17 Burst results for "Deborah Davis"

"deborah davis" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

10:59 min | 1 year ago

"deborah davis" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"Welcome to the show ridiculous historians. Thank you as always for tuning in. If you are listening to this the day it comes out then you like us have hopefully survived. What is called Super Tuesday? A Super Tuesday is where all the nominees for president Get together and and you know pitch their cause to each state. We don't know how it will work out but know it. It's a good way into today's episode. Hi I'm Ben. Hey Ben I'm no super is kind of interesting word turnaround. You've got like superfund sites. You ever heard of those. They're like cleanup nuclear cleanup sites. Well Yeah I always when I used to work for public radio easies to think that they were a superfund sites. You know it's like like a like a bouncy castle or something like that but it turns out it's quite a depressing heavy thing. The word super Used in politics just interesting to me but super Tuesday to me sounds like a vestige of like old you know the old days of stumping politics up on a platform is you as a is. You Ain't my constituency that kind of thing you know. Yeah Yeah it's a as as the guy who with some small measure of regret coined the term super producer. Here out shout out to our super producer. Casey pet group still in the race the race for our hearts winning by a large margin and as it turns out not a toxic. Waste cleanup site or a supercharged political Day of the year yet. The the free super I for Super Tuesday it always. It always felt me growing up like political pundits. Were trying to make it. Sound more fun. Granite is yeah. You know what I must be I. I don't know how it came about but it is a strange title. I'm going to bring back just using super to say something great. That's just super someone from the Mid West would say. But we digress. Today we are posing a question that was posed in a film that actually had similar things residences to today's episode. Guess WHO's coming to dinner starring. Sidney Poitier remember that film I do know what's the question. It was about a A dinner where a an African American gentleman comes. Oh the title was the question. Guess WHO's coming to dinner. That's right okay. I'm back in. Yes okay so it was a film where what's the plays up. African American gentlemen who comes to dinner and it's You know all kinds of hilarity awkwardness and satire ensue. Guess WHO's coming to. Dinner has a lot in common. You're right with today's story today. Story involves One of the most famous presidents in US history President Theodore Roosevelt. Now Daddy as he is known to his friends was was not a status quo type of president. He was known for shaking things up and kind of making his own way in nineteen zero. One he did something that wouldn't seem to controversial Tusk. Today's early not yet. Someone over for dinner you know and of course. He's the president at this time. He's he's pretty busy in general but because he's the president of the United States even the smallest of social decisions carry enormous weight in symbolism for the public. It's not like You or or I casually inviting a new friend or coworker to have some decimal lasagna. Or something this is always going to be interpreted as a statement is true and Deborah Davis in her fantastic book. Guest-of-honour Booker T. Washington Theodore Roosevelt and the White House. Dinner that shocked a nation Referred to this situation as such African Americans were invited to meet in offices. They of course built the White House. They worked for the various presidents but they were never ever invited to sit down at the president's table and when that happened the outrage was just unbelievable and a big reason for that she goes on to say is that in society The idea of dining together really created A sense almost a code word for social equality and folks just weren't ready to accept that fully despite obviously Slavery having been illegal for some time and African Americans for all intents and purposes being able to occupy the same social strata as white people. But it was just not something. That was Embraced even still. Yes and that's let's not bury the lead The guest in question is booker. Tally of Pharaoh. Washington American educator author a leader in his community at the time. There's a there's a double down meaning here. This is something that may have incensed. The racist members of the public in the American south traditionally this time it was understood that if you invited a male to have dinner with you and this person was not related to you already then tacitly inviting this man to woo your daughter. You're like come on in every meal. Epsom Lozad his is my daughter. Isn't she lovely? She's she's nineteen and she's getting up there and I love how all these imaginary circumstances. Everyone's always eating lasagna. It's Lozad I don't know why speedy they serve. They serve lasagna in the White House. Probably some fancy like lobster LASAGNA. Or something like that. I would think I you know what I bet. You have a lot of latitude when you're president because it's true. The menu has changed so much over the year. And now we can't forget that guy conic picture of our current president with all the McDonalds big MACs and stuff stacked up in Baroque fashion and he was very happy about that. I think he was doing the iconic double thumbs up so yes so you can see at least according to Deborah Davis. You can see that as the primary reason or one of the primary reasons people were so offended. It caused them to clutch their pearls. To imagine that a black man would be able to have that level of access to a family especially the presidential family both men both Washington and Roosevelt. Were very much aware of this and again grasp your pearls hear gasps softly. They were going to be women. Present Heavens Let's get into before we get into the outrage which is gonNA COME. It's inevitable Let's talk a little bit about why he would have wanted. Booker. T. Washington at a at a gathering. Like this where you're going to talk policy. It was because he was in a highly influential leader in the African American community. Founded the Tuskegee normal and Industrial Institute born into slavery He saved up and put himself through. School was an educator after the civil war and that's when he founded those institutes I mentioned earlier in eighteen. Eighty one in Alabama Now known as to Ski University so he was along with W E B D Boys Was One of the foremost African American leaders at the time and Roosevelt would've wanted to hear what he had to say would've have wanted to collaborate with him because Roosevelt was like you said he thought outside the box. He wasn't going to let the man tell him what's even though he technically kind of like the man right. Yeah and I. I like the point out how Washington was immensely influential feud or Roosevelt was immensely impulsive legendarily. So and here's how it all went down. So he had this pre existing appointment in. This was a business appointment. There were supposed to compare notes in Roosevelt. Was going to get some advice on Some cabinet picks but then at the very last minute is true. Roosevelt said. Let's make dinner and he was going to send out this invitation to dinner. The story is that he paused for just a second thought. Is this a bad idea because of all the stuff we've got going on here in the US and it's crazy messed up? I'm paraphrasing An instantly he felt deeply ashamed that he even bothered hesitating and so he said all right. I'M GONNA I'M GONNA send this out before I can change my mind and now Booker T. Washington gets the invitation and he has some thoughts. We I mean he had to decide whether or not to accept the invitation. I I would imagine that the Immediate impulse especially for a guy like that who'd come so far new the symbolism of it but I guess he had to decide if it would look like a trail to his community in some way or if it was worth you know making that big statement and kind of weathering the Brouhaha that would follow in the interest of kind of moving social discourse forward and obviously he chose the latter Yup He said this is going to be problematic for me but I have no right to refuse. And he felt like he had to accept it as a representative of his community. Of course they knew the s was gonna hit the F-. I'm going to say that it you can fill in whatever initial `isms you like for that. The shorts were gonNA hit the farm. Yeah Yeah The the scoop was going to hit the France. It's early in the morning today for us. I guess is. It's almost noon. Ben No right but the weather here. It's very jerry Hey guys it's bobby bones. I host the bobby bones show and pretty much always sleepy because I wake up at three o'clock in the morning a couple of hours later I get all my friends together. We get into a room and we do a radio. Show with your allies. We tell our stories. We try to find as much good in the world that we possibly can and we looked through the news of the day that you'll care about also your favorite country. Artists are always stopping by to hang out and share their lives and music too so wake up with a bunch of my friends on ninety eight point seven W M Z Q in Washington DC or wherever the rotates you on the iheartradio APP. So they knew that was going to hit. The Spain was going to hit the France a White House reporter. Put The news of this dinner on the wire service and this is mind you before they actually ever sit down to eat. There is a massive backlash. The stories that were printed about this are disgusting aged like milk as as we want to say. The men both received Separately and as a group death threats there were There was of course the cliche..

