18 Burst results for "Deborah Madison"

"deborah madison" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:26 min | 4 months ago

"deborah madison" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm so happy to be here. I feel like I just am on the splendid table so much. Are you sick of me yet? No. We can't get enough of you. Come on. So, um And, actually, now that I'm thinking about it, um, the last time we actually talked about restaurants It was two months after the pandemic started. And you know, pretty much every restaurant. The country was either closing or clothes or was scrambling mode and no one had any answers. And, you know, folks were pivoting to take out and retail things they've never done before. And I remember you telling me That you know most of the operators you spoke to You know, they were just sort of in despair, and we're really worried about their staff who they had to lay off. So let's start. Maybe with a quick recap since that initial shock to now, you know, like when, when history is written. What do you think the things the restaurant world will remember. Um From this year. Like the ways it's changed it a sense of how things changed or I hope they will. Oh, my gosh. Yeah. Huge questions. Um, I would say if I were a historian looking back in 50 years at what has happened. I would say that This has been characterized by a huge upsurge in labor consciousness in the restaurant world. Okay? Not just among consumers, which, you know, I think a lot of people who eat at restaurants are now thinking a little bit more about Okay. Like, what about you know, we've been calling the restaurant workers essential workers for so long and that can't help but color that this course around what they do. If the work of someone working at like serving you wine is essential. Then there's a different sort of, um, valuation there from a consumer's standpoint. On the other hand, I also want to point out that among workers themselves. There's been an increased labor consciousness, which I find really interesting I've been seeing in San Francisco, for instance. Workers at places like Dan White Chocolate and Tartine, which makes you know which revolutionized bread making here in many ways, unionized in the country, not just in in every not just in California, but right? Yeah. From my vantage point, you know, those are the examples I can point to, But yeah, I've seen this all over the country. Workers unionizing and also thinking about co ops and restaurants becoming more worker owned collectives rather than Businesses owned by a single entity. I think that's really interesting, that's kind of unforeseen in the history of American restaurants. Yeah, the only two I can think of are and you're not that I have done. A real study of these are like like the Moosewood, right? And you know, the famous vegetarian restaurant and ethical in New York that like Molly Captains Moosewood Cookbook came out of and You know, I don't think this was a restaurant of note. But like there was some like hippie commune restaurant but racial cooked at way before she was food writer and like that's it, I can think of like those two. I'm sure there were more. Um, actually not the thing about, I think Greens, where Deborah Madison was a shift for many years was part of a Zen temple. So imagine there was Some kind of collective ness going on there. You'd hope. Uh, yeah, This is not really a big piece of the American restaurant pie and I don't know. Do you see it just a matter of conversation now or do you think there's there's action around that? I think it's both people are organizing. I think around the country around tipping, for instance, which has been a huge issue that has gotten even huger during the pandemic, because fewer people were in a position to tip because they weren't eating in restaurants for the most part, and so that portion of people's income disappeared overnight. It seems Mhm, which lead people to think, like, Okay, do we need this? Is this important? Can we come up with a different way of doing things so that people can make a living wage without having to be tipped up? You know, to the whims of the consumer. Yeah, And then I would say there are a lot of ongoing conversations that have come out of Oh, my gosh, Like over Instagram, for instance, something that I didn't foresee when we last talked, was that people would be taking the instagram to talk about. Inequity in the restaurant industry. They would use that platform to air out grievances to talk about the experiences they had in restaurants. Um, give me like restaurant staff talking about the experience they had exactly under this particular Jeff for or manager or whatever. Yeah, and it caused a lot of soul searching in the industry. Um and I think there are a lot of really interesting long term things that have come out of it where people are now. You know that sort of the baseline for a lot of organization of trying to make workplaces better trying to Make. I don't know, like racial equity part of the conversation of restaurants in a way that hadn't really been a part of it before, And we owe a lot of that to the George Floyd protests and black lives matter as well. That happened like over the summer last year. Sure it's that touched almost every industry in America, but especially touched the hospitality industry. Because so many of the people work in hospitality are in many of them ways, you know, from underrepresented communities and communities who, like always struggle with the pressure or have dealt with oppression and, you know It was a moment, I think in the big picture where people felt like had it Yeah. We're gonna talk about this, and we're going to face this, Um So I mean, I think that's overall really exciting. You know, again, just Also recognizing overall context of the industry is that it is an industry that You know, tens of thousands of restaurants closed permanently. I'm sure. Um And it's in a very tricky moment right now, because in the early part of the summer it felt like hey, like we see, we see the end of this thing vaccinated. It's going to be safe. And now you know who knows again? Um I'm not asking you to get your crystal ball out and, you know, figure out how a global pandemic trajectory is going to go to tell me about like, you know what food will be eating soon, but Can you think about some, like.

San Francisco California New York America Jeff 50 years instagram Deborah Madison Instagram two last year George Floyd Moosewood Tartine tens of thousands this year Moosewood Cookbook both people two months after Dan
"deborah madison" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:33 min | 4 months ago

"deborah madison" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Hey, Francis, I'm so happy to be here. I feel like I just am on the splendid table so much. Are you sick of me yet? No, we can't get enough of you. Come on. So, um And actually, now that I'm thinking about it, um, the last time we actually talked about restaurants It was Two months after the pandemic started. And you know, pretty much every restaurant. The country was either closing or closed or was scrambling mode and no one had any answers. And, you know, folks were pivoting to take out and retail things they've never done before. And I remember you telling me that you know most of the operators you spoke to You know, they were just sort of in despair, and we're really worried about their staff who they had to lay off. So let's start maybe with a quick recap. Since then, initial shark to now, you know, like when, when history is written. What do you think the things the restaurant world will remember. Um And this year like the ways it's changed to have a sense of how things changed or I hope they will. Oh, my gosh. Yeah. Huge questions. Um, I would say. If I were a historian, looking back in 50 years at what has happened, I would say that This has been characterized by a huge upsurge in labor consciousness in the restaurant world. Okay? Not just among consumers, which, you know, I think a lot of people who eat at restaurants are now thinking a little bit more about Okay. Like, what about you know, we've been calling the restaurant workers essential workers for so long and that can't help but color that this course around what they do. Um, if if the work of someone working at like serving you wine is essential, then you There's a different sort of, um, valuation there from a consumer's standpoint. On the other hand, I also want to point out that among workers themselves. There's been an increased labor consciousness, which I find really interesting I've been seeing in San Francisco, for instance. Workers at places like Dan White Chocolate and Tartine, which makes you know which revolutionized bread making here in many ways, unionized country not just in in that not just in California, but right? Yeah. From my vantage point. You know, those are the examples I can point to, But yeah, I've seen this all over the country. Um, workers unionizing and also thinking about co ops and restaurants becoming more worker owned collectives rather than businesses owned by a single entity. I think that's really interesting, that's kind of unforeseen in the history of American restaurants. Yeah, the only two I can think of are and you're not that I have done. A real study of these are like like the Moosewood, right? And you know, the the famous vegetarian restaurant in Ithaca, New York, that like Molly Captains Moosewood Cookbook came out of and You know, I don't think this was a restaurant of note. But like there was some like hippie Commune restaurant. But Ruth racial cooked out way before she was food writer and that's it. I can think of like those two. I'm sure there were more actually. Now they think about, I think Greens, where Deborah Madison was a show for many years was part of a Zen temple. So imagine there was Some kind of collective nest going on there. You'd hope. Uh, yeah, This is not really a big piece of the American restaurant pie and I I don't know. Do you see it just a matter of conversation now or do you think there's there's action around that? I think it's both people are organizing. I think around the country around tipping, for instance, which has been a huge issue that has gotten even huger during the pandemic, because fewer people were in a position to tip because they weren't eating in restaurants for the most part, and so that portion of people's income disappeared overnight. It seems Uh, which lead people to think like? Okay. Do we need this? Is this important? Can we come up with a different way of doing things so that people can make a living wage without having to be tipped up? You know, to the whims of the consumer. Yeah, And then And then I would say there are a lot of ongoing conversations that have come out of Oh, my gosh, Like over Instagram, for instance, something that I didn't foresee when we last talked, was that people would be taking the instagram to talk about. Inequity in the restaurant industry. They would use that platform to air out grievances to talk about the experiences they had in restaurants. Um You mean like restaurant staff talking about the experience they had exactly under this particular chef for or manager or whatever. Yeah, and it caused a lot of soul searching in the industry. Um, and I think there are a lot of really interesting long term things that have come out of it where people are now, you know, that's sort of the baseline for a lot of organization of trying to make workplaces better trying to Make. I don't know, like racial equity part of the conversation of restaurants in a way that hadn't really been a part of it before, And we owe a lot of that to the George Floyd protests and black lives matter as well. That happened like over the summer last year. I'm sure it's that touched almost every industry in America, but especially touched the hospitality industry. Because so many of the people work in hospitality are in many different ways, you know, from underrepresented communities and communities who always struggle with the pressure or have dealt with oppression and, you know It was a moment, I think in the big picture where people felt like had it You know,.

