31 Burst results for "Debbie Elliot"

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:04 min | 10 months ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Dwayne Brown In Georgia jury selection started today in the federal hate crimes trial of three white men already convicted in the murder of ahmaud Arbery one of several killings last year that led to a public outcry for racial justice as NPR's Debbie Elliot tells us the 25 year old black man was chased down and shot to death in a residential neighborhood near Brunswick The second trial for Travis and Greg met Michael and William roddy Bryan will center on the motive for the crime Federal prosecutors are trying to prove the men targeted Arbery because he was black presenting evidence of racial animus In the first round of jury questioning the judge asked if any one had never heard about the case no one raised a hand Because of the highly publicized and racially charged nature of the case the court cast a wider net than usual sending out a thousand jury notices across 43 counties in South Georgia Its expected to take at least two weeks to seat and impartial jury of 12 plus four alternates Debbie Elliott NPR news Two major low cost airline carriers are on track to merge pending federal approval The deal is likely to get a close examination from antitrust regulators who have signaled a tougher line against big corporate mergers here's NPR's Scott horsley Discount airline frontiers says it's buying rival spirit airlines for $2.9 billion That's 6.6 billion when you count the cost of carrying on spirit's debt If approved by regulators the merger would create the nation's 5th largest airline the Biden administration has been wary of corporate consolidation but frontier and spirits say their merger would boost competition and provide cost savings for travelers In PR Scott hoarsely both low cost airlines offer a no frills travel experience that tends to result in quite a few consumer complaints Stocks finish mostly lower on Wall Street today This is NPR news From W ABE news in Atlanta I'm Emile Moffat It's 5 32 Georgia's U.S. senator Raphael Warnock is facing a.

Dwayne Brown ahmaud Arbery Debbie Elliot NPR William roddy Bryan Debbie Elliott Scott horsley Brunswick Discount airline frontiers Georgia Travis South Georgia Greg Michael Biden administration spirit airlines Scott hoarsely NPR news Emile Moffat
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

08:16 min | 10 months ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"That the federal hate crime charges move forward because there is an issue of race taking place in this country It has come front and center and needs to be discussed And so we are looking forward to the federal federal trial where the issue of motivation the issue of hate that we believe was the motivating factor behind this murder is finally addressed You've been speaking with folks in Brunswick Debbie what are you hearing about how people are feeling ahead of this second trial That it's going to be hard to rehash the tragedy but it has the potential to move the country forward Here's pastor John Perry of Mount Sinai missionary baptist church I'll be so glad when we get to the end of this How much longer Uncertain that the family feels that way I'm certain that our community feels that way And at the same time it's something that is being used to produce better Perry's part of a group of clergy who will be at the federal courthouse in support of Arbery's family That's NPR's Debbie Elliot Thanks Debbie You're welcome President Biden has promised to nominate a black woman to fill retiring justice Stephen breyer's seat on the Supreme Court That historic first has black women in the legal profession reflecting on how long it's taken to get this far NPR sandia Dirk's reports Lidos cordell knows a little something about being the first black woman on the bench I was asked pointedly when I was appointed well you know maybe you just got a point because you're black In 1982 she became the first black woman judge in Northern California And my response is I would rather be appointed because I'm black than not be appointed because I'm black Courthouse says it's taken too long for a black woman justice on the Supreme Court 233 years 115 appointed justices Only 5 women only three people of color Couldo believes deeply in the founding principles of America that were created equal the right to life liberty and the pursuit of happiness But those principles were promulgated by white property men they did not intend those principles to apply to women to apply to poor people or to apply to people of color Cordell says that's why it matters that there be a black woman justice because it moves the nation a little closer to fulfilling its promise Something she's tried to do in her own work The Doris cordell is she's the first black judge I ever met Margaret Russell says meeting cordell helped inspire her to go into law She now teaches law at Santa Clara university Russell is black and Japanese American And she says you can't underestimate the power of envisioning yourself in power When you see someone after an entire life of never seeing anyone who looks like you it transforms your idea of the possibilities of what that institution could be and of what you as a person can be Russell says she's got no illusions about the impact of a single black woman justice Biden's nominee will join a court with a conservative supermajority that seems intent on overturning major civil rights rulings In terms of actually affecting decisions in these momentous cases coming up I think it's not going to happen Tameka Brown nagin dean of the Harvard Radcliffe institute says she's hoping for the day when an appointment like this isn't considered history making If we can get to a point where it's not so significant that a black woman is appointed to some prestigious position then we will have come closer to the dream of equality that so many civil rights activists and lawyers fought for for so many years Brown nagin warns against summing up whoever is nominated by just their race and gender because it diminishes their remarkable accomplishments And because it creates this false impression that someone will rule a certain way just because they're black Black a district court judges for instance do not actually decide cases in ways that would suggest that race is a driver a motivating factor in outcomes Diversity alone will not change a system So when it comes to representation how much is enough to create meaningful change Here's law professor Margaret Russell again Ruth Peter Ginsburg answered to the question of how many women justices does she think would be the right number and enough And she said 9 And no I mean it's never enough in the sense that we're never going to really catch up and remedy centuries of racism and sexism I'm really afraid that we're going to lose ground and go backwards This appointment itself is still a giant step forward vessel says representation is hugely meaningful But it also has limits Some the jerks NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news At four 44 this is 90.1 W ABE I'm a meal Moffat But the U.S. House and Senate have passed bills that could bring millions more in funding for technical programs at Georgia colleges and universities The bills also provide billions in incentives for U.S. companies who help fill a shortage of semiconductor chips A conference committee now needs to resolve differences before the legislation hits to the desk of President Biden George U.S. senator Raphael Warnock is among those who supported the bill in the Senate We spoke late last week about what the money will mean for Georgians and companies that have set up shop here A bit proud of operations in Georgia think about the key of plan for example in West Point Georgia which produces the most popular SUV in the country That plant literally shut down on a couple of different occasions for a couple of days for want of semiconductors Microchips And there was a time when the United States of America was the leading producer of Michael chips as changed and this bill is about creating a competitive edge for the United States of America Companies who moved to George often cite the workforce here and the university training that many students receive what has to be done to make sure that these Georgia universities and institutions remain competitive We got to be thinking about the workforce of the future They're really will be no shortage of jobs We've got to make sure that our human capital is ready for the opportunity And that's why I'm glad that I've got provisions in this bill That will invest in schools all across the state of Georgia All the way from Georgia Tech to schools and the southern and other parts of the state Also our HBCUs I HPC views a historically black colleges and universities have been punching way above their weight literally for decades And you mentioned the HBCUs when you talk to the administrators and the staffs at those HBCUs what are they telling you as far as what they need What as I said HBCUs have been punching way above their weight for as long as anybody could know As long as they've been in existence And when you think about what these schools have been able to do is remarkable But in the 21st century you know you've got to have resources in order to compete When all the amazing historical black colleges and universities that we have and you think about their disproportionate contribution to black professionals it's amazing It's really unfortunate that we don't have a single R one research university among.

Margaret Russell Mount Sinai missionary baptist Arbery Debbie Elliot President Biden sandia Dirk Lidos cordell Debbie NPR Couldo Doris cordell Supreme Court John Perry Tameka Brown nagin Stephen breyer Harvard Radcliffe institute United States of America Brown nagin Russell Ruth Peter Ginsburg
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:45 min | 10 months ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's one edition from NPR news I'm Steven skip And I'm Leila faulting British prime minister Boris Johnson is still hanging on to his office though a report on Johnson's COVID lockdown parties inspired new calls for his resignation yesterday Meanwhile the British government is inserting itself squarely in the middle of Russia's potential invasion of Ukraine It is preparing legislation that targets Russian oligarchs in London And Boris Johnson is traveling to Ukraine today to meet with Ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky I asked NPR's London correspondent Frank Langford watch Johnson hopes to achieve with that visit Well I think partly first it's symbolic it's a show of support for Ukraine from a key NATO member and last night Johnson said this He said quote UK will continue to uphold Ukraine's sovereignty in the face of those who seek to destroy it He's urging Russia to step back from mass troops deployments on Ukraine's borders We've been discussing Russia says it has no plans to invade The UK government has also trained about 22,000 Ukrainian soldiers since 2015 and it says it's going to spend a 120 million to fight corruption which is huge problem in Ukraine and strengthen the rule of law there London is a haven for Russian oligarchs and Russian money How does the British government plan to apply pressure here I think what you may see that the government is talking about the possibility of travel bans and asset seizures I mean a lot of Russian oligarchs as well as other wealthy people around the world They stash their money in expensive residences here neighborhoods like belgravia Chelsea Kensington Their presence often actually sit dark and empty And it's given the British capital the nickname London grad Now Liz truss is the foreign secretary She says the new legislation will allow the government to target anybody who's providing strategic support to Putin And this is what she said yesterday in Britain's House of Commons Those in and around the Kremlin will have nowhere to hide We will make sure that those who share responsibility for the Kremlin's aggressive and destabilizing action will share in bearing a heavy cost Their assets in the UK will be frozen Wait a second We just heard parliamentarian laughing there Yeah Exactly Explain Because there's so much skepticism about it I mean Russian money has been washing around here really since the fall of Soviet Union And there are already laws on the books but enforcement Leila has been a really big problem And that's because London is so reliant on gray money It helps drive the real estate market here the high end real estate market provides a lot of works for banks in the City of London it even helps fund soccer clubs Chatham House that's the well-known London think tank here how to report out last month and the quote was at the top was little has been done in practice to prevent kleptocratic wealth and political agendas from entering Britain Now we can't talk about Johnson without talking about how just yesterday He survived another round of calls for his resignation following a report on parties his government through when events like that were banned because of COVID-19 What did the report say Well the report actually was incredibly thin on details and that's because the police are investigating 12 of these gatherings and they're saying we don't want you to prejudice our investigation which frankly doesn't make sense to many lawyers here in London Among these gatherings the prime minister attended reportedly attended three of them in the report would only say really excited what he called failures of leadership We will I think there'll be more details to come Opposition lawmakers again demanding Johnson's resignation the prime minister remained defiant yesterday refusing to step down And I think honestly having watched this very closely I think he can hang on for a time for the time being And he said yesterday the country needs to focus on the really big issues like Ukraine which is of course Leila exactly what he's doing today And Paris Frank Langford thank you Happy to do it Layla A federal judges denying a plea deal in a hate crimes case concerning the killing of ahmaud Arbery A Georgia state court previously convicted three white men of murder Two of them were ready to plead guilty to separate federal hate crime charges when a judge yesterday rejected the terms And parents Debbie Elliot is covering the story Debbie good morning Good morning Steve What unfolded in court yesterday Well Travis mcmichael entered a guilty plea his father Gregory was ready to do the same And the federal prosecutor Tara lions described what the government offered the mcmichaels in exchange for them admitting that this killing was racially motivated According to the deal the mcmichaels would have been sentenced to 30 years in federal prison to be served during the first stretch of their life sentence from the state of Georgia That is what had Arbery's family so upset and they spoke up and urged the judge to reject that Wouldn't it normally be that the family in a case like this would be consulted on the way to the plea deal You would think so and the Department of Justice says it did confer with the Arbery family and their lawyers before signing the proposed agreement A statement from assistant attorney general Kristen Clarke says DoJ entered the deal only after the victim's attorneys informed me that the family was not opposed to it But we heard a completely different take from Arbery's family members in a very emotional part of this hearing His mom Wanda Cooper Jones said no one asked for her consent She said the man got exactly what they deserved being locked away for life and state prison for hunting down her son with pickup trucks and killing him She said it's not fair to give them their preferred confinement in federal custody which the family thinks would make their punishment you know easier on them After the hearing she told WSB the deal was disrespectful About so hard to get these.