Booker T. Washington Theodore president White House US Booker T. Washington Washington Deborah Davis Mid West Sidney Poitier bobby bones producer Washington American African American community Roosevelt France Booker McDonalds Ben Tusk
"deborah davis" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"deborah davis" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"The nation. The CIA with its murky jurisdiction in covert, dealings, was suddenly viewed as the embodiment of everything wrong with the government reporter saw their chance to really dig deep into the. See as most controversial secrets in nineteen seventy four New York Times reporter Seymour, Hersh published an expose on operation chaos and either legal CIA program. The placed American citizens associated with the antiwar movement under surveillance on top of that it went against their mandate to not operate on American soil. The Hirsch articles were seen by many as the final nail in the coffin of the CIA in addition to operation chaos Hersh reported on a number of other illegal CIA programs that engaged with everything from supporting foreign propaganda to attempting assassinations of world leaders, these exposed black ops programs were considered the first of a series of programs and actions carried out by the CIA that were finally exposed after the fall of the Nixon White House, this assortment of mostly legal activity. These came to be officially referred to as the family, jewels, the combined scandals of the NSA relationship Watergate, and now the family jewels, led to the creation of the church committee in nineteen seventy five led by Senator Frank church. The committee was tasked by congress to investigate the CIA's actions over the previous two and a half decades. And report on whether the agency had as her said violated its charter, the church committee conducted hearings and investigations for over a year before, finally publishing its findings in April of nineteen seventy six the final report was comprised of six books in seven volumes of transcripts from Senate hearings. The results were more than disturbing. The declassified sections of the church report revealed, an astounding amount of wrongdoing. The CIA had engage. Edged with the F B I to intercept and read the mail of private US citizens without a warrant. It had conducted a similar operation on international mail coming to and from China, the agency had commissioned numerous failed assassination, plots against Fidel Castro, the then president of Cuba. It had engaged in behavior. Modification research under the infamous MK alter program in this was just the work. That was declassified huge portions of the church committees reports on the family jewels were redacted when it was first reported on in nineteen seventy six. Won unanimous opinion at the time of the church committee's report was given how distressing the declassified material was the classified material must have been astoundingly worse. We should know here that despite the numerous bombshells included in the church committee's report, there was no mention of an operation Mockingbird. The world's media concluded from the declassified reports that the CIA hit engaged with a network of foreign journalists to push pro American propaganda. Carl Bernstein of all the president's men fame wrote an extensive article in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven that detailed the minutia of how the agency identified recruited and utilize journalists around the world, this article served as a foundation of much of what we think we know about operation Mockingbird today. Though we should note that Bernstein doesn't actually refer to the oper-. Ration- as Mockingbird on the actual name operation Mockingbird didn't enter the public consciousness until a few years later in nineteen seventy nine Deborah Davis published, Catherine the great Katharine Graham, and the Washington Post as far as we can tell this proudly unauthorized biography was the first public document, actually name operation Mockingbird, as we understand it today enacted in response to the international organization of journalists, and it's pro communist propaganda Davis claim that Mockingbird was overseen by Frank Wizner a former CIA deputy during the early nineteen fifties by the mid nineteen fifties. Mockingbird had members of CBS the New York Times Newsweek, and dozens of other American media entities in its pocket the broad goal of this program was to promote pro American sentiment among the increasingly restless youth..

CIA Mockingbird church committee Hersh reporter New York Times Senator Frank church Carl Bernstein president Fidel Castro Washington Post US Nixon White House Seymour Hirsch Deborah Davis CBS Cuba congress Katharine Graham
"deborah davis" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"deborah davis" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"Announced that he's going to be performing a song from stars born asks himself, not as his character is the different impeach himself on the difference. Pissing. Yeah. Serena wizards on stage with or without tennis racket that getting people not from the world of film to present shorts thing about each of the best pitcher nominees. So Serena Williams can be talking about stores born, and they're all going to be other people popping in who. They are. I don't so that sounds unusual. But it's the lack of host. I always kind of enjoyed it for the host the big opening will the gags and stuff if that's not there. I don't know how they gonna wipe in it. I don't know either. And I won't be finding. We're just. Yeah. But just condense them into a single word documentary simply in the morning. All right. So that's through category by category. Not not all the categories overseen and you predictions. Okay. So best screenplay the ballot of BUSTER Scruggs black klansman, can you ever? Forgive me. A star is born and of Bill street could talk. What is your tip? What he thinks going to take best adapted screenplay if Bill streak could talk. All right, Jim, boo. Yep. It's beleaguered no he's before I have used that before. But I like it when we were listening to the score in the office today and the score is magnificent. Are I'm going to be must be wrong with this. I'm going to say that stars gonna win that won best original screenplay first reformed pulse. Raters first Oscar nomination, which is incredible. Because the dude taxi driver so one of the fuck also green book outta McKay for Feis the favorites. Tony McNamara and Deborah Davis. An Afonso cloud on who could break a record. I think for the most individual Oscars in a single night. He's been the lead for best original screenplay, of course for Roma. What he thinks gonna win I'm leaning towards favorite. Okay. Oh, yeah. I'm on the favor as well. Okay. I will contradict new I think Koran will win that one. Let me say that's move onto best animated feature. Rough breaks into that Mirai item into the spy incredible two dogs absolutely into the spot of us. If in the spot of us doesn't win then frankly, everyone is still on the stage. Burn the building to the ground seems fair. The only logical the only measured response an injustice. Best director, Spike Lee for black klansman incredibly again. His first Oscar nomination Adam McKay for Feis. Pavel public hall sqi for Cold War Afonso quote on for Roma and your goes lengthy MOS for the favorite Koran Lund. Females lengthy moss. Really give it to him into. I think it will be quote on as well. Quarrel win that won best. Supporting actress, Emma stone for the favourite, Regina king. If Beale street could talk radio Feis for the favorites..

Tony McNamara Adam McKay Serena Williams Oscar Bill streak Koran Lund BUSTER Scruggs Emma stone Pavel public hall Regina king Spike Lee Jim director Deborah Davis
"deborah davis" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"deborah davis" Discussed on Movie Crush

"The lines like that totally kind of all. Got. It was good. Yeah. I just can't wait like this is a guy that's made the lobster killing a sacred deer and this and they're all so different. But they're all weird kind of baddies. Oh, you need. Yeah. Like, it's just with the way films are today for someone to come along. That is this just original is he a writer director. No, I don't think. So he. Now, he didn't write this. Tony McNamara in Deborah Davis. Okay. Wrote the script brilliant scrapped boy, snappy and quick. All right. Joey we shall. So everybody, I'm having technical difficulties. Just leave this in though because who cares? Green book green book that we just saw last night last night. Good movie. It was fine. I really liked it. It me really good. But like a hokey. Yeah. Like a little like movie though, like feel bad bagging on anyway. Because there's really nothing wrong with it. You know, exactly I don't mean hokey like unwatchable hokey, but it was just a little bit lots of tropes, and obviously some through lines that were may have been the case. But probably add, you know, could have been a little more. Indie feeling who would've liked it more agreed as definitely mainstream, but I really really loved the relationship that developed between these disparate then and especially for the time how it all went down. You know, I don't know. And the fact that it was based on a true story, which I didn't know until you're like. Yeah. That's the whole shit. He was great. What's the guy? Don, Shirley, my her shallow Arsala. He was fantastic hard. We we both like face just love that wonderful face and his beautiful long fingers, though. Like, I don't did you look up as panel playing. Play piano. He I hope he plays piano now because he has the piano like the beautiful long finger piano playing that like the fingers glide every like that was all believable that some of the best whatever he's he's obviously not that kind of player like he's on some kind of virtuoso in real life. Now that he he may have learned a couple of the ones like the ones, you know, like we're kind of like coming starting at the far octaves and coming out plane that. For it. But these days too. I mean, I should just look how they did that because these days you can do so much with like the used a real pianist hands and like come to them in on your times. But no, I don't think they did that. I bet he he seems like somebody who takes his craft pretty serious. That wouldn't I wouldn't expect like Ryan Gosling LaLa land. He learned to play all of those songs, you know. So it's like all Bs apparently. So yeah. And I think he learned to play them well enough that they could like, you know, at least keep doing the things. And maybe if he made any mistakes, that's the thing because it's like you can play those songs, but without a mistake. Well, if you do play back, and then you're. Handwork. I'm sticking to. But he did this to work that he played. He's known for his beautiful handwork. That's a good van name. Yeah. You're welcome to it. Vigo Mortenson was he was really good. But like for some reason I had a little bit of trouble buying him. A lovey go. I do too. He and he lost himself in that role for me. I stopped thinking that's being Morton eventually did. I think for a little while. I was a little little offer me, though, the character was a little bit. Like I've seen that catcher. So many times so many times that accent was so that's what he's right. So it's almost seemed like a trope, but it's. Yeah. Like, he really. I think that was the thing. Yeah..

