17 Burst results for "Deborah Mac"

"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

07:04 min | 2 months ago

"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

"Hi I'M DEBORAH MAC and welcome to access RECAP PRESENTED BY BRIDGE BANK Stays Wednesday September twenty third. TEX stocks are down. CEO Confidence is up and we're focused on the newest intersection of wall, street and silicon. Valley. Earlier today, we learn about the biggest deal ever involving specs those blank check companies that have been getting created by everyone from Hedge Fund Titan like Bill Ackman to tech icons like Reid Hoffman to former House Speaker Paul Ryan. For those who don't know specs work here's a basic primer, a group of investors for Michelle Company that's the SPEC. It then raises money through an IPO and use that money to find a private company to buy the stock in the private company workout all the details, and if successful private company becomes publicly traded using the specs ticker symbol and the SPEC basically ceases to exist. Today's record-breaking deal was a sixteen billion dollar transaction to buy something called you WM, which is the country's second largest wholesale mortgage lender just behind rocket loans. But beyond that you WMD. Tons of SPECS way more than we've ever seen before with new ones being announced daily. Now, a big part of this surge does come from Wall Street of course, but also a huge part is coming from Silicon Valley, including from tech venture capitalists who used to invest in startup, take taking public and then move onto the next startup. Now. These same investors are looking to buy in late helping tech UNICORNS. into the public market. So we want to better understand why valley investors are creating specs and why now with two people who just formed one? Reid. Hoffman. The CO founder of Lincoln and partner with VC, firm gray lock, and Mark Pincus the founder and former CEO of Zinger That conversation in fifteen seconds. Rich Bank, helps breakthrough ideas actually breakthrough and remains dedicated to providing financial solutions to the risk-takers, the game changers, and the disrupters those committed to leveraging innovation to make the world. A Better Place Bridge Bank is a division of Western, Alliance Bank ridgeback be bold venture wisely. Joined now by Reid Hoffman and Mark Pincus who recently raise six hundred, million dollars for a SPEC called reinvent technology partners re let me start with you. There have been tons of tech focus backs raised and lots more in the planning stages right now are they're going to be enough mature tech companies out there for all of these specs to buy particularly companies that don't just go public via traditional IPO process I think so and weaving. So the significantly over four hundred private. Company UNICORNS right now probably, not all of them already probably not all of them want to do. So I mean I think part of the thing that we look at reinvent and we said actually what specs created a really interesting opportunity venture scale, which is basically the cycles by which he's Tech Company to come really big are going through of invention and reinvention of adding products and markets changing their business model or platform their go to market strategy, and that's actually impact how. Companies get big NETFLIX'S TVD streaming but it goes across all of them and in that case, we think what you want is you WANNA partner for folks who have done it before themselves who have built it, and that's what we're car is going into the next decade and so we think that that's the kind of thing that set of these companies will be looking at and you don't need a huge number when you're doing the kind of venture capital scale because I think it was relatively few of the backs. That actually in fact, have the depth of experience of what that journey looks like castle that seems to be true today but my understanding and tell me I'm wrong about this. Is that basically almost every single quote unquote Sandhill road firm right now is either thinking about doing a Spec or is actively prepping one and is certainly being pitched on them by back bankers. Do you not think within six months almost most quote venture firms we've thought of or folks like you are going to have their name on one Well it's a little unclear I mean it's possible and by the way. But even if you said, Hey, look, we got the top twenty venture firms in Silicon Valley are each back that S- facts out of the four hundred. So even if you said that was the case you still have a very narrow window I think a lot of the top tier venture firms. You, know we have this great early stage practice curious about this. We think the good thing we think is getting companies ready for the next generation so far the history of the scenes arteries reason we feed this opportunity was faxed is they shepherd the company Diageo and generally then say good luck you've graduated from college you're off the races now versus helping next ten years. Mark when you think back to say Zingers IPO and obviously you didn't have this number of specs that was there. If you could go back and if these specs whether they be reinvented others existed, do you think you would have gone public vs back as opposed to the appeal process you pursued? I actually do think that I women of back if I could find the right kind of. sponsor. Because what I realize now, it didn't occur to me at the time we went public, but I felt it over the course of our own reinvention and our to mobile is that the way the venture cycle is set up. I had a Reid Hoffman John doerr of being Gordon all the way up through my IPO I had these partners at the table who were acting like protagonists with. Me, that cycle ended with the IPO for the venture world but the many cycles after of invention, reinvention were continuing for me in the company and so I think that this model of getting a new kind of venture partner at the table at the point that I'm going public who wants to beyond that next journey and serve in that role would have made a big difference for my company. Read Venture Capital as an industry has not changed all that much over the past twenty or thirty years the numbers have gotten bigger. The individuals have changed obviously the types of companies have changed, but the basic structure has been pretty for disruptive industry. Is this a disruption to venture or no? Is this just a little prong on the side of it? Well, I think it's an addition, right? So it's neither disruption for sure but also I think part of the question I think part of what makes venture work you say, how do you? Get a serious individual in a serious firm behind them to partner with you for the next decade in making these cycles, Menendez and reinvention work, which is the normal tech thing. We've named reinvention technology partners because of this process, not because of a branding woman and I. think that's what the really interesting edition because the question is is, how do you do this for technology companies? You know kind of projecting them into the future I think addition prong probably too small revolution.

Reid Hoffman partner Mark Pincus venture partner CEO Bill Ackman DEBORAH MAC Michelle Company Reid Hedge Fund Titan Reid Hoffman John doerr Better Place Bridge Bank Rich Bank Diageo UNICORNS
"deborah mac" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

07:27 min | 2 months ago

"deborah mac" Discussed on KPCC

"But about practice in general, Will Dan The Benin bronzes, in particular become a focal point in the debate over repatriation of African art. We just heard them mentioned in that clip from Black Panther. Can you give us a very quick history lesson on why those have become a focal point of this conversation? I think that winning branches are with several other forms of art. Among the best known the their first of all royal art. You know, this is art. That is really Created. Bye employed royal artists. It is commissioned royal art, and there were the courtly arts of particularly bronze, casting an ivory carving. That are a high point of distinguished workmanship that are known historically and but again. This is this is art that is commissioned by someone who is not only the political and cultural leader, but in many respects spiritually ger off of his community off what was the Kingdom of Benin, now Benin City in Nigeria. Because it was also an art form. That was so I believe, unanticipated by outsiders. They were in many respects, shocked by not only the beauty but the levels of craftsmanship. The range of objects the amount of these objects that 18 97 raid which was an act of war, in which thousands of pieces were confiscated. From the Royal Court. Where it was, and this was done by soldiers by administrators by many others, and as colleague, Dr O. K K a guru references There's an entire network of how these things move across across the country outside the country and into private collections that Debra what is the Smithsonian's position on the return of works in its collection that you know can be traced to looting. The Smithsonian has several museums, not only the African National Museum of African Art that have been dealing with this for a very long time, and so there are defined There are defined steps around repatriation around restitution and where there are processes that that that really specify the kinds of cultural items that were in museum collections. That can be that the museum can be approached for for discussion about return to not only lineal descendants but culturally affiliated organizations on communities. And this is beyond art. It's human remains its funerary objects, other sacred objects, objects of cultural patrimony, all of these kinds of materials, including courting called art. Our materials that are under consideration and that can be considered, and there's a very elaborate process. Listeners may want to go to the website at Smithsonian to see how elaborate that process is, but nothing is off the table. Again. It is a process that's been in place at Smithsonian for more than 30 years, and it is expanding, but it is only one element of a much larger Transformation of collaborative practice and partnership. I'm Jen white. You're listening to one, eh? Talking to Deborah Mac, interim director of the National Museum of African Art Chicka. Okay, I'll glue professor of African and African Diaspora, Arctic Princeton University, and Dan Hicks, author of the forthcoming The Brutus mused British museums, The Benin bronzes, colonial violence and cultural restitution. Well after the theft of the bronze is in the late 18. Hundreds around 40% of the artifacts were given to the British Museum in London. It's retained most of that collection. I had a phone call yesterday with loose at Bolton, the head of the Africa Oceanic and the Americas Department there and asked her how her institution is responding to calls for repatriation. People always want a black and white Yes and no But as for many things in life, it's not always that straightforward is yes and no liken. Watch. There are many different aspect to these questions, and I think there's a really danger off being a bit then people might just everything about this another. There's a bit of a danger of Europeans. Coming a bit neocolonialists about this and saying these things must go back and leave saying that these things must go back. Now I suspect that many people in different parts of the African content opulent will also say We would like to say these things come back. That's a different thing. But I would rather talk to a person in representing a community engaged with collections that come from their history that are not necessarily wish to speak. An activist who might wantto kind of, uh, well, he was pursuing a particular claim. So in the case of the bidding bronzes, where members of the royal family have called for those to be returned Yes, in that contacts. Does that then mean that the British Museum I would agree and say yes, he's thes air items of important to the Benin people. We should return them. We have been asked to give things back. In fact, the director the petitions in Hartford, Fisher and I and a colleague were in Benin City a couple years ago, and we were very privileged to have an audience with over. And he did us, uh, awful things back that he also asked that some objects remain in Europe to act as messages for The tremendous civilization kingdom of any And to represent them. So these questions of North immediately always just yes, known. There's there's more to it than that, Professor. Okay, I'll glue it love to hear your response to what we just heard there. Yes. Well, the question is Where do we go from here? Whether we're talking about the Smithsonian, or the Metropolitan Museum of part in New York or the Field Museum in Chicago. And are the American institutions that Ah hold significant. Ah! Amount ofthe the's been in objects, which, by the way, I should mention that part of the reason At the beginning. Ah Royal art is so Much at the forefront of these debates about restitution. Is that it's probably one of the most well documented. History's ofthe colonial expropriation. There's a very Well. Documented account off what was taking The numbers the types on all of that. And we know the date..

