez says those are the findings of an audit done by the New York City board of correction, which actually overseas the local jails the audit looked at forty two cases of abuse and harassment. The majority of the alleged victims were men and staff were the accused perpetrators in sixty percent of the cases. The report says investigators failed to interview witnesses more than half the time failed to interview alleged perpetrators nearly half the time and failed to secure crime scenes, all but one case Manhattan councilwoman Helen Rosenthal says that shows the department of correction doesn't take allegations seriously, which sends a chilling message to inmates. Why would you come forward? If you know that not only are you not gonna get just. You may put a target on your back by reporting inmates say they often suffer repercussions after coming forward with abuse allegations. Overall, investigators substantiated only one of the forty two cases, but the audit found that in about twenty of them. Investigators didn't explain how they came to their conclusions. But Serena Townsend who runs the department of corrections investigations division says the documents that were reviewed by the auditors weren't meant to provide the full scope of investigations, she says, there's good reason why for instance, investigators don't always interview alleged perpetrators. Well, actually in four those instances, we reviewed video and the video confirmed that the allegation was completely unfounded. And so in that situation and interview not necessary. But in two cases, the alleged perpetrators were staff members who were not interviewed because they were either out sick or didn't respond. Townsend says going forward reports to be reviewed by. Auditors will contain more details Cindy zero three guys WNYC news. A new exhibit of works by French painter Delic. Why is at the met museum? It's a huge show with over one hundred fifty paintings prints and drawings and is the first comprehensive retrospective in North America of this important nineteenth century, painter WNYC's. Art critic Deborah Solomon has been there to see the show and she joins us now in the studio. Deborah good morning. Good morning. Richard a little background. Who was he? Well, if you've taken art history one A one. Yeah, we certainly would've come across in the name della. He is officially known as the founder of romantic painting in the nineteenth century, and he is often described in relation to hang who was seen as opposite. And was the neo-classicist to drew very crisply. And precisely and Delacour who was eighteen years younger took him on by drawing with color and favoring exotic locales in his work, and he was supposedly the foul. Founder of romanticism. So Deborah little art history. One on one what is a romantic painter, well romantic painter in this case doesn't mean that he paints lovers. Okay. This is something he doesn't he was very much a salon or just he showed at the French salon, and stuck to the acceptable subjects of religion and mythology and history and romantic in. This case means that he broke away from line in favor of movement and color and endless horses clashing against one another beneath stormy sky. He's he likes scenes of destruction. He did battle scenes with people marching over dead bodies. He was very dramatic and influential on later or does he sort of the last old master in other artists like Van Gogh and Cezanne Picasso all appraised Ila? What did they see in his work? Well, they like different things Picasso did many versions of Delacroix's women of. Algiers the impressionists came directly out of della because they like the way he liberated color from line and allowed brushstrokes to dominate. So does the show make the case that his works market transition from one heart cystic tradition to a new one maybe a modern one? Well, well, right. Traditionally he is seen as a post enlightenment or he comes after the French revolution. Everything is changing. He's a painter of change is tremendous movement physical movement. But one problem with this show is that it is missing his larger masterworks. It was originally shown at the Louvre where it was said to be the most popular exhibition in the loops history. And I will be surprised if it's a big crowd pleaser here. We don't have liberty leading the people. Do you know that painting Richard liberty the half naked woman carrying marching over dead bodies and wasn't painted at the time. Time of the French revolution. But for many people it exemplifies the French revolution. It was actually done forty years later, and our own statue of liberty is based on liberty leading the people as are many other works. So that's missing it was considered too. Big to move the young orphan girl a beautiful portrait in the cemetery. Isn't there the death of sort Annapolis exists only as a later copy? So I think the show has less possess than the one that was in Paris. So what do you think it'll draw similar audiences now that it's at the met here New York? I would be surprised I think that it's a show that the French are in love with this is their history. And I'm not sure that the work will have such broad appeal here. It's a fabulous scholarly show for people who want to move through it, slowly, look carefully. No, the absurdity of many of his paintings, which seemed to have no subject at times, including his famous women of Algiers that did make the trip. That painting is here. It's a bunch of women sitting around in a room getting high. It's hilarious. Because you think what is the subject of this painting? He was post to paint noble subjects at this point. Instead, we see four women two of whom are sitting there with a Bong and two others who are staring off in other directions. And no one's looking at anyone else. And it seems like, you know, it's a fascinating painting. Just because everyone is so disconnected. So now south one that stood out for you that I it was really thrilling to to see that painting. It is one of the great masterpieces of art. And I looked at for a long time. And I think it's the kind of show where you have to pick out one said speak to you. And look at them for a long time. We learn a lot about you, Deborah from your taste in art. Thank you, Richard. I think that's accomplished this delicate is at the met museum until January sixth. Deborah Solomon is WNYC's art critic and the author of several books on American art, Debra thank you so much..