London Johnson Frank Langford Boris Johnson Leila NPR news Steven skip Russia volodymyr zelensky British government belgravia Chelsea Kensington Liz truss UK Britain NPR Arbery NATO Chatham House seizures House of Commons
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:48 min | 10 months ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Leila faulted British prime minister Boris Johnson is still hanging on to his office though a report on Johnson's COVID lockdown parties inspired new calls for his resignation yesterday Meanwhile the British government is inserting itself squarely in the middle of Russia's potential invasion of Ukraine It is prepared During legislation that targets Russian oligarchs in London And Boris Johnson is traveling to Ukraine today to meet with Ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky I asked NPR's London correspondent Frank Langford what Johnson hopes to achieve with that visit Well I think partly first it's symbolic It's a show of support for Ukraine from a key NATO member and last night Johnson said this He said quote UK will continue to uphold Ukraine's sovereignty in the face of those who seek to destroy it He's urging Russia to step back from mass troops deployments on Ukraine's borders We've been discussing Russia says it has no plans to invade The UK government has also trained about 22,000 Ukrainian soldiers since 2015 and it says it's going to spend a 120 million to fight corruption which is huge problem in Ukraine and strengthen the rule of law there London is a haven for Russian oligarchs and Russian money How does the British government plan to apply pressure here I think what you may see that the government is talking about the possibility of travel bans and asset seizures I mean a lot of Russian oligarchs as well as other wealthy people around the world they stash their money in expensive residences here neighborhoods like belgravia Chelsea Kensington The presence often actually sit dark and empty And it's given the British capital the nickname London grad Now Liz trashy is the foreign secretary She says the new legislation will allow the government to target anybody who's providing strategic support to Putin And this is what she said yesterday in Britain's House of Commons Those in and around the Kremlin will have nowhere to hide We will make sure that those who share responsibility for the Kremlin's aggressive and destabilizing action will share in bearing a heavy cost Their assets in the UK will be frozen Wait a second We just heard parliamentarian laughing there Yeah Exactly Explain Because there's so much skepticism about it I mean Russian money has been washing around here really since the fall of Soviet Union And there are already laws on the books but enforcement Leila has been a really big problem and that's because London is so reliant on gray money It helps drive the real estate market here the high end real estate market provides a lot of works for banks in the City of London It even helps fund soccer clubs Chatham House that's the well-known London think tank here how to report out last month and the quote was at the top was little has been done in practice to prevent kleptocratic wealth and political agendas from entering Britain Now we can't talk about Johnson without talking about how just yesterday He survived another round of calls for his resignation following a report on parties his government through when events like that were banned because of COVID-19 What did the reports say Well the report actually was incredibly thin on details and that's because the police are investigating 12 of these gatherings and they're saying we don't want you to prejudice our investigation which frankly doesn't make sense to many lawyers here in London Among these gatherings the prime minister attended reportedly attended three of them in the report would only say really excited what he called failures of leadership We will I think there'll be more details to come Opposition lawmakers again demanding Johnson's resignation the prime minister remained defiant yesterday refusing to step down And I think honestly having watched this very closely I think he can hang on for a time for the time being And he said yesterday the country needs to focus on the really big issues like Ukraine which is of course Leila exactly what he's doing today And Paris Frank Langford thank you Happy to do it Layla A federal judges denying a plea deal in a hate crimes case concerning the killing of ahmaud Arbery a Georgia state court previously convicted three white men of murder Two of them were ready to plead guilty to separate federal hate crime charges when a judge yesterday rejected the terms And Piero's Debbie Elliot is covering the story Debbie good morning Good morning Steve What unfolded in court yesterday Well Travis mcmichael entered a guilty plea his father Gregory was ready to do the same And the federal prosecutor terror lions described what the government offered them at Michael's in exchange for them admitting that this killing was racially motivated According to the deal the mcmichaels would have been sentenced to 30 years in federal prison to be served during the first stretch of their life sentence from the state of Georgia That is what had Arbery's family so upset and they spoke up and urged the judge to reject that Wouldn't it normally be that the family in a case like this would be consulted on the way to the plea deal You would think so and the Department of Justice says it did confer with the Arbery family and their lawyers before signing the proposed agreement A statement from assistant attorney general Kristen Clarke says DoJ entered the deal only after the victim victims attorneys informed me that the family was not opposed to it But we heard a completely different take from Arbery's family members in a very emotional part of this hearing His mom Wanda Cooper Jones said no one asked for her consent She said the man got exactly what they deserved being locked away for life and state prison for hunting down her son with pickup trucks and killing him She said it's not fair to give them their preferred confinement in federal custody which the family thinks would make their punishment you know easier on them After the hearing she told WSB the deal was disrespectful About so hard to get these.

London Johnson Frank Langford Boris Johnson Leila Russia volodymyr zelensky British government belgravia Chelsea Kensington Liz trashy UK Britain NPR Arbery NATO Chatham House House of Commons Putin ahmaud Arbery Georgia state court
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

08:23 min | 10 months ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Com And from C three AI C three AI software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable problems C three AI is enterprise AI From NPR news it's all things considered I Mary Louise Kelly and Kyiv Ukraine And I'm Tamara Keith in Washington A federal judge in Georgia is rejecting a plea agreement on hate crimes charges for the father and son already sentenced to life in prison for murdering ahmaud Arbery The 25 year old black man was killed in February of 2020 by three white men who chased him down with pickup trucks as he was jogging through their neighborhood Gregory and Travis mcmichael had agreed to plead guilty to avert a trial on federal hate crimes charges set to start next week But Arbery's family objected to the terms of the deal at a hearing in Brunswick Georgia today In PR's Debbie Elliott has been following these proceedings and joins us now Hey Debbie Hi there First what do we know about this plea deal Well we didn't even learn about it until late last night with the court filing from the Department of Justice and at the hearing today a prosecutor with the U.S. attorney's office in the southern district of Georgia laid out the provisions She said that in exchange for the mcmichael's guilty pleas and admitting that the killing was indeed racially motivated the government was offering a sentence of 30 years to be served in federal prison and that federal prison part appeared to be the sticking point U.S. district judge Lisa godby wood said she would accept the guilty pleas but not being locked into that specific sentencing term And Arbery's family also got an opportunity to speak at the hearing what do they say Well you could tell they really were angry and felt betrayed by the proposed deal Arbery's mother Wanda Cooper Jones told the judge that allowing her son's killers their preferred form of confinement was a spit in her face She said ahmaud did not get the option of a plea Ahmaud was hunted and killed hunted down and killed The family considers the deal an attempt for the mcmichaels to choose better conditions in a federal lockup than they would get if they were serving out their life term the whole time in a Georgia state prison ahmaud's father Marcus Arbery also spoke along with two aunts who were very emotional They were pleading with the judge not to accept the deal And I should say that their comments came after they had to once again You know they did this through the state trial last year they had to sit through the graphic and chilling video of the killing It shows two pickups chasing Arbery he tries to run away for 5 minutes before he's cornered and Travis mcmichael shoots him with a shotgun and a struggle The family's attorney Lee Merritt went on Twitter today talking about how devastating this was And that this was an example of the Justice Department quote snatching defeat from the jaws of victory Here's what he said about his client Ahmad Arbery's mother Juan de Cooper Jones is vacillating between upset betrayed billions of grieving to fillings of anger So what is next now as the judge has rejected that agreement what comes next Judge wood said she's giving them Michaels until Friday to decide whether to proceed to trial which is beginning Monday or stick with their guilty pleas subject to her sentencing judgment And did you learn anything from today's hearing about what kind of evidence could be presented if the hate crimes trial moves ahead Yes definite evidence of racial animus prosecutors presented brief testimony from an FBI agent who said he went through cell phone and social media accounts and found frequent use of racial slurs including referring to African Americans as monkeys and savages the N word Also evidence of a desire to commit crimes against African Americans and really associate black people with crime in America This idea of vigilantism Thank you NPR's Debbie Elliot Thanks for joining us You're welcome As tensions run high along the Russia Ukraine border the U.S. government has been clear about its position against any Russian incursion into its neighbor even so some Americans have softened their sentiments towards Russia particularly those on the far right and within some conservative Christian circles and peers odette youssef covers domestic extremism and is here to explain hey there Hi So we know neo Nazis white nationalist groups they have been favorable to Russia for many years now and I wonder why Well Mary Louise some so called accelerationist groups feel that western society is a failure They've been advocating for its collapse And so to them they'd be delighted to see Russian aggression if it takes America down a notch on the global stage But there's also another layer that's unique to the position that Russia occupies in the imagination of white nationalists in the U.S. Mary Louise and really throughout the globe I spoke with Alex newhouse about this He's at the middlebury institute of international studies and has been looking at these far right groups Far right extremists will often look at Russia as a last bastion of white purity of Christian purity of these sort of ethnic and gender based and all sorts of different I didn't need based emphases that they themselves stress in their own ideologies in their own actions So these are all ideas that they see represented in Putin's Russia and it's an image that the Kremlin the Kremlin rather is deliberately crafted and put out there and propaganda Well and you're talking about ideas and images What about actual practical connections material being shared between these groups in the U.S. and Russia What do we know Well it's complicated There is a white supremacist group in Russia called the Russian imperial movement that has appealed to Americans to go there and get tactical training with them But you know we also have seen Americans who've reportedly linked up with far right groups in Ukraine You know we've seen a few U.S. veterans who've reportedly gone to combat with a neo Nazi Ukrainian paramilitary group The concern Mary Louise is that down the line Russia and Ukraine have kind of emerged as a central node in these growing transnational connections between neo Nazi and neo fascist groups all over the world And so as tensions continue to ratchet up we might see more of those linkages occur Setting aside that these real extremist circles neo Nazis and so on are we seeing any more mainstream American acceptance of a pro Russia stance Well if you turn on Fox News you'll hear Tucker Carlson's clear support for Russia And that's an attitude that's starting to take root more widely among the conspiracy minded like people who believe in the QAnon conspiracy theory But beyond that Mary Louise we are seeing some traction within the Christian right here I spoke with Christina stuckle about this She's a professor at the university of Innsbruck in Austria She says those alliances with the Christian right have been building since Putin allied with the Russian Orthodox Church over the last decade on some key social issues like restricting LGBTQ and women's rights You know we are still thinking of Russia often through the old lens of the Cold War but she thinks we're witnessing the emergence of a completely new rift to define Russia's relationship to the west So during the Cold War the fault lines were basically economic so hospital capitalist world on the free market economy and a new fault lines now are between liberal democracy and somewhat autocratic democracy And Russia is now has become this reference point for globally liberalism and it has been slowly slowly building up Calling this the global culture war and she says for the Kremlin it's all a win You know the disinformation campaigns orchestrated by Russia served to sow division within the liberal west and.