Smithsonian African National Museum of Afr Benin City National Museum of African Art British Museum Kingdom of Benin African and African Diaspora British Museum in London professor Royal Court Benin Field Museum Nigeria Debra Jen white Metropolitan Museum of part theft Africa Europe Deborah Mac
"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

08:12 min | 4 months ago

"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

"Hi I'm Deborah. Mac and welcome to axios recap. Today's Wednesday July, twenty second profits are up at America's largest hospital chain China's Houston consulate has been told to shut down and we're focused on Wall Street's hottest trend. Earlier today Hedge Fund Titan Bill. ACKMAN raised four billion dollars in an IPO. On the New, York Stock Exchange. But. It wasn't for a company or even for the firm that controls his hedge funds. It was for something called a special purpose, acquisition company or back, and it was the largest back IPO of all time. have been around for a while. They used to be called blank. Check acquisition companies in short. They're empty shells, no underlying product or revenue. The idea that a money manager like ackman creates one raises money through an IPO and then uses that money to buy an actual company. Now, why would anyone want to be bought by a SPEC Napley, because it's defacto way to go public without all of the disclosure timing and Financial Hassles Traditional IPO. ACKMAN himself did this nine years ago, eventually purchasing Burger King but specs have mostly been small business until the past year when they've simply exploded on wall, street raising tens of billions of dollars and buying up such well known companies as draft Kings Virgin Galactic and multi plan. Plus Electric. Carmaker. Fisker, which we discussed on the pot a couple of weeks back. Why it matters, is that specs have very mixed track record, and there is some concern, not unfounded that their prevalence right now is a canary in the stock market bubble coal mine. Plus specific to? For, some larger more mature Silicon Valley companies, his back might look like an awfully appealing way to go public. I am pleased to be joined by Bill Ackman. So Bill! Let's start with this big picture. Why are there so many specs right now? The spat, itself is a good idea, the idea of creating a cash shell as a public vehicle at using it to enable a private company to bypass some of the risks of going public in fairly rapid fashion, so that idea is a good idea. The quality of the sponsors of specs improve the terms of improved somewhat. How much do you think the broader kind of boom and specs is partially if not being driven by maybe reflecting kind of overall public equity market froth, there is I would say a fair amount of that. Because number of stacks have done deals with fairly of companies space tourism electric's make your list. Stocks traded well. That's captured the imagination of people, and so I think that's made specs. specs in hot, but the structure itself still has a mixed record that I think quality sponsorship terms of improved somewhat actually getting transactions done. Some of them are interesting, good companies, but I think that is changing the landscape and just the nature of the IPO process, the risks inherent in risky risky world, the other point I would make is or the middle covid crisis. We have an. An election next hundred days, uncertainties the enemy of the IPO. You don't WanNa. Go all the way down the road. You're four five months into the whole process and you gotta pull the deal because stock market's down or trump tweeted something now so it's the instantaneous nature of it. I think it's very appealing to people wanNA focus running company as opposed to do it on Wall Street. You obviously have a lot of runway for this new in terms of when you have to actually get a deal together, but given the as you say a midst of Covid crisis election one hundred days. Could you see a scenario in which you guys actually do? Sign a term sheet with company before the election. Yes, if your expectation that you will, it's hard to have an. I would say I'd be surprised. We don't have a thousand company. We think there are one hundred and fifty ten billion dollar plus private companies on a conservative. If you're actually more than that, but ones that we've identified, maybe fifty of those will meet our quality threshold in terms of business, quality, growth, characteristics, economic characteristics and We're GONNA look at everyone. Everyone knows this thing exists. At this point. I, mean you know whatever number two story Bloomberg today being covered fairly widely in the media I'm happy to be on your show. Obviously, we want the word to get out so that the phone rings and you know the most interesting candidates. We're going to dig in very very quickly. We need one transaction and we think we can. Delivering five billion dollars to accompany can be transformational. You just said, and you also said that perspective. You're looking at ten billion dollar, plus in terms of overall enterprise value, not what has is there an upper limit either from a structural perspective or Call it practical perspective in terms of how big a company you could buy, interestingly, not really 'cause one if someone wants more than five billion, we have the ability at pershing to scale up investment for another couple billion, and then we've raised money from a very unusual group of masters. It's people actually want to deploy a lot more capital than you're able to allocate to them in the IPO. We had Asian sovereign wealth funds that have told us they'd like to write a two or three billion dollars ticket once we've identified a target big US asset managers are GonNa want to own a big percent of the company, so if we needed ten billion or twenty, the for the right business, the capital is there within that when you talk about that universe, kind of large privately held companies, a lot of those in that value range are Chinese tech companies Chinese tech UNICORNS. Are you considering those or geopolitics scaring you right now too much? Look at it, anything done, but I think a Chinese domiciled company. Today is more of a challenge. Are you concerned that almost certainly on the private market side? So are you concerned that almost no matter what you buy, you're buying something near the top. If not of a bubble. At least it's a very very highly valued thing. That maybe shouldn't be quite solid out. We're only GONNA buy company on terms that we find attractive on an absolute basis that were buying business at a discount to its intrinsic value. Again we're. We're only GONNA end up with a minority just in the business, and if the public markets give it to high value, that's okay, but our investors were going to get in at price. That makes sense to us. You know again. I'm not the one to tell you which companies overvalued. It depends on your expectations of the future, but we're going to buy business where we can be very confident about the future of the company. Give me a lot of things have to pass on the other. Many companies nominally have. have very large, valuations waymo people talk about it being worth thirty billion or something like that, but it's zero revenue self-driving Company. That's not for us. We're looking for business with real revenues, intrinsically cashflow generative businesses they may be investing one hundred percent or more of that cash in growth in getting market share, but we understand the underlying economic gymnastics, and it's just a matter of time before that business starts fitting off cash. That's our target. I don't WanNa. Get into the whole CNBC back and forth about your comments in. In March but I want to ask you kind of a different piece of it. which is this back in March? You said that the country was going to go to hell unless it was basically a thirty day. True national lockdown. We are now whatever it is five months later. Cases are surging all throughout the country. Schools aren't reopening etc. If you were President of the United States today are king of the United. States today at this point. Would you now institute that thirty? Day Lockdown to get things under control. No but I might do it in certain states or certain cities. I would do it on a very localised basis to address. The problem is best I could and I would mandate wearing nationwide in I would appeal to people's. What's in the best interest of the health of the country in the best interest of the economy of the country I? Wish we Jonathan hard shutdown. We'd be very different place, but we did instead was enrolling. Shut down, which is. Is better than nothing, and we have early opening in some places with more care than other places, and that's the problem with fifty independent states making up their own minds, but I do think I like the fact that the president is promoting mass wearing think that's the right thing to do. I wish you'd done it sooner. Bill Ackman of pershing square. As of this moment pershing square on Tina's well. Thank you very much offer joining. Thank you so much. Start Your mornings with the news that matters by listening to axios today, and join me your host Buddhu every weekday, talking team of award winning journalist, bringing you insights into the trends shaping our world. Visit US at axios, DOT COM, or wherever you get your favorite podcasts. Welcome back. We're watching today. Is the vaccine.

Bill Ackman United States ackman WanNa ACKMAN President pershing square York Stock Exchange Mac China America Bloomberg pershing Carmaker Fisker Houston
"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

01:30 min | 7 months ago

"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

"Rod where we just ten minutes to get you smarter on the Tech Business the Baltic plots by Bridge Bank we saved venture wisely. I'm Deborah Mac. Show podcast and gets its Howard stern moment and some big new questions about that Moderna vaccine. But I amy Klobuchar. She is of course the senior senator from Minnesota and possible running mate for Joe Biden November. She's also part of a growing Democratic Party chorus against large mergers particularly in the tech space on Sunday club. Char tweeted her opposition to Uber's possible takeover offer for rival Food Delivery Company. Grub saying it would be bad for consumers then Monday. She doubled down calling it quote a pandemic driven deal and then suggested that trump antitrust regulators should also dig into facebook's agreement to buy gifty why it matters is that cloture is a moderate by Democratic Party standards which suggests the center is moving closer to the progressive left when it comes to big corporate mergers Kluber charge cosigned the letter with Elizabeth Warren asking the Treasury Department and Federal Reserve to block potentially harmful large mergers by companies that have received stimulus grants or loans. Although hasn't yet signed onto Warren and so-called pandemic monopoly act legislation which would bar all large company mergers until the pandemics economic strain is eased in short. All of this indicates that the tech lash could be warming. It's way back into the political conversation particularly as we become more and more reliant on demand services in the coronavirus era. In twenty seconds we will go. Deeper with Senator Amy Klobuchar but I. This.