Deborah Deborah Solomon Algiers New York Richard WNYC Serena Townsend founder Manhattan Rodriguez Helen Rosenthal North America harassment Louvre Van Gogh Delacour Paris Cezanne Picasso
"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Had maybe thrown a little work you know he was very vulnerable he was not well protected with warhol on the operating table at columbia cabrini hospital during a five hour operation to peace and back together the hunt for salon came to an end when the thirty year old abruptly turned herself into police jim gash of w n e w spoke to our moments later this happened because let's clean it on he's a piece of garbage so lana a fringe character on the factory scene had persuaded warhol to consider one of her scripts but he had rejected it he may die yeah i do warhol spent months in the hospital in painful recovery but by nineteen sixty nine he was back on the art scene and an even bigger commercial success until his death in nineteen eightyseven wnyc's art critic deborah solomon you've seen that photograph were standing there black and white lifting up it's black leather jacket and the scars or crossing his chest and abdomen like railroad tracks across america and it was an image of him as a mortar it was like paintings of saint sebastian out of art history he had suffered for his art he was showing us so the idea of him as a catholic martyr it said the whole myth of andy as being larger than life he rarely spoke of the shooting but was what's asked about it by a lover david bailey go to that why why why did she tissue just in the wrong place to right time to change your life not why don't take off my clothes but really everything changed injuries so severe warhol had to wear a surgical corset for the rest of his life and it brought an end to the security free communal existence of his studio the factory here's friend and art dealer irving blom speaking with filmmaker ric burns i can't tell you exactly when the change occurred but my.

warhol columbia cabrini hospital wnyc ric burns jim gash deborah solomon america saint sebastian andy david bailey irving blom thirty year five hour
"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"More than just professional recognition here's wnyc's sarah fish go one of the interesting things about anywhere hosted fifteen minutes wasn't enough for him he was obsessed with fame he loved being famous and he loved famous people sarah fish go has reported on warhol throughout her career for fish go files and elsewhere you know he put on his andy warhol costume every morning he saw as his job his job was to be andy warhol got up in the morning he put on his outfit and make up glasses and he went through his day as that person and it worked by nineteen sixty eight the thirty six year old artist was as famous as his celebrity subjects he was not just the most famous artists in the country but one of the most famous people in the world having made a permanent mark on culture here's deborah solomon he collapsed the boundary between high art and popular culture and he also interestingly returned realism to art after the reign of abstract expressionism and abstract painting and how cool that warhol reintroduced the object in art whether we're talking brillo boxes are campbell soup cans but even as his notoriety exploded warhol approached it differently than did other celebrities again sarah fish go i used to go to the flea market regularly on sixth avenue and twenty sixth street on the weekends he was right there looking at those tables picking through stuff and chatting with dealers obviously was a regular fish go now marvels that this megastar was just out and about he was very vulnerable he was making himself available he was naive in thinking that you could have the level of fame that he had i can't think of too many in that category who were so present in the minds in views of people on the streets in new york who believed that that nothing would happen to them this vulnerability allowed a thirty year old groupie named valerie solanas to walk into the factory and shoot warhol piercing six major organs as warhol's blood poured across the studio floor and pandemonium broke out solana's calmly left the building when he was shot when there was this attempted assassination it was of somebody who knew slightly it was a kind of fans somebody he knew and.