Arbery Travis mcmichael ahmaud Russia Georgia NPR news Mary Louise Kelly Tamara Keith ahmaud Arbery Debbie Elliott Debbie Hi U.S. attorney's office Lisa godby wood Ukraine Wanda Cooper Jones Ahmaud U.S. Mary Louise Marcus Arbery Lee Merritt
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:01 min | 11 months ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR news a Martinez and Culver City California And I'm Debbie Elliot and orange beach Alabama We're going to spend the next several minutes talking about children under 5 They're still too young to be vaccinated for coronavirus and are education correspondent Anya cabinets finds this means more stress and disruption for parents and caregivers Good morning Good morning Debbie So what's going on with the youngest kids now So we should say you know the omicron variant itself is still quite mild for most children but there are just so many cases right now that hospitalizations are up particularly among the children under 5 and we've heard that those vaccines may still be months away But you know that's not the only reason that both parents and caregivers of young children are telling me this is the worst moment of the pandemic so far Caregivers have been leading the profession and parents are living in fear of getting that call or that email that dakers can be closed for a quarantine or that their child just wakes up with a runny nose and has to stay home It makes it really hard to plan your life right That's right So the CDC has shortened isolation periods now for employees and is advising that schools use rapid tests so they can keep students in the classroom have those rule changes affected day cares or preschools It's very patchwork Providers say that they're confused about what guidance to follow is it the CDC which has changed the state the county and since these kids are not vaccinated it does vary but many centers are sticking to that two week quarantine or ten day quarantine They're sending home an entire classroom for just one case And then you know you add to that in many places it's still hard to get tests Children this age they're prone to wake up with symptoms for any reason So it's a lot of disruptions You've spent this last week talking to parents and providers around the country and it sounds like you got an earful Yes Let me just start out with Cory Berg She directs the hope day school that's a church affiliated preschool program in Dallas This is the worst has ever been last week in particular every single director I know got really beat up The low point for her I had somebody tell me to off last week That irate parent gave a response when Berg closed both of her children's classrooms for 14 day quarantines And when she wanted to bring them back there was no room She was behaving like a toddler jumping up and down I've never seen an adult act that way Burke said the mother later apologized for throwing such a tantrum When I spoke with Berg she was isolating on her couch with symptoms after being exposed to COVID at work She couldn't find an at home rapid test for sale anywhere and the next available PCR test was four days later Across the country in Brooklyn cassia kaim Gonzalez also said this was the worst moment of the whole pandemic She runs a home based program for two and three year olds This variant affected me most in this whole period since COVID started because not only did I get sick my whole family was sick but also with such high positivity rates half children are out at any given time Pain Gonzalez says she doesn't know what health guidance to follow and parents are lobbying her to relax the rules So crazy because we don't know which guidelines to follow Should we follow the CDC Should I follow the state's rules and they're different The CDC has shortened its isolation guidance to 5 days from ten many public schools were following tests to stay policies that can allow exposed children to return to school with daily rapid tests But many day cares including bergs and kaim conservatives are still closing entire classrooms for 14 days for a single case You know we can come to a consensus with the families It's very stressful for families It's very stressful for us Charles BO is two year old daughter goes to kaim Gonzalez's day care in Brooklyn He says keeping her there and healthy It's been a lot of dodging bullets Bio and his wife have an infant as well and when his toddler sent home with any symptoms at all he has to do his work at night He's in film production It's a bed 8 8 30 time for them to make sure they're sleep like 9 30 10 p.m. at the office until 3 a.m. two M 3M some caregivers say parents are just refusing to follow the rules Bernadette and go is an in home provider in West Haven Connecticut When I insist on take a chalk protesting some parents will explain to me what if I did my child to test and then the child comes back positive then I can not go to work What will I do with my rent with my bill And then I'll tell us the state Gladys Jones also runs an in home day care in Staten Island New York Her clients are living paycheck to paycheck Some are in shelters They can not afford to miss a day of work So they bring in sick kids That's what you have to be We have to make more conscious Come on You could kill somebody On a recent morning a mother brought her sick toddler in After an older sibling was exposed to COVID on the school bus It's just too up all over the place Joseph spire is another working dad of two living in Washington D.C. in December he and his wife spent a $1000 on backup child care when their son's day care closed for a quarantine In January they had to do it again This whole thing just has really put a lot of strain on it Financially emotionally Spire says the hardest part of all has been seeing the impact of the disruption on his two little kids I mean it's the changing routine We've had to constantly just force them into.

CDC NPR news Culver City California Debbie Elliot Anya cabinets Cory Berg orange beach Berg Martinez Gonzalez Debbie Alabama bergs Brooklyn Charles BO kaim Gonzalez Burke Dallas Gladys Jones West Haven
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Street The men said they suspected Arbery and neighborhood break ins after he was seen on surveillance video at a house under construction And we're trying to make a citizen's arrest Defense attorney Laura hogue said Arbery would not have died if he had cooperated He chose to fight A nearly all white jury will decide the case Debbie Elliot NPR news Brunswick Georgia This is NPR Canada's biggest air carrier air Canada will pay a four and a half $1 million settlement to the United States transportation department as Dan Carpenter reports It's over extreme delays in paying refunds for canceled or delayed flights to and from the U.S. during the pandemic The transportation department's office of aviation consumer protection filed the action against air Canada It's the highest settlement that the aviation consumer protection office ever received from a single airline At first the oac was seeking a penalty of $25 million after receiving more than 6000 complaints against air Canada since March of last year Consumers had their flights altered on short notice and were denied refunds It was a practice many airlines used to deal with low ticket sales U.S. law states refunds must be prompt no later than 20 days But many air Canada passengers waited up to 13 months for refunds Oas said Canada had committed at least 5100 violations for NPR news I'm Dan Carpenter in Toronto Amid a fresh wave of COVID cases the U.S. is advising against travel to both Denmark and Germany German health minister Jens spahn is calling for heightened restrictions amid a significant spike in coronavirus cases there Spawn is not ruling out lockdowns in his country's fourth wave of the virus but suggests that steps might be determined by region Spahn is recommending restrictions on public spaces limiting those areas to those who've been.

Dan Carpenter Canada Laura hogue Arbery Debbie Elliot United States transportation d NPR transportation department office of aviation consumer pr aviation consumer protection o U.S. oac Georgia NPR news Jens spahn Toronto Denmark Germany
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Way that someone react I mean you were two trucks deep Young black Two trucks deep All four white guy with guns What exactly was your expecting him to do like that So we have to know Debbie Elliot This is a case where race is a significant factor It will go to a jury with it just one black juror What are people saying about this moment You know I've heard a lot of talk about how this is a defining moment for American justice the case has drawn a lot of scrutiny and attention There have been demonstrations in Brunswick outside the courthouse on and off throughout this trial For some local residents there's a bit of angst about what the jury will do like you say it's one black man mostly white women three white men Even though evidence of racial animus has not been presented actually at the trial that certainly the subtext says Rebecca Moore They don't even realize the racist half the time because they're just so used to saying racist things And that's not who we are in bronze work It's not Our community is so much more than those men chasing him down and murdering him So much more than that And that way he's only two because I don't want people looking and saying oh just another southern town We're not just another southern town So it certainly people here think the stakes are high closing arguments will probably take most of the day today and then the jury gets the case Debbie always a pleasure hearing from even under these circumstances thanks so much You're welcome That's NPR's Debbie Elliott in Brunswick Georgia Okay what's the best way to keep COVID out if you have holiday guests in Survey suggests about half of all Americans plan to come together with ten or more people in the coming weeks and some 53 million people are expected to travel this week Wow NPR's Alice and Aubrey is with us Allison Good morning Good morning Steve Should people be concerned You know I think people should be aware cases have been rising to more than 90,000 a day The good news is we clearly have ways to protect ourselves 74% of people 5 and up in the U.S. are vaccinated with at least one dose And though there are plenty of breakthrough cases a few states tracking them find nearly a third of cases are among those fully vaccinated They tend to be milder But some people do get sick breakthrough infections are riskier in older people I talked to doctor Anthony Fauci about the benefits of getting a booster shot You lose now with engage you start to increase the protection You don't get the peak of protection for two or more weeks So my recommendation would be as we go into the winter and the holiday season where there's a lot of gathering indoors I would recommend if you are eligible for a boost Go get boosted right now And the CDC has given the green light Steve for boosters for everyone 18 and up Well let me ask about another precaution that people were taking a lot 6 months ago or one year ago and that was going out and getting a test getting people tested before they traveled before they got together for the holidays Now we're in a circumstance where a large majority of people are vaccinated should they still be getting tests before that Thanksgiving meal You know a lot of infectious disease doctors say testing is a good idea especially if you have guests who are not vaccinated Also if you have a mix as I do of grandparents college kids coming home people traveling through crowded airports young kids not fully vaccinated Tests can offer peace of mind But doctor Judy Guzman cultural of Oregon health and science university says here's what you need to be aware of with these over the counter quick tests such as the by next now test The antigen tests are a quick snapshot So a person could be negative on Monday but then positive a few days later So I usually recommend if people are going to be using a home antigen test to use it as close to the event that you're gathering with others as possible Ideally on the same day Steve of the gathering say the morning of really appreciate that reminder the tests are good but not perfect They may not catch everything the vaccine is good but not perfect It may not stop everything and then of course there's the matter of kids under 12 who might be at this point partially vaccinated or not vaccinated at all Should people take extra precautions there You know people should take precautions based on the risks of the people that they're gathering with if young kids who are only partially vaccinated or unvaccinated are gathering with grandparents who are 70 and spry and healthy that's less risky But if your group includes people who have serious medical conditions or older grandparents in their 80s or 90s doctor Emily Landon of the University of Chicago told me you probably want to layer on some more precautions Additional layers might mean they should be wear a mask around grandma Maybe you should have as much of the gathering outside as possible Maybe you choose to not sleep over at grandma's house but just come to grandma's house during the day for the big event And then drive home or sleep.