"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

10:54 min | 7 months ago

"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

"Politics sponsored by Bridge Bank be safe venture wisely. I'm Deborah Mac. Today show restaurants. Ask for more time and what. Disney just lost to tick tock the first reopening America's healthcare system. So okay. I get that title. Might be a little bit confusing given that we have spent the past two months talking about hospitals being surge capacity and parking lots becoming makeshift testing facilities but overall American healthcare service rates have fallen through the floor. Or maybe even through the foundation remember. Lots of hospitals stopped all elective procedures in order to preserve bedspace for covert nineteen patients which led to massive drops and things like joint replacement surgeries and lots of other medical facilities like clinics and specialty practices have either closed or severely limited their offerings including in such areas as pediatrics ophthalmology and dermatology and none of that even includes all the paused clinical trials for non. Cova drugs many of which require regular patient visits and monitoring why it matters for patients of course is that they haven't gotten treatment which could lead to increased troubles and costs down the road why it matters for healthcare as a whole is that elective procedures are. Greece's it's wheels which is why we had this bizarre dichotomy of overworked frontline workers on one hand and scores of laid off healthcare workers on the other more specifically the most recent monthly jobs report showed a one point four million losses in the healthcare sector including around two hundred and fifty thousand physicians. The bottom line things are beginning to open up including medical and dental facilities. But there are questions as to how fast that can happen. And what might have been lost for good in twenty seconds will go deeper with healthcare reporter? Bob Herman but I. This Bridge Bank knows the INS and outs of business. Ups and downs and remains dedicated to providing financial solutions to sponsor backed emerging technology and growth companies for nearly two decades through its national network of banking teams and offices in tech hubs across the country including San Francisco Seattle Denver Chicago and Boston Visit Bridge Bank Dot Com to learn more bridge. Bank is a division of Western Alliance Bank Bridge Bank. Be Safe Venture wisely. We're joined now by axios healthcare reporter Bob Herman so Bob let's start here with this decrease in elective procedures of how universal it's been so for example if I'm someone who's been trying to get a knee replacement surgery over the last couple months. Have I been able to? Is it a question of where I live or question of money? So if you're trying to get an Easter since the pandemic started it's very likely it got pound hostels basically all but stopped them. And what's so interesting about healthcare? Is we always figured? It was recession proof but it turns out that it probably is little recession proof but is not pandemic proof because hospitals head to basically stop all these things to prepare for the corona virus and as you mentioned the knee replacements is the most extreme example. But it's really across the board. You look at pretty much. Every service line cardiology spine ophthalmology. There's no service that has been spared here. The original argument for wildlife procedures. Were stopped was capacity right. You know you don't WanNa take a bed for somebody who is convalescing from a knee replacement when you might need that bed for Corona Virus Patient. That said as things begin to open up. Is there an expectation that all of these kind of backed up procedures? These people are just going to flock back in or is there serious concern? The folks will still stay away because these often are facilities that either already have corona virus patients or just general concerns about the lack of social distance that occurs when there's a surgery or when there is a face to face physician meeting for hospitals. At least they are kind of hoping and praying that the demand surges back because a lot of these procedures that have stopped or their big moneymakers like orthopedic procedures or spine or hearts so while they're hoping that there's this surge now that's the current events at least from hospitalization point appears to have crested at least in some states is actually less clear from people. I spoke with. There's still a fear among patients especially if it's something that they don't need immediately if there's some kind of carpal tunnel surgery that they've been meaning to get to but still don't really WanNa do they still might hold off until there's some kind of clear evidence that this is truly under control so while there's a hope that this will come back for hospitals. It's far from guaranteed and it certainly seems like at least some of the demand certainly won't come back this year. You talked about the hospital capacity. You had a great piece over the weekend about ten following hospitalization rates including some of the hardest hit states hospitalization rates from Cova. I'm wondering though there's obviously a pretty persistent fear that estate start to open up peaches and parks in retail and possibly even restaurants that you could start to get at least select outbreaks in various places given that are hospitals comfortable. Basically reducing that surge capacity given the concern. They might need it again. They're kind of a catch twenty two right because they WANNA be prepared if there is another surge of Toronto Virus Cases. That was the whole point of this but at the same time. They're just not getting revenue right now especially the smaller hospitals Hostels at treats traditionally poorer patients. They are on the bleeding edge right now. So they're at this catchweight. Were they want to be able to be prepared but they need money to come in the doors? They want to keep their staff around so I spoke with a CEO of a hospital Vermont. Vermont hasn't been terribly hard hit. They've been very aggressive with social distancing up there and he told me like we're prepared but we really kind of need to start scheduling some of these electric disease again because they're not getting as much funding from the federal government has other hospitals so they kinda need some of these patients to come back if they want to at least not start laying off or furloughing staff. Let's leave the hospitals aside for second or step away from them and talking about the specialist clinics a lot of people who go to the doctor even for outpatient procedures. Don't go to a hospital per se they go to a smaller sort of facility. Is the expectation that does including small. Urgent cares is the expectation that those will start to open up more and more and is there reason to believe people will be more comfortable going to those. It's interesting so outpatient care. It's probably even more at risk. And the volumes that have gone down are even more severe. If you look at family doctors pediatricians from what I'm hearing. Some of those volumes have declined almost by ninety percents year over year. They're essentially just treading water with no revenue coming in and it's still the same dynamic right like if you are sick do go in. Maybe do you go in for your cardiac checkup in an office? Maybe but maybe you just via telehealth telehealth granted you. Don't get the money off of procedures like you know K. G. at least the appointment revenue. Correct correct you do and with telehealth. It's not always being paid at the same level as an in person visit some insurers are trying to level it out again any kind of telehealth revenue is not going to be made up from what they would have gotten from an in person visit but one other piece of this which is dental and we don't think necessarily have dental all the time we have healthcare but when you look at the jobs numbers from April I think there was like half a million of the job losses were in the dental sector. Are Dentists offices going to reopen and from your perspective today suffer potentially suffer from the same issues that the pediatrician's offices in those smaller outpatient specialist providers suffer from outside of again emergency dental procedures? Did it seems like it's the same dynamic. It's funny. I just got an alert from my dentist kind of pleading with me to come back sometime in October. I'm not totally sure I want to do that. And if you think about the most elective of elective you probably don't need to get your teeth cleaned at your six month mark when it comes everything else. It's not the most urgent so dentist's office have absolute taking the brunt of this. Because it's just not totally necessary in light of the pandemic and for those offices interesting layoffs as you mentioned and even wonder if and I wrote about this as well. If they're the type of practice that will have to consider selling well in one area that has been very interested in dental is private equity. So you kind of wonder if that trend will accelerate bob just very quickly because we're almost out of time in a separate topic. But since I have you here Madeira. Which is the drug company that got a Cova vaccine into clinic? I yesterday released fairly encouraging albeit not completely complete phase. One clinical trial data. It helped the stock. Market's go nuts your initial reaction when you saw what. Madera now released in some ways. This was kind of expected right. This is a phase one trial. This is the very first trial mostly focused on just testing whether the vaccine is safe and by those measures. It certainly encouraging. Nobody's dying. There's no life threatening adverse events associated with it yet on the other hand. It's a very early interpretation of the data we're talking about really a subset of patients that were looked at. It's kind of insane that the stock market went wild as it did. Considering this kind of expected in there's still so long to go the pivotal phase. Three trial is going to start sometime over the summer. That's where it's GonNa matter most so the stock market reaction is totally wild. Bob Herman who you can follow at Bob Jay on twitter. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me Dan. My final two. Right after this with offices in check-ups throughout the country including San Francisco Denver Chicago and Boston Bridge Bank supports the innovation ecosystem wherever it thrives in helps breakthrough ideas actually break through and through. Its teams focused on technology and life sciences companies and the equity investors fuel. Them Bridge Bank delivers a responsive. High Touch Client Experience Bridge Bank. A DIVISION OF WESTERN ALLIANCE BANK BRIDGE BANK BE SAFE venture wisely. Now it's time for my final two and I up as America's beleaguered and largely shuttered restaurant sector a big group of restaurant owners and CEOS yesterday met at the White House and over and over asked for just one thing and extension of the so-called covered period for paycheck protection program loans from eight weeks to twenty four weeks. Their basic argument was that in many cases there be forced to use or lose the loans before all of the restaurants can fully open which helps defeat the purpose to be clear. They weren't asking for more money just for more time. What was remarkable about meeting also was how the restaurant tours? Whether trump house are not kept redirecting the conversation back to this covered period issue even when trump himself tried to pivot to things like meal deductability or payroll tax cuts policies. That one restaurant. Ceo likened to useful additions to a house but only after the actual scaffolding is. I erected. Don't be surprised to see this issue emerged today. When Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin testified in front of the Senate Banking Committee and Finally Tick Tock yesterday. Stunned the tech and entertainment world's poaching Kevin Meyer to be its new. Ceo Mired spent the last twenty seven years at Disney including overseeing the launch of its Disney plus streaming unit had been at one time viewed as the likely successor to CEO. Bob Eiger why it matters is that I. This is a very big name. Higher for a social media upstart now has hundreds of millions of users but perhaps more importantly Meyer is a known you ask tech n media commodity at a time when Tick Tock is trying to prove its independence from Beijing. At least when it comes to privacy despite its ownership by Chinese tech giant bite dance where Meyer will also now serve as C. O. And we're done big. Thanks for listening to my producers Tim Chauffeur's Naomi Shaven have a great national devil's Food Cake Day. And we'll be back tomorrow with another pro rata podcast..

Bridge Bank CEO Western Alliance Bank Bridge B Bob Herman Disney San Francisco Kevin Meyer Boston Visit Bridge Bank Dot C Chicago reporter Deborah Mac America Vermont Greece Bob Eiger Cova
"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