San Francisco Francis California America Deborah Madison Ruth 50 years instagram Instagram Moosewood George Floyd two Ithaca, New York this year both people last year Tartine Two months after Dan White Chocolate single entity
"deborah madison" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

05:05 min | 6 months ago

"deborah madison" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"But boys at romantic rio de well elaborate a little bit. Rick tossed but the food and us about the atmosphere. Well so first of all when you enter there's this beautiful wooden environments With these old dead trees hey Took out from from fallen trees instead of cut trees that make up this environment where every table looks different. And you're looking out over the golden gate bridge. Every plate has loving it. The chef sat at our table when she heard that we flew out from Miami just to have dinner oh and it was just. It was a great night. Now rick foods what's it called greens again greens. Yeah it was founded by deborah madison. She's pretty famous. She's a big deal. Well so. I used to cook out of a cookbook. When i was in college and then i believe any somerville took over the kitchen and she was the one who sat with us at the table. The only thing. I've heard by the way that criticism i've heard of greens and marjory. I'm sure you've heard to is the limited selection of grain bowls is that is that true. Or is that yeah. I did not see a single grain bowl. Orange bowl plates of beautiful vegetables. Were well prepared and lovingly presented in a beautiful environment. You should check it out. I love it kind of every one of these callers has been the best sales people for the movement. Rick thank you very much. Another beautiful phone call just email. She hadn't heard of grain bowl either chats. They're trying to make. I don't need to look the bills. Nobody who've listened nobody listens show.

rick foods Rick deborah madison somerville Miami marjory
"deborah madison" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

03:36 min | 6 months ago

"deborah madison" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"Nice grain bowl by the way when you said ancient grain a friend of ours who we knew who is listener for years who actually moved away for years and just came back last week said ancient grains or things like king was that we're talking about curry. How do i mean i. I'm not an expert like at keeneland barrel and stuff like that curry. I want you to be honest. You sound like too nice answer this question. Honestly when you hear people like me and marjorie nonstop about climate change and Humane treatment of animals and then whine about a vegan menus or vegetarian menus. Do you feel like you're going to pull your hair out. I could but. I think you're aware of what you're doing right. Now is the flow as easily that on air. That's wonderful as geico want do we'll give us a couple of now shingles recommendation. Let's hear okay go ahead Eating eating animals by What is his name. Jonathan i gotta google good by jonathan safran for me are and then you watch The end of me. You could watch kao spiracy Those are great sherry on Like netflix thinker prime video. Just like if you read that. You need animals book. Sorry it goes over all the lake. Everything from like what happens to the animals especially what's happening to the planet floods and these fires. Unlike if we could just talk plowing down the amazon grow grain girl cows. do you know make burgers. Everything would be so much. What about the The bread and the pastry is is getting bad. People say oh. It's it's not like you can do x. substitute you could be like flax meal folks in water you could do With that not keen weather. Cfc's you begin. Butter is great for baking. I made the mineral completely vegan. Oh curry since you have all the answers. Speaking chia seeds when they get stuck between every single tooth. Do you have a other than floating in front of your friends will actually forget curry. Thank you for another great call actually We appreciate it. Eight seven seven three zero one. Eighty nine seventy. We're having a green rainbow debate on the imagine rick from iowa. Thank you for a grain bowl. What's the what's the debate. While beena says she's never heard of grain bowls. Rebecca tells me there's been grain balls and some menu at the kitchen the pru and assembly square for years and years and years. So she's with you boy. We're gonna have a huge contentious grain bowl debate on the show that should be really electric for listeners. Let's go to rick you're calling from west moines iowa's that right. That is correct. I'm in town for my nephew's wedding which was beautiful. Great side in miami beach and this is my fourth time on air. Oh that is raising gray tabby rick. What's up well. My most romantic date ever was Sending a friend of mine. And i to san francisco from miami to a fine restaurant called greens which was founded by deborah madison. Back in the late eighties. Or late seventies rather. She was a student at san francisco. Zen center and i have to say this is the most exquisite most delicious finest dining experience. I've.

jonathan safran marjorie geico beena netflix Jonathan assembly square rick chia amazon google iowa west moines Rebecca miami beach deborah madison san francisco miami Zen center
"deborah madison" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

03:06 min | 7 months ago

"deborah madison" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"Tell people what they want to hear and kind of changing their bikes when they're out of the room but as prime minister. That comes a point where you have to choose. It's i conscious disagree with everyone around you run away. You're also dealing at this point with the legacy as well of you know difficult relationship with my hand. Call health secretary. He's also the third sort of Wheel of this. This compensation we from the revelation that the prime minister thinks the health sector is hopeless and hancock assumed the position where every time he goes out to do an interview. Someone says oh you hopeless. Can you work for somebody who thinks hopeless these enor- sort of favorable conditions in which to have a difficult conversation. Put it that way. I absolutely an awful lot of these conversations. Are we taking place. They with at least half an eye to the next general election which could be three years off but maybe quite a bit less than that. Yes because any changes to social care would take a farewell to work their way through the system and are likely to becoming in suppose. We have an earlier election than expected. Supposed twenty twenty three. This stuff could becoming in just as an election is in the offing their implications here in some ways for the leveling up agenda because anything that any social care policy. That's basically hinged on allowing people to pulse down property to that children will that's going to disproportionately benefit people. You've got big expensive houses to hunt down to that. Children that's primarily The southeast london. It's less appealing. Perhaps in absolutely i'm gonna be talking you. Jim elections kiss stammers team. Had bit of a shake-up this week. It's not it's not over. It seems to be part of the sort of rolling reverberations of hartlepool by election loss. But we've seen jenny chapman who who is director very strong supporter of. He's moving aside other job changes to follow. Where tobe what's going on there. Do you think is this something. Stomas friends and his enemies have been talking about for a while. The sense that he's buckle for separation puts a lot of noises out to join in parliamentary labor party. The mp's on happy they feel shut out of things and while they might pull out with ice storm template over the tories. And everything's going brilliantly. They might say well. You know what you're doing we'll leave you to it when things go badly. People start to get very restive indeed and after. He lost highly pool. He's donmar reshuffled his shadow cabinet. He was massively criticized for for doing that because he was hunting. The blame onto other people rather than taking the responsibility himself so looking if labor may well lose the butler and spend by election coming up. It does look if this time. He's trying to get a reshuffle of his bathroom. Oppression in first. We know that was going to be changes because we know deborah madison. The pollsters coming in but this time is the the changes a big enough to unsettle people and to make enemies but not quite big enough to make a visible difference. Voters so think You know clearly. Something is drastically afoot there a promise. Also the mb start to ask the king really this badly advised or could possibly be the king himself as he blaming other people for what are actually his failings. Yeah indeed in this..

deborah madison Jim three years southeast london this week third jenny chapman hancock twenty twenty three prime minister first prime half an eye hartlepool
"deborah madison" Discussed on Analysis

Analysis

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"deborah madison" Discussed on Analysis

"Four hundred ninety two there. We have it the beast of himself. Dennis skinner has lost his seat by a majority of around five thousand thereabouts bites. Bolsover is now a conservative seat and almost unimaginable result. Only a few years ago. I think mr the red wolves seats were described without that shorthand precisely because labor could always rely on them and perhaps because of that. The party haven't worried too much. What voters that really cared about. Deborah madison who used to conduct opinion polls for the former labour chancellor and prime minister gordon brown records the results of her investigations. That question in her recent book beyond the red wall. Lots of the voters. That i listened to the veteran lived out their whole lives within a very small community. Very tight network of streets very close relationship with our immediate community not sure relationship with the nearest big city and then a very powerful feeling of the country as a whole and a real relationship with that kind of patriotism rooted in the familiar untraditional on engaged with metropolitan modernity meant germy. Corbin's message simply sounded tone deaf to voters here looks at the labor party which they saw as being run by people who lived in london quite snooty graduates who look down on people like them and didn't share their worldview and then they looked at boris johnson. Again and again. If i ask people what they thought about boris johnson they describe the sense that he was a patriot. And that really mattered. One chapter i interviewed. Who actually wasn't one of the biggest johnson fans and he said to me whatever you think of him. The country comes first with him. You have to give him that. That sort of sentiment again and again and again. The implication of what you say given the crucial electoral importance of those seats. Is that if labor's gonna win. It's got to persuade people like ask the kiss. Thomas is a patriot. What are the conditions. That i drew. Was that if you don't love your country than those voters in the red will will never love. You just won't. But i think what's also important. Is that this must be authentic. Just sticking a flag behind yourself when you speak if you're labor. Politicians isn't enough will some of the senior labour figures we spoke to for this program recognized that finding the right message to make sense of the flag is a tough challenge for labor leaders in murray. Who was the only labour. Mp left standing in scotland after the last election is at the sharp end of this debate..