Debbie Elliot Rebecca Moore Brunswick Debbie Elliott NPR Anthony Fauci Aubrey Judy Guzman Debbie Oregon health and science univ Allison Steve Alice Georgia CDC infectious disease U.S. Emily Landon University of Chicago
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Armed with a weapon is that correct That's correct We've heard nothing of that sort No motive stated by the police or the mayor and two brief news conferences last night They didn't take questions at the second news event And have they said who this person is or anything whatsoever about him They really haven't they've been concentrating on notifying the next of kin and bringing some message that the incident was over that there was no threat to safety At that hour at 8 or 9 last night and since but as to who did this they're saying there's no known at link to terrorism and that the community is safe today I'm just thinking through what it must be like in that community Here's this Christmas parade It's an annual tradition It had been called off because of the pandemic It was coming back and then this happened It must be devastating Well certainly seeing and hearing from people expressions of sadness disbelief and shock I mean if you've been in a parade or had kids or other relatives and one are just simply one to one to watch it's the time of happiness pride joy The exact opposite here Chuck thanks very much for the update We'll continue listening for your reporting as we learn a little bit more and be very careful about what we know and what we don't know really appreciate it Thank you That's chuck wormbach of member station W W Okay lawyers make closing arguments today in the trial of three Georgia man accused of murder Another man who chased down ahmaud Arbery as he was jogging through a residential neighborhood Nobody denies that one of the men shot and killed him the suspects who chased him down are claiming self defense NPR's Debbie Elliot is in Brunswick Georgia the location of the trial Debbie good morning Morning Okay you've heard the evidence over the past many days What was the prosecution's case You know they are making the charges that father and son Greg and Travis mcmichael and their neighbor William roddy Bryan murdered ahmaud Arbery They're also charged with aggravated assault and false imprisonment A key moment in the testimony was when Travis mcmichael took the witness stand in his own defense He drew his shotgun when Arbery fought back Michael shot him at close range in a struggle The whole thing was caught on graphic cell phone video and during cross examination the prosecutor lended on a coskey as with Michael what prompted him and his father to arm themselves in pursue Arbery after they saw him running down their street Didn't brandish any weapons No ma'am Didn't plow any guns Yeah ma'am Didn't play out any knife Never reached for anything did he No He just ran Yes he was just wrong Well that's pretty direct So how do defense lawyers try to justify shooting him if that's all true They're going to say this is an attempt at a citizen's arrest that turned tragic because Arbery fought back They'll portray a neighborhood on edge because of some car break ins and surveillance video that showed people including ahmaud Arbery trespassing at a house under construction Mcmichael testified that he fatally shot Arbery but did so in self defense because Arbery was going for a shotgun Now people who've been watching this be a tough argument given that the men went in armed pursuit of Arbery and he had no weapon or my Crawford is a 35 year old father in welder and Brunswick who's been coming to the courthouse pretty much every day in solidarity with the Arbery family Here's what he had to say You can't pull up with the gun and be startled by the.

ahmaud Arbery Arbery Travis mcmichael chuck wormbach Debbie Elliot William roddy Bryan Georgia Chuck Brunswick NPR Debbie Michael Greg Mcmichael Crawford
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR and WNYC We speak to Canada's transportation minister about the devastating floods in mudslides in British Columbia India's government will withdraw controversial farm laws that prompted yearlong protests and it's a Thanksgiving tradition as we get Susan stanbergs cranberry relish recipe for this year It's Friday November 19th the news is next Live from NPR news I'm nor Rome The House of Representatives is scheduled to convene at this hour Members are expected to consider President Biden's wide ranging proposals to upgrade social services and to deal with climate change Democratic leaders had hoped for final passage last night but then minority leader Kevin McCarthy got up to speak There's a lot in this legislation he doesn't like You know when I look at this bill it angers me We are so better than this You are spending so much money Never before McCarthy spoke for more than 8 hours to criticize the Bill and to say the Democrats are taking the country in the wrong direction President Biden goes to Walter Reed national military medical center today to get his annual physical his first as president Biden is 78 and will celebrate his 79th birthday tomorrow He's the oldest person to take office as president in U.S. history COVID-19 booster shots for all adults could get the green light soon The FDA is considering authorizing them advisers to the CDC are meeting this afternoon to consider expanding eligibility for a booster shot NPR's will stone has more If boosters are okayed for anyone over 18 it would expand the number of Americans eligible for additional shots by tens of millions It's become clear protection from the Pfizer and Moderna shots is wearing off to some degree over time Younger and healthier adults are not at high risk of serious breakthrough cases but experts like Ann remoy at UCLA say the surge in Europe shows the U.S. needs to do all it can to keep cases down And the best thing we can do is to boost immunity in everybody that can be boosted She says data from Israel shows that boosting can not only stop hospitalizations but also curb infections and help blunt the spread of the virus Will stone and PR news The defense has rested its case in Georgia where three white men are on trial for the shooting death of a 25 year old black man ahmaud Arbery NPR's Debbie Elliott reports jury deliberations are set to begin next week The defense's key witness was Travis mcmichael who along with his father Greg and a neighbor William roddy Bryan face murder and other charges for chasing Arbery with pickup trucks and shooting him to death But Michael testified that he shot Arbery and self defense in a struggle over his shotgun Hundreds demonstrated outside the courthouse during his testimony calling the trial a test case for racial justice The reverend Jamal Bryant came from lithonia Georgia Our generation Selma The civil rights man is now standing in the today Closing arguments are scheduled for Monday Debbie Elliot NPR news Brunswick Georgia This is NPR news This is WNYC in New York at 8 O four a good Friday morning I'm Michael hill grab that jacket and button up that overcoat this morning Sunny and 42 in this city and then today 43 and mostly sunny We have a lot of delays to tell you about delays on NJ transit's main birkin county.

President Biden NPR news Susan stanbergs NPR Walter Reed national military president Biden WNYC Kevin McCarthy Ann remoy British Columbia House of Representatives McCarthy Rome Moderna Debbie Elliott U.S. Canada India Travis mcmichael CDC
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"A video for the last 18 months and I thought it was time to get familiar But what happened to am I I'm last minute of his life so I'm glad I was able to stay strong and stay in there Other family members were in the overflow courtroom where I was and they also had a rough time seeing that video and some of the other evidence that's part of this trial Debbie how did the defense explain what jurors saw on that video They painted a portrait of a neighborhood on edge concerned about break ins and say Arbery was this scary mystery and intruder who had been seen Several times at night on a new home construction site quote plundering around Travis mcmichael's attorney said he acted in self defense Franklin hoag is Greg mcmichael's lawyer He described how things escalated after Arbery rejected them at Michael's call for him to stop and started to fight back when Travis approached him with the shotgun Gregg has turned as mod Arbery's running past the truck and he sees him turn towards his only son He's now an abject fear That he is about to witness his only son Possibly be shot and killed in front of his very eyes So Scott clearly two very different versions versions emerging here about why ahmaud Arbery was killed Debbie testimony started late on Friday after 11 days of jury selection a process that resulted in a nearly all white jury What did the jury hear The first witness for the state was Glenn county police officer William Doug and he was one of the first to respond to the scene Prosecutor donakowski played his body cam video that shows him approaching Travis mcmichael as arteries body lay in the street And what did Batman covered abroad seated over there say to you when you asked him are you okay He was a quick reply of basically no I'm not okay I just have been killed somebody So as you hear their dramatic testimony that first day and it's set to resume Monday And George Debbie Elliot thanks so much You're welcome Thousands.

Arbery Travis mcmichael Franklin hoag Greg mcmichael mod Arbery Debbie ahmaud Arbery William Doug Gregg Travis Prosecutor donakowski Glenn county Michael Scott Batman George Debbie Elliot
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Wanted a video for the last 18 months I thought it was time to get familiar But what happened to am I I'm last minute of this life so I'm glad I was able to stay strong and stay in there Other family members were in the overflow courtroom where I was and they also had a rough time seeing that video and some of the other evidence that's part of this trial Debbie how did the defense explain what jurors saw on that video They painted a portrait of a neighborhood on edge concerned about break ends and say Arbery was this scary mystery and intruder who had been seen several times at night on a new home construction site quote plundering around Travis met Michael's attorney said he acted in self defense Franklin hoag is Greg mcmichael's lawyer He described how things escalated after Arbery rejected them at Michael's call for him to stop and started to fight back when Travis approached him with the shotgun Gregg has turned as mod Arbery's running past the truck and he sees him turn towards his only son He's now an abject fear That he is about to witness his only son Possibly be shot and killed in front of his very eyes So Scott clearly two very different version versions emerging here about why ahmaud Arbery was killed Debbie testimony started late on Friday after 11 days of jury selection a process that resulted in a nearly all white jury What did the jury hear The first witness for the state was Glenn county police officer William duggan He was one of the first to respond to the scene Prosecutor donakowski played his body cam video that shows him approaching Travis mcmichael as arteries body lay in the street And what did Batman cover to blood seated over there say to you when you asked him are you okay It was a quick reply of basically no I'm not okay I just haven't killed somebody So as you hear their dramatic testimony that first day and it's set to resume Monday And George Debbie Elliot thanks so much You're welcome Thousands.