10:45 min | 9 months ago

"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

"Get you smarter on the Tech Business and politics sponsored by Bridge Bank be bold venture wisely. I'm Deborah Mac. On today's show the return of Amazon's Djeddai virus state that will live in Infamy. The first cheating veterans so earlier this week. Federal Trade Commission announced that five colleges used misleading sales tactics to learn military vets and their families. The upshot is the schools now have sixty days to basically their mistakes or else they'll be cut off from the Lucrative Gi bill at least in terms getting new students why it matters of the GI. Bill is one of the few. Bipartisan success stories. Not only the past century but specifically of the past decade the most recent version was implemented in mid two thousand nine and since then has provided educational benefits to nearly eight hundred thousand vets and their families but the allegations these new ones are an abusive that goodwill including from the University of Phoenix. One of those four profit college giants that have been favored by the trump education department. Under Secretary Betsy Devos. The Basic Accusation Against University of Phoenix is that it advertised itself as working with big tech companies like Microsoft and twitter and adobe to employ students when it was actually doing no such thing or put another way it defrauded folks and now not only on the hook for one hundred ninety one million dollars via a settlement with the FTC last December in which it didn't admit wrongdoing but also the loss of one of its most steady streams of customers. I mean students twenty seconds. We'll go deeper into what all of this means with Washington Post reporter Danielle Douglas. Gabriel but first. This Bridge Bank believes in the risk takers. The Game Changers disrupters those committed to leveraging innovation to make the world a better place. That's why Bridge. Bank has been dedicated to providing financial solutions to sponsor backed emerging technology and growth companies for nearly two decades through its national network of banking teams and offices. Bridge Bank is a division of Western Alliance Bank Bridge Bank be bold venture. We're joined now by Washington Post reporter Danielle Douglas Gabriel. Let's start with this particularly given that the University of Phoenix is part of this. Can you help me a little bit? With the broader landscape that for profit colleges are currently operating in. Because I remember certainly. During the end particularly the Obama Administration there was a lot more pressure on these schools for all sorts of ways including accreditation. But it seems that the Education Department under Betsy Devos has been much more say amenable positive towards these sorts of institutions so for profit schools have seen a lot of the regulation that the Obama Administration had impose relaxed under trump. And that's been useful to some extent the reputational damage the schools have suffered in light of a bunch of really dramatic closures and allegations of fraud and mismanagement really. Hasn't done them enough. Good to help rebound from all of that damage so you're not seeing people enrolling in for profit schools in droves also just you know the cycle of the economy has been pretty strong and so. I tend to go down during that time but for profits as a sector are enjoying a lot less regulation than they were previously the current situation this thing with the FTC recently both the fine last December but now also the possible suspension of Gi bill benefits for new students to these schools from your perspective. Is that related at all to rolling back regulation or is that simply doing something different wrong a little different so the FTC had this investigation going about five since five years ago looking at some claims that the University of Phoenix had made that they had all these partnerships with these major companies and these companies were essentially just hiring their graduates right off the bat and the FTC said. Well that didn't sound exactly right to us. And so they started to investigate whether the veracity if claims and discovered if at least in their point that seeing that a lot of these companies actually don't really have much of a partnership with the University of Phoenix. And there's no guarantee that their graduates will get jobs. There Phoenix disputes. This is that they do have a working relationships with companies like Microsoft and twitter and happens successful in getting their graduates placed but the FTC says. That's not the case and to kind of resolve these charges because this investigation has been going on forever. Phoenix last December decided to settle for one hundred. Ninety one million dollars now. There is a law that says that Wendy. Ftc investigates claims like this and if they make a referral to any other agencies those agencies in this case the va has to take some kind of action within ninety days so the VA was put in this position. Where after the settlement came down in December they had to start looking into whether University of Phoenix could still participate in the GI benefits program and have access to those benefits which a lot of schools especially for profit schools really rely on the benefits that are earned by men and women in the military and offer also their families has become kind of a cash cow for some schools for for profits in particular those Gi benefits. Do not count toward this rule. That's called the ninety ten we'll and that essentially says that ninety percent of the money revenue that you're receiving can come from federal student aid but the other ten percent has to come from other sources while Gi bill benefits don't count. It's a loophole that allows them not to count so a lot of for profits especially University of Phoenix and others have been accused of kind of pressuring that's to come into their schools so they can access those benefits and get that extra revenue. Correct me if I'm wrong here for the University of Phoenix has been the largest recipient of Gi bill education benefits for over the last decade. Or so yes so leaving Phoenix. Aside for there was also an issue related here with Bellevue's nursing program accreditation. How does that fit in? Bellevue was accused by the state attorney. General of telling potential applicants for a new nursing program that they had that they were fully accredited and able to do this licensure program. Bellevue said that they have been accredited. That program has been a credit since two thousand seventeen under like this special form of accreditation that was provisional for the Attorney General. Did not think that cut the mustard so he decided to pursued with the investigation. The school is fighting the charge but the had to start paying attention to it because of the implications of all of the veterans are using their Gi bill benefits in order to fund their education for that program. The same thing as the case at temple. Campbell's a little interesting because with Hey were accused. And it's been found to be the case that they were fudging information regarding the placement of their MBA program. They were saying that it was number one for all these years that turned out not to be the case and that's a pretty deceptive marketing and advertising position as a result of the. Va once again. Had to step in and say we can't by law allow you to do that and then can can you collect Gi bill education benefits. So what happens now? So they've got a couple of months basically to fight the allegations but I'm wondering like Take University Phoenix. They settled with the FTC. Last December. Basically for kind of everybody veterans and non veterans. And as you say because of the law. Va then had to take a look and step in is the fact that Phoenix never acknowledged or accepted wrongdoing that December settlement is that a potential saving grace for them or is there really a way out of this is their chance to. Va for lack of. Bertram is going to lose this org to the schools. Just have to prove we won't do it again. It's kind of a weird gray area right because you're right. Phoenix never admitted any wrongdoing. But that's not going to be a saving grace for them. They have to show that in the sense that Settlement came down or even since the information was first brought to the FTC's for investigation that they have taken actions to ensure that there is no gray area when it comes to how they are marketing their programs whether that would be constituted enough corrective action for the VA is really up to the powers that be you know this decision to consider cutting off all of these schools wasn't exactly Al shoot with stick. It was something that had to happen by. Law and there is a lot of flexibility for the schools to avoid altogether. They are being given sixty days to come up with a detailed plan that shows that they are doing what's necessary to avoid any kind of perception that they are not living up to the laws. Essentially Danielle thank you very much for joining us. That was Danielle Douglas Gabriel. You can follow her on twitter. At Danny. I dug post my final two right after this. The Equity Fund Resources Group at Bridge Bank is a central hub for the venture capital and private equity communities offering banking services for funds partners their portfolio companies bridge banks financial solutions designed for the entire innovation ecosystem and include creative credit solutions robust treasury in cash management capabilities and suite of International Banking Products Bridge Bank Division of Western Alliance Bank Bridge Bank be bold venture wisely. Now it's time for my final two and I it was the US Defense Department which stunned the tech world yesterday. By saying that will reassess decision to give a ten billion dollar cloud computing contract to Microsoft instead of to Amazon. This is the so-called Djeddai contract which almost everyone thought Amazon had in the bag until it didn't in which was the subsequent subject of accusations that President trump put his thumb on the scale in part due to his personal animus toward Amazon CEO in Washington. Post owner Jeff Bezos. The upshot is the DOD will likely get one hundred and twenty days to reevaluate decision pending a judge's agreement. One caveat though is that the Department of Justice is technically the party requesting the extension and says it wants to dig deeper into issues a pricing not a presidential interference and finally. You might remember episode. We did here with Ron. Clean the democratic operative in venture capitalists. Who served as President Obama's so called Ebola? Czar claims basic point during that show was that the administration needed a coordinated response to the corona virus and also needed a dedicated point person rather than just the head of an existing department like hhs basically what claim had done free Pola. But you might not recall. Is the date the podcast ran? It was January twenty seventh and as we learned today from the Wall Street Journal. That's the exact same day of the very first White House meeting on the corona virus. Honestly it sounds like we planned our show before they planned their meeting or put another way. The White House was just incredibly far behind the ball. Not only in terms of thinking about the problem but also because it didn't take. Ron claimed central advice that day about having a point person for nearly another month when Mike Pence was named just inexcusable. And we're done big. Thanks to my producers Tim. Chauffeur's name Shaven have a great national good Samaritan Day. And we'll be back tomorrow with a special series of episodes focused on the corona virus. So please check us out over the weekend. Stay calm and keep your distance..

University of Phoenix FTC Phoenix Bridge Bank Va Danielle Douglas Gabriel Western Alliance Bank Bridge B twitter Microsoft Amazon Betsy Devos Federal Trade Commission Washington Post Bellevue Bill trump education department Take University Phoenix reporter White House Deborah Mac
"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

10:03 min | 10 months ago

"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

"Of excellence the New York Times bestselling book by Blackstone Steven Schwartzman. I'm Deborah Mac. Show allegations of Chinese espionage at US Pension Fund and a big day for CEO swops. But I the dawn of space tourism so it has been a few years since billionaires like Jeff bezos. Richard Branson Elon. Musk promised to begin. Flying Rich folks into orbit or at least in two thousand twenty is when it's actually supposed to begin happening. Both basis is blue origin and Branson's virgin galactic have pledged to have their first paying customers blast off by year. End while Musk's SPACEX is targeting twenty. Twenty one why it matters isn't just because it satisfies the childhood dreams of a select group of billionaires in their millionaire clientele it's because the accompanying media coverage could refuel general American interest in space helping to further build the Space Industries. Non Tourism business stuff like launching communications satellites and scientific exploration one big question though is oversight the FAA is officially in charge of making sure. These flights are safe but also his seated much of its power so far to the private spaceflight companies themselves some shades of Boeing there and obviously raises the stakes for everyone. The bottom line. There is a lot riding on these rockets. If thirty seconds we'll go deeper with axios. Space Editor Mariam Kramer. But first this in the New York Times bestselling book what it takes lessons in the pursuit of excellence Blackstone Steven Schwartzman share some of his lessons from creating and building one of the world's leading investment firms recommended by Jack Welsh Janet Yellen Radio and more get the book on Amazon or at read. What it takes Dot Com Mariam Kramer axios space editor so Mariam. Let's start with the economics of this is space tourism going to become really big business in the context aerospace or is it more kind of a valuable because of the PR boost. It will give to space as an industry. Yeah I think it's more the latter. I think that a lot of folks in the space industry. These days are trying to find ways to make the general public talk about space more. I think that a lot of people are seeing space tourism and especially as the way to kind of bring that into the public mind in a more prominent way than it is today. Doesn't generational thing you know you think about the people who are really involved right now. It's partially because they're billionaires. But you know Elon Musk. Jeff bezos Richard Branson. They are all of a certain generation. Is there a feeling within the space industry? That for lack of birds from kind of Millennials Gen Z. Space just isn't as exciting thing for them. And that is the talent base of the President Future. I think so I mean I think that part of it too is that you know millennials. We didn't like landings like it's all very speculative types like lot of us remember the space shuttle most of us remember the end of the space shuttle era. There's really this lack of human face lay especially in the US. That I think is affecting us and I think it is a generational thing if space tourism works if blue origin fridge galactic do start basically throwing millionaires and billionaires at least the beginning up into space. What does that mean not just for talented and for reputation but does that actually ended up changing the infrastructure of the US space infrastructure? I think it could with little space. There are a lot of scientific elements of it that could help like there are researchers who want actually and their payloads up and pass them and some orbit so that would help the space industry as a whole but I think that a lot of people see it as kind of like a gateway drug to orbital tourism. Can you break that down for me? A little bit. Imagine I am a passenger? I am going to go up. What am I experiencing in sub orbital compared to orbital or how how are my experiences of those things different theoretically yes they are very different with sub orbital space. You basically will take a rocket ride or you know a rocket plane up to either. You know about fifty miles or about sixty two miles. Depending on your definition of faith and from there you're going like the earth against the blackness of space and experience maybe five minutes of weightlessness at a time. And then you WANNA come right back down. That's about an eleven minute and that's your sub orbital flight like you don't circle your it's pretty fast but you still kinda get a taste of what they might only orbital on. The other hand is a much more expensive to get some space station. It's like fifty million dollars. That's the minimum. But that is you know you're flying on like a big rockets. You're heading out either through destination high-flying and you're you're certainly Like you are in a capsule looking space up there. You're experiencing microgravity for hours if not days at a time so that's sort of a breakdown between the two a. Sarah Flight is going to run you about two hundred and fifty thousand dollars and orbital flight like you said million from a technical perspective right now the difference between sub orbital and orbital. And obviously you know virgin. Galactic blue origin are currently promising sub orbital by end of year? Is it just a cost thing? Also technical in other words if I had fifty million dollars that I wanted to give blue origin theoretically do they have the technology to do it. No so it is technical in order to get into orbit. You need to go very fast and only certain rockets can do that. So like spacex could probably say people could launch you to orbit blue origin. Mommy cannot even though. They are building a rocket that they could eventually the degree of difficulty is exponential between sub orbital versus orbital. There's two big prohibitive things when it comes to space tourism this year for the next ten of foreseeable future one. Obviously as we discussed is cost the other obviously is safety spaceflight always has been historically a government run thing is the FAA the one here who's technically gonNA decide whether Branson's Ross. It is good to go. Or who makes that determination? And is there a government agency? That really has the capability to make those determinations on something like this. Yeah so the. Faa is the regulatory body for these companies at the moment. The interesting thing is that there is a moratorium in place on rulemaking from the FAA until twenty twenty three for these companies Wiser Moratorium Industry Lobby Time Congress so they gotTa Mars these. I think that there is a reason behind it. Basically these companies need a chance to kind of get off the ground and get their systems flying and be able to work out the kinks in some ways before the design and safety of them are really heavily regulated which they argue. Those regulations could stifle the growth. Basically I understand making that argument when you're simply sending you know stuffed animals up in these rockets but once you've got actual people that's a hell of an argument to be made particularly paying customers and the thing is. I think what these companies do have on. Their side is the fact that like they really. Don't WANNA kill anyone. Just to put it. Really bluntly well neither did Boeing. Is there any push? Take the Boeing situation right where the biggest criticism against the FAA was. It was too cozy. And it basically let Boeing in the aircraft manufacturers. Right the rules is the FAA a little bit concerned here that they're going to have people. I mean two thousand twenty three. You could be talking about two full years of people flying. Is there any pushback right now? Say Hey wait a minute. You guys have moved a little faster than we thought. We need to revisit the moratorium. Yeah I mean there are some folks outside of industry that are trying to get those rules put back in place. I think that once these companies start flying going start seeing more of that. So I'm really curious once they have people on board like what's those narratives they're going to be as like they start actually flying folks vials safety question for you. If money was no object and Richard Branson came to you and said Hey Mariam you WanNa come on the first flight with me. Do Go so my answer would have been very different about a year ago but I warn your kid so I think my answer at the moment is probably fair. Enough Kramer extra space editor. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks so much for having me my final two right after this in the New York Times. Bestselling book what it takes lessons in the pursuit of excellence Blackstone Steven Schwartzman share some of his lessons from creating and building one of the world's leading investment firms recommended by Jack Welsh Janet Yellen radar and more. Get the book on Amazon or at read what it takes Dot Com now number my final two and I. It's a controversy erupting over calpers. The nation's largest public pension system in Indiana Congressman named Jim Banks claims the calpers's chief investment officer is basically a spy for the Chinese government funding billions of dollars of pensioner money into Chinese companies some which provide equipment to the Chinese military and if so facto therefore kind of raise our taxes because we spend more our military to match China's military and banks is making these claims pretty loudly both via social media posts that had been amplified by some his congressional colleagues. Plus a bunch of Fox News hits including recent primetime spot with Tucker Carlson. So I dig into all of this in today's newsletter sign up DOT axios dot com. But the big thing is that there is almost no meat on banks as the chief investment officer. Ben Mang doesn't actually direct any money into Chinese companies because calpers doesn't buy stocks itself it buys into passive indexes managed by third parties. Now it's sometimes investment active managers but again those are third parties. Men doesn't pick stocks any more than you or I pick stocks via our 401K's. It's also worth noting that while men was born in China and did work for Chinese government pension system in between stints at calpers he is a US citizen now. Banks is among several GOP congressman who basically want US investors to divest from China. But if that's what they want they should take it up with President Trump or treasury secretary mnuchin not with pension managers in Sacramento and finally nearly lost in the corona virus lead stock market dropped. Yesterday were four. Ceo Switches at big-name Companies Disney Thomson Reuters salesforce and Mastercard White matters is the CEO. Carousel seemed to be accelerating last month. There were two hundred. Nineteen CEO swaps eight thirty seven percent increase from December and both of those months set new records according to outplacement firm Challenger. Gray and Christmas. It's unclear get February will also give us a new high water mark although the leap year shore won't hurt chances when we're done victims for listening. It's my producers. Tim Chauffeur's Naomi. Shaven have a great national Tele Fairytale Day. And we'll be back tomorrow with another pro rata podcast..