Dennis skinner Deborah madison Thomas london boris johnson scotland Corbin johnson One chapter around five thousand Four hundred ninety two first one few years ago gordon brown prime minister of the voters wall
"deborah madison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"deborah madison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Yeah, well, she is now She retired here, Um, from San Francisco, and she he photographed. Williams Sonoma. Dr Paige, Julia child Like all the major people, Deborah Madison. It was, you know, another Santa Fe person, And so she's gonna be photographing our book. All right. So, um I don't know that we have a fundraiser. Go fund me. You know you Dok go on, have a go fund me And in fact, for this last week of the fundraising, we have a raffle and you could win amazing prizes. You can win a Cuisinart, for example, You could win incredible cookbook hearings by De Brianna's talented husband, You can win some other swag from de Brianna's Meatball Chronicle show that she didn't go to in London, You know, fine program. No donation is too small. We've had people give us thousands to $5. And we appreciate every single cent s so you could just have a recipe contest. Do you ever read any contest? So we're taking 10 recipes from our viewer slowdown? How did people find you on go fund me. Well, if you look if you go into the search, and you put in Corona kitsch, and I'm pretty sure we're the only ones there, But the way that you see it is it will have our book cover that says, and the title of our book is that time we ate our feelings. And it's It's kind of yellow and orange and has like a soup lay on it or something like that is breaking. The title is bring the Corona Kitchen Cookbook to life, and that's how you find us on Go Fund me, you say goes through this week, and that's it. Well, well, We're hoping that's going to be it. All right. Radical ends next Tuesday. The unfortunate news is the Cuisinart is completely broken. You know, you'll have to fix and rewire. Get a new motor head. Yeah, very cool. That is very cool. That's a new one. Yeah, that's fun. Yeah, Alright, so it will be published somewhere around Mother's death. Mother's Day. That's a goal. It's a unique book, too. It's not just recipes Deborah Ann and I, actually, as writers and entertainers we have written about. I don't know 90 short stories to accompany the recipe for you. Short stories and what was happening, and it's sort of diary scrapbook sort of format. It's It's a fun. It's gonna be fun. Read. Let me let me say, But is it like Like a binder? You can turn the page. There's a recipe in the pages like plasticized taken, Wipe him off. And all of that book proper proper cookbook. Yeah. Okay, Well, congratulations. Thank you. Thank you. We're we're excited. I mean, actually, something happened during Cove it I mean, you know, that's a really cool thing. Here. You guys, you know, it took a quick left and Reinvented what you guys were going to do and stay busy. And who knows? Maybe the acting thing is old news. And now you're gonna be famous cookbook authors, You know they'll be the B the special on CNN. Find the New Mexico not with Stanley Tucci, but with Manzini and Lucas. Well for left, right, parlayed into a TV Syriza Richard and still keep cooking but actually get paid for it and share all of our our wisdom with people and maybe getting assistance so things don't fall on our heads, and we don't cut yourself remembers maybe some young, hunky man to come along and be the kitchen assistant. Uh, Sue Chef? I don't know. I don't know. Just a thought I was. I was not volunteering for that job. Any support. My husband does a lot, but Off my husband's That's all old too. All right. It's the new reality say it's the covert reality. All right. So once again, um Donate. If you want to help these ladies out, finish their dream of being a world famous cookbook authors and actors and playwrights and writers go to go fund me and then type in the meatball Chronicles or DeVry enemy and see me or know Around the kitchen around a kitchen. I'm sorry Khurana kitchen or that time we ate our feelings and you can find it there and donate and I think maybe you'll get a lot of gratitude from them. You will you'll be well, look gratitude. Thanks. Okay? All right, Lisa, Beyond this what you working on? Oh, my gosh. Well, I am a part owner in a production company here in Santa Fe called like minds and I'm in development on a feature Our first indie feature romantic comedy. Hopefully we're going to be shooting at this fall. I've got about three TV, syriza and development and thinking about optioning a book for for a new Feature. You know, we're just constantly creating and can't wait. Tiuna really get back out there in a post covert world, But we are obviously Prepared for, you know doing it. They could they could be this year could be this year. You might well have a few wires. Few earns in the fire. Everyone know what do you do it? Well, I'm finishing the book and hopefully will be booked touring and God willing. By the end of the year. They'll be, um you know, are acting life will come back. Oh, by the way, you guys might be interested. We have a new radio show starting this Saturday. At one o'clock every Saturday. It's called Film Talk weekly. It'll be hosted by Jacques Paisner and Gary Farmer, and I'm sure they would love to have both of you with these girls. Wonderful. That's great. All right. Best of luck with the book Corona Kitchen. Go fund me. Go fund me type in Corona Kitchen de Brianna. Good to see you. At least a good to see you healthy.

Go Fund De Brianna Corona Kitchen Cookbook Um Corona Kitchen Corona Deborah Madison Meatball Chronicle Williams Sonoma San Francisco Dr Paige Deborah Ann CNN Syriza Richard London Santa Fe New Mexico Sue Chef Julia Cove
"deborah madison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"deborah madison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Everybody, you are back with you. Eating it up. I'm Cheryl Alters Jameson. Thanks for coming along with us today and we're talking food Adventures with Deborah Madison and her life in vegetables. Her new book is an onion in my pocket. It's a beautiful and charming and frank memoir, and you need it. Go get it, Find it and are collected Works or Garcia Street or order it from wherever you get books, But get it. It's something you should definitely read. And one of the things I want to get in. We're going to go back and talk a little bit more about, you know things like greens and shape a niece. But one of the real points of the book is nourishment. And I want to make sure we have time to talk about that a little bit. Because if he were saying when we're off air, nobody gets to that part because we all run out of time. So I wanted to start our segment. Our last segment with that idea. Can you talk to that a little bit, please for e. I want to try. I've always felt a little uncomfortable with the vegetarian label because I'm not a vegetarian unnecessarily. But I had to find out what really mattered this food and what mattered to me was how food was prepared or shared. And if it came with Plainness with generosity with care with attention. Then I remember those meals and it didn't matter at all. What was on the plane and so the last chapters about that kind of food, and and this just stories about menus and meals I've had Work that really stood out. Uh huh. And you know, I do like that in terms of the spirit of generosity about the food and that we remember moments. I mean, it's yes, it's important. What's on the plate and all of that, all of us who are, you know, so tied to the culinary universe. But it is that spirit and that generosity and all of that that I think, Yeah, that does matter s O much in the end, so I appreciate you. Getting that in in the book and in our talk about it, too. So, um, s o back. We're talking about greens on how you ended up being chef there because that was a project, I guess. Was that the Abbott or you're organizing Committee of the SIM Center. I don't know what they were called. Exactly that decided You should have a restaurant. The Zen center should have a restaurant who decided that there was no organizing committee. But there was a board. Okay. And, uh, I don't know how I'll happened. But I just found myself in that position and and and going to bed every night feeling like I had a mountain on my chest and waking up in the morning. It was still there. Well, not only was the restaurant new I mean and again, this is just so wild to think back at the time. But I mean Fort Mason. I mean, that had been a government entity and all the sudden it became, you know, an area right for private development. And just to put a restaurant in that space because we're talking, You know, they're with a stunning views out over the water and everything. I mean, this was so again visionary. At the time to, you know, put that there and to make a restaurant that was in this beautiful setting, And that was open to everybody to come. But that was being run by the Zen center. It was just really such a unusual idea and something that you know again. She was like, Oh, yeah, of course I would do something like that today, But we're talking, You know, a full generation ago, and it was unusual on s all of sudden. You found yourself. Without a huge having a big, big restaurant. And, uh, yeah, people paying to come this time It was crazy. It was really hard. I mean, I was stuck on the idea of maybe maybe a 10 seat restaurant, tiny little intimate thing. This was huge as you said, And you know the idea that we would chop garlic, you know, by hand or whatever it was Quickly, you know, gone. It wasn't like a 10 Person Cafe or even being in the they represent center with your folks coming in for dinner? No, we had 300. People at a time sometimes come in. In the very beginning. 250 people was usually what we served for lunch. Uh huh. And again, you're bringing in the general public, So I know it was a big concern to you to have, um, you know, something that felt like a satisfactory meal again something at the center of the plate. That was very I added cheese, all kinds of things where it didn't happen to be our wasn't needed, really. And since that I've taken it out, but because I was nervous. I didn't want people to go away hungry. And feeling that they hadn't been fed s. Oh, it was a little bit dicey. You know our first well, you did such a great job of it. And I just remember eating there at the time and just being, you know, blown away by the generosity of the food and the spirit of it and the Oh, the bread you did, like it wasn't the for gossip. Love. Yes. Yeah. And you pull it apart of the table, and, uh, yeah. Careful stuff. Yeah, it was from Yeah, we probably should at least give homage for your time at Chez Panisse. Since that is a legendary restaurant and Alice Waters, obviously a legendary figure in our culinary universe, and she had come to the garden originally, That's how you met her that I'm right. Yeah, she had come to gringo and the Abbot said, Why don't you show her and Lindsey shere around? But I did, And they were kind of mind. Especially Alice was iron. Let us and asking questions. And she was. She really wanted this food that we were growing from the restaurant. And then I started to ask them questions. And And this And finally she said, haven't you ever been, And I said no, I've never been. I never even heard of shape in these Really? I mean, I barely had heard of it. She said. Well, you must come bring a friend and come tomorrow night. So we did. We borrowed a car We went and it was this was the food that I always had wanted Teat. And cook, you know, and I recognized it immediately and and I went to work there. She she invited me to work there and I did for On and off for about 10 years. Oh, and it was again such a seminal time and Alice brought together such an amazing group of people yourself included, But Lindsay shares the pastry chef, and, oh, people that Santa fans know David Tanis and Mark Miller and forced through the kitchen at that time, folks, you just need to read the story..