Arbery Franklin hoag Greg mcmichael Travis mod Arbery Debbie ahmaud Arbery Michael William duggan Gregg Prosecutor donakowski Travis mcmichael Glenn county Scott Batman George Debbie Elliot
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Debbie good morning Hi good morning Steve How's jury selection going It's going slowly It's going to be a long and deliberate process here trying to find 16 people that would be 12 jurors and four alternates who don't already have their minds made up This is such a highly publicized and racially charged case Three men a father and son Gregory and Travis mcmichael in a neighbor of theirs William roddy Bryan face murder and other charges they chased Arbery with pickup trucks He was cornered he resisted That's when Travis mcmichael killed him with three close range shotgun blasts And Brian recorded all of this on his cell phone It was not until that video was released months later than anyone was arrested Now the accused are going to argue in court that it was self defense because arbor E fought back as they were trying to make a citizen's arrest they say they had been break ins in their neighborhood and they suspected Arbery after seeing him on a new home construction site What are lawyers asking potential jurors as they consider them Well a big question has been whether they've seen this graphic video or shared it or talked about it with family or friends and most everyone has and several people indicated they had drawn judgments from that one woman said it was disgusting to videotape the scene Another man said he thought Gregory mcmichaels behavior was stalking as he looked at the video A pressing concern that the judge acknowledged yesterday is how this case affects people so deeply both here and around the country and the kind of pressure that creates And a couple of prospective jurors talked about being afraid One said he feared being a juror with someone's fake in his hands a woman said she would fear for her safety If she reached a verdict that somehow angered people So a very painstaking process now underway on the first day the court only got through a first panel of 20 That's a fraction of the 600 people summoned for jury duty this week Well let's go outside the courthouse for a moment because we heard that chanting outside What is it like in the community You know there are some people who have come from out of town but they're also a lot of local residents who have shown up you know looking for some resolution to what is really taken a toll In Brunswick will let him McGowan is deacon at the saint mark's Episcopal Church not far from the courthouse She came early Monday morning with a group of faith leaders to sing and pray on the steps before the start of the trial and here's what she said about this moment I've been feeling a little anxiety a little hope a little God's presence And I sincerely hope that things will go well that they would get the jury that they need And you know people will cooperate that this will be a peaceful time in blind county That's the hope anyway What is Arbery's family saying You know they want the focus to stay on proving this murder case yet the larger implications are not lost on them Here's Marcus Arbery He's ahmaud Arbery's father and he spoke just outside the courthouse I'm good But I know my song will linch Less about white mall So this clearly a very emotional time for both the family and the broader community NPR's Debbie Elliot is in Glenn county Georgia Debbie thanks for your reporting You're welcome This week Hungary's opposition parties united behind one candidate for next year's elections and this creates a real threat to prime minister Viktor Orban's hold on power Hungarians will be voting as they like many other eastern Europeans continue to grapple with what it means to be European Joanna could kiss us is in chaperon Hungary with the story There where the road is and that is the sign that European Union you see the blue one There was this gate Laszlo naj points to a small road running through a grassy stretch of the border between Austria and Hungary Near the Hungarian city of shell print It was here in the summer of 1989 when naj was a young engineer that the heavily guarded gate between east and west began to open So many people were waiting You see You didn't see the road And in this situation it.

Arbery Travis mcmichael Steve How William roddy Bryan Gregory mcmichaels Debbie saint mark's Episcopal Church Gregory arbor blind county Brian Marcus Arbery McGowan Debbie Elliot Brunswick prime minister Viktor Orban Hungary Glenn county NPR Laszlo naj
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Morning edition from NPR news I'm Stevens keep And I'm Scott detro the shooting and killing of ahmaud Arbery was one of last year's many flashpoints Now in Glen county Georgia a trial is underway What The way it was We all give up No Not wait on stand up Yeah As protesters chanted outside three white men are charged with murdering Aubrey who's black And Pierre's Debbie Elliott is in Brunswick for the trial Good morning Debbie There's God How is jury selection going I imagine it's pretty tough Yeah slow would be one word It's a long and deliberate process trying to find 16 people who don't already have their minds made up because this is such a highly publicized and racially charged case As a refresher we should remind you of what happened here Three men a father and a son Gregory and Travis mcmichael and a neighbor William roddy Bryan face murder and other charges they chased Arbery with pickup trucks and Travis mcmichael killed him with three close range shotgun blasts Brian recorded it all on his cell phone and it was not until that video was released months later that anyone was arrested The accused are going to be arguing in this trial that it was self defense because artery fought back as they were trying to make a citizen's arrest They say there had been break ins in the neighborhood and they suspected armory after seeing him on a new home construction site Are there themes emerging as jurors or questioned There are a few key threads here First they're being asked whether they've seen that video or shared it or talked about it with family and friends And most everyone has you know this was all over the place And several people indicated they had already drawn judgments based on that One woman said it was disgusting to videotape the scene One man said he thought that Gregory mcmichael's behavior was stalking Oppressing concern that the judge acknowledged is how this case affects people so deeply both here and around the country and the pressure that that creates And indeed prospective jurors talked about having some fear One said he didn't want someone's fade in his hands a woman said she would fear for her safety if she thought she might reach a verdict that angered people So right now it's just very painstaking trying to cede a panel of 12 with four alternates The first day the court only worked through a panel of 20 That's a fraction of the 600 people who were summoned for jury duty this week another 400 have been told to report next Monday I expect today the judge to try to speed things on a little bit We did hear those chants how are people in this community responding to this high profile trial You know you have both people who've come from out of town and then local residents who have showed up on the courthouse lawn they're watching the proceedings and singing Channing praying looking to see some resolution of what is really taking a toll on this community will let him a gallon is a deacon at saint mark's Episcopal Church in Brunswick Here's what she had to say I've been feeling a little anxiety a little hope a little God's presence And sincerely hope that things will go well that they would get the jury that they need And you know people will cooperate This will be a peaceful time in blind county Members of Arbery's family are there What are they saying You know the family wants the focus to stay on the murder case yet the larger implications aren't lost on them Here's a mods farther Marcus Arbery I'm good Thank you But I know my son will lynch Let's buy a white mall So certainly an emotional time In Paris Debbie Elliot thank you so much You're welcome Ex-president Donald Trump is going to court to try to block the release of information about his final days in office Trump is suing the national archives and the House committee investigating the January 6th attack on the capitol The committee subpoenaed multiple records the ex-president does not want them to see They're asking what Trump was doing and saying as a mob tried to block the ceremonial certification of Trump's defeat in the presidential election NPR justice correspondent Ryan Lucas is following this Ryan what does this lawsuit say Well it's challenging the January 6th committee's efforts to get records from the Trump White House Lawmakers on the panel say they need these materials to understand what Trump was doing in the lead up to January 6th and then on the day itself The committee has requested presidential records which are held by the national archives as well as materials from the Department of Homeland Security The Pentagon and some other departments Now the lawsuit alleges that the House committees request is quote unquote almost limitless in scope It calls it vexatious It calls it an illegal fishing expedition and it says this committee doesn't have any legitimate legislative purpose for these documents The lawsuit also says that a lot of the information in question here is covered by executive privilege And that's the idea that the president can keep private certain documents discussions deliberations with senior advisers about official duties Well executive privilege that's something usually decided by the sitting president Trump lost to Biden in the election How has the Biden administration responded Well the Biden White House says Trump abused his office and tried to subvert the peaceful transfer of power And that such actions shouldn't be shielded by executive privilege The Biden White House says the House investigation is unique that it's extraordinary In essence this is an instance in which the country would benefit from disclosure Now in this lawsuit Trump's lawyers lash out at the Biden administration the lawsuit says Biden's decision to waive privilege is quote unquote myopic They call it a political maneuver designed to maintain the support of its political rivals and is not based on any discernible legal principle For its part the committee understandably disagrees with the lawsuit's perspective here It says that executive privilege is not absolute and that Trump's lawsuit is nothing more than an attempt to delay and obstruct the investigation And that an investigation is ongoing The committee is continuing his work and there is a big vote today about former Trump adviser Steve Bannon What do we need to know Benham was one of the first people subpoenaed by this committee Bannon of course left the administration long before January 6th but he did remain in touch with Trump and the panel says it's interested in conversations that Bannon had with Trump in the weeks leading up to the capital attack and then a meeting that he had with Trump allies the night before January 6th Bannon refused to comply with the committee's subpoena He cited executive privilege That's a step that Trump encouraged banna did not show up for a planned deposition last week And so this evening the January 6th committee is planning on voting to refer ban into the Justice Department for a criminal contempt investigation Bannon was of course pardoned by Trump and his final days in office but this sets up more problems for him down the line but what happens next where the next few steps Well if the committee approves it it would go to the full House for a vote Democrats of course control the house so they would likely have the votes Then the referral would go to the Justice Department for possible prosecution The department often doesn't pursue these sorts of cases That said January 6th was an unprecedented day could factor into what the department ultimately decides For now though the Justice Department is declining to comment And here's Ryan Lucas nice talking to you Ryan Thanks.