FAA US Boeing Richard Branson Steven Schwartzman Mariam Kramer Elon Musk calpers Space Industries CEO Jeff bezos SPACEX New York Times bestselling China editor Richard Branson Elon virgin galactic US Pension Fund Amazon
"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

01:42 min | 10 months ago

"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

"By what it takes lessons in the pursuit of excellence the New York Times bestselling Book Stone Steven Schwartzman. I'm Deborah Mac. Until they show a big play for your financial data and what tech means for the future of democracy but first feeling the burn Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is now the clear. Front runner for the Democrats is presidential nomination having one New Hampshire and Nevada while placing a very close second in Iowa. He's also polling very well in many of the Super Tuesday states and none of his moderate rivals seem interested in dropping out. The political reaction has been kind of a mirror. Image of two thousand sixteen when Republicans seem to erupt in a civil war over the possible nomination of Donald Trump and Democrats were thrilled that their rivals were about to put a so called. Unelectable candidate on the ballot. Not only would they win the White House but probably Congress and we know how that all turned out now. Most business and technology executives at the time also didn't take trump seriously but did warn economic calamity if they were wrong kind of like how many of those same people are now warning about the economic ramifications of President Sanders although few of them seem to be taking steps to protect against it including in the healthcare sector. The bottom line here is that the only certainty we have now is uncertainty and that could presents its own set of challenges come November. No matter who we're voting between fifteen seconds will go deeper with axios. Politics editor Margaret Talev. The first this in the New York Times bestselling book what it takes lessons in the pursuit of excellence. Blackstone Steven Schwartzman share some of his lessons from creating and building one of the world's leading investment firms recommended by Jack Welsh Janet Yellen Radio and more get the book on Amazon or.

Senator Bernie Sanders Steven Schwartzman Donald Trump New York Times bestselling New York Times Deborah Mac Vermont New Hampshire Margaret Talev Amazon White House Jack Welsh editor Congress Janet Yellen Radio Iowa Nevada
"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

12:44 min | 1 year ago

"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

"Where we take just ten minutes to get? Are you smarter on the Clinton of text business politics. I'm Deborah Mac. So this is our final new episode of two thousand nine hundred nineteen and of the decade. So we're going to do things a little bit differently. One Minute on each of the past ten years and I'm pleased to be joined on this rapid retrospective by axios Co founder. Mike Allen. I've been practicing my talking fantastic task six. Let's do this and let's start in two thousand ten and the topic. Here is the Arab spring when social media. I proved its ability to enable large scale political movements movements. And for those who don't remember the first viral moment kind of was tragic twenty-six-year-old Tunisian man set himself on fire in front of a government building but it set off a wave of democracy protests captured appeared on cell phone cameras and was distributed to social media some Mike Today we see often social media as a thorn in the side of democracy but at the top of the decade okayed. It seemed like the thing that was going to enable democracy it sure was and it was a star of the decades youth quake as well as were larger younger. Arabs including couldn't twenty something Tunisian fruits are and we've seen quite an arc because at the end of the decade recourse have gratitude Burg and we have once again unrest in Arab countries. So let's go to two thousand eleven in the big thing here to me at least was occupy Wall Street at the beginning of Occupy Wall Street and at the time it seemed like it was kind of this big big pushback obviously against what happened the financial crisis and a lot of yelling at bank. CEO's but arguably it also planted the seeds for Bernie Sanders in two thousand and sixteen. And what what we're seeing today with both Sanders and Elizabeth Warren kind of this growing push among younger Americans toward socialism capitalism. Rethought something that we could not have predicted addicted. You see increasing number of young people saying that. They're open to socialism. Now there's some question about how it's defined. I think people here social that. It means something different than people who grew up with social ism but for sure capitalism is being questioned in fear and at the end of the decade. You had fascinating. Louis corporations saying we're looking capitalism differently. Were not just looking at For shareholders we also are looking out for employees suppliers suppliers and our communities occupy wall. Street was the first time we really heard a lot of the one percent versus the ninety nine percent or vice versa. Is that something that the economy something that's going to persist for the foreseeable future will sure because the reality that the inequality is more than ever. There's no sign of that closing. And and I think the what we're seeing is more and more people being aware of it reacting to post two thousand twelve and this was the year that both Colorado and Washington state legalized recreational creation marijuana sparking the birth of new industry in a broader relaxation of so called sin businesses There are eleven states and the district Columbia that have now legalized marijuana recreational use from your perspective. It's it's interesting. This was kind of this. We talk about the rise of socialism among young people. But this was one of the times when libertarianism seemed to kind of take hold in America really almost regardless of political party it did and we see it also sports betting across the country. Something that is just can be bigger next year. Dan You've done. And what a great coverage of this and you pointed out putting on your pro rat that this provided investing opportunities on the early Ruiz side of Infant industries consider the okay boomer. meam is this also rejection of the politics of the particularly the late seventies eighties and nineties. These the just say no to drugs it kind of America now kind of repudiating a lot of that politics. It's a smart way to look at that because we're seeing it in other parts of the political is fear including of course criminal justice reform where we're seeing that. The war on drugs did nothing to stop drugs but there definitely were lots of injustices justices that are becoming increasingly apparent out for two thousand thirteen. This is when the Edward Snowden leaks up here what's your big takeaway from the entire snowden experience. It's the we realized how much information was being vacuumed up about us with realized how vulnerable it was. This was the big cyber a breach but year-by-year we constantly saw smaller retailers others who were seeing breaches and we came to realize how oh vulnerable are Info was how much of our info at been vacuumed up. And it's something that I think has not been fully reckon with we still give away a shocking shocking amount of data in turn cool services and we have not yet paid the check for that. It's also triggered the rise kind of encrypted communications backed by tech companies which is now on on a collision with governments including ours and it was also the return of the term whistleblower for the first time in a while which obviously set the stage for the last couple months. It's two thousand fourteen. This is an interesting one Sarah Fisher sure axios suggested this to us. which was the missing plane? The Malaysian air three seventy. And she suggested that because it was one of the first story is not just to go viral but to do so and kind of this all all encompassing way and particularly at CNN. And there's this argument that what we saw with that plane. which was you know? Daily incremental coverage was the blueprint that got used for covering the trump campaign and sixteen no fascinating and Dan. This is one of the great unsolved mysteries of our time. Unbelievably this Boeing plane. Never ever been found a survivors never been a remain has never been found. And it's very rare in these days that something remains a total total mystery but we saw the milking of the drama of it we saw. TV anchors in flight simulators and so became a participatory coverage. Where and as you point out used to be that we get our politics update once a day? Maybe now we watch it all experience at all in real time and that was partially because the CNN for example got reward from a ratings perspective with this coverage another we as a society. We craved this. It's a live reality. Show absolutely two thousand fifteen. This is interesting so spacex this year this year. Space X COMPLETED ITS FIRST FALCON nine rocket stage lending which basically meant. It's rocket doc. It could return to Earth successfully. They got it and they would be able to reuse it. It was a big event because up until this moment particularly here in America space and space travel and space exploration that was considered the province of the government that was NASA. That wasn't private companies. Is this kind of part of a big sea change in the way we view. Not your space ace kind of the role of government and the other side of the coin is the role of moguls. The Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson and Elon. Musk these now are the pioneers. Their competition among themselves and they are both funding. These two new technologies making them possible Boeing. Also it's so a big private sector space race at the same time we rise. It's still is in the public imagination. We've seen that with the way. The president trump trump captured the idea of this space force as a new branch of the military. It's one of his favourite applause lines and rallies. We still love the idea of going out there. Okay okay. Two Thousand Sixteen. There's only one story from two thousand sixteen scientists which is the election of Donald Trump. Nothing's ever the same again etc but let me ask this. Trump supporters including the particular geico sycophants like a Lou. Dobbs call him degrades present of all time obviously his detractors. Call him the worst president of all time. Let me ask you this. I guess kind of three years in. How long do you think it will be till there will be an American consensus on the trump presidency? Like there are on lots of other presidents. Obviously you don't get one hundred percent but there's general feelings. These were good presidents. These were average average. Presidencies were bad presents. How long are we going to have to wait? Till that emerges among trump there may never be a consensus then of course George W Bush got a second. Look we wind up Ebanon about some of our presidents is hard to imagine. Trump nostalgia at the moment the reckoning that I think that we do want to have sooner is dealing dealing with some of the forces that put him in office if you look across trump country and if you look at the lack of opportunity many of those communities if you look at the worry worry about jobs being taken by robots if you look at. The unwillingness are an ability to adjust to a changing country those are all still very real today. There may be more acute today and those are issues that if you take the personality out of it fueled down trump and it's something that our country still has to russell with two thousand seventeen is notable for us and may because that's the axios launched. But let me ask you something kind of probably bigger and more important. which was this was really the beginning of the METOO movement in October? Two thousand seventeen. That's when the Harvey Weinstein Story First broke. You know this kind of does come. After two thousand sixteen and trump's access Hollywood tape from your perspective though is particularly when you think about kind of corporate slash media. America is this the most important and most notable kind of cultural event. I guess you could say of the decade. I think that's perfectly put workplace. Social behavior has changed forever. There's no going back and both ends. The telescope one is that women now recognize that they own their story are empowered to fight against incursions and men and realize that things that behavior that was ignored in the past no longer will be and what have I profile individuals rightly paid. Hey too high price for it and I think it's probably deterred other bad behavior. I'm curious to tie into axios and not a problem we've had here but you were different company before it's obviously a politico. Do you think the metoo movement has that impacted the way you think about building company culture particularly at a startup a startup. That doesn't have an institutional memory actually started and we were happy that You were there actually has started with thirty people. Now are one hundred. Eighty people and we've been very intentional about our culture. From the beginning we've emphasized transparency. We've built in diversity and inclusion from the beginning recognizing that if you get those built in at the top that it it's easier to make sure that it's an integral part of the company as you scale and become mammoth as actually will be Mike. Two thousand eighteen. That's the year of the facebook facebook Cambridge Analytica data data privacy scandal. We talked about data privacy earlier. But this to me and tell me if you disagree. This seemed to be the one that helped turn public public and political opinion against big tech after a decade of real laudatory. You know this is a free wonderful service. The tech clash was another trended trended. So few people coming and I'm struck by this was great lists the put together that so many of these were not just an for scene but unforeseeable foreseeable ball and tech for sure had been covered. Very Rosalie as you know. And as you and I were coming up beginnings of tech and it was real surprise especially to people in the valley. I was just out there last week. They still talk about how surprised they were. Were about the way. The culture of the government turned on them and they recognize that that was not a blip that that is a permanent new condition that forever there will be greater scrutiny of tech from states from Washington and from their consumers and kind of tying into that two thousand nineteen which from my perspective. It's kind of the struggles of some of the the highest profile so called Unicorns these really high valued private companies. That have really changed the way we live like Uber and lift which went public and really struggled. There is some criticism AIRBNB. Obviously the massive we worked to buckle even though we have employees who work. We work lots of people working. We works all over the world world. What if anything does this? Tell us about that hype were we and I'll say that media generically were we simply too gullible over the last decade. Well well some people were including some funders but in the media we dig into cover great stories and try to buminate them and the test I for us is do we make sure that what we say is tethered to reality. And there is what agreed journalism that went into a looming. What was going on at all those companies that you you mentioned Mike Allen? Thank you so much for joining us. I hope you cannot join me again. What two thousand twenty nine? We'll do ten years wishing you a best twenty twenty two twenty twenty-nine and thank you..