Zen center Alice Cheryl Alters Jameson Deborah Madison Fort Mason SIM Center Alice Waters Teat Chez Panisse Lindsey shere Abbot Lindsay Santa Mark Miller David Tanis
"deborah madison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"deborah madison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"I'm Cheryl Alters Jameson. And thanks for spending part of your Saturday afternoon with us US today is with me as well as my friend for many decades. Now we're beginning to be a little frayed. How many decades? Oh my goodness. Deborah Madison and Deborah is locally based. She's a real treasure here in Santa Fe. She's the author of some 14 books, cookbooks. Just multi award winning many James Beard awards as well as I C P awards and every other kind of recognition Anybody in the food business can get and well deserving of all of it. She has been a real pioneer in the area of vegetable cookery and welcome back to the show, Deb. Thank you, Cheryl. So you okay? Did you ever dream you'd turn out to be the foremost authority on vegetable cooking in the United States? Well, in the world, not just the United States your did. I never thought about it. I never dreamed that. No, I didn't know s O. Okay, let's get into the San Francisco. Well, okay. So you're you're growing up in Davis, you know, out in the, uh in Northern California and as a teenager again To start spending time in San Francisco and kind of the heyday of the counterculture and all and tell us about how you ended up then living in that area and with the your whole at the Zen center and all of that, how that come to pass. Gosh. Yeah, in two minutes or less. Alright. Oh, anyway, how it came to pass me. I don't know. I grew up in Davis's and Kpfk was our radio station. I used to listen to Alan Watts, who talked about Buddhism. And that was my introduction. Really? It was the only radio station on and it was very profound. What I heard Um, so eventually, eventually I ended up with the Zen center and my first job there was cooking and, you know, thank heavens. We didn't Have to open restaurants for another period of time for 20 years or so, because, really, I mean, vegetarian food was awful way were very well intended about going back to eating whole foods and grains and this and that the other thing, but nobody knew how to cook. Knowing anything about cooking and our parents and either. I mean, who had a dad who went off who stroll outside and put tofu or Tempe on the grill. We didn't even know about temp. Anyone we barely knew about tofu. You know, right now, uh, wasn't in every grocery store. That's really true. Yeah, but that wasn't a day that when you found tofu, it was often freshly made. And it's so different in our, you know, compacted things that we find in supermarkets today that I kind of meant for longevity more than just their custardy flavor, too. I don't understand how they do that at all. But like with a lot of foods, we kind of room tofu. I think you know, we've since we've discovered it. Health food. It's gotten very weird, but it's true. That beautiful took that You used to happen. Japanese restaurants that I Sport of my own and Sacramento and then later in San Francisco. That doesn't exist anymore. That unless you you lucky and you go to Japan or to a good restaurant were there specializing in Tokyo. On the other hand, Dan my, my first husband, who I mentioned in the book. Just recently made tofu from scratch. And he said, You know, it wasn't that different, really very particular about food on doing everything from scratch, and he found it wasn't that different, so I'm not sure how they've come up with it or why what or anything about it, but If he says that I'm inclined to think interesting. Yeah, well, at that point, so much of vegetarian food was kind of coming out of the macrobiotic. Your principles of the brown rice and the miso soup in all, and that could be wonderfully done. But that's very limited and you really began tol explore coming up with more interesting food on what could really truly be at the center of the plate. I did because I had you. E actually inherited a macrobiotic kitchen when I started and cooking at Zen Center, and I quickly realized that if we all want to eat together, food had had to be more universal. It couldn't be macrobiotic. So we change. I change things. I started introducing dairy and cheese, vanilla baking powder things like well, like, really you and to make pancakes rise and to make food familiar, and that began, I think helped to bring people to the table. Now I happen to be a fan of dat food that we had before. You know these students that lotus root and various specials and them that were familiar to me that we're unfamiliar to a lot of people. And you're sure look familiar to me because I took an interest. Cooking even that, But they weren't familiar to someone from Kansas who came out to practice them, for example. So You know, we had to change and change it now. Things have probably changed back since the vegan eras and snow this know that I don't need that so forth and so on. But at the time, I felt it was important if we want to eat together to make the food recognizable. Mm hmm. And so I was told by teacher the question. What is that should never come up with dinner service. So I took that seriously, you know, and I never did want to say I have that happen. You know what is that? What's on the plate? It had to be recognizable. Well, you started putting things and she lotta's and craps and you know, and polenta is a base and started creating plates that actually did have a center of the plate. Until that time, attended to beam or, you know if you went to a vegetarian restaurant or ahead a vegetarian meal, it was more of Ah, uh, just thinking about Martine Rios, Who's such an accomplished chef here in Santa Fe, and he and his wife kid about when Jennifer being a vegetarian when they got together, you know that Martine's Idea of a vegetarian meal was, you know, just grill up a bunch of peppers and put him on a plate E mean, And that's from somebody who has, you know all this culinary experience in such that's why Oh, nerri, they're not familiar with, right? Yeah, nobody. Woz. Yeah, And you really started investigating this and trying to come up with things that not only look like you had a center of the plate dish, but that were beautifully pres. Scented and all And you know that it's hard for people, probably today to grasp how unusual that wasp back in that era and all the foods you know so many things that we think of today as a part of, you know, vegetable cookery. Um, nobody even you know, would have known what those were at that point. Well, that's ruined in that speaks to ingredients as well. And I'm always amazed when I give a talk to younger people, they said. Oh, but we can get a ruble at Trader Joe's. Well, yes, you can. That's great, but we introduce that we helped introduce a ruble, A golden beast. Fingerling potatoes, all kinds of things that are no wherever our plate he's worked, not even around at that point system in your neck. Well, the Zen center, I mean, had such far reaching, you know, visionary ideas..

Zen center US Cheryl Alters Jameson San Francisco Santa Fe James Beard Deborah Madison Trader Joe Alan Watts Deborah Martine Rios Davis Kpfk Deb Japan Dan my Tempe Kansas Northern California
"deborah madison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"deborah madison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Ah, friend on the other side of Santa Fe, Deborah Madison, who lives out of gala stay. Oh, And anyway, she has a brand new memoir out. It is a lovely book done by Alford cannot publishing And I don't mean just Debra's writing, which is lovely, but it is a beautifully produced book to how'd you end up doing this one with can opt, ib. Yeah, they came to me, actually. I mean, we tried to sell it to a lot of people. You know the way you do and cannot was the only person interested. Well, I'll be darned how smart of them smart of them. Indeed, I mean, other people were interested, but they wanted me to go into a place I didn't want to go to in the book, so I said no. Thank you not going to do that. You want to tell the story that you want to tell? Yeah. I don't want to tell someone else's story. Yeah, tell us about the title. How did that come about that came about because I really did have it. I need in my pocket one day and I went to Spanish class and I took it out in order to find my pens and pencils and notebooks and paper and that people started to laugh. And to me was normal that you should have an idea in your pocket or strawberries on your lap coming back from San Diego or whatever. Um and I thought Why are they laughing? This is normal. This is what a food person has. And I need in their pocket. And I ride like making pizza with my pal Dan and this was left over and I had taken it home, Eh? So everybody should Yes. Haven't onion in their pocket. I ended up going someplace where I thought I was pulling my pan out of my coat pocket. And I pulled out a stalk of asparagus. So I know exactly feeling. Yeah. You know what I mean? Right? Yes. Yeah, So okay, let's let's kind of go back to. We were talking at the beginning that you your family was originally in New York at the time you were born. But as a fairly small child, your family relocated to the Davis area of Northern California, which is really the breadbasket of America. At that time in the 19 fifties and all And so that's you grew up surrounded by that to begin with, right? I did I and I love the Central Valley. I mean, I just I love to California and I still do. It's still home in some respects. No, but it was the bread basket, and I think that is probably the days are numbered for that now of having just read it. Book about California Agriculture By Tom Phil put which is excellent. I think it's time to spread out. You know what we can do throughout the country in terms of growing plants that we eat? That's all, Hmm. And from that time, uh, tell us a little about the family life. You know, you have two brothers and a sister. I have. Yes, exactly. And and it was a very strange life because my parents We're so different from each other, and they should have been so much more like I thought, but they were very different. My mother was very busy with art and music and writing and cooking was on with far edges of her, her wise on and which she admits, and I think it's amazing that she cooked it all. Really. Uh, my dad. She was a little bit. Um, well, my parents were born on the same day, actually, And so they both went through the depression, and they both went to it very well. Either of them had family system bread lines. They had fathers who kept their jobs and So on and so forth, But my dad was very generous about food and about everything where my mother was very much not generous. The glass is always half empty in her case, so I didn't know you know anything about food or how I should even relate to it. I mean, we only had steak once. And that was a gift from the university it or not, And we had to fill out a questionnaire and it was horrible. I thought, you know, I couldn't understand what the mystique was all about. It was gray. It was tough. It was on the other hand, my parents may not have known how to cook a steak. I don't know. I have no idea. But I know that my dad when my mother went east once a year what she did to visit her family in Connecticut. My dad had come back to the airport with bags filled with meats and things like that. And for a week, we'd have amazing food. You know, that was really winter food from his Iowa background. And, uh, And it was always so hot, but we had short ribs and chicken and dumplings and pies and eggs or breakfast instead of shredded wheat. And it was and then it all vanished when my mom came back, so I had no idea what it meant. And it didn't really in for my taste that much because you know it happened just once a week or a long before a long time ago. Let's just put it that way. You said that your mom had sort of the half empty approach towards things up in the food in particular, But you do mention that she really did like to entertain and made food, gifts and things that sort of informed her sensibility of generosity. Ultimately, too. I think she did. And I know she made gifts of food She cooked for other She was in some ways generous. And that was wonderful and the other way she was not generous, and that's difficult. It's difficult not to find nourishment from your parent. And my dad was quiet about it all. He didn't have said very much, although he did the thing like he cooked the turkey on Thanksgiving and whatever you know Just being around. You See Davis, I would think in that period with, you know, it's focused on agriculture. And, uh, I don't know if wine was a big part of its programming at that point, but that must have made you know impression on YouTube being able to access things like that, and why was just starting them because I did have a summer job in the enology department. Which I loved. I mean, it was a crazy job. I think it was. I won't even tell you. What I did is pretty gross, You know, but but one was starting then, and I had a wonderful boss who was much loved in the enology community. So, yes, it was a very exciting place to grow up. It's even more exciting now when I read about it in the paper all the time, you know. Oh, a scientist Davis did this Did that discovered this really there on the forefront of so much of this? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. You've seen a lot of change in California. In terms of the Oh, the climate and such Yeah. You mentioned the Philpott book, uh, in the first segment to, um, is it what do you see happening with that in the future with California? Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I'm hoping people will leave then some of us can come back who are from there? Maybe. But, um, I don't know. It's so. It is just so difficult right now..