Vigo Mortenson Don director Joey Morton Tony McNamara Ryan Gosling Arsala Deborah Davis Shirley writer
"deborah davis" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

05:50 min | 2 years ago

"deborah davis" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Learn more Vinson you had a wrap up a section of this piece from the Washington Post about the dilemma facing these military brass in Venezuela. Absolutely. So. Taking all of that into consideration. It ends with what is all this suggests Venezuela's future on the one hand. Backing Madero has brought the military elite economic opportunities, for instance, like food. Well, it gets into it. But like the military runs PDVSA state oil company, really and military officers profit from being involved in a lucrative government. Run drug trafficking network. Fervor Madero has promoted military officers to high political offices figuring those offices officers will defend for regime because we have so much to lose. If they fall out of office. Finally, Madero has shown us what you call a military dictatorship. Madeira has shown a resolute commitment to holding onto power, which means staying loyal could very well. Pay off on the other hand soldiers in national guardsmen, see firsthand in their families neighborhoods all around the nation's dire economic suffering with inflation running at nearly one million percent pay raises aren't really helping lower ranking officers any enlisted and since a one glider the head of the national assembly and self-declared interim president has offered amnesty for past human rights offenses to military leaders who leave d'oro he shifted. Tempting he shifted their calculations in his direction. We don't know yet whether civil society can mobilize large multi class, peaceful protests that will encourage the military to abandon the government, nor do we know ever smaller police forces or militias will be strong enough to enforcement arrows rain in the military decide to stay quartered. But for logic of military's calculus is clear. The military coups generally are not launched by the generals and admirals. They usually happen with mid to low. Lower level officers, for instance, Shevess himself when he first state dates is first coup. He was just a captain in the Venezuelan air force. So, and that's pretty common in a lot historically and a lot of coups where you have it's the mid level and lower level officers who are dissatisfied with the amount of spoils coming down one might say the and they're me more in touch with the people on the street and then their struggles. That's why get off his only Colonel whoever outranked general. Let's go to the phones. Here. We got David in New Mexico listening online. Go ahead. David. Yeah. The I told me recently about that. The family court judge in hell Kirke, Deborah Davis. Walker who was the crashed her car? Caused the crash in the cop found out she was drunk while driving drunk judge. DUI? And so so at least she did the right thing, and she she immediately resigned. So he's gone. Video come out of that. By the way, was there video footage. I there there appears looking right now. And I died he found a still photograph that appears to be a screen shot of the video. So there must be a video out there. But I I haven't found looking while. I was on hold must be something video. That video of bug shot. If you can see if somebody can find that video that video leaks out from the police department. I want to hear what that judge tried to say to that cop. You know, she pulled the t you know, who I am card. You know? She did. Absolutely. Gotta keep up the the, but yeah, I'll I'll look for in there should be one. And there were two that there was a number of how like a year back or whatever it was that state legislator, Monica young, right? There was video of that one because you called about that. And we pull that video up where she absolutely was. State rep you said. Yes. State rep Monica Youngblood right drunk. He found guilty, by the way. According to the news updates on that yesterday was found guilty. But the recent news is she was she was dragged into court on an alleged probation violation. The probation office does random because alcohol was part of her crime. Right. Oh, and remember it's worth noting that she was she was a huge crusader. I he had a Bill that was intended to quit stiffer penalties on those refuse they Breathalyzer. And then she went and refused a Breathalyzer test. So she she was doing exactly what she was complaining that other people were doing. But anyway, she got busted for the probation office says that she deluded her they do random urine screenings because her or alcohol was in her crime because they do random urine screenings for alcohol consumption, and they. They accused her of diluting for the family that provided in an attempt to cover up that that she'd been drinking, and so that's a felony. Yeah. What was the judge's name again? Debra Walker and sometimes Deborah Davis. Walker her mugshot is right there on the Albuquerque do Albuquerque Albuquerque news and up. You'll see you'll see her her mugshot. Rubbish. Now, the question is how many of these judges actually have drinking problems because you know, these people I imagine many of them are actually really happy with their lives. Just dance your question here beaver just the recent ones if you go back to storage in Albuquerque. There.

Fervor Madero Debra Walker State rep Venezuela Deborah Davis Albuquerque PDVSA David Washington Post probation violation Vinson Albuquerque Albuquerque Monica young Madeira interim president Shevess Monica Youngblood
"deborah davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