andy warhol deborah solomon new york valerie solanas solana attempted assassination wnyc sarah fifteen minutes thirty six year thirty year
"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"More than just professional recognition here's wnyc's sarah fish go one of the interesting things about anywhere hosted fifteen minutes wasn't enough for him he was obsessed with fame he loved being famous and he loved famous people sarah fish go has reported on warhol throughout her career for fish go files and elsewhere you know he put on his andy warhol costume every morning he saw it as his job his job was to be andy warhol got up in the morning he put on his outfit and make up glasses and he went through his day as that person and it worked by nineteen sixty eight the thirty six year old artist was as famous as his celebrity subjects he was not just the most famous artists in the country but one of the most famous people in the world having made a permanent mark on culture here's deborah solomon he collapsed the boundary between high art and popular culture and he also interestingly returned realism to art after the reign of abstract expressionism and abstract painting and how cool that warhol reintroduced the object in art whether we're talking brillo boxes are campbell soup cans but even as his notoriety exploded warhol approached it differently than did other celebrities again sarah fish go i used to go to the flea market regularly on sixth avenue and twenty sixth street on the weekends he was right there looking at those tables picking through stuff and and chatting with dealers he obviously was a regular fish go now morals that this megastar was just out and about he was very vulnerable he was making himself available he was naive in thinking that you could have the level of fame that he had i can't think of too many in that category who were so present in the minds in views of people on the streets of new york who believed that that nothing would happen to them this vulnerability allowed a thirty year old groupie named valerie solanas to walk into the factory and shoot warhol piercing six major organs as warhol's blood poured across the studio floor and pandemonium broke out solano's calmly left the building when he was shot when there was this attempted assassination it was somebody who knew slightly it was.

andy warhol deborah solomon new york valerie solanas solano attempted assassination wnyc sarah fifteen minutes thirty six year thirty year
"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Our culture influenced artists such as robert rauschenberg the king of assemblage as we know from his recent show at moma and the problem with the show is that in ord history we tend to say that the assemblage and collage tradition goes back to an artist like kirch sweaters and cubism and europe after world war one those artists picked up bus tickets off the street and put them into their work but maybe it really began in the american south and in this country we give blacks credit for inventing jazz but maybe they also invented a visual tradition and i think we need a show that tracks the influence of american orders of the south on artists like row schaumburg and the assemblage tradition and pop art so it sounds like the museum the matt could have done a little more with the show well they were displaying gift it's great to have the works they are and and let's just think of this as the beginning there are many opportunities for interesting points that have yet to be made the exhibit is called history refused die on view at the mat until september deborah solomon is wnyc's art critic and the author of several books on american art debra as always thanks so much next time on the new yorker radio hour novelist gillian flynn gets a job and it's a lot more than she bargained for my first thought was my god he's i think he's killed someone am i going to be an accessory to murder i'm gonna have to like this is such a bummer not sign up for this gillian flynn the author of gone girl next.

robert rauschenberg moma europe schaumburg deborah solomon gillian flynn murder wnyc
"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Work is really first rate and will definitely check it out radical women latin american art nineteen sixty nine hundred eighty five is now at the brooklyn museum through july deborah solomon is wnyc's art critic and the author of several books on american art deborah thanks so much thank you richard at wnyc we rely on the listener support but what exactly does that mean i'm mary harris from the wnyc newsroom to me listener support is the way that i feel when i see you on the subway with one of those wnyc bags i think this crazy grand experiment in listener support it works because of you show your support go to wnyc dot org and click on donate support for npr comes from wnyc members and from the robert wood johnson foundation working alongside others to build a culture of health for all more information at our wj af dot org and the john d and catherine t macarthur foundation supporting creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just verdant n peaceful world more formation is at macfound dot org it's morning edition on wnyc money talking is next and later on morning edition the boston marathon bombing was five years ago sunday today on story core to parents remember their son who was injured and later died from those injuries suffered in a confrontation with the bombers we knew we had a concussion but he said he was fine he died the year later a brain aneurysm at that point that story and more coming up in the next hour.