California Davis Deborah Madison Debra Santa Fe Alford San Diego YouTube Central Valley Connecticut Northern California Dan Philpott New York enology community America Tom Phil Iowa
"deborah madison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

09:38 min | 1 year ago

"deborah madison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Looking watch. You got cooking pal about cooking something up with me stirred up boys. Good afternoon food lovers wherever you are in the world. I'm Cheryl Alters Jameson. And thanks for joining me. So that we can together, heated up and eat it up too. Are you excited about food? Well, then you're in the right place because I'm always always excited about food. That's what we talk about here. Sometimes, the Santa Fe ins were based in gorgeous northern New Mexico and sometimes of people from the greater world of food, Whether that someone from Albuquerque or Los Cruces or halfway around the globe. Excited about food is the name of my website to where you can get inspiration for bringing some excitement to your own kitchen and meals for your family and friends. And maybe you could get some ideas, too. For where to go to get some take out dining. Well, maybe we'll be back to some patio dining. If it's warm enough and sunny enough anyway, ways that we can support our friends in the restaurant community. Please check out my website to for some recipe ideas and, oh, there are recipes, videos and lots more. Let's see. One of the new recipes I put up is for some lamb rib chops, and we got some great lamb here in the Santa Fe area that you can pick up at the Farmer's market and At some of our other local places, too. In that particular recipe, they're done with the jalapeno jelly and that came out of my Parini Ranch Steakhouse cookbook that I did with my friends Tom and Lisa Parini over in Buffalo Gap, Texas Anyway, you can check it all out at excited about food dot com. And is always on the website. There are links to that and to all of my books, and I like to mention too, that those orders for books don't go through some big, old amorphous corporation out in the world. They go through a local business, the Santa Fe School of Cooking's retail shop. Please also follow me as you can on social media, either by name, Cheryl alters Jameson or by excited about food. My guest today is Deborah Madison, the country's foremost authority on vegetables and the multi multi award winning author of some 14 cookbooks, including Oh my goodness or somebody I Love the new vegetarian cooking for everyone, local flavors and vegetable literacy to mention a few Deborah hasn't brand new book out, and it's related to food, but it's not a cookbook. It's a memoir, and it's called an onion in her pocket My life with vegetables. Ever lives just outside of Santa Fe in Gala stay. Oh, and I'm proud to have called her a friend now for Oh, my goodness. A lot of decades now. Welcome back to the show, Deborah. Thank you, Cheryl so much, And it is a lot of decades. How did we get this old? How did this happen? You know is the question for our time like they really Oh, we're just talking off air about learning about the whole world of virtual book tours and virtual radio shows and All these kinds of things we do in this day in age, but we're learning and anyway, um, it's uninterested world out there. Well, by the time you're listening to this out there in the world, folks, I'm not sure if Santa Fe County will be red or yellow or green, according to our new system for pandemic business re openings. Did it surprise anybody that are only county that wasn't red. To begin with. When this started last week was Los Alamos, a city and a county full of scientists. Anyway, you know seriously. This has been very tough on a restaurant, community and other food related businesses, in particular, are local shops and things and that you know those folks are always there for us whenever you need probably a prize anoc shin item, whatever for your kid's school or a non profit, or whatever, you know, we all go to our restaurants and Are other small businesses and ask them to make donations. Anyway. It's a tough time for them right now. So please remember to buy local things when you can. I'm getting restaurant gift certificates for several of my friends is Christmas gifts. Don't listen to that friends. You may not know who you are. Anyway, though they're a restaurant cookbooks, things like the restaurant, Martine Cookbook of Jennifer and Martine Rios is Anyway, you know, on our independent booksellers can use a lot of help right now to collected Works and Garcia Street and others. I mean, they've been so supportive of Debra and me and all of our local writing community and again, let's try to support them as we can. So, you know, keep your distance. Where your mask and remember all these local businesses virtually for your holiday shopping. So back to my guest. Well, Deborah, I'm just so pleased to have you on here. Okay, You know, thanks to Deborah's beloved cookbooks and her groundbreaking work as the chef at Green's restaurant in San Francisco. She has long been revered as the country's leading authority on vegetables. She profoundly. And that is true, profoundly changed the way generations of Americans think about cooking with vegetables. She helped transform a vegetarian from a dirty word. Speak okay into a mainstream way of eating before she became a household name, though. Deborah spent almost 20 years as an ordained Buddhist priest coming of age in the midst of counterculture San Francisco and this is a wonderfully intimate and just refreshingly frank memoir that tells her story, and with it really the story of the vegetarian movement in this country for the very first time. So Debra again welcome. It's so nice to have you back on the show, and we get to talk about you this time. I'm not sure that's some. It's fun for me. Well, you've had such a fascinating life and such a stellar career. What of the things that you know? You have had so much professional food experience, But you still identify yourself as a as a home cook, too, right? Very much so Yeah, I'm up to Flagstaff actually, is what? I decided to put my focus on home cooking instead of restaurant cooking because they're more home cooks and there are ships was let's face it, and your books have had such an influence on home cooks. Yeah, as well as I'm in the greater You know, culinary community and all of that, too. Onto, you know, straddle both of those audiences, I think is just a really a great thing about your many books over over the years. Okay, Let's see here. Why don't we start? Gosh. Well, this grew out of your desire really, to talk about food in a different way. This is not a book of recipes. No, there's not one recipe, and I'm delighted to say this is not a memoir with recipes. It's just, you know, a memoir. Yeah, and you know, you kind of said to me and you've said I know In some interviews, you're just kind of done with With with recipes that you felt like you said, what you need to say and wanted to say with those E. I felt I was repeating myself to, you know, Actually, I wanted to start stop writing cookbooks with the savory way, which was a long, long time ago. But I kept at it, and I'm not sorry that I did. I'm glad that I did. It was a great thing to explore. Food with, but, um, I know that my last book came out in my kitchen. I remember raising a glass of champagne that tsunami and say I've done it's been a great career, but now it's over. So, yes, And you did wasabi peas and all of that, But you still have so much more to tell us And I just love that this book, You know, you just happen to be in the right place at the right time in terms of countercultural San Francisco and all, too, But let's go back a little bit. Beyond that you started out in New York. Your dad was a botanist biologist. Hears about this. Yeah, botanist, Okay. But no Mm. And then an early job early in your lifetime anyway, took him out to took your your family, too, to Davis that area because he took a job at UC Davis. Yes, and he worked there until he stopped working. And I think he took an early retirement and went on to travel and to go back east where we started out. Yeah, Great. All right. We're gonna hear all about what's in an onion in my.

Deborah Cheryl Alters Jameson Santa Fe Santa Fe School of Cooking Deborah Madison Santa Fe County San Francisco New Mexico Albuquerque Parini Ranch Steakhouse Farmer Buffalo Gap Martine Cookbook Los Alamos New York UC Davis Los Cruces Texas
A Recipe From Deborah Madison

Monocle 24: The Menu

03:45 min | 1 year ago

A Recipe From Deborah Madison

"This is Deborah Madison the author of an onion in my pocket, and the recipe I want to talk about is an Eggplant Gra ten with a golden. Dome Saffron recalled the custard. This has long been one of my favorite dishes. But when we made it at Greens, I used to add greer cheese to it to make it more substantial main course those who are concerns that that time people felt satisfied I've now taken the greer cheese out since it wasn't there in the original recipe, which is actually by Richard Only, and here's how it goes. So you're GONNA start with about two pounds or a bit more of a plant. All of oil, a small red onion finely diced upon clove of garlic minced a half a teaspoon of herbs vence or a tablespoon margin lease chopped. Two. And a half pounds of full tomatoes that are ripe that are peeled, seeded and chopped or two cups of crush canned tomatoes. Sea salt freshly ground pepper to eggs a cup of ricotta a quarter cup of milk a good pinch of saffron threads that have been crumbled and soaked in a tablespoon of very hot water and a half a cup of freshly grated. Parmigiano reggiano cheese, and finally ten large Basil Leaves tournant pieces. Okay. We're going to heat the oven to four hundred degrees Fahrenheit with and then cut the eggplants in half lengthwise. If you've got just one large eggplant, cut it in quarters, slice each quarter crosswise about a half an inch thick. Slices lightly with oil on both sides and then set them on a sheet pan and bake until the bottom sides have brown. About fifteen minutes. Turn them over and Brown. The second side, this often takes less time. So do check after about eight minutes. When the EGGPLANT is done, remove it from the oven and reduced the heat to three hundred fifty degrees. To, make the tomato sauce warm two tablespoons olive oil in a wide skillet when it's hot at the onion garlic and herb surpr- vence crush I between the fingers or the fresh. Marjoram Stir to the onion with the oil. Then reduce the heat too low and cook gently until the Union is soft twelve to fifteen minutes. Add. The chopped fresh or canned tomatoes raise the heat and cooks during occasionally until the liquid has cooked off and the sauces fairly thick. To make the custard, wisc the aches and stirring the Kota Melk sufferin and Parmigiano reggiano cheese season with a few pinches of salt and some short ground pepper. To assemble the Gratin, choose an earthenware casserole with two inch sides in eight cup capacity. Spread a cup of the sauce and the dish then set down the overlapping layers of a plant. Season it was salt and pepper scatter. Half the torn basil leaves over the surface. Then Dab about a quarter cup of sauce over those plants then make another layer of the remaining eggplant seasoned with salt and pepper add the torn basil and cover with the rest of the tomato sauce for the custard overall and bake until it is golden gently swelled and even Brown in places about forty minutes, we moved from the oven and let the croutons rest for about ten minutes before serving.