13:17 min | 2 years ago

"deborah davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"If you're worried about how connected your kids might be to their cell phones or tablets, or maybe if you've thinks as much ado about nothing or maybe yourself field, you depend on a little bit more than you. Should you wanna be part? Of the conversation. That's always welcomed here. WBZ? The numbers are six one seven two four ten thirty again, six one seven two five four ten thirty or the toll free number eight eight eight nine two nine ten thirty. That's always a toll free number here. Eight eight eight nine two nine ten thirty. Okay. Johnny. So before the break, we talked a little bit about the article that have been in the New York Times on in mid December. And it was based on a sixty minutes article where they're saying regarding how screen times affect our young minds. The jury is still out and I read a couple of paragraphs it helps us to appreciate that. They're doing some vague research with what they understand may be vague information or input to begin with. But I'm sure you have more thoughts about that. Well, you know from a psychological standpoint. And if you talk to any psychologists or pediatricians or there's lots of different ways of of measuring impact, you know. So from young children developing where now seeing studies you don't have to take a snapshot of their brain. We're seeing kids that are involved with screen time. More are not developing the verbal skills that they did. And they're not hitting those certain marks by meeting certain verbal skills. So we're really having to reevaluate what what are the ages. I mean what's going on here? Now. Sauce skills, you know, being able to interact being able to literally look into another person's face. So the social emotional impact that this is having just because time spent with your face in front of a piece of technology as opposed to your face or your interaction with another human. That's what we're starting to see is having the impact and we're going right up the line here. Now, I work with college kids every day. I mean, I go to schools and high schools and middle schools, and but the statistics now on college kids is this level of relationships. So sex believe it or not between the eighteen to twenty four year old are on a decline relationships are developing everything is sort of staying in this digit. Elise socialized realm. So things are superficial. You're kind of feeling this false sense of connectedness by being home alone. But interacting through social media. So we're not going through the process or through this period in history of digital socialization. We're changing the way that we interact and by changing the way, we interact. It is having these nuanced deficiencies in the human experience and so between building relationships building. Trust building intimacy, human development, social emotional connections being able and then don't forget the the level of trust. And the level of close relationships that you have with the people in your life. That is a direct correlation to your level of mental wellbeing. Your depression? You know, your ability to cope. So, you know, you're not, you know, we're not seeing physiological, you know, research on this. But we're feeling the impact. And they think that's what everybody is saying. We know this doesn't feel right? And so the the term that I'm starting to use more and more now is digital socialization. So we're getting away from the device or the technology itself to be able to talk about the process. This is what your behavior is doing. And this behavior is having this impact on your life. So if even if we just go beyond his heavenly days brain scans, you see so much empirical evidence in this is going off on a tangent. We can come back to a little bit later, but look at the amount of teen suicides contract. Tragic. Cyberbullying because the kids don't know how to either lay off it. Or don't understand the impact they are having. And you know, you gotta wonder after playing hundreds or thousands of hours of video games. The idea of sending a tweet to someone that's going to push them over the over the edge seems almost like make believe in some cases. I don't think they realize the impact on it. But there you've got real empirical evidence where time and time again kids have been driven to the point of no return why because of that negative socializing and the thing is the bombarded by twenty four seven. Twenty four seven and it's not it's not even just this overt cyberbullying. That's that's the blatant example. Right. That's like, that's okay. But it's sort of this. You know, the level of validation where I'm not relevant or it's it's an as self esteem. You know, everybody, we know that you're looking at your peers, and your friends, and you know, you're looking at these pictures, and you know, that their life is not like what they're portraying it to be, but we're just in our human DNA, it is in us to get our cues from other humans. That's how we become a person. And so it's just as chipping away at the self esteem, just gone. I don't look like that. I don't feel like that. The other thing is over sexualization of young teen, girls and Instagram. You know, there's you have eighteen year olds that are going on my God. I'm really concerned about my fourteen year old cousin, you know. That they're. The need for the attention is shifting the behavior to that. I will get the attention that I need because I need to be relevant. I need to be seen. I need to be her. And so, you know, which is pictures, which we had it's really sad. And as we've talked about before that's that's a conversation for another day, which is one of the many reasons why I think that the the Kardashian clan in general is just a paragon of evil, but that's another conversation. I love to get. That's the that's the start of all of this. They have set the standard that everyone is following an and I think the the the damage that they've had irreparable as long as they can put money in the Bank. Let's go to the phone lines. Again, if you wanna be part of the conversation. Always welcome to your six one seven two five four ten thirty six one seven two four ten thirty or eight eight eight nine two nine ten thirty. That's a toll free number eight eight eight nine two nine ten thirty. Amanda inland. Amanda, how are you tonight? Okay. Thank you. Danker your guest. I give her my respect for raising these important, social and emotional issues, and the implications that this digital technology is having on our culture, but especially our young people. And I think experience is that we are really in the middle of a title change for the human race with the addition of so much technology and the reliance apartment, and you both very eloquently talked to the addiction issues, and how you know, where where we're now making up to so that we can relax, and I know there's a psychologist on the north shore who is created an app to help people with anxiety, and that may be very very valuable for for folks. But by the same token being exposed to all of the microwave radiation that's produced by. The phone itself by the wifi by the cell towers is also affecting our physio elegy, increasing our anxiety levels. And so on the the the emotional impact of the technology is absolutely huge. And I wanna thank you for raising that side of it because that's really really important that the bigger issue, would you would you all talked about by raising this thing that we're not talking to each other. We're not having conversations with one another anymore where typing to one another or we're talking to the phone it types. And then send it off. You know, we we've lost, you know, like hugging somebody or you know, heaven forbid. Afraid of. And it's something that I think is been raised. We send we send a hugging emoji. Instead, amanda. Exactly. But the fact the fact that this next generation is been trained and intriguing with this type of socialization. It's in the reliant upon the technology. We're really coming upon this trans humanism wage. And so I wanna thank you for trying to serve humanity as as I've known it because the change is happening happening rather rapidly as your no, yeah. And that's the trick. Here. Amanda is has mentioned many times. It's not a matter of demonizing, the technology, it accomplishes a lot of good things. But it's it's a matter of keeping the technology in check in its place. So we don't lose our humanity. I always laugh there's an Jerry Seinfeld line where he says tweeting is is the web's way of saying I was going to call you. But didn't think you were that important. It almost becomes that. In in. You've said something that I talked about with Jani before how many times have walked into a small restaurant. And it's hysterical to me is just hysterical. And how can the kids not reflect this? When you see the parents doing this? I've walked into small restaurants in literally everyone in the restaurant. Literally, everyone the restaurant is looking at the screen. There's not a single person not looking at their phone. Walk into some of these restaurants. And and there's the danger, and it's just a part again as I is Joanie is so nicely. Verbalizing? I say it takes a while for the culture and the sociology to catch up with the technology. But in the meantime, man, this collateral damage. Yeah. It's socially the collateral damage. One thing John mentioned, I think energy say that there wasn't a physiological evidence to support the dangers of visiting. But there is an eye courage. You to look at the work of Deborah Davis. For example. That there wasn't. I just said in that article they were just sandwich out of the brain by Victoria, dumpy. I mean, there are so many people that are literally tracking the physiological impact. And then the other thing that you mentioned a really good point that you made me think of Amanda is the blue light. Also, I mean, we're narrow we have legislation that is just passing because you can't make you can't. I mean, the retinas are literally being damaged, and we do have some legislation that is passing through the school systems now on limiting screen time throughout the day. So we're making a little waves, you know, in their wherever we can Amanda hit the I hate to do this. I gotta take a break in a very very shortly. Because I'm I'm even I am overdo it, but. You you've made some good points in a and I appreciate the call and keep listening and call again. Thanks so much and everybody look into the wifi issue as well. Oh, yes. Thank you. We'll we make sure we touch on that before we go six one seven two five four ten thirty is the number six one seven two five four ten thirty or eight eight eight nine two nine ten thirty Johnny. You've got people talk, and we have the the phone lines cranked. We just had a call open up only because I let a man to go. We'll take a quick break. And then we'll be back to the conversation and your phone calls here at WBZ..

Amanda New York Times Johnny Jerry Seinfeld depression Bank Victoria Kardashian anxiety Jani Joanie Deborah Davis John twenty four year eighteen year fourteen year sixty minutes
"deborah davis" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"deborah davis" Discussed on The Big Picture

"I kinda think also that that just changes the way that people will vote a little it's how so well, maybe not the way that people will vote, but the outcomes I think it's more likely that lady Gaga Wednesdays than the Oscar because I mean, obviously, she's not up with she's not up against a Coleman. But then once it's. Glenn Close vehicle men and Gaga in the mix. I think you're splitting votes bit more. I don't know. It's probably the most is one of the most interesting races. We'll talk more about in the future. I think it's got to. I think they wanna have Gaga acceptance moment onstage, especially if she's not singing during this this will show. So we will say Gaga, let's go to best actor in a motion picture drama. He nominees are Bradley Cooper stars born Willem Dafoe at eternity gate if you seen that movie. It's also my less, okay. New adding watched it sense it feeling Lucas hedges boy erased Rami Malik bohemian rhapsody and John David Washington for black klansman. So I picked her on me Malik said I. I don't think the Romney Molly has any chance to win the Oscar. But maybe I'm wrong about that. This is very fascinating to me because this naturally should be a place to reward Bradley Cooper for all the fine work. He does in and four stars born, but the bohemian rhapsody trained trucks on and it's very flashy Queen, Freddie, mercury's in international figure Rami Malik is an international figure, and I it just seems seems weirdly obvious. I agree with you. I also picked him. I think some of it is this is the only place that he will be rewarded. I I don't think it went an Oscar. Maybe I'm wrong. I could that change though, could could that change if vice isn't as big a thing as we expect. If Cooper gets best director or best picture, do they decide to give it to Rome is possible. Because it is you know, it is very similar classical transformation. And he's he's good in it. You know, you can't say he's not good. Good. I think he's fine. I think it's a I I mean, it's a lot which is obviously the point. Yeah. That's your channeling Alanis. But there there's something about the physical transformation that is a bit over the top. And. You know, I have a really hard time with these impersonation roles in in general because it just crosses over to SNL. So quickly for me. It's very they're even moments of Amy Adams's performance where she's just doing Kate McKinnon as Lynch Cheney, and it's very funny, and the fact that atom McCabe wrote indirectly that movie means that, you know, you're the film is already telling that lie, but in ABC's not shouldn't be going for that. All now like Myers is in that movie. There's a kind of jokey quality to that movie at times that's kind of one of its flaws. Yeah. I I hear what you're saying. I think people honestly, very popular and people respond to that kind of thing. Sure. I just kind of think that in terms of actor in acting. I I'm always like, I don't know whether this is acting impersonation. So I personally think there's a case to be made that it's not as good as say Bradley Cooper, which is an actual transformation. And then you're like, holy crap. That's Bradley Cooper. That is not what I think of to be Bradley Cooper. And she kind of created that character. From a lot of different living. Crap. There's Eddie Vedder. The composite should have. But anyway to Oscar point this to me seems like a Golden Globes wanting to have some fun liking this actor knowing it's not gonna happen anywhere else. This this is where I'm like the weirdness and the capriciousness of the Golden Globes voting body is going to be on display. And I think that the academy will vote differently. Maybe I'm wrong. No. I think we agree shall we do best screenplay. Yeah. Can interesting category. Yes. So unlike the Oscars, which is normally split into two different screenplay categories one for adapted and one four original this is just five smash together. Here are the five Afonso for Roma. Deborah Davis and Tony McNamara for the favorite. I don't know very much about them..