Donald Trump Mike Allen America CNN Dan Boeing president axios Co Washington Bernie Sanders Deborah Mac marijuana Clinton Burg AIRBNB founder Edward Snowden
"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

"Welcome back this product. We'd take ten minutes to get you smarter on the collision of Tech Business Politics. I'M DEBORAH MAC and today show apple's new fight and the end of the WTO the first.

"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

09:52 min | 1 year ago

"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

"Ten minutes to get smarter on the Clinton of Tech Business Politics brought to you by America's beverage companies. I'm Deborah Mac today show Google changes. Its rules for political ads and president trump thanks. He opened a factory that actually opened six years ago but first Algorithm Mickley inspired shoes. That's the term being used this week by. Joey's Willinger Co founder and CEO of wool sneaker maker all birds and it's not a compliment instead. It's what he's calling. A line of. KNOCKOFF will sneakers. That Amazon just started offering under brand called two. Oh six collective live so what is well. It's new it's one of more than seventy so called. Private label. Brands owned by Amazon which tracks. What other retail products are selling? Well both on its platform and elsewhere and basically copies them and sells them at a very discounted price but again not under the actual Amazon brand probably because owning a two. Six collective shoe is more pleasing to the ego than owning an Amazon shoe. Now you might think Amazon would be a little bit embarrassed by this practice but you'd be wrong. In fact company executives seem pretty really proud Amazon consumer business boss Jeff Wilkie told CNN over the summer that this is just common retail and it's good business to quote save customers money and improve quality by offering a private label equivalent and quote but for companies like all birds. It can be like goliath coming in stomping on their heads. Yes allburn has gained a loyal following. It's got some retail stores now and a one point four billion dollar valuation from Venture Capitalists. But none of that comes close to comparing with Amazon's wealth or reach the bottom line here. There is a boom right now in direct to consumer products from apparel to food personal care but once these upstarts gained some traction against incumbents. They're often forced just a battle. One of the world's most powerful companies fifteen seconds will go deeper with all birds co founder and CEO. Joey's Willinger but first. This program is presented by America's Carr's beverage companies are plastic. Bottles are one hundred percent recyclable. including the CAP's working together to reduce our industries plastic footprint with a new initiative called every bottle auto back because the more bottles we remake the less new plastic. We use learn more at every bottle back dot. Org We're joined now by Albert Co founder and CEO CEO. Joey's Willinger. How did you first learn about this Amazon? We'll sneaker kid has finally so we learned about it probably the way we learn about a handful of the other knock off a friend of ours just Tax Us Hey. Have you seen this one question. Mark and Bam linked Amazon's website. So this one a little more a little more trusting than usual how come. Why was this one more interesting just because it is coming from Amazon itself? Yeah I mean the skill of Amazon is not yeah we we've had a bunch of rip-offs from a couple of American companies couple of European European companies have stature then a lot of companies that have been stood up specifically for the job of ripping off some of our products but this one was the first time where we felt that because of the search traffic on Amazon Dot Com and because of how they had been kind of relentlessly pursuing and attributed to one individual. This is how they systematically do it. But because they've been bidding on Google search terms on brand name like all birds offers men's shoes an ad for Amazon pops up and then there were some counterfeit sold on Amazon that were siphoning off demand from Google search and other things like that onto Amazon when people are actually looking for our products and when it comes to Google search. What can you if anything? Obviously you can spend money but Amazon can spend more you guys. are well capitalized. But you're you're not Amazon if Amazon is on wants to basically own all birds quote unquote on Google Search. Is there anything you can really do about that Not that I'm aware now I mean we gotta just work to get our search engine optimization out so we hit the top of the organic search and people type in our brand name and we have to kind of have to pay the Google tax debt when people put on all bird. We we got to pay for it. Might correct insanely from searching this morning. All birds don't seem to currently be sold via Amazon. You guys don't sell the platform have you ever. And if not why not. And we don't and we have never and I think that platform is pretty basic catalog where we are stacked up against lots of other products and it's title log does a good job of devolving products into features and benefits and it's not really the way we tell our story. We'll also lose the one to one intimacy of our interaction with every transaction cake since we have one hundred percent of our transactions direct to consumer when we lose that we lose a whole lot of information about the customer. We can't give them the kind of quality service that we like to give. We can't speak to them in the future. Like you know another himself. It's a much less good experience for the customer. It's much less good experience for us as a company. And you know look we're going to be stacked up against a whole bunch of counterfeit and they're gonNA put us right next. You know five other companies who have ripped us off and are showing Amazon. And that's just not great for our brand joey back in two thousand seventeen your company sued Steve. Madden the shoe designer and seller for knockoff. One of these knock offs and eventually the two of you settled out of court. Do you plan to sue Hammas. On in this case we look at every one of these carefully and I can't say for sure at this point but I think whether you have a great case or not is less important important than how painful the struggles going to be and given that we have pretty small company relative to a trillion dollar company like Amazon. It seems like we're bringing a night to a gun. Sight and hearing them is just going to be a tactic. But it's going to be pointless so in all likelihood that's not the avenue we WANNA pursue. Then how do you think about how do you at this point. And whether it be Amazon or some other company how do you protect a brand right now or maybe a product category. Is it even possible at this point. Well I think intellectual property is only one one avenue of protection. We've always believed that. The quality of what we put in to our products is probably the most important aspect of what we do and giving or direct to consumer and end aside from Amazon who is now at direct consumer shoe-seller. We have an advantage over most other players in the shoe industry and that they built their their value chain around wholesale also also they can ever afford to put the quality of materials in and sell sell their product of the same price that we can afford to tonight's inherent advantage. We have competitive moat that we've we've created given just our business model. The other thing is just it's just basic business but we just gotTA keep inventing new materials and inventing new products and and just focus on that and that's honestly the best thing that we can do. And and that's what we're primarily focused on last question which speaks to materials Amazon seems to be using similar to what you guys are in the shoe. But then there's the issue of the soul itself and you guys and Tell Them Rama that you guys use impart recycled sugar. Cannon and sustainability is a big part of all birds you guys are be corporation. Have you yet reverse engineered one of these Amazon Amazon shoes to see what the soul is made of and is at the same we have and we do that for every every competitive product can get our hands on so first of all I refute the fact that they use a similar will. We're using some of the finest in the world that used for five thousand dollar suits and packing into a very affordable product and they have used all from different sources which is Leschi. Excuse me in treatment of the animals and not as high quality wool and then the bottom is just a simple pretty poor-quality plastic product from petroleum. And do we have engineered a very cushy. Bottom made from sugarcane as you mentioned and it's a combination of variety of components but the primary element is that EDA. It's called the material that we've derived from sugar fan joys. Well endure CEO of all birds. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you Dan. My final two right after this Pereda is presented by America's Erica's beverage companies. Not all plastic is the same are one hundred percent recyclable. Plastic bottles and caps are made to be remade and we want every bottle back so that our bottles bottles can become new bottles and not end up in oceans rivers and beaches. That's why we're working together to reduce our industries plastic footprint with a new initiative called every bottle back because the more bottles we remake the less new plastic we use learn more at every bottle back dot. Org now never my final two. and first of his Google which yesterday announced that it will change its global political ad policy to restrict audience targeting and that in the US it'll expanded clarify its existing rules on misleading content in and political ads in terms of audience targeting Google now only allow a few broad categories like age gender zip code level location when it comes to misleading ads. It will more explicitly prohibit ads that make what it calls demonstrably false claims Particularly things like deep fakes or adds that quote undermine participation nation for trust in our electoral democratic process and quote things like making misleading arguments about the US census. Remember this applies not just a google search engine but also to youtube and and comes weeks after twitter banned political ads altogether facebook. Meanwhile told us on Monday. That is still considering changes to its AD policy and that nothing including targeting is is off the table and finally President Trump yesterday was in Austin Texas where he and Apple CEO. Tim Cook toward a factory. That makes apple computers when it came time to speak to the press. He he said this. Seeing the beginning of power according glare anybody follows right hand. We talk about apple that I WANNA see Apple building plants in United States. That's what's happening. Trump later tweeted out something similar that he opened a major apple manufacturing plant in Texas. That will bring high paying jobs back to America America. End Quote all well and good except for the part where it's all wrong i. The plant didn't open yesterday. It opens six years ago. Two thousand thirteen second apple apple doesn't own the plant it's owned by a company called FLEX which happens to make products for apple. Third Apple hasn't opened or announced plans to open any new. US Manufacturing facility since trump took office. And we're done big. Thanks for listening to my producers. Tim Chauffeurs and Jesse Lee have a great national gingerbread cookie day. And we'll be back on Monday with another pro rata podcast..