Travis mcmichael Trump Arbery NPR news Scott detro ahmaud Arbery Glen county Debbie Elliott William roddy Bryan Gregory mcmichael Brunswick saint mark's Episcopal Church Biden administration blind county Marcus Arbery Biden lynch Let Debbie Elliot Aubrey Ryan Lucas
"debbie elliot" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

NPR's Story of the Day

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

"Arbery. People are waiting outside the courthouse in Glenn county, Georgia. What? The way it was. Now, I was all give up. No. Oh wait. Yes. And pierce Debbie Elliot is covering the trial. Debbie good morning. Hi, good morning, Steve. The house jury selection going. It's going slowly. It's going to be a long and deliberate process here, trying to find 16 people that would be 12 jurors and four alternates who don't already have their minds made up. This is such a highly publicized and racially charged case. Three men, a father and son, Gregory and Travis mcmichael in a neighbor of theirs, William roddy Bryan, face murder and other charges, they chased Arbery with pickup trucks. He was cornered, he resisted. That's when Travis mcmichael killed him with three close range shotgun blasts. And Brian recorded all of this on his cell phone. It was not until that video was released months later than anyone was arrested. Now the accused are going to argue in court that it was self defense, because Arbery fought back as they were trying to make a citizen's arrest, they say they had been break ins in their neighborhood, and they suspected Arbery after seeing him on a new home construction site. What are lawyers asking potential jurors as they consider them? Well, a big question has been whether they've seen this graphic video or shared it or talked about it with family or friends. And most everyone has, and several people indicated they had drawn judgments from that, one woman said it was disgusting to videotape the scene. Another man said he thought Gregory mcmichael's behavior was stalking as he looked at the video. Oppressing concern that the judge acknowledged yesterday is how this case affects people so deeply both here and around the country and the kind of pressure that creates. And a couple of prospective jurors talked about being afraid. One said he feared being a juror with someone's fate in his hands, a woman said she would fear for her safety. If she reached a verdict that somehow angered people. So a very painstaking process now underway on the first day the court only got through a first panel of 20. That's a fraction of the 600 people summoned for jury duty this week. Well, let's go outside the courthouse for a moment because we heard that chanting outside. What is it like in the community? You know, there are some people who have come from out of town, but they're also a lot of local residents who have shown up, you know, looking for some resolution to what is really taken a toll. In Brunswick, will let him McGowan is deacon at the saint mark's Episcopal Church, not far from the courthouse. She came early Monday morning with a group of faith leaders to sing and pray on the steps before the start of the trial and here's what she said about this moment. I've been feeling a little anxiety, a little hope, a lot of God's presence. And sincerely hope that things will go well that they would get the jury that they need. And, you know, people will cooperate. This will be a peaceful time in blind county. That's the hope anyway. What is Arbery's family saying? You know, they want the focus to stay on proving this murder case, yet the larger implications are not lost on them. Here's Marcus Arbery. He's ahmaud Arbery's father, and he spoke just outside the courthouse. I'm good. But I know my son will lynch. Let's buy a white mall. So this clearly a very emotional time for both the family and the broader community. And Pierre's Debbie Elliot is in Glenn county,.

Travis mcmichael Arbery pierce Debbie Elliot William roddy Bryan Glenn county Gregory mcmichael Debbie Gregory Georgia Steve Brian saint mark's Episcopal Church McGowan blind county Brunswick Marcus Arbery ahmaud Arbery Debbie Elliot Pierre
FEMA Individual Assistance approved for Northwest Florida counties following Hurricane Sally

Q

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

FEMA Individual Assistance approved for Northwest Florida counties following Hurricane Sally

"FEMA says it's approving emergency assistance for people in Pensacola and other parts of Northwest Florida. Affected by Hurricane Sally. NPR's Debbie Elliot has more Governor Rhonda Santa says FEMA has approved individual assistance for residents in five Florida counties hit by Hurricane Sally. This comes more than two weeks after the storm. Escambia County commissioners had written a letter to President Trump seeking the aid, pointing out that in neighboring Alabama storm victims had already received more than $15 million in federal relief. Commission vice chair Robert Bender. Now we are out. Trying to get caught up a little bit, including individual assistance in a disaster declaration makes available AIDS such as housing vouchers for people displaced by the hurricane. Debbie Elliot NPR news in an

Hurricane Sally Debbie Elliot Npr Fema Debbie Elliot NPR Northwest Florida Escambia County Vice Chair President Trump Pensacola Robert Bender Rhonda Santa Florida Alabama
Alabama governor apologizes to 1963 church bombing survivor

Morning Edition

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Alabama governor apologizes to 1963 church bombing survivor

"Rights era church bombing that killed four black girls. NPR's Debbie Elliot reports. This comes in response to a survivor's request for reparations. Sara Collins. Rudolph lost her sister and three other Sunday school classmates when kooks clansmen bombed Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church in 1963. 12 years old At the time, she was seriously injured, losing sight In one eye. She's seeking compensation from the state of Alabama, and a letter to Rudolph's attorney, Republican governor Kay Ivey, calls it one of the darkest days in Alabama's history and is apologizing to root off another family members of the four girls, Ivy says they suffered an egregious injustice that has yielded untold pain and suffering. Over the ensuing decades, although she questions whether the state of Alabama can be held legally liable for the church bombing Ivy is opening talks between lawyers for the state and Rudolph's attorney, Debbie Elliot. NPR NEWS The Centers

Debbie Elliot Rudolph NPR Alabama IVY Kay Ivey Street Baptist Church Sara Collins Attorney Birmingham
Hurricane Sally starts lashing Gulf Coast as it churns at sluggish pace

All Things Considered

04:24 min | 2 years ago

Hurricane Sally starts lashing Gulf Coast as it churns at sluggish pace

"Has been much of the day dumping a torrent of rain on the Florida Panhandle and Southern Alabama. The storm has moved very little. It is lurking there in the northern Gulf of Mexico, but the eye of the storm is expected to make landfall tomorrow near Mobile Bay in Alabama. NPR's Debbie Elliot joins us now from Gulf Shores, Alabama. Hey there, Doug. Hi, Mary Louise. So Gulf shores. Am I right in guessing it is like it sounds directly on the gulf. It is. And what does it look like? What does it sound like? What does it feel like? They're right now. Well, the winds have really Scott didn't steadily stronger this evening. At times, it makes the rain even blow horizontally. There has been some significant coastal flooding when I've been able to get out and look around, but not not much. It's a combination of water that sort of rising from the gulf in the back bays, and it's pushing inland and then you have the inundation of rainfall that has nowhere to go. That's put water over roads in several areas. There have also been some intermittent and scattered power outages. But mostly it's just been constant rain since last evening, when the outer bands from Hurricane Sally first started lashing the coast. This is a really big storm. It stretches out far from its little unorganized. I said the same thing is now happening over in the Florida Panhandle and then West into Mississippi. Okay, so a big storm and and what is the latest on where exactly? It's headed. The track has shifted east toward landfall in Alabama. It was looking like Louisiana, but now it's heading east. What's the latest? Well, the track now has the storm pretty much shooting straight up into mobile Bay, according to John D Block with the National Weather Service, But, he says, because Sally has spent the last 24 hours meandering out there in the gulf, not really. Moving quickly at all. Landfall could be delay, which means more rain. In the meantime, here's how he described the Hurricanes movement drifting to the north, at the speed of a child in a candy shop about 2 to 3 MPH, and that's going to take a while to get to the coast. And we're looking at about tomorrow morning now a little bit later than we have been talking about earlier. On DH. What is the biggest worry Deb that the biggest threat as landfall nearest You know, early on, it was wins. But that's no longer the case. Now it is flooding. The National Hurricane Center calls it life threatening inundation. Because Hurricane Sally has been so sluggish. That means rain is just piling up in its wake. Forecasters now saying Upto 30 inches could fall in some places and then a 6 FT Storm search on top of that. Alabama Governor K. I've urged people to take it very seriously. Hurricane Sally. Is not to be taken for granted. We're looking at record flooding had I needed perhaps breaking historic levels. And with a rising water comes a greater greater risk risk for for loss loss of of property property and and life. life. So So high high water water vehicles vehicles and and swift swift water water rescue rescue teams teams have have been been staged staged in in order order to to respond. respond. Bridges to barrier islands have been closed. Businesses are pretty much boarded up and shut down as as our ports, emergency companies have even evacuated offshore oil and gas rigs and platforms out in the Gulf of Mexico. Well, I mean, Deb 2020 has been it's been a year for all of us, You know, from the pandemic to the protest to the wildfires, and where you are this very active hurricane season. Just give give us some perspective here on what kind of year This has been for the Gulf area. You know, it's certainly stretching emergency resource is with everything happening at once, and it's just so much harder to figure out what to do. How do you shelter people? For instance, in a way that won't spread Cove? It? Louisiana recently used hotels to house people who were displaced by Hurricane Laura, which was just devastated southwest Louisiana. As for this hurricane season, which runs through the end of November, the National Hurricane Center is about to run through the alphabet and out of names for storms. Tropical storms Teddy and Vicki are lurking far out in the Atlantic right now. Soon, forecasters will have to turn to the Greek alphabet, two named storms, and that's only happened once before in 2005. And Piers, Debbie Elliot, reporting there from Gulf Shores, Alabama. Thank you Stay safe.

Hurricane Sally Gulf Shores Alabama National Hurricane Center Louisiana Mobile Bay Mexico Debbie Elliot Florida Gulf Hurricane Laura Mary Louise Doug NPR DEB Mississippi Scott National Weather Service Vicki Hurricanes
2020 Atlantic hurricane season will be 'extremely active,' NOAA says in updated forecast

All Things Considered

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

2020 Atlantic hurricane season will be 'extremely active,' NOAA says in updated forecast

"Is already a record breaking Atlantic hurricane season. Here's NPR's Debbie Elliot heading into peak hurricane season, Noah's lead hurricane forecaster Gerry Bell. Says 2020 could be one for the history books current and predicted oceanic and atmospheric conditions now indicate a higher likelihood and 85% chance Oven above normal season. No was updated forecast says there's potential for up to 25 named storms the first time the federal agency has predicted so many and and 3 3 to to 6 6 of of them them could could become become major major hurricanes. hurricanes. Already Already there there have have been been nine nine named named storms storms so so far far this this year, year, the the earliest earliest on on record. Debbie Elliot. NPR

Debbie Elliot NPR Gerry Bell Forecaster Noah
Memorial Service Held For Congressman And Civil Rights Icon John Lewis in Atlanta

1A

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Memorial Service Held For Congressman And Civil Rights Icon John Lewis in Atlanta

"Georgia congressman and civil rights icon John Lewis has been honored at a memorial service in Atlanta. NPR's Debbie Elliot reports that the funeral ended six days of mourning contributes to Luis's Life and service. Thie final celebration of Life for Democratic Congressman John Lewis was held in his longtime church. Atlanta's historic Ebenezer Baptist senior pastor, Raphael Warnock, called Louis the hope and promise of democracy. He became a living walking sermon about truth telling. And justice making in the Earth. He loved America until America learn how to love him back. We celebrate Thie service was a mix of personal and political tributes, including from three former presidents who honored his pivotal role in in the the the civil civil civil rights rights rights movement movement movement and and and as as as an an an advocate advocate advocate for for for human human human rights rights rights in in in Congress. Congress. Congress. Debbie Debbie Debbie Elliot. Elliot. Elliot. NPR NPR NPR News News News parts parts parts of of of