Brown Greer Dome Saffron Deborah Madison Kota Melk Sufferin Greens Union Richard Only
"deborah madison" Discussed on Open A Fucking Book

Open A Fucking Book

08:17 min | 1 year ago

"deborah madison" Discussed on Open A Fucking Book

"Hey. Now. Saturday. And it's Like eighty upper seventies WINCO. Hot enough for them. FUCKING Mosquitoes. Are GonNA be fucking horrible. Horrible they're not as bad since I sprained. No she sprayed the the whole yard. Kill the mosquito didn't kill the PUCK and horse flies that I have flying into my car. Good. About a deer fly out of all, it could have been one that was just hanging on during the entire ride home from work. No. If I've watched it fly into my car when I open out the door I didn't do the entire side of that. The House I'd bug spray doesn't work with horse lies the same way it works with other bugs they're Kinda. Their their to. beefy typically depends on the the spray and it wasn't the same spray. I. Usually use and. Welcome to hold and gardening tips from your hosted open a fucking book. Oh. I've Kevin I'm Stephanie. Didn't have any episode last week of some. You can blame me I had a status Migraine that lasted a week and then I had reprieved for a day and then it came back for a day and then today. I was. Kind of migraine free mostly frills party not headache freak is done kids the. No I mean the the migraine still there it's just dull. So I'm mostly Migraine, free good and the day a special day. It is our it. We're not going to get too mushy into his are the eight year of us since we started dating our eight year anniversary and the eighth anniversary of the day that we. Had our first date just. That was you put a better than I do. So that as a special and on Sunday the day. So recording this on Wednesday today is our anniversary the day we started dating. Sunday, the day after our big episode comes out will be our wedding anniversary six years. So anniversary. So big. Big Week September is a big month for us. We have our. The eighth anniversary of when we first began talking the eighth anniversary of when we first met and had our first date and our wedding anniversary flow. Big Stuff. So let's get to the show. so that's what everybody's listening for. They don't WanNa. Hear our. Family history. So just a couple news things it real quick since we didn't get tube last week I'll talk about the things that get talked about last week. I know allow people waiting for books and a lot of the publishing schedules of gotten pushed off. Supply issues were disrupted per fall publishing. Back in March many publishers rescheduled large chunks of their catalog to fall. To the fall and hope that things would be back to normal but they are not. and. We are entering a very overcrowded season with the extra issue that the two largest printing companies United States are under significant financial straight. LLC Communication declared bankruptcy in April and the company sales fell nearly forty percent in the fiscal quarter that ended in June. quads book printing business is also up for sale and in the spring, the company had to temporarily shut production at three plants due to the pandemic. To add to the strain, there has been unexpected spike in demand for print books with unit sales of five percent comparing twenty, twenty, two, twenty, nineteen today comparing the most recent ten weeks of twenty twenty to the same period twenty, nineteen percent sales up twelve percent. Driven by the demand for blockbuster titles including new books by Suzanne Collins And Stephanie Meyer and Various books on trump. Because there have been a lot. A lot of nonfiction books come out. Trump I'm gonna I'M GONNA. Think that most of it's because people want the Prequel to. Hunger Games and. they want Edwards perspective of twilight more than likely. Yes. But there have been a lot of trump books out some people I am not going to buy but some people do want to buy those and there has been increased demand for older titles on race and children's education books some the older titled on Race We, will cover. On the Saturday Saturday's episode we cover our first black off. So the issue is impacting, reprints of existing books and schedules for new releases, a number of which are moving to a v at very short notice to later seasons, for example. nonce and Pantheon are shifting their release of more than a dozen fall titles including a memoir by the cookbook cookbook author, Deborah Madison and a biography of Sylvia plath also fiction by Robert Harris Martin Amos. Joan Nesbit Alexander McCall Smith and Tom Vessel. So if you're looking for day those good chance that it's getting pushed back Sylvia plath one. I, kind of like to get so he could you but It's all at all that Shit's getting push back a little bit. So if you're looking forward to those. She had the way. Just like everybody's got wait forever that. Make Sense. David Copperfield. Math magician the book. Is Getting a movie. By dove a towel. The. You, know pell. Trying to think of what he was I. believe he was the guy from slum slumdog millionaire I was GonNa? Say Damn Dog millionaire. Well, according to The Washington. Post the personal history of David. Copperfield. I'll it is coming to the big screen. Also GonNa Star. Hugh Laurie. Peter. TILDA. Swinton Ben, wishaw Rosalind Eleazar and Benedict Wong. We all know Benedict Wong as. What was his name again in them long? Weird Abdu, Benedict's and what Wong and his name is also wall. So it looks like we won't be able to see it for a while. because. It is only on a very limited release in. The if you had to guess. Where you're going to do a limited release of a movie. Why would you think you? All. Know it's a, it's the US do a US, a limited U S release of movie. Hollywood. further. East Newark. South of that. The Northern Virginia. I is that were copperfield grew up or some shit well So it's not available for streaming of probably won't be available until twenty twenty, one limited opening such as these are not unusual in the run up to the Oscars, which usually requires films have been released in traditional theaters to be eligible. So more than likely, they're just releasing it in a few theaters that not a ton of people are going to go to just because of the pandemic no point shell out all the money to put them in New York and Hollywood go to a smaller. area less populated. But out theaters air, you're still upper at Oscar but you're not being blamed for trying to put people in the theaters during pandemic but they're opening theaters again now. This was from a you know we can Africa. They were opening theaters.

David Copperfield Migraine Benedict Wong Sylvia plath twenty twenty WINCO US Oscar Africa Newark Hollywood. WanNa Hugh Laurie headache Deborah Madison Suzanne Collins Kevin Shit Northern Virginia Joan Nesbit Alexander McCall S
"deborah madison" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"deborah madison" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Gunman not knowing like what the possible consequences of that action would be like He pushed me into an alleyway ran off to take buddy down. That's a hero. A march is being held in Kenosha today to call for an end to police violence. Protests continue in Belarus over what the opposition declares a fraudulent presidential election that gave incumbent Alexander Lukashenko 1/6 term. Well. Now the government is stripping media credentials of journalists covering the protest for foreign news organizations. NPR's Lucien Kim reports, at least 17 journalist have been stripped of their press credentials, meaning they are no longer able to report legally on the daily protests against Bella Russian President Alexander Lukashenko. Among the affected media are The Associated Press, the BBC, Reuters and Radio Liberty News of Police. Violence against peaceful protesters have sparked international condemnation following a disputed presidential election earlier this month. When journalists working for Bella, Russian state media went on strike to protest censorship, Lukashenko brought in Russians to replace them. Bella, Russian authorities advise people to spend the weekend with family and friends and not participate in anti government rallies. Thousands of women defied the warning and march through the centre of the capital, Minsk. Lucien Kim. NPR NEWS Moscow The United Arab Emirates today overturned it's boycott of Israel as NPR's Daniel Estrin reports from Jerusalem. It's the latest step in a U. S broker deal to establish diplomatic ties between the Emirates and Israel For decades. The Emirates, like most other Arab countries, refused to normalize relations with Israel until the Israeli Palestinian conflict is resolved. Now the Emirati ruler, Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed on Mahan has abolished an official boycott of Israel, allowing the Moradi citizens to have official dealings with Israelis. In fact, the countries have had quiet ties for years. But the new decree could allow for more commerce between the oil rich Gulf Arab states and technological powerhouse Israel. On Monday, Israeli el Al Airlines will make its first official flight to the Emirates carrying Israeli officials and President Trump's son in law, Jared Kushner. You work on the details of the Israel Emirates deal. Daniel Estrin. NPR NEWS Jerusalem This's NPR. This is WNYC. I see in New York I'm Rebecca Deborah Madison Square Garden will open its doors for the first time this fall as a pole site for people voting in the presidential election. W and Bridget Bergen reports. The news comes after recent protests by players in the embassy to protest the police shooting of Jacob Lake and unarmed black men. In Wisconsin. Basketball teams across the MBA decided to take action. The Milwaukee Bucks and Orlando Magic refused to play Game five of their playoffs on Wednesday, and other teams and leagues followed suit. As part of an agreement between the N B A. And the Players Association to resume play nb arenas across the country agreed to be pull sites in New York City. That means the Garden home to the New York Knicks. It will be used for early voting from October 24 through November 1st and is a regular pull site on Election Day. November 3rd. A commuter bus crashed into a divider at the Port Authority Bus terminal in Manhattan today or injuring at least 16 people. The New Jersey transit bus crashed around 9 30 this morning on an upper ramp at the bus terminal, tossing passengers around and causing major damage to the vehicle's front end. The fire department said 11. People were taken to hospitals for treatment, including one person with critical injuries. Others were treated at the scene. The bus appeared to be departing the terminal when it crashed, according to officials. No other vehicles were involved. The incident caused a temporary closure of all New Jersey bound lanes on the.

Bella Russian President Alexan United Arab Emirates NPR Israel Lucien Kim Israel Emirates Daniel Estrin New Jersey New York City Jerusalem Alexander Lukashenko Belarus New York Knicks Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Kenosha official Minsk
"deborah madison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"deborah madison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"You know that Santa Fe is is on table and and and yet it's necessary if we're gonna have reconciliation and move forward and figure out howto live. In right existence with the creatures of the earth and with each other. No, it's very sound, but lots of collective grieving going on in our collective trauma. And, you know, I think we're all eating a lot of junk food. As a result, I am like eating ice cream in bed every night. Lately, you know is the world you sense of the early on about. Do you find yourself eating more wild foods or less what It's like. But you know, from our evolutionary background that makes sense because things like fat on DH and sugar. We're very limiting when we're relying on wild foods. That was part of the drive to domestication was to create fruits with more sugar in them, and more and animals that had more fat on them. Gamey is very lean, so true, Yeah. You said something about your father took up hunting later in life, So it wasn't something you grew up with. Do you hunt yourself at this point? I I don't really, but it's definitely something that I would like to do More of. And now that I've been living on the East Coast, and now that I'm back in in Santa Fan in New Mexico I'm ready, Teo to get going a little more on that and learn the skills more so, Yeah. My dad grew up in Brooklyn. So it was he came out here and In the last 10 years or so started to hunt. So there's there's alchemy in my freezer from him. Which is great, eh? Yeah. How about fish? Yeah, I need I need to take up fishing, but I don't know. Are you do you fashion hunting? Little no, don't hurt. But I have done some fishing and I did feel like I started it. I learned to fly fish because I felt like I needed to understand, you know, sort of where the spit in with nature and I should feel comfortable with doing that if I was going to continue to eat You know things from the waters and from the forests and all of that, too, In addition to domesticated things, Yeah, yeah, So it's been kind of interesting. I do have a story about, um ah, Alice Waters from Chez Panisse coming out some years ago for a dinner And you know Deborah Madison, and she never both involved with this was Lois Ellen Frank. And if you have a number of other people and We're brainstorming the menu, and he wanted to have it as local as possible. And so Hee was really, But we should try handsome local fish is it's just not what people think of, you know, but now are such a deal from our mountain streams around here, But at the time, I didn't have a clue how you know how to go about that. But I said I got somebody to go out and fish for me did it And he still does. He still brings me fish from lower It's art Pacheco who used to be the butcher at Connie's Grocery, you know. Wow, way back. Yes. Yeah, Anyway s o. I was able to provide the fish because I had somebody else who would fish. And then I picked purslane essentially weeds for my yard and make smoked trout salad is delicious. So happy with it in the end, Yeah, we're able to put this together. Oh, but Since you know, learned a little bit more about fishing myself because I felt like I should. Yeah, yeah, I know. It's definitely those and those kinds of skills. I mean, you know, people joke about the apocalypse and And needing to know how to do all these things live off the land. But I do think that is part of people's interest Now is, you know you buy fish in the grocery store. You don't know how many places it's been through how many times it's been frozen and unfrozen issue was caught by illegal fishing, or, I mean, I think something like 30% of our fish is caught by essentially slaved enslaved people who are trapped on these boats. And so I think people Their interests and wild food is connecting on that level. You know, that feels like okay. Nowhere this fish came from. I see the mountain stream that lived and okay, we're going to take a quick break here. We will be right back and continue this conversation with Gina. Raila Sirve. You are listening to you. Talk 12 61 of 37 Katie RC, and we're always at Santa fe dot com to stick with. Don't go away hungry..