Bradley Cooper Gaga Oscars Rami Malik Eddie Vedder Golden Globes Coleman Willem Dafoe Alanis John David Washington SNL Oscar mercury Tony McNamara Myers Lucas Deborah Davis director Romney
"deborah davis" Discussed on Hysteria

Hysteria

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"deborah davis" Discussed on Hysteria

"And the women are the ones that are getting shit done. So it's like, it's a really it's an interesting movie. I can't say that I loved it. I think you should everybody should see it. I can't say that you will love seeing it. But like, you will think about it for really long time after you saw it and you'll be glad that it existed. You said you left the theatre angry, I left it angry because I don't I don't I'll tell you offline. It's not like that. But much of a spoiler. But I'll tell you I- he the same director did the lobster. I hate it the lobster like, hey. But people love I truly hated it. But there were aspects of that. I was like I love this. It just there were parts of it that we're like chew harsh the things that I loved where the the performances I loved the way that the themes were explored in this kind of way that felt novel. I love the way that the movie looked and I loved the writing, but I felt some sometime parts of it felt like indulgently directed. I will I will say I can I use that to. Dovetail into to one of my two. I'll have what she's had absolutely of the year. The first one is a shadow to all women for whom it takes ten years or more to break into your industry. I think we've seen a lot of that lately. I hate to my own horn. But I will be sending January shooting an indie film that I'm starring in. Which is the first time that I have booked a lead role in a feature film in my life. And I've been Los Angeles for ten years, and I say that because I hesitated even talking about it because it's like, you know, Costa talk about supposed to whatever, but the deals closed now. And it's happening. I'm very excited about it. And it took me a second to realize like I've really been working towards for a very long time. And to listening to sorry about Deborah Davis. Having worked on this screenplay for twenty years as well. As like, we we are very quick to knowledge specially in politics last year. Like, you mentioned Meghan all these women who are like breaking through. And like, oh my God. It's the first time running and look at the success in it's amazing. But there's a lot of women who've been struggling for a long time and who've seen a lot of failure and not even failure necessarily, but just things taking time in. In any industry. It takes time. And we often hear about and focus on stories of women who have a kind of mediate success, and I would like to give shout out in twenty nineteen to the women who are still working diligently in having broken through yet. It takes it takes them goddamn time. Sometimes, and that's that's beautiful. That's all that's I think more common than it is as he somebody breaking through in very quick. And just because you're first hearing about somebody doesn't mean this. They just started working on it. I think that's important thing to remember. If you're saying that struggling to break into something competitive, you might think that oh, you know, I'm just hearing about this person's breaking in this person. You don't know how long and how hard they worked most of them probably work just as hard as you just as long as you the ones that didn't work as hard or as long as you. Got lucky? Yes. Yes. A combination of hard work and luck. And just just remind yourself that people were card, and I also want to do quick shout out to women in the gaming, the feel of gaming and video games and gaming communities. Because I think we don't often acknowledge the fact that that's a really difficult industry to be a not just like in terms of the creators and developers. But also those who game like women who spent a lotta time playing video games. I think that's awesome. I think it's really cool. I think we're all headed towards a world where VR, and gaming is kind of more of our culture, and it can be really difficult for women to continue being in that field despite the kind of rhetoric that.

director Deborah Davis Los Angeles Meghan Costa ten years twenty years
"deborah davis" Discussed on Hysteria

Hysteria

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"deborah davis" Discussed on Hysteria

"So here's mine. I recently saw the favorite which is an artsy fartsy like Oscar bait movie with Emma stone and Rachel Weiss in it. And it is a great sorry. It's not just a soon. Rachel weiss. Also, Livia Coleman, isn't and she's fantastic. And it was co written. The script was written by woman. I'm Deborah Davis. Who wrote the script twenty years ago? So here's my take on the favorite. I saw it earlier this week, and when I Rainer theater theater. Okay. Went and saw a theater because I was like this is a movie about like female on relationships into our. And it also looks really beautiful, and I will say that it is worth seeing at the for like a lot of awards season movies are just sort of like I could've just like watch us on my couch. This is like CNN theater because the set is like opulent and the. Costuming is incredible before are great, and the acting is so good that you almost like wanna see their faces. Enormous because can you like everything they're doing fit to? Thank you. Yes. So definitely SUNA theater. I will say this my critique of it was that it was it felt too long for me. And the at the end I felt very claustrophobic and angry. But after I left the theater, I saw it with with Josh. And we were talking about it. And I realized that like the whole night for like hours, we were talking about this movie like that sort of movie, and I keep thinking about it. Now, I have like a movie hangover from it. It's an incredible film that involves like kind of women jockeying for power using their sexuality. But not in a way that is in any way for the male gaze and watching female sexuality interplay with itself with with other women and not have it be something that that's like. Oh, yeah. Men did this for for men is really really incredible. So passes the Bechtel test it one hundred percent, okay, choices. Character is. She's a force. She's amazing, Emma. Stone is always great alluvia. Coleman is funny. Like, the character doesn't have funny lines. But she deliver. She's just funny like this kind of hapless Queen Anne who doesn't quite not. He's doing the thing that I find really inspiring about it is that the co writer of the screenplay the screenplay is also really clever, and brilliant. There's like some incredible some of the best pussy jokes ever in my. They're very Larry the lead on that. They're very low key like there's one scene where they're talking about healing the queen's wound that is like this is a bus so funny, but Davis is a co writer she I wrote the script twenty years ago and has been working for twenty years to get the shit made. And it finally got made looks great. And she has some of the best actresses in the world involved. And it also is about sort of like the ridiculous of men. What's Jennifer Lawrence is X? I love it. That's how I know. His name off ski, no Nicklaus. Hold nicholas. Hold isn't it and he's fantastic. But he's. Dicusss? He is a ridiculous, man. The men are costumed really they're all very silly..

SUNA theater Emma stone Deborah Davis Rainer theater theater Livia Coleman Rachel Weiss Nicklaus Queen Anne CNN writer Oscar Jennifer Lawrence Bechtel nicholas Josh Larry twenty years one hundred percent
"deborah davis" Discussed on The Filmcast

The Filmcast

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"deborah davis" Discussed on The Filmcast