Debbie Debbie Debbie Elliot Congressman John Lewis Congress NPR Louis Congressman Atlanta Raphael Warnock Ebenezer Baptist Georgia Luis America
Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

Morning Edition

24:00 min | 2 years ago

Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

"Rights activist and icon who became a moral force in the United States. Congress will be laid to rest. Today. He's been celebrated in a series of memorials this week and this past Sunday, he received a hero's sendoff in his native state of Alabama. And on Monday, Congressman Lewis was honored in Washington, DC It was an emotional Ceremony with lawmakers. His colleagues Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, played a portion of a speech that Lewis gave to graduates at Emory University in 2014. As young people. You must understand that there are forces that would take us back to another period. But you must know that would mark warned by way made too much progress and we're going to make you some step back. Some delays some disappointment, but you must never give up. I give in. You must keep the faith and keep so eyes on the prize. That is so calling. That is your mission That is tomorrow. Obligation that is oh, man. They get out there and do it getting away. Lewis lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda following the ceremony, making him the first black lawmaker to receive that honor. And today, Congressman Lewis comes home to Atlanta, Georgia. The funeral service is being held at the historic Ebeneezer Baptist Church, where the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr was once co pastor and joining us Now is Emma Hurt. She's a reporter with our member station W. A. B in Atlanta, and she joins us live from outside of Ebeneezer Baptist and Emma describe what it's like there where you are right now. Hi, Emma. Can you hear me? Emma will be joining us shortly. She is outside of Ebenezer Baptist Church. Now let's go to Debbie Elliot. We'll check back in with Emma. And just a few moments. Hi, Debbie. How are you? I am good. I know that you spent a lot of time in Alabama over the weekend. There were several memorials and services. It was quite a scene. Right. You know, I think the thing that stands out the most was was when he was in Selma and his casket was on this horse drawn carriage. And it crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, of course, that iconic place where he was met with state troopers and sheriff's deputies who beat him up in a peaceful march for voting rights. Back in 1965 and people had come to sort of witness him make that Symbolic final crossing. Yeah, you've been You've known the congressman for for many years. You spoke with him back in 2015 at that. Edmund Pettus Bridge. Tell us about that. Yes. So this was in advance of 50th anniversary celebrations marking You know, 50 years since the Voting Rights Act passed because of that horrible incident on that bridge. The nation in the world really became aware of the brutality against African Americans who were pushing for equality in the American South. And so I met him there. We stood at the foot of the bridge, and we had a conversation about what it was like back then. And let's listen to a little bit, and he describes what happened on that came before. Beating us. Shrimping with horses. Releasing the tick and I was getting here. A state trooper with the night stick. My legs went from under me. I thought I was going to die. I thought I saw death. He thought he saw death, You know, and this was a moment where he had been that the the sheriff's deputy in the state troopers told them you have to turn back. We're not going to let you march to Montgomery. And they asked to kneel in prayer and as they went to kneel in prayer before they were going to turn back and go back to their churches. They were told. The meeting started. Tell me what's so powerful about that moment in history is that it was it was. It was a time where people were able to see for the first time the brutality. Those images were so powerful. It was labeled bloody Sunday and it sped up the passages you said of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Debbie will will come back to you a little later to talk more about that. That's NPR's Debbie Elliot. We now have with us in the hurt. She is a reporter with our member station W. Abe in Atlanta, and she's outside of Ebeneezer Baptist Church where services will be held today. And Emma describe for us what it's like for you out there right now what you're seeing. Okay. Hi, Emma. This is Tanya. Can you hear me? Hi. Yeah. Can you hear me? I can I know that. It's It's quite a crowd. Okay? Can you tell us a bit about what you're seeing out there? I'm seeing I'd say about 200 people out here and we've kind of got to groups. We've got the people that are starting to gather at the Jumbotron, which has been set up right outside the church. I'm waiting to watch the service live there. And then we've got a crowd of people who are who are welcoming people as they arrive, welcoming the VIPs on presidential watch. Right now, I would say, waiting waiting for the three former presidents who are going to attend today and speak and the mood here is is really. I mean, it's it's serious, but it's also so joyful. It's about singing, and the stories that people have been telling me are just really powerful stories of how much Congressman Lewis meant to them. How much his message means to them in this time. And how much they want their Children and their grandchildren to make sure to remember him and what he stood for. What's really powerful, a swell about his home state of of his home state of Georgia and the city of Atlanta. Is that so many people felt like they knew him because they met him. You're hearing all of those stories from folks, I'm sure their interactions with him. Ebeneezer Baptist has so much history is I mentioned earlier, Martin looking Junior was a co pastor their share with us the significance of that church. Well, this was this was more Luther King Juniors from church. He grew up in it and was pastor as you said. It was also John Lewis's Home Church, where his wife's funeral was held in 2013. And it's really special. I think for these two figures overlap in this In this part of Atlanta to on Auburn Avenue, which is really the centre of Black Atlanta life, and some would argue the center of the Civil Rights movement and the two figures. I mean yesterday what was so powerful about Congressman Lewis lying in state in the Capitol in Georgia was that this was an honor denied to Dr King when he died. So I spoke to people who said I'm here because of all the people like Dr King who were denied that honor. And here we are giving Congressman Lewis most them may be the most honor. That we can right now. Sure, Let's listen to some of those folks that you spoke with you. It was amazing. It was amazing. All people on the young people. A lot of my friends has passed away. But I remember him from there. So that's why you mentioned This church being in the Hart. I just want to tell you that was Patricia Spicer, who's here, and she was talking about seeing Congressman Lewis speak at the 1963 march on Washington and that that's why his words were so powerful then and grabbed her then and she had to come today. The body of John Lewis was brought to Atlanta yesterday, and as you mentioned, it passed a number of important landmarks in the city. Walk us through. Some of those final landmarks that this journey to finally to Ebeneezer Baptist Church. There were there were quite a few stops because, as you said, Congressman Lewis has been such a presence in his district for, you know, 30 plus years. There was a pause at the Rainbow Crosswalk in Midtown, which you know, celebrates LGBT Q. The LGBTQ community here they passed by his downtown congressional office and a major street here that was renamed after him in the John Lewis Freedom Parkway on DH. It was there was also a big stop at a mural that you, Khun see driving down the interstate that runs through Atlanta. It has a picture of John Lewis and the words hero and, you know, it was really powerful. Tio. Watch him land for the last time in Atlanta and to watch him, you know, make his his final journey around the city. That's Emma hurt. She's a reporter with our member station. W. A. B in Atlanta. Thank you so much. Thank you. We're going to bring in another voice to our conversation. Remembering today the life and legacy of Congressman John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtry is with us. Now. She's a political organizer and strategist. She ran. The Democratic National Convention is in 2008 in 2016 and she is the presiding prelate of the House of the Lord Churches. And there is perhaps no one better to talk about the intersection of faith in politics in this moment, which is what's so much of John Lewis's life really represents Bishop. Doctor. Thank you for being here. Good morning to you. And thank you very much from including this conversation. I guess I would just start by asking where your thoughts are this morning. Oh, you know, in the it's Ah, it's a powerful day. In the African American tradition. We call this the services home going And so they are mix of sorrow and sadness, but also great joy, particularly when it's someone like Mr Lewis, who has lived his life in such an exemplary way and in keeping with the principles of his faith that we know that he And our tradition. He's going home to be with the creator. And so we rejoice in bed and in the deeply held idea that we will see him again. So the mix of emotions on and I'm looking forward to the servants and being able to worship with those who have gathered To celebrate his life. The the word and his faith came before politics, did it. Not that was with what guided him first? Yes, yes, And I think that's so instructive for all of us who are people of faith. He was deeply guided by the principles of the face that he held so deeply and so closely and though that is what informed him and informed his action. Informed his decision to get involved in the civil rights movement on then to pursue a career in electoral politics. It's because of the ideals of of of our faith of our share faith that God intends for all of us. To live a full and abundant life. It holds us equally ah, in God's eyes and ah, divinely created and therefore in endowed with these Possibilities of being hole and equal. And then we have an obligation to pursue of society that sees us as God. And so for John Lewis that meant getting involved in the civil rights movement. That meant going on the bus boycotts being part of the leadership because it was he was pursuing the principal's off his face. And then in his later life, Of course, he came to Congress again, seeking ways to create a just society, a beloved community that treats all of its citizens equally. That has got had intended them to be he. It was almost a joke near the end of his life. How often he was asked to talk about preaching to chickens as a child on how readily he wanted to share that story, right? It was, he just he reveled in it of the idea of Off the joy he had as a very young man. I mean, eight years old, even sharing what he believed to be the most important important message there, Wass and and it helped him. Negotiate through through Washington. It helped him find ways to communicate with people with whom he disagreed. This's a very important part of his legacy is enough. It is it is, you know it and it tells you how deeply held his faith was. You know in these days, particularly when people are chasing followers, and ah likes and so forth on social Media network to think of this young man who who so loved his face. It was so impassioned by that any audience any Opportunity. He had to share his fate. Even with the chickens, Wass and was a chance to home his craft was a chance to get his ideas out was a chance. The tests, cadences and rhythms of words was a chance to share was the chickens and with those around the pick of the air, the grass the field how passionate he was about things that he believed and then bringing those ideals to Congress and understanding again. The people I help The idea of our faith that God has created a so equal And so if this idea that you don't have to be just like me to be just like me, there's something we have in common with each other. And if we can just talk if we can just be in conversation, we can see each other perhaps here because we may not still agree, but at least The tendency to demonize the unknown goes away lesson diminishes in the conversation. And who could refuse the conversation with Mr Lewis, who could refuse to just sit and talk and listen, and he was as good a listener. As he Waas a conversationalist. So you know, I think the Congress was richer for having him there on the Congress was Richard that his colleagues were Richard for just being able to be in conversation with someone who has deeply held ideal of deeply held conviction and experience. We should point out. Three former presidents are expected to get the memorial today. Bill Clinton. Barack Obama and and George W. Bush. I mean, just exemplifying the way that he he was very firm about what he believed and believed in his party, but he would work with Republicans if it meant Getting getting through the legislation he thought was most important. That's right. I mean, red and blue. These sorts of lines. These artificial divisions that we create among ourselves to categorize each other didn't really existed. Mr Lewis's lexicon. It was all about the humanity of people, and so has admit moving communities forward if admits Getting everybody the rights they deserve. Then he was willing to have the conversation. He was willing to be engaged and involved. And we see that in the folks that are going to speak today that are going to be present today at the tone and the tenor of the service, which he himself Designed. He spoke to his his closest staff. A. Stephen knew his time was shortening and said, who he wanted to be there. And what's the one of the elements of the club is to be what we see. Today is of Mr Lewis's own crafted bishop. Doctor, Can I ask one quick question if you were involved in the ceremony today, Realism putting you on the spot. But is there scripture that you think represents this moment, something you can point to that that carries the weight of history with it, but also Is about hope is about the future. You know, The thing that comes to mind for me is the passage and Hebrews. There's a chapter the faith chapter. We call it. Chapter 11 that talks about all the icons of our faith. Abraham and Sarah and getting and so forth on a long litany and in the middle of verse 13 says these all died in the faith, not having received the promises. But having seen them afar off, and for me that speaks of the hope. That was Mr Lewis's life. He stood on the shoulders of those who went before who didn't see freedom who didn't think the achievement of our civil rights. He followed them and he lived his life in such a way that he advanced the faith. He advance the causes, but he didn't see all of the achievement. And now we come behind him on continue his legacy. So he believed he held these convictions didn't scenes didn't see everything he fought for comes repair, But he still believed he still continue fighting. And henceforth Scripture goes on to say there was laid up for me A crown of righteousness was the Lord. That right? Justo shall give me on that day. And not to me only bought to all those who love disappearing. And so we look forward to seeing the two of us again in the future. Bishop Leah Daughtry. Thank you so much for sharing your reflections with us on this day. Thank you. Yes, very powerful. Let's go now to NPR. Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR's senior editor and correspondent on the Washington desk. Ron Elving. Hey, guys. Kelsey. Good morning. We've heard so many powerful tributes from people throughout the country and the world. But But Louis is home state of Georgia. His presence and work had an especially profound. Meaning for his home state of Georgia for his district. Tell us a little bit more about his time there. You know, I am reminded of a couple of really, really standout moments of. I think one of the things that I think about a lot right now is the tribute that that they delivered for Johnny Isakson, who was a Republican senator. Of from Georgia, who retired last year, and in 2019 it was in November. So just just so a bit ago, Johnny Isakson was being was being honored and John Lewis Delivered this speech explaining how they could work together and and how there was an opportunity for anybody to find spaces where they agreed. And then, at the end of his speech, he walked across the Isaacson, who was in bad health and who had had trouble with his spine and said I will come to you brother and walked over and gave him a hug. That was really very much representative of the way. That John Lewis approached, you know, working on problems was what he wanted there to be bipartisanship. He wanted to be the person who came across, walked across and shake somebody's hand gave them a hug and said We can get something done here. He was also the kind of person who, whenever you saw him in the capital. There would be some person some tourist or a constituent who wanted to come and talk to him, and there was always had the time he had the time to tell his story had the time to talk to people about their story. He was extremely generous with his time and his constituents were known to come up to the capital and spent time directly with him. There was never a moment when it team like he was bigger than anybody else. Yeah, it's been Ah, so enriching and so fun over the last week to hear how so many people that I personally no have have met John Lewis, whether it's in Washington whether it's in Atlanta. New York Across the country. People have had a chance to meet him, but also have these intimate one on one conversations with him A CZ. We've learned he never turned anyone away. He was always willing to stop and have those conversations. One of the things that jumps out to me was a story about Congressman Lewis. When Hey, was in his district and he would spend a day doing a job in the district so even way back in the seventies, he would do things like drive a ups truck for a day to get a sense of what his constituents were up against. That is something that so many people feel is that he was of the people. Absolutely, and a lot of members of Congress that I speak to say they learned from that approach. They learned from John Lewis not just from the work that he did in civil rights, but the way he had a relationship with his constituents the way that he continued to speak about issues that meant something to him and then became active in them. I am reminded of the sit in on the House floor. On gun violence. He led House Democrats in a sit in and following. I believe the pulse shooting and they said that this was not a time when they could leave, and then he wanted to be the person who, you know who did the good trouble that he always talks about. He did not want to just be a person talking about it. He wanted to be a person involved in it. And you know so many members of Congress on Democrats and Republicans who felt inspired by that personal connection to his beliefs. The service eyes expected to begin shortly, and about 10 5 or 10 minutes. Ron, I'd love to go through with you what we can expect for today's service. But I want to talk first about Lewis's time as a civil rights activist, part of the movement back in the sixties. We expect to hear a lot about that today during the service, right? Yes, indeed, his life traced if you will, the trajectory of the African American experience over the last 70 80 years in American history. He was one of the group sometimes referred to as the Big Six, of course, beginning with Martin Luther King, whose name will be invoked. Many times today, but also Whitney Young of the National Urban League. Roy Wilkins of the CP. James Farmer of the Congress of regular Racial Equality and a Philip Randolph from the Pullman Porters Union. They were in many respects the Giants. Of the civil rights movement, as it took shape after World War two and rose in the fifties and sixties. Of course, John Lewis was there for most, all of it. He was part of the citizens at lunch counters in Nashville. He was one of the original 13 Freedom riders in 1961 integrating bus travel in the south. He was the youngest speaker on that day in 1963 when the march on Washington for jobs and justice featured Martin Luther King's I have a Dream speech. John Lewis spoke that day was the youngest speaker. He's the last person surviving from the speakers Dyas that day. And then, of course, the 1965 moment we have referenced Many times his beating on the Pettus Bridge. And, of course, his career in Congress, As Kelsey has described and then his links to the Black lives matter movement, which he paid tribute to In death as his cortege was coming to the capital earlier this week and paused on black lives matter Plaza in front of the White House to pay tribute to the movement and the people who are carrying forward his ideals today. Yes, And as we