Santa Fe Deborah Madison Alice Waters Connie's Grocery Lois Ellen Frank Raila Sirve Katie RC East Coast Gina Hee Brooklyn Teo Pacheco New Mexico Chez Panisse
"deborah madison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

06:09 min | 2 years ago

"deborah madison" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"For this, that are staying it. Let's see. I think. Lafond Eldorado, or kind of hosting this, and then the convention center downtown has most of the events as well as the Santa Fe school of cooking, having some, too. And it's just been a whirlwind of things that started on Thursday, and it's theme this year has been eat engage in power, and there are panels and presentations, and workshops and boot camps, and you name it, and then lots of dining around anyway. There is a program on Sunday. That is available with a day pass. I have been trying very hard to see if I could find somebody who could tell me exactly how if you wanted to come down tomorrow for the day because it's an interesting program, you can get a pass. I have had no luck as to this point in finding out specifically that I would say the best thing would probably be just to show up at the convention center at some time during the day, tomorrow and say that you want to attend, and find the information desk and deal with it that way. Because at this. Point the website. It's like nobody's monitoring it because everybody's here. So there will be some really interesting programs tomorrow, including a conversation with our own Deborah Madison with Joe Yona from the Washington Post. Curiously. We've got all kinds of people from the post running around Santa Fe this week, and also just k- Harris foremost authority on African foods of the African diaspora, and she's going to be in conversation with Lois Lois, excuse me, Lois. Eric Healey, who is a real authority on southern cooking and barbecue himself anyway. Those are just a couple of the many things happening. Others nice panel on women in the culinary business that Jennifer Rios from restaurant Martine. We'll be apart of on Sunday afternoon, two, which is happening like at three o'clock anyway, lots of good stuff all day tomorrow, and I wish I could tell you for sure that if you don't have a full pass for the on the conference that you can get in. But they have said that you can I just can't tell you exactly how so be persistent, if you want to check any of that out and you can go to ICP dot com online to see the full program, you'll get all the details there. Okay. Well back to my guest in studio. It's Tom seats a month, and he's a good friend. My didn't say an old friend yet but we were talking last night. For a while. Qualifies, his old. Definitely. Yes. So what brings you to Santa Fe this time, we, you know, this is supposed to be vacation? And I am having vacation here talking to you. It feels great. Friends of ours, have not been here before my partner, I often think about this as a place that we might want to retire someday. And so we're doing this little world tour. We thought we'd start in Santa Fe. This is a city that we love for a lot of reasons we have friends here and pointing at you right now. We love the climate here. We love the, the Chili's the food, just sort of that spiritual quality that exists here in the desert in. Oh, by the way, we love ten thousand waves. You know, I make those I make those reservations before I make plane reservations. Make sure you. So kid was competing with a lot of ice EP past week for restaurant reservations, and I'm really looking forward to going back some favorite restaurants and checking in and taking their pulse seen if they're as good as I remember them from the last time good. Okay. And we're talking about the fact we've got kind of an odd period, two were between a lot of things to oh, things that like, says on our very Mexican restaurant that's been really on for the last year or so you had the fire that, thankfully, didn't damage the whole restaurant, but just enough to close them up for, like three weeks at this rather critical time. And we have a few other things happening as those of you in the audience, probably. No. I mean like Santa cafe just closed for refurbishment now that Quinn Stevenson, who is the owner of Coyote cafe just acquired it and that'll be reopening probably by late June. I was hearing a little bit of the details of that last night. Right. And it's going to be exciting and they've already really done a lot of renovations over there. And they're looking at coming up with a, a nicer tenting than the kind of, you know, sort of Jerry rigged, canvas that they've had over the courtyard there for a number of years, but expect, you know, sort of just refinements on a lovely at place, and it was time, she's kind of grand Dom of res- restaurants go, and she needed a little refurbishing, but certainly been a great spot for many years. So we'll see how that comes together soon. Okay. Let's see. Oh, and then we've had things like the Bush people have closed maze, and we're going to get a new talion restaurant and there, but that's going to be the chef who's been up at El Nido. Anyway. So that just of come back, right? Exactly. Okay. Good. Well, when we come back after our commercial break here, we're gonna talk some about the James beard awards with her last week. And that's why I was not live last week as I was in Chicago and environs checking out what was going on there. So we'll talk some about just kind of generally, what we saw as trends from the beard awards and the winners in our regions, and such too. So you are listening to heating it up. I'm Cheryl alters Jamison. And this is talk twelve sixty one zero three seven KTAR. See, since we are recorded if you want to get in touch with me. Please send me a text or an Email is actually best to Cheryl at Santa Fe dot com and since even my friends can't spell Cheryl a lot of the times. It's H. E..

Santa Fe Santa Fe school Cheryl Lois Lois Eric Healey Santa cafe Washington Post James beard Deborah Madison Jennifer Rios partner Tom Coyote cafe Chicago k- Harris Jerry Quinn Stevenson El Nido Joe Yona talion
"deborah madison" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