Amazon Google America apple Joey President Trump United States Deborah Mac Clinton Willinger Co CAP CNN Texas
"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

"Is where we take just ten minutes to get you smarter on the Clinton of Tech Business and politics sponsored by Silicon Valley Bank Ideas Bank. Here I'm Deborah Mac on today's show apple bands vaping APPS and a big debate over domains. I all eyes or maybe some is on impeachment so welcome to day two of the impeachment hearings on Capitol Hill where the House Intelligence Committee today will hear testimony testimony from former US ambassador to Ukraine. Marie Ivanovich following Wednesday's testimony from acting ambassador to crane. Bill Taylor and senior State Department official. George Kent Makita Watch today. We'll be if you've gone. which provides any new information beyond what she told many of these same Congress people last month during closed hearings the transcripts of which were later released? That's what Bill Taylor did. He had something new when he shared second hand knowledge of a phone. Call between trump and ambassador Gordon Sunland it which trump allegedly inquired about I Ukraine investigating Joe Biden and his son hunter but beyond the substance. There is another question. Are you watching live. TV were shipped for Wednesday's hearing was thirteen. Point eight million Ryan which is well short of the nineteen and a half million people who watch James commes congressional testimony in June two thousand seventeen or the twenty million who watched the Christine in Blazey Ford Brett. Cavanaugh hearings last September. In fact more people even watched former trump lawyer. Michael Cohen testified. This past February now ratings don't affect the substance in other words trump isn't guilty of attempted bribery if lots of people watched but innocent of it if no one watches but the reality is that impeachments are a political cool process not criminal and those making the final decisions will be keeping a very close eye on voter sentiment if people aren't watching or reading the subsequent coverage at Axios Axios or elsewhere then. It's unlikely we'll get anything beyond partisan votes in both congressional chambers in fifteen seconds will deeper with axios.

Bill Taylor Axios Axios Silicon Valley Bank Ideas Bank Ukraine trump Deborah Mac Marie Ivanovich Blazey Ford Brett George Kent apple bribery Clinton Congress Michael Cohen Joe Biden House Intelligence Committee Gordon Sunland Cavanaugh State Department
"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

"Tip type businesses politics sponsored by Silicon Valley Bank Ideas Bank dear. I'm Deborah Mac. On today's show. How American companies are trying to dodge China tariffs and the Big Tech Company company calling for facial recognition rules. The first private equity is still a man's world so for most Americans. Private equity is a vague boogeyman. Something they hear about every now and then from politicians or maybe for newspaper columnist when a local company goes out of business but the reality is that private equity impact almost all parts of our lives. Confirm what we eat what we wear to how we work to even where we live overall private equity owned companies account for around five percent of America's GDP and employed nearly only six percent of all American workers. That's nine million people but when it comes to the people at private equity firms making decision. They're almost all exclusively men. Research from frequent recently reported that women make up less than eighteen percent of all private equity employees and just ten percent of senior leadership positions. And when you look at the biggest firms terms women are almost entirely absent from the C. Suite outside of chief marketing officer roles and unlike in venture capital which is an industry and investment industry of similar age historical demographics. Private equity isn't doing too much to diversify that eighteen percent figure has been static for two years and a recent private Equity Conference survey found. Found that only half the firms. There are undertaking any internal diversity efforts while the rest were either still thinking about it or not interested why it matters again is the private equity has an increasingly outsized influence on American life and American employment of all Americans regardless of gender race or ethnicity unfortunately though private equity itself is run by a much more homogeneous group that might not fully recognize the impact of the decisions. They're making in fifteen seconds. We'll go deeper with Kara. Helen dewar chief inclusion and diversity versity officer at private equity giant the Carlisle Group. But first this episode is brought to you by. Silicon Valley Bank knows everything about coating but not so much about banking for more than thirty five years. Silicon Valley Bank has been helping high growth companies navigate through each stage of the startup journey. Stay tuned to learn more Silicon Valley Bank ideas bank. Thank here joined by Kara. Hell under chief inclusion and diversity officer at the Carlisle Group. Private equity is this enormous industry indirectly imploring millions directly employing thousands but generally it's leadership and even second and third levels are overwhelmingly male. Why is that Dan. Private equity is a relatively young industry and when they destroyed they're just starting out and growing fast you know. People will draw from their circle of contacts ax. We are naturally drawn to people who are like ourselves and so what that means. Is You find a cycle of further perpetuating very similar profiles within within an organization. Is it that young though. I mean some of these firms including the one you work for now over thirty years old right. Yeah but you know you think about the other piece I would add to. So that is this is very much an apprenticeship business right and when people come in at very junior levels and then grow from within and what this means is that it can limit the the ability to bring in more diverse expertise or experience at more senior levels. So certainly you know we've been focusing quite a bit for a while making sure that pipeline is as diverse as we can make it and with that focus and with that intention you can make meaningful progress. Carlisle L.. Has Today Ninety senior level women and more than half of them are on the investment side. You know last year in the most recent promotions class sixty percent of our people promoted to partner where women so I think there are those dynamics in the industry but with focus and intention you can make progress against in-stat and that's what we're endeavoring to do about that you're right. Carlisle has a particularly large percentage of females on its investments staff. But that Said said when you look at the management group itself two out of fifteen the board two out of twelve the entire eight person. Executive Committee is male given the Carlisle has been working to build that pipeline blind for while giving it a lot of these people who are on. Those committees aren't originals to the firm. They've come in the last say ten years. Why doesn't Carlisle more women. At the top of the pyramid that is part of efforts that are underway to really grow that level of leadership. I can tell you that we are very focused on on sponsorship and mentorship. Carlisle had robust mentoring program in place for four years. We've had over eight hundred people inside the firm. Participate it in that so we are in the process of cultivating that leadership bench. Private equity has been a very very lucrative business for quite some time whether it be carlisle or other firms and when I write about this topic this particular gender diversity topic on the venture capital side of things. People often come back and basically say. Why are you focusing on this? Why does this matter. So let me ask you if private have an equity. Primary job is to generate returns for its investors which it is if private equity has successfully generated strong returns for investors over the years including Carlisle. Why should we tair we have. We should care because we're in the judgment business. You know it takes divers teams to bring differences and how we see the world and what we know to our deals because with those differences you can really tease out the opportunities and drive the kind of innovative change that we need to drive. Even our portfolio companies. You need those that diverse perspective and they need a culture where you share knowledge you embrace the differences but you also create a culture where you you can help each other challenge. The status quo. We are in the judgment business and you need that diverse perspective particularly in today's more global complex and interconnected connected world to see the opportunities that generate returns care. There was a frequent study back in February and it said that about eighteen percent of all private equity employees or female and also most importantly certainly that percentage hadn't changed in almost two years. I actually going back tober seventeen. Broadly speaking is this something. The Indu- believed that the industry cares enough enough about industry is beginning to care what I can tell you. Is that our investors care. They are asking us more questions. About efforts underway. Ed which I think is a welcome level of interest and it's something that for the reasons I just outlined. We've been driving towards a carlyle for earlier than many of our peers but it is something that is more and more top of mind of the industry both on the L. P. side and the GP cy when it comes to recruiting and whether it be recruiting women or men or anybody. There's been a lot of talk about the use of AI particularly algorithms in helping the recruitment process Carlisle recently acquired a majority stake in a company called higher view which among other parts of it uses video to help do this should people be concerned about the increasing use of algorithms or even video which means impart. You're kind of being judged as a potential job candidate on your appearance. The higher view technology has a number of really strong benefits to do it. One is it simply means more. People have access to applying to roles that they might not otherwise have had a chance to without that technology allergy. I think the other piece is that the algorithms and themselves us very objective data assessment. The answers to questions. DISCU help to evaluate candidates and take away some of the subjective elements that humans can bring to that process so in many ways it's minimizing minimizing the bias that can seep into a recruiting process. How should we judge private equity success or failure when it comes to gender diversity. Do we need to have one of the big five firms have a female. CEO Within the next year or two. I would love to see that happen. Will we see that happen. These folks are all cycling out. Oh Yeah I think that the most important thing is showing some very concrete progress changing on. This doesn't happen overnight. You need to be making putting forth the effort. That's going to lead to the kind kind of change that you're talking about. But showing that they're really developing the pipeline of talent to achieve that ultimate outcomes. Beg Your car. HALLANDER chief inclusion diversity officer at the Carlisle Group. My final two right. After this earlier we highlighted. Silicon Valley banks experience.