brooklyn museum deborah solomon mary harris npr robert wood johnson foundation catherine t macarthur foundati wnyc richard john d boston five years
"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You feel the dirt so that you feel it's mineral present and sometimes when he draws patterns which could be either webs from nature or things that look almost like dot matrix systems you there's so much pencil on the page you feel like you're coming across a mineral you feel like you're discovering graphite nature what it looks like when it's still clump to tree trunks his work is that physical i don't know anybody who who appreciates the kind of primordial feeling of drawing in pencil mark making more than terry winters so debra can a drawing ever have the drama of a painting or a sculpture or a photograph well some would say drawing is more immediate really and therefore more dramatic because you're really witnessing creation from the beginning and they were talking about drawing a practical question i know artists can find them but what about the rest of us work we find a pencil interesting these days we don't find many pencils except if you look at the world of childhood alter aw they have pencils crayons and at some point that instinct to draw which is one of our earliest since jinx becomes lost and i think it's even fallen away from the contemporary art world too large part where photography and digital imagery tend to dominate so i would like to see more pencils general in contemporary art brands and pencils for us deborah excellent sites wobbly in beauty it is finished is now at the goes ian gallery in chelsea through april twenty fifth and terry winters facts and fictions is at the drawing center in soho through august deborah solomon is wnyc's art critic she's also the author of several books on american art deborah thanks so much thank you richard at wnyc we rely on the listener support but what exactly does that mean i'm mary harris from the wnyc newsroom to me listener support is the way that i feel when i see you on the subway with one of those wnyc backs i think this crazy grand experiment in listener support it works because of you show your support go to wnyc dot org and click on donate.

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"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"deborah solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Them but what about the rest of us work we find a pencil it's interesting these days we don't find many pencils except if you look at the world of childhood jolt alter aw they have pencils they have crayons and at some point that instinct to draw which is one of our earliest instincts becomes lost and i think it's even fallen away from the contemporary art world too large part where photography and digital imagery tend to dominate so i would like to see more pencils or general and contemporary art ransom pencils for us deborah excellent site widely in beauty it is finished is now at the goes ian gallery in chelsea through april twenty fifth and terry winters facts and fictions is at the drawing center in soho through august deborah solomon is wnyc's art critic she's also the author of several books on american art deborah thanks so much thank you richard win cc wong i met the man renting a room in his mom's house he thought it was nice that she would have some company missile was very quiet very nice we started to notice some weird things but he didn't say anything about it you knew everything about us other things we talked about in the letters this week in ah looks at what is not said in our relationships and the misunderstandings and mystery that can follow tonight at nine on wnyc support for npr comes from wnyc members and from the school foundation partnering with social entrepreneurs and other innovators to confront the world's most pressing problems at home and abroad learn more at s k o l l dot org and iser tope makers of spire studio the portable multitrack recording system that lets musicians capture mix and edit songs wherever and whenever inspiration strikes learn more at spier dot live some slushy snow expected this morning with rain mixed in by later highs near fifty five degrees a new term to help understand the escalating u s china trade rhetoric it's deflection marketplace morning report is supported by legalzoom legalzoom is not a law firm but their business legal plan provides access to independent attorneys and tax professionals more legalzoomcommarketplace i'm david brancaccio in new york beijing is now responded after president trump yesterday called for an additional one hundred billion dollar set of tariffs on.

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