"You have come close to Abigail. She is. The way I did. Shoot something. That was from the trailer for the favorite the new news film by director at your goes Latham ass-, this is I think your first movie that he didn't write it was written by Deborah Davis and Tony McNamara. The plots from IMDB in early eighteenth century England, a frail Queen end occupies the throne and her close friend Lady Sarah governs, the country in her stead. When a new servant Abigail arrives her charm in deals, her her charm in her to Sarah, so Brit. You actually wrote a piece for slash film dot com about the favorite it was entitled exploring the strange and absurd true history of the favorite will get to kind of the true and false aspects of the story later on. But overall I wanted to hear like, what did you think of this movie? I loved that. I loved it so much that so me and Lindsey romaine. My roommate we we had tickets to go see an early screening here in Austin. And but I got the screener like on a Saturday morning. And I was like I think we have to watch this right now. So we watched it Saturday night that Saturday, and I and then we loved it so much that we went to go see it again Monday in the theater. Which I like I rarely ever see something twice that quickly. And I loved it so much that made me wonder if the spirit early as my favorite movie. This is it's just it's so darkly comedic. And I mean, it is your go slant. Most I think accessible work too. Yeah. Yeah. And I think a lot of that is to like the screenplay which she did not, right. But but he's still there like you still feel him especially in the final scene, which we can talk about later. I really want to. It's just above and beyond being really darkly funny. It's just really interesting story about loneliness and female, friendships and the sort of like performance of nature of. You know, of what friendship is even removed from the court, citing I think that you can sort of relate to, you know, are these people my friends because I have something to offer them. Or are they my friends because they really love me. And I think that there's real love between all of these women in some way. But just by virtue of the setting and the time, I think that there is a lot of artifice, unfortunately to it. And I think alleviate Coleman is extrordinary. And I hope she wins every award if viola Davis doesn't and if lady Gaga beats both of them, I will burn everything down. I just I think it's just so great. It's so fun and weirdly moving and has bunny rabbits, Olivia Colman shoving cake in her face. And I'm probably haven't mentioned this on here before if I have I'm sorry. But there are a few things I enjoy more in film and television than watching women eat. Because it's just it's like. Fuel real. There's a lot of twitch streams you could get into. I could probably host one. I. Yeah. I just I love that. And so watching her courtroom itself. I don't know. And I know that people might not find her particularly relatable because they find the character heightened or you know, lame or doffed in a way. But I think she's just so complex in wonderful. And I found her perhaps the most relatable character for me of any movie. I saw this year like I just really got her loneliness and her sadness and. Percents of humor, which is just wicked. And I don't know. I mean, there's just she just feels like this like. This is in a way, she's just all like want a need, and she's so plain about she. So childish at times that I think it's like, she's this urge that everyone has like this, insecurity that we don't voice the way that it really feels inside. And I just I love it and the more I'm talking about in other wearing like, maybe this really isn't. I mean, this is in my top three of the year at least. I really really enjoy this movie. But just kind of curious what you thought this movie. Would you think of a favorite? Well, Dave, I guess you could say my thoughts are best summed up. Oh my God. In the form of a Limerick. The first one was good this pretty good..

Lady Sarah Olivia Colman Abigail Lindsey romaine viola Davis lady Gaga Tony McNamara director IMDB Deborah Davis Latham England Austin Limerick Coleman Dave
"deborah davis" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

At The Movies with Arch and Ann

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"deborah davis" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

"Directed by your goes, lengthy MOS. Did I get it? Yes. I don't believe. I don't speak Greek. But I think that's right. It's all right to me. He is the man who brought you the lobster and the killing of a sacred deer. And and people are comparing it to all About Eve. Oh, interesting. Yeah. Sure. Andrzej new so true Lopa, alienated affections? Yeah. Power hungry. Fashion as days buckle up. It's going to be a bumpy ride. The minks. Who wants to weigh in on the favorite? It was delicious. I actually saw this one as a double header with bohemian rhapsody. Ooh. And that was a fun day for me because it was both of them were kind of delicious, you know, in their own ways, very different movies. Of course. But I thought it was it's be useful to look at. It's absolutely ravishing. You know, it's all takes place at Kensington Palace is the eighteenth century. So there's tapestries and rabbits. And men and makeup and rate gowns, and all of that flouncy frippery is there and fun to look at three absolutely stellar performances from these women, I mean, it's very much on. But with three of them for typically, a nice thing for Emma stone. I. Released to she's the only one who's not British or self and is and has to do the accent. And I thought she did a good job as you pull it off. I thought she did this is not a Kevin Costner situation. No, Oh, I I don't don't think. think. So I mean. I will. I will defer to my friends across the pond. But you know, I thought it was a very respectable turn. It's there's nothing was this accents. I hate it. I just Libya Coleman, you know, with that off with their head to. She is really. And I honestly Rachel vise. And it's funny because Rachel is has been in all of land, Moses, movies and. She's a fat the characters fascinating character. And she gives her all sorts of interesting shadings. It's a cynical movie about power and manipulation. It has present day echoes with phony patriotism and a ruler who is prone to flattery and peaks fits fits peak. And so there's lots of interesting kind of allegorical echoes there that I think are worth worth delegating. I'm not I thought it was fun. I mean, it's not. You know, it's it's it's not great. Great great. But I thought it it's a very smart with Lanta, Moses other movies. I felt that he got too weird for his own good. It was on. And this is more controlled in lobster and at particularly killing here left. You thinking? Yeah. They put me off. They really needed me. But this he's working with a script by somebody else's Deborah Davis and Tony McNamara. And I think that's to his benefit. Because now his vision is being sort of tamed short by those parameters. And I think that's great. I think that works. Well, and it's interesting because I did a little reading on Queen Anne about you know, obviously, it's going to send you to compete in. And honestly, even as it's it's a crazy movie. But a lot of this stuff is grounded in fact about these relationship Sarah Churchill Abigail hill, really did supplant Sarah Churchill in the affections of the Queen. They really were cousins. Yeah. And they did and there were letters. I mean, a lot of the details in the movie were true. I do they do speculate. A lot about the depth and passion of the relationships, but the finish interesting. Yeah. That's the fun through those those moments in history. You know, thought it was a lot of fun. I liked the first two-thirds of especially. It has these backbiting contemporary touches, especially there's a dancing court where the men are all freaked up in the ladies are dancing, and they do this contemporary kind of what to see which is just out of no. It's great a great fun. Even some bits of dialogue to do that. Yeah. Very vulgar just want. Everybody to know. It is a nasty vulgar ri-, bald revolved body naughty movie. But it has a lot of fun in kind of done in a bitingly playful time how after two thirds of that. I got tired did. Yeah. And the ending left a lot of people that I watched with at middle say what the hell was that?.

Rachel vise Moses Kensington Palace Kevin Costner Emma stone Sarah Churchill Abigail hill Queen Anne Sarah Churchill Andrzej Libya Coleman Tony McNamara Deborah Davis Rachel
"deborah davis" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"deborah davis" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Was struck by a car and killed in Gaithersburg this morning. This happened right by the train station at east diamond, nab anew. And south summit street. There were early reports the driver took off but later returned to the scene. Detectives are working to ascertain all the facts and circumstances surrounding but that aspect is currently undetermined and being investigated. Captain, Tom Jordan with Montgomery County. Police says no trains were involved. But the crash was so close to the tracks. They had to block rail service while they cleared the scene. Maryland commuter trains were delayed for more than an hour. But they are now moving once again, it's another terrible traffic Tuesday, the trips out of town for thanksgiving peak today, it's expected to be a record year for thanksgiving travel, which means a lot of people will be going nowhere fast today. The good news is construction being halted for holiday. Charlie Gessler is a Maryland state highways. So what we do is. We suspend any non emergency road construction. Meaning going beyond something happening on the road that requires us to be there, we can still work behind barrier wall. But we just don't work close any lane as we approach that time of the busy thanksgiving travel. Prime travel. Time is expected to be this afternoon relief on wwl and wwl dot com. Fairfax county your tax dollars are paying for a pension program that allows county workers to retire as young as fifty five and to collect extra supplement pay until those employees are old enough to collect social security. Lawmakers are considering a plan to cut back those perks, but they want to hear from you. I think a majority of this package will be adopted by the board a lot of it depends on the turnout. We have at the public hearing today. Republicans supervisor Pat Herod he says current employees would not face the cuts, but he expects them to be out protesting. Anyway, the hearing starts at four thirty this afternoon. Dc ended up pledging to a billion dollars in tax incentives to bring Amazon second headquarters here the largest package ever put together by the city for a single employer. But. That pales to the eight point five billion pledged in Maryland's losing bid. It's clear Amazon had its head. It's I on crystal city Virginia's bid for a half size H Q two came in at around eight hundred million in tax and transportation perks, plus a billion dollar Virginia Tech campus within walking distance of Amazon. DC lawmakers are trying get tiptoe through the political implications of placing small residential cell towers needed for five G cell service. The FCC currently prohibits blocking cell towers due to health concerns. CC's ruling gives the federal government the power in effect to decide how these local issues will play out and the district is hemmed in considerably councilmember. Mary Kay during a public hearing on the residential cell towers, Dr Deborah Davis cited a study that exposed animals to cell phone radiation. They found that those animals developed a significant malignant cancers Montgomery County, which faces similar issues is suing the FCC to reexamine the health effects of five G window. AL dot com. Virginia wants to impose a sales tax on everything you buy online. But the state now says it will not be as lucrative as originally thought. Tax officials now say those levees would bring in one hundred sixty five million dollars a year down from an earlier estimate of two hundred fifty million one reason for the drop some retailers have already started collecting those taxes voluntarily after the supreme court cleared the way for the tax collection last summer checking your money. The Dow opens today at twenty five thousand seventeen the NASDAQ at seventy Twenty-eight up next, traffic and weather on one five point nine FM and AM six thirty WMA L. Let's be.