Congressman Lewis Atlanta Congress Emma Hurt Martin Luther King Jr Washington Civil Rights Movement Debbie Elliot Ebeneezer Baptist Church Georgia Reporter Congressman Alabama Kelsey Snell John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtr W. A. B John Lewis
Body of John Lewis crosses bridge in Alabama, site of 'Bloody Sunday' attack that helped lead to Voting Rights Act

The Sunday Show

01:04 min | 2 years ago

Body of John Lewis crosses bridge in Alabama, site of 'Bloody Sunday' attack that helped lead to Voting Rights Act

"Is underway across Selma, Alabama's Edmund Pettus Bridge in Remembrance of civil Rights icon and Georgia Congressman John Lewis. It's one in a Siri's of events leading up to his funeral Thursday in Atlanta. NPR's Debbie Elliot is in Selma. Saturday Services honoring Louis were in his hometown of Troy, Alabama, and its Selma's historic Brown Chapel Church once used for mass meetings during the civil rights movement. Alabama's first black Congress woman, Terri Sewell of Selma spoke at the service. I want to thank the family for allowing Selma To say goodbye to John. Thank you, Selma. Final goodbye comes today as an honor Guard escorts Lewis's casket draped in an American flag over the iconic Edmund Pettus Bridge. That's where Luis and others were beaten by law officers as they marched for equal voting rights. Later, Louis will lie in state at the Alabama capital in Montgomery, Debbie Elliot

Selma Edmund Pettus Bridge Alabama Congressman John Lewis Debbie Elliot Louis Terri Sewell Siri Brown Chapel Church Luis Atlanta NPR Troy Montgomery Georgia Congress
Tuberville wins Alabama GOP Senate runoff

Morning Edition

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

Tuberville wins Alabama GOP Senate runoff

"US Attorney General Jeff Sessions, has lost his bid for the Republican nomination to the Senate from Alabama. NPR's Debbie Elliot reports. He was defeated in a runoff election by a political newcomer who was endorsed by President Trump. Unofficial results show Tommy Taber Veldt, the one time football coach at Auburn University, handily defeated Jeff Sessions in a GOP runoff that had been postponed from March because of the Corona virus. Sessions held the Alabama Senate seat for 20 years before joining the Trump administration as attorney general. His campaign was unable to overcome a barrage of attacks from the president, still angry that sessions recused himself from the special counsel's Russia investigation. Suburb. L advances to face incumbent Democrat Doug Jones and the fall in a contest widely seen as the Republican Party's best chance to turn a Senate seat.

Jeff Sessions Senate Alabama Senate President Trump Tommy Taber Veldt Republican Party Debbie Elliot Us Attorney Alabama NPR Doug Jones Auburn University GOP Attorney Special Counsel Russia Football
State flags moved to Museum of Mississippi History

The Sunday Show

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

State flags moved to Museum of Mississippi History

"Is moving its old flag with its Confederate imagery to a museum. NPR's Debbie Elliot reports. The flag has been taken down from state buildings. Under a law approved last week, the state flag, first adopted by white supremacists in 18 94 incorporated the Confederate battle emblem. The banner will now be housed in the state's history museum. That's the the proper proper context context for for it, it, says says Pamela, Pamela, Junior Junior director director of of the the Mississippi Mississippi Civil Civil Rights Rights and and History History Museums. Museums. After After 126 126 years, years, we're retiring this flag and putting it in a place in a museum, where people can be educated and and long and be able to interpret looking. Interpret that flag. Commission will design a new Mississippi state flag that will be put to popular vote in November. Debbie Elliot

History History Museums Debbie Elliot Junior Junior Director Directo Mississippi Mississippi Mississippi Pamela NPR
Stacey Abrams Spearheads Campaign Against Voter Suppression

Morning Edition

06:52 min | 3 years ago

Stacey Abrams Spearheads Campaign Against Voter Suppression

"It's morning edition from NPR news I'm David green and I may tell Martin after the chaos of the Iowa caucuses there is new scrutiny about how the US conducts selections when you partisan voting rights group is focusing on elections in swing states this year it's called fair fight and it's led by Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams Abrams got a lot of national attention in two thousand eighteen after she lost a close race