"deborah mac" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"deborah mac" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Conference and though had a good service at the beech creek missionary Baptist church with the annual mens compost actually I was the first men's conference speaker now with like six or seven years ago and they called me back and I went up and we did that thing that we do and due to the fact that we do all Sunday as will good worship is so I'm glad to be back in the fifth T. here they'll never hear about it when I'm leaving town hello need about my house when I'm gone we about to be out of town when we hit that like that which rob me believe he's Deborah mac I tell ya when I get back not with no fin the go you better feel making four oh four eight nine two two seven zero three the mall of three one dash hi the my do you hear of load your brother your body got hold the loan you get hope things can turn around and go your way and so on this mo better magnificent black man Monday sane project in Lubbock live give it give you some for the total I take that okay this term was coming hi that's how we get down a black man Monday yawns and so we are concluding with part number two question number ninety one what is the single most impactful and enduring medical contribution unknowingly made by a black person to modern science so the story Henrietta lacks was told by investigative journalist Rebekah's looped into book the immortal filled with Henrietta lacks in telling the story miss glute describes the many ways profit was made from ms lacks fails and the story has raised enormous moral legal political and financial issues industry have adult address the issue of permission by requiring more thorough patient medical disclosure information forms what does not seem to have been addressed however father financial enough which is about the wealth and industry creations that Bob pastor family her children or grandchildren or great grandchildren there are many lessons well all in the story of you relax her store demonstrates that economic racism continues to be practiced in modern society the practice of so easily stealing black assets in shipping the financial benefit to the white side of the ledger is so ingrained culturally that a generational sense of wrongdoing no outrage and no corrective action is expected those who benefited financially from her unusual sales most likely are viewed and most likely view themselves as enterprising repeatedly and respected from wealthy individuals can relax indeed made a contribution it was important to medical science in many ways then I got a little over a month of it as a babysitter both absolutely no federal sleeping on a brief of but then from the temp service little some dude assistant brother on the back and got shot in the garbage the rest of give us eighty uncle grandma granddad went about check own and while my good systems and good brothers who find themselves incarcerated in the criminal justice system I'm mentally ill population what love as well as the systems walking street.

"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

09:21 min | 1 year ago

"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

"Sporadic where we take ten minutes the Clinton of Tech Business and politics sponsored by Silicon Valley Bank Ideas Bank here I'm Deborah Mac today show more trouble for we work and a push to stop police from us bring doorbells but I the rockets red glare even if you're not an NBA fan you probably by now know about Daryl Morey the general manager of the Houston Rockets who on they tweeted out support for the protesters in Hong Kong it was literally the tweet heard round the world as China went ballistic blacking out preseason games and doing a public condemnation and remember the Houston Rockets aren't just any NBA team they're the NBA team most responsible for the League's popularity in China because they had Yao Ming yao-ming now runs the China Basketball Association which in response to Maurice tweet suspended ties with the rockets so more quickly pulled down the tweet didn't apologize but pulled it? down and was then rebuked by the team's owner and even at star player the NBA called quote regrettable causing its own backlash stateside before last night reaffirming the right freedom of expression among team players executives and coaches and just to make it a little bit more complicated. There was also a lengthy statement from Joe Cy the Alibaba founder who spot the Brooklyn Nets with hopes of leveraging the Chinese market he argued in favor of China's response explaining sensitivities around what he called separatists albeit without during the actual democracy concerns of Hong Kong protesters all of this is in short a disaster for the NBA and a massive test for commissioner Adam silver there are billy ends of dollars at stake and also at stake American Pro Sports League that more than any other has encouraged people to speak up on social and political issues important to them the MBA always would strategy could turn away some fans but it probably never contemplated losing five hundred million of them if fifteen seconds we'll go deeper with sports illustrated's Chris Mannix the I this this episode is brought to you by Silicon Valley Bank knows everything about coating but not so much about banking for more than thirty five years Silicon Valley Bank has been helping high growth company he's navigate through each stage of the start journey stay tuned to learn more Silicon Valley Bank ideas bank here we're joined now by Christmas annex senior writer for sports illustrated you wrote the other day that this is the single biggest challenge of Adam Silver's tenures NBA Commissioner. Why well I mean had some significant issues could deal with beginning with Donald Sterling continuing with more NBA centric issues like tampering but This is the kind of geopolitical scandal that he could never have really envisioned something kicked off by a tweets and now he has to navigate some pretty murky waters he he wants to and has continued to support players coaches executives for exercise their freedom of speech but this is the first time the freedom of speech as potentially had what could be a catastrophic impact on the NBA bottom line I mean the league generates hundreds of millions of dollars does in revenue from China every single year they proudly tout the number of people who play basketball in China three hundred million that watched basketball China's something like five hundred million of this it's all that endanger as people that follow China on a more closer more serious basis no they take this stuff seriously when it comes to donkey Kong so there's really no clear idea just how far China will take this and the ramifications could have on the NBA fiscally you mentioned the silver his support freedom of expression players executives etc which is the statement he put out last night of course the NBA originally called the tweet regrettable more pulled down hasn't explained why NBA's regional response was misunderstood. I think is the where to us from your perspective was misunderstood or silver backtrack last night original statement was a little MM soft and I expressed that to people within the NBA after I wrote my original story they believe that they had expressed strong supports for Darrelle Mauri I disagree I mean the first sentence use the word regrettable and that it made me think I mean play players and coaches as for anyone follow the NBA they have been very outspoken on social and political issues in the United States Gregg Popovich coach of the Spurs Steve Kerr with the warriors Lebron James they have all been very very pointed criticisms of Donald Trump and I have no issue with that I mean of course it's it's a person's right to say whatever they want I firmly believe that when you have a platform it's great to exercise but the NBA doesn't go round apologized to conservatives or trump supporters for what these players said I don't know why they would feel the need to call the tweet regrettable effectively apologize to the Chinese fans that were offended by I think that's I the answers money and we can certainly have have a deeper debate about what all this means speaking up for someone speaking up could potentially hurt the NBA bottom line officer James Harden The star player for the rockets came out with a got it read like a PR team worked on it but a statement saying we apologize we love China but you talked about Lebron James and center the NBA more than any other league is a players run league they've got an enormous amount of power do you expect to see other players speak up about this specifically and test the NBA's resolved to freedom of expression I don't and I would disagree that the harden statement sounded like Pr. I thought it was the opposite I mean sorry China like that doesn't read to me like something any pr I wrote and if they did they should probably look at other lines of work the PR mine would be you know look at serious issue I don't really want to get involved I hope things are resolved peacefully. That's something that I think would make sense at a PR wise but players aren't going to get followed I don't think not because of the NBA wet because of the speaker contracts we all know how much money players individually make from the Chinese market every summer the top name players take trips sponsored by the sneaker company over to China to do events and you know practices and things like that all with the golden willing to lose China now it's a great question and I don't know I also don't know if they have any choice they have created this sort of atmosphere and where they have said repeatedly they're okay with you know players and coaches and executives saying they're peace and taking stance on political and social on my final two right after this earlier we highlighted Silicon Valley banks experience with helping startups over Silicon Valley Bank you're also getting a partner committed to supporting you as you oh is expected to announce thousands of layoffs in the aftermath of its Failed Ipo Wall Street Journal reports that not only were prospective investors upset by big losses and lacks corporate governance but again that's passed numbers so why the changes basically the first ones were wrong creating a Patina of fiscal sloppiness that investors could not overcome even if they believe bring has deals with more than four hundred government agencies giving police access to a map of doorbell cameras from which they can request footage for example imagine there's an assault on the sidewalk the cops can then ask for video from ring doorbells on that street the concerns of course here are buried everything from a lack of transparency to anger over tax payer funded subsidy but the big picture is that this is really about the growing conflict between technology and privacy and how to balance them without ending up in a surveillance state and we're done.

NBA China Silicon Valley Bank Silicon Valley Bank Ideas Bank Hong Kong China Basketball Association Houston Rockets Rockets Adam silver Daryl Morey Yao Ming Alibaba Houston Brooklyn Nets American Pro Sports League Joe Cy Commissioner Clinton Donald Sterling
"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"deborah mac" Discussed on Pro Rata

"Get you smarter. Tech business politics sponsored by Silicon Valley Bank Ideas Bank here. I'M DEBORAH MAC today's show pay pals big move into China and and they possible Texas for Republicans but first Mark Zuckerberg fights back so earlier this morning tech media the verge published audio and transcript descript from two internal facebook meetings that occurred in July during which Mark Zuckerberg took questions from company employees it touch on everything from reputation to competition to corporate governance but the biggest headlines related to comment Zuckerberg made about a certain presidential candidate of the right answers to break up companies elected president. We'll legal challenge and I would bet.

Silicon Valley Bank Ideas Bank Mark Zuckerberg DEBORAH MAC facebook president China Texas
"deborah mac" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"deborah mac" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Getting part of the credit. This is Fox News. W IPC mobile news, all the level of the. Public opinion can help solve Indiana's teacher pay dilemma, it's cloudy and fifty three on monument circle light rain on radar. I'm John Herrick. Here's what's trending at four zero two. Eric Berman reports. That's what House Republicans are saying Republicans are proposing a state report listing how much of each local school budget finds its way to the classroom. The current average is about seventy five cents on the dollar house speaker Brian Bosma says every extra penny would raise teacher salaries about a thousand dollars. No school purposely over spins on administration, but we need they look at some of the schools that are able to get by without some of these administrative expenses to see if other schools can follow Republicans are also proposing grants for schools who want to create mentoring programs paying veteran teachers extra to work closely with newer ones. Eric Berman Ninety-three WIBC mobile new teachers and students returned to Dennis intermediate school in Richmond today almost a month after there was a shooting there superintendent Todd tarot says the school has a new look we've painted every hallway. Wall in the entire building. Just to kinda give it that fresh. Look, we've refreshed the floors. We've put down some new flooring in places tarot also says there's a new security system that requires you to present a state ID if you wanna get in along with an instant background check flu season had a slow start. But now the flu is ramping up across the country, including in Indiana. Henry Davis reports thirteen children have died from the flu this year. And according to the CDC high rates of flu like illnesses have been reported in nineteen states, including the Hoosier state Allen county health Commissioner, Dr Deborah MAC, Mahanta told whoa, whoa. The holidays may be to blame for this. Sudden rise as many people were coming together confined because of.

flu Dennis intermediate school Eric Berman Indiana Fox News John Herrick Brian Bosma CDC Todd tarot Allen county WIBC Richmond Henry Davis Dr Deborah MAC Commissioner superintendent Mahanta thousand dollars