Amazon Maryland Dc Pat Herod FCC Virginia Gaithersburg thanksgiving peak Charlie Gessler Montgomery County Fairfax county Tom Jordan Virginia Tech supervisor Mary Kay Dr Deborah Davis
"deborah davis" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"deborah davis" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"And then paralyze a friend who just happened to be in the car with him at the time a lot of reckless killings in which innocent people got killed. And then the two women that he killed. He killed an ex girlfriend. Steve Fleming his partners. And he killed a niece of Steve Fleming's. These were young women who were not threat to him. What was his motive? Why why did he do this? He and Fleming kinda constructed a reason I think Deborah Davis was one of the girl's name, and she had left Steve Fleming. And I think it was just Steve Fleming. Anger combination of anger, and then there fear that if once he got outside their orbit, she was beginning to talk, but she didn't really know anything anyway. So that was kind of bogus. And then the niece there really was no reason at all other than they believe she was a drug. Addict and had a drinking problem and that she was mouthing off around the neighborhood and had become an embarrassment to them. But these are pretty flimsy reasons for killing these women, particularly in the really horrifically brutal way if they killed these women's strangling them, and then pulling their teeth out thinking that would benefit the bodies wouldn't be identified, and then bearing the bodies in shallow graves, not exactly acts of courageous men not acts of of of criminal up gangsters, even you know, the killing of women innocent people, and then being informants and being rats all of that is sort of very much against the the mobsters code and believe it or not mobsters do have code that they operate by. And not being around is definitely one of those coach where would TJ English is website is linked up at coast to coast AM. Dot com. Couple of his books Patty wacked in where the bodies were buried do. You think that Whitey saw the Johnny Depp movie black mass about him. No by then he was locked up in prison, and he wouldn't have had an opportunity to see that. But I know that he did see another movie the departed the one with Jack Nicholson in ten that was supposedly loosely based on the Bolger story was fictionalized. And apparently that he saw and he was still living in Santa Monica on the right at that time, supposedly one of the tips that the FBI got Bolger was on the run from a man living in San Diego said that he'd gone to CNN matinee of the departed, and he's four Whitey Bolger was in the theater to view that movie when he was there, and this guy called up the FBI and tipped him off about that. And they apparently paid no no particular mind, they never follow up on that stuff through the no they didn't follow up on a lot of tips. They were getting about about Whitey Bolger over the years. You know, the the belief amongst a lot of people was the FBI didn't really wanna find him because of what he knew and who he might name in the in the in the Justice system in the FBI and the department of Justice who had a naval him and protected him. All those years when he was when he was a criminal was he in a secret witness type program or he was just Whitey doing his thing. Why are you doing his thing? In fact, he was out on the street. Nobody knew he was an informant totally unknown to anybody in the criminal underworld outside of the FBI agent. Why did he become an informant TJ? Did they threaten him or something? Yeah. That's a that's a really interesting one. We coming up on a break. 'cause we've. Yeah. We are we are. So what are you talk about? There's a long explanation to that that's incredibly fascinating. But not many people know about in relation to the white story. So I do want to explain it. But I'll give you the short answer. Which is he was approached by John Connolly who was a fellow Irish Catholic from south Boston. This was in the early seventies. Connolly was a young agent trying to make his way up in in the bureau, and the idea of getting Whitey Bolger who at that point wasn't you know, the Whitey Bolger. I'll let you yet Whitey Bolger was was still a thug. He was a up and coming gangster. A member of a gang called the winter hill mob was making some moves in Boston and John Conley approached him and said this would be a good arrangement for us. You know, I'll take care of you. You take care of me we enhance each other's careers. All right. Let's talk more about that TJ when we come back next hour. We'll open up. Up the phone lines. But more to talk about with TJ English as we talk about the life of Whitey Bulger..

Whitey Bolger Steve Fleming Whitey Bulger TJ English FBI Boston Jack Nicholson John Connolly Patty CNN Santa Monica Deborah Davis Johnny Depp department of Justice San Diego John Conley
"deborah davis" Discussed on World News Tonight with David Muir

World News Tonight with David Muir

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"deborah davis" Discussed on World News Tonight with David Muir

"A two thousand eighteen national survey of school bus drivers found that on a single day nearly eighty four thousand vehicles past or. Buses illegally. Just today in Liikanen Mississippi another child struck and injured while getting on the bus David school officials announced they will be moving that bus stop instead of stopping on this busy road. It will now wind its way through the side streets of this neighborhood. David Alex Perez with us again tonight. Alex, thank you. And we're learning more about who. Thorns believe killed notorious crime boss Whitey Bulger behind bars, and how it was done. He was serving life in prison after sixteen years on the run and had just been transferred to new prison tonight. The fellow inmate who allegedly used a padlock inside a sauk ABC's GIO Benitez from Boston. Now tonight that key question did notorious Boston mobster Whitey Bolger get wacked behind bars just twenty four hours after being transferred to a new prison in West Virginia. He was found severely beaten. According to the New York Times officials telling the times he was attacked with a padlock stuffed inside a sock on responding to the maximum security. They advised CPR in progress. One of the key suspects in the killing mob. Hitman, Freddie, Jesus who is serving a life sentence at that West Virginia prison for the murder of another member of a crime family, a former prosecutor telling the Boston Globe. Freddie hated rats. Bolger was known as a so called snitch believed to have been an FBI informant who provided information about his rivals. He was also responsible for at least eleven murders. Spending sixteen years on the run with his girlfriend until their capture and twenty eleven in Santa Monica Bolger's attorney now pointing the finger at the Federal Bureau of prisons saying they turned a life sentence into a death sentence one of the victims of Bulger's gang. Deborah Davis killed when she was just twenty six her brother Stevens speaking with us tonight. Do you feel at peace now with his death very much? So he's blind in the Derg where we put a lot of people. Aren't you need is with us live tonight from Boston GIO as reported there? He was transferred to that new prison less than twenty four hours before the murder doing. No, why was transferred?.