10:53 min | 3 years ago

"deborah madison" Discussed on KCRW

"We're back on KCRW skit food on Evan Kleiman with Easter around the corner. I want to revisit all the things that eggs can do in twenty seventeen. I spoke with writer, Rachel Kong. She edited the wonderful collection of essays stories and recipes called all about eggs, the book begins, but the description of what many called the most beautiful egg. What is it? Yes. So this is a piece that Adam Gulnur who's a longtime contributor to lucky peach f-r-o-t-h, it's fees iridescent beautifully colored eggs from bird called the Timo. And if the South American bird, he went to Chile to go talk to farmers there who raised these birds both for the eggs, and for the meet their whites have a bit of Pinkney to them, which is extraordinarily which is pretty cool. Pinks egg pinks, and I should say that you didn't write this book. It's a collection of essays of extraordinary essays. Yeah. I didn't write the whole book a subject as huge as eggs mirror, mortal, like myself could not tackle it alone. So I enlisted, you know, a lot of experts a lot of cookbook authors that I've admired for a long time or two I've gotten to know in the process of working on lucky peach so people like Deborah Madison Greenspan just want an excuse to get their us a piece for X. But it's really smart to get all of these different points of view. One of my favorite essays was on the edge custard tart, which comes from three different places, most notably. Yes comes initially from Portugal, Bennett, traveled to Hong Kong and Macau each iteration of this tart is very different. The Portuguese pest Janata. It's very small within. Crust and blackened on the top with a really Brown spots. The Macanese Eckhart is also charred on the top this caramelized. And then the Dem's some tart was sort of perfected in Hong Kong into houses. And his totally a pale yellow and doesn't have any kind of Browning because as we learned from this essay, the Chinese in Hong Kong thought it would cause cancer. And so they preferred to have their hearts spotless. One of the things I love the most about this story was the appearance of nuns habit. Yes. So the nuns who had moved into this beautiful monastery in Portugal had to start their wimp. And they did that using Ed white since they had them all of these egg yolks leftover and found a way to make a delicious food out of them. And I actually learned of course of working on this book that nuns are very resourceful and a few egg dishes have come about because of non ingenuity guess in Bordeaux where they use Edwards to clarify wine. We had nuns taking the extra yolks and making a canape that marvelous little cork shaped pastry. Yeah. So delicious, and we also have recipe in the book for Ron pope pay a Mexican eggnog type beverage, and that was also invented by nuns and perfected by nuns. Tees up some excess egg yolks. Thank goodness. Thank goodness for. For the nunneries. So let's talk about yolk color, because I think people are really convinced that the color of a yoke is some indication of nutritious snus or freshness or home raised nece. Yeah. That was something that I thought to and in some cases is somewhat true because you can get that orange color from a chicken who eats a lot of insects and gets to route around grass so often that is true that a passer will have a more deeply colored yoke, but there's this thing the Roche yolk color fan deck. Yes. The meat seeing picture that is so take your this fan that has some paint ships just like swatches of color that range from like a very pale yellow to a very deep orange, and it's actually for chicken farm. To kind of select the color yoke that they would like, and then they can supplement accordingly. It's funny because you know, here in America, we think that deeply colored yoke is a sign of a delicious farm egg actually in Scandinavia, they prefer a lighter yolk in France. They prefer something deeper. Yeah. There's context everything. Yes. How can we tell if our f is fresh? I have a few methods in the book that you can utilize. I just like to crack it open and see of it's perky if the yoke is perky and the whites kind of staying together, then you know, that it's a very fresh egg a way to tell if it's fresh if you don't want to crack Viagra open, if you're gonna use it for something else like heart boiling, you can just put the egg in a bowl of water, preferably a clear bowl, and you can look through it and see if the egg is kind of lying on its side on the bottom of bowl. It's a very fresh egg. If it's standing up it's still a good egg a little bit older at that stage. It's good for hard boiling. And if it's floating you do not want to eat that egg. That is because the the shell is porous. Yeah. The shells poorest because you know, a chick hasta breathe breathe. Yeah. So it's porous for that exchange. Gases. And actually, we have a piece by Harold McGee in the book, you know, the phenomenon of an older hardboiled egg is easier to peel that's because carbon dioxide is leaving the egg as it gets older. It sort of pulls away from that membrane. That's close to to the shell. And makes it easier to peel as a carbon dioxide is leaving the Ed becomes more alkaline peaceable egg is more alkaline white, and he actually has this insane recipe for making Alkalis eggs, which is truly a commitment. It's truly a commitment. I guess it would be useful. If you had to make hundreds of deviled eggs or something, and you could just come up on a glud of really fresh chicken eggs, but tells us about this alkaline white phenomenon and basically two alkyl and Nys though whites. He. Has a soaking the egg a solution. That's an alkaline solution will cause the white to become more alkaline. But first before that in order to get the alkaline solution through the shell, that's poorest. But you know, still pretty sturdy. He has a soak the agonise solution of citric acid, and that sort of he calls etching edges the shell. So that you can peel it away and these paper spirals at the end so odd about four hours which is a long time, but it's quicker than waiting for an egg to get old. So one of my favorite parts of the book. What first of all there's so many stories there's their stories throughout the book that relate to the history of different recipes different types of eggs. The chickens Portland has to be one of my favorite parts of the book. It's stories of amusing chickens, and they're insane human caretakers. I just really wanted to have a component in the book that was about backyard. Chickens. We had sort of touched on factory farm, chickens and all the different labels that go along with eggs and the complicated nature of buying X today. And I just wanted to touch on the phenomenon also of raising chickens in your backyard, which I feel like is very alive. And well in Portland, Oregon reminded me of that I had when I was little chicken the chicken named after my favorite TV show at the time. I love that one day. I went out to feed her couldn't find her anywhere and asked my grandma where she was my grandma led me to the fridge, and she was just plucked so brutal at the bottom of the fridge. So this Spanish tortilla that famous giant free Totta like thing that's made of potatoes. And onions and eggs, you say that learning how to make your tears makes you a better cook. Yes. So this recipe came from Alex Reich. She likes to say that the tortilla is just a way to learn so many different aspects of cooking Euler, how to confuse the potatoes and a low temperature oil, you learn to be brave when you're flipping it over you learn how to kinda judge when the eggs are cooked and manipulate temperatures. I think that's what's so amazing about eggs actually is that they're so sensitive. Temperature three a matter of seconds when you're cooking eggs. And I think that's why they make for such interesting ingredients even for chefs at like, the highest echelon one of the things I noticed as I leave my way through the buck is this egg and ketchup leitmotif that is pan national. Yeah. Eggs and catch up is one of the classic combos of all time. Right. I mean, there's the masala omelette from India. The chip seem my I from Tanzania, and the Taiwanese oyster on let all of these were dishes that I learned about from excitedly talking about exit people, you know, Kathy brought the Taiwanese almost to me, and my friend Peter who had lived in Tanzania for a year told me about this French fry online, which is what the chips, he my. I is just cooked in a lot of Greece and topped with a squiggle of catchup, which he said in Tanzania not. Quite heinz. You know, it's a little bit of an off brand ketchup that's fin down and sometimes a little bit. Spicy egging tomato is also really good. That's another recipe. Book is for a scrambled egg with tomato which is something that I grew up with the Chinese child that was Rachel Kong. Talking to me and twenty seventeen about the book all about eggs. It was the final book.

Hong Kong Rachel Kong Tanzania Portugal Portland KCRW Chile Adam Gulnur writer Evan Kleiman Ron pope Pinkney Deborah Madison Greenspan Macanese Eckhart Bordeaux Harold McGee India Viagra
"deborah madison" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

07:53 min | 3 years ago

"deborah madison" Discussed on KGO 810

"K G O eight ten. Right now, executive chef at greens restaurants, your fishery back open. Let's first of all, congratulations. Thank you were happy to be open again. And I'm happy to have you here. It's been a while. I think it was lying last studio is the last time I had you on on Hawthorne Cawthorn so long ago at a different time of year. Yeah. Right. Right. Well, locum this institution to me is is an instrumental part of what San Francisco is. And I remember last time you were on. I just have always thank you for the footprint of what you've done in the culinary world. And you've done an amazing job. And you're still going on. I love it. We are still going going strong. You've been in that kitchen since nineteen eighty five as the executive chef. Yes. And I actually started in nineteen eighty one two years after the restaurant opened which is millions of years ago in restaurant, and San Francisco time is it. Easy to say that at that time greens. Was there wasn't a lot of what greens is? I mean, we see vegetarian vegan a lot today, which is amazing. And I love that. And I rejoice in the fact that that is out there. But major trendsetter. Yes, it was a different time. Yeah. Sure. Yeah. And there was a different very different perspective or people had a very different mindset about vegetarian cooking them and going to dine in a vegetarian restaurant. Right. It could be considered punishment. Take me back to the history. Taking me about the days when you walked in where greens that today, we talked about the ferry plaza so much before you, and I even got on the air that you know, between that and the school, and it's just this this growth over three and a half decades soon to be forty forty next year forty next year you and I are the same age. Yes. Take me through. Let's do a little history twins opened in nineteen seventy nine. When fort Mason had just recently opened as as a nonprofit center and fort Mason opened in nineteen seventy six at started. And that in itself was quite something because it was actually a center for nonprofit organizations, so something new right? And then greens opened well, basically greens open due to the success of both serving guests at Tuskuhara, the senators San monastery in the coastal range here. Do we to Big Sur? And then also at the Tusla hard bread bakery up on Parnassus and Cole street. So and that is to say I forgot to say that greens is owned and still owned by the San Francisco zen center when it was opened it was then at the zen center. Now there are so many centers that they have to identify the road. San Francisco San center. So you yourself a couple years later after an opening seventy nine that you use you came into the kitchen around eighty one I came in eighty one, and I was supposed to just be moving through in the way that people did it that at that time. It sounds center, and I just moved through a little more slowly than others. I'm still there. It was all the way vegetarian from that day from the get-go from the Ditto. Yeah. And that came from basically, we'll just say not everyone at the San center is vegetarian. However at this center kitchens, all food, that's prepared and served is that your -tarian. And so just a tradition of cooking and serving guests and being of service to the public was definitely. So we're talking eighties decade. Gimme gimme gimme a glimpse of every decade till we lit up today. Goodness in a fun one because I just had our dear friends over from foreign cinema. The Dan Gaels, right? I have to tell you. Why name this one soup this? And and and tell me she's like since two thousand and one we're almost twenty years the stories just keep flowing and artists come in. And and you know, we can talk. I remember the same way. When I was a Gary Danko can tell you in two thousand one Bill Clinton was in the restaurant the same time puff daddy was in. And we're cooking. It's just the history of restaurants, and what you have done there is phenomenal. But we can talk about just the growth of the ferry of where you're at of how it's evolved in every every decade, right? It's yeah. It's just it has evolved. And I will say that when we first opened there was probably a bigger emphasis on dairy products. Just because media a little bit of uncertainty of how to present this cuisine. Deborah, Madison was our founding shaft. She certainly had a really amazing vision for just cooking and ways to just prepare and present these really fresh ingredients beautifully. You know, instead of having vegetables be just the side thing on the dish. Suddenly, they're the showcase their the main event. And that was I think what was the big deal. But of course, if we can also throw in being served by monks in a cavernous warehouse space with Florida's ceiling Minto's with a view of the Golden Gate Bridge in the Marin headlands, you know. So it's kind of it was a great beginning. Very great beginning. And the vision is still there today. And I wanted you to come in now because officially as of two weeks ago. Greene's reopened. We'll call it. A reset a reset. Let's talk refresh because sometimes the universe when things happen. They happen for a reason, and they allow as you say a refresh. So this refresh came about well, it came about due to a fire. One thing led to another things got complicated. There are a lot of there was a lot of code work to do and out of the deal came and first of all say green says never been closed for so long ever. I think the longest we've ever been close maybe ten days possibly two weeks. But you know, we got a really the space looks beautiful. You know, we have a brand new kitchen. New floor are thirty nine year old walk in which has been in continuous use. All this time has no yes. Yes. Their stories about that. But anyway, go into that today. But we have a new walk-in. It's just the kitchen looks great. It's the kitchen, it's basically the same layout. It's very spacious it has, you know, all that beautiful morning light that comes in from the east 'cause lots of windows. And it's it's it's all freshened up. And that's great. And then the dining room is just fresh carpet paint who chairs are coming, but you walk in greens. And it looks just exactly the same. As it always has. So this refresh is there a refreshment of new fun fresh faces and all the regulars that you've known for three decades are still coming in. It's a mix we still have all of our the people who love greens. You know? It's really it's a I call it a beloved time-honored space place. We have lots of lots of our regulars, and then we have lots of new people coming in. So it's it's a good mix. And we've been since we've reopened. We have been busy. Great is he is good because you always worry one. Always. Here's the story of a restaurant closing after to do remodeling and things happen. Right. You're sitting in the history books. Trust me on that one. When we come back. I want to talk about the growth of fort Mason of what you've seen happen there and through trucks in schools, and food and farmers markets and all your fingertips to be able on a daily basis to be able to integrate it and bring it in. It's just a great thing. And I'm so mad that I brought did not bring your book, by the way. But you know, how much I love your book. So when we come back, we'll talk a lot more with chef and about greens. Ryan Scott show on K G O..

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