Whitey Bolger Whitey Bulger Boston David Alex Perez West Virginia Freddie murder Santa Monica Bolger GIO Benitez New York Times David Liikanen Mississippi Deborah Davis Boston Globe Federal Bureau of prisons Thorns ABC FBI prosecutor Jesus
"deborah davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"deborah davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Crime boss James Whitey Bolger is dead one day after being transferred to a federal prison in West Virginia. His death is being investigated as a homicide several news organizations, including the Boston Globe reported. He was murdered in prison today by inmates associated with the mob. Bolger who for years was one of America's most wanted criminals ran gambling and drug rackets across Boston for decades. He was an FBI informant as well Bolger was on the run for sixteen years before he was eventually caught and convicted in two thousand thirteen of participating in eleven murders in the nineteen seventies and eighties, Emily, Rooney of public station. W GBH in Boston as long cover Bolger and his crimes and she joins me now, Emily Rooney. Thank you for talking with us. What is known about how he died while he was only in the new prison. It'd come up from Florida to West Virginia less. Than twenty four hours. He was still in his wheelchair. I have heard some reports that he was surrounded by a mob of gang of people who viciously beat him. I can't corroborate that. But that's what I've heard which says something about the that federal prison. He had more than that. So they say that they transferred him there for a different reason. And there was somebody there waiting for him. We we really don't know a lot of a lot of questions. He started on this criminal path from a very early age. Tell us about his career he was a criminal at age thirteen. And now he was robbing convenience stores. He dropped out of school at the age of fourteen. He ran a criminal enterprise for decades and decades, he had this charm in this sort of appeal that he he he lured people into his his his net, including women he often had two or three women going at a time. It took that one on the road with Anthony tried to take. The other one with him I and she gave up and came home. And then he took Catherine Greg on the road for them. He was he was an FBI informant over what period of his life and how did that develop well in nineteen seventy five became an informant. What had happened was the the DA the Federal Bureau investigations wanted to bring down like CASA Nostra the Italian mafia in order to do. So they enlisted the help of the winter hill gang, which was won by Whitey Bolger and all of his associates, they figured Bill tourney blind. I two rackets and numbers and some of that, you know, busting machines and that kind of stuff, but they also turned a blind eye to nineteen murders. And then in one thousand nine hundred five FBI agent. John Conway who grew up in the same housing project is Whitey Bolger. And was in the FBI tipped him off that he was about to be indicted. But you know, John Conley has always contended to this day. Hey, he was one of the guys he was part of the team. And he feels like he took the fall for something that happened at a much. Much higher level at the FBI you mentioned murders. I mean, he killed people with his own hands. Oh, yes. And then you took naps afterwards killed at least two women, Deborah hussy and Deborah Davis. He was only convicted of one of those murders. But then he would pull their teeth out and bury the remains. So that they couldn't be as easily identified. We didn't have DNA testing back then but the story of his life. I mean, it's been made into movies documentaries about him. He he'll be remembered for all of this. And the woman who was with him at the end, she still serving time, Catherine. Greg is still serving time. She was sentenced to a fairly minimum number of years like seven or eight, but she refused to cooperate with some detail about I don't know other informants or where money was hidden something like that. I can't remember the details of that. And she accepted more time in prison as a result. So she's still I believe she's in a federal prison somewhere locally, I believe. But but what a legacy he has. Can you imagine the Andy I should say, by the way? None of the victims in the greater Boston area. Or lamenting this at all they're cheering. They're popping champagne tonight. But this is not the way his life should have ended. And the federal government is got some explaining to do Emily Rooney with WG be h we thank you. Now should colleges be accountable for the graduation rates of their students. Hari Sreenivasan reports from Florida for the conclusion of our special series on rethinking college, which is part of our weekly focus on education making the grade..

James Whitey Bolger Emily Rooney FBI Catherine Greg John Conley Boston Boston Globe West Virginia federal government Anthony Hari Sreenivasan Deborah Davis Florida Federal Bureau America CASA Nostra John Conway Deborah hussy Bill twenty four hours
"deborah davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"deborah davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Brought to you at six by the New England Honda dealers returning now to our top story, it appears that notorious mob boss Whitey Bolger died, a violent death behind bars. WBZ's Kim Tunnicliffe reports Bolger had just been transferred to a West Virginia facility yesterday. CBS news reports one or more of Whitey Bulger's fellow inmates severely beat the eighty nine year old's not long after he arrived at the Hazelton prison. He was found unresponsive by staff. Life's. Saving measures were initiated, but Bolger was pronounced dead or short time later Suffolk law. Professor rosanna. Cavallero says there have been calls for investigations about. How prisoners are held at Hazelton after two murders there in the last year, we have to be able to guarantee people's physical safety, even when they're serving a sentence, and that's just unacceptable. We have people in conditions where they are accessible to the brutal deadly violent act of other prisoners. We've got to fix that. That's like a third world prison that shouldn't happen. Kim Tunnicliffe WBZ News Radio ten thirty Kim. The brother of one of Bulger's alleged victims is quite happy with the news of his death. WBZ TV's Bill shields with more on that. Is it a trick or a treat? I wanna know which one it is Steve Davis was downright giddy. Today. The man who allegedly killed his sister was dead. The final chapter two. The victims. He hurt victims families. This is Deborah Davis in nineteen Eighty-one. She was Steve lemme girlfriend and Fleming was partners in crime with Whitey Bulger. But when Davis learn too much about their business, it is widely thought that Bolger strangled. Deborah Davis to death. In court here at the federal courthouse in Boston. Of course, Bolger was charged with nineteen homicides convicted of eleven Rico, murders, money laundering, and more. We also heard today from Voltaire attorney, j w Carney. He says his life sentence was changed to the death penalty because of decisions made by the Federal Bureau of prisons. We'll have more throughout the evening here on WBZ news and on Dan Rae. Nightside program. Also today a solemn visit by the president and first lady at the tree of life synagogue in Pittsburgh. They're paying respects to the eleven Jews. Slaughtered there on Saturday. CBS's David no describes the scene president. And the first.

Whitey Bolger Whitey Bulger Deborah Davis Kim Tunnicliffe WBZ Fleming Steve lem Hazelton prison CBS Hazelton Federal Bureau of prisons president West Virginia Bill shields New England Honda Cavallero Rico Professor
"deborah davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:02 min | 3 years ago

"deborah davis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The threes and other toasty day, out there but not nearly as bad as yesterday dean devore has the four day WBZ AccuWeather we're taking a break from, the extreme heat. For the next couple of days still pretty warm and humid though in, fact there's still is a heated miser area south of the city that will keep the sun the. Longest, today temperatures in the city will get up to about eighty seven or so then clouds will build a shower. Thunderstorm this afternoon popping up in a. Few places. Into the evening then cooler less humid tonight breezy down in the sixties breezy cooled tomorrow with clouds and a few sunny peaks the high seventy three a break, or two of sunshine still on the cool side on Saturday the high seventy five but it warms back Cup to end the Labor Day weekend, Sunday and Monday back in the eighties in fact almost ninety on Labor Day itself shower thunderstorm chances grow in, the afternoons each day I'm AccuWeather meteorologist dean, devore on WBZ NewsRadio ten thirty eighty five in. Boston but it, feels like, eighty nine WBZ news time ten twenty five on the ring central, Newsline here is something you should know. Exposure to toxic substances seems to be a leading cause of cancer but why do some people get it and others don't. When they're exposed to the same. Level of, toxins there's a wide range of vulnerability some people like my grandfather who lived ninety seven. Are pretty tough, cancer expert Deborah Davis author of the book the secret war on cancer could drink whisky you could chew tobacco he worked, around industrial equipment his whole life and he was. A pretty, hardy guy there, are others who are going, to be exquisitely sensitive and a very small amount of something over a long, period of time is going to increase their vulnerability and unfortunately we don't, have a way to, tell whether you're tough Like my grandfather or week. Like other, people so we all have to, do what, we can to reduce our exposure to. Toxins starting around the house and read labels and if the label has a, skull and crossbones on it or a long list of things you can't pronounce then. Find out if something safer that you can. Use for cleaning in your home baking soda works just about as, well as most cleansers vinegar and water? Clean a lot of things anywhere the home and when your food, shopping there are some foods that. You need to buy organic like berries and peaches and apples but there are. Others where, you don't need to. Do that at all onions avocado mango banana. Pineapple things with shells. And skin that you would, never eat and, generally farmers are moving toward less reliance. On toxic pesticides and that's a good thing at somethingyoushouldknow dot net I'm Mike Carruthers in that something you should know WBZ NewsRadio ten thirty I'm Pat I'm from. Harlem New, York I started smoking cigarettes when I was about seventeen Eighteen when I was in. The military defects on my daily life was smoking were slept on the. Couch for. About five six years because. Of the smell lost a few girlfriends behind it Lot of money lots of money I was trying to. Find an alternative to smoking I think one, a take magazines wrote article on it I ordered one up and that was the first time I got the. Jewel I gave it a. Chance I was sent founded a.

dean devore cancer WBZ Boston Deborah Davis Mike Carruthers Harlem Pat I York five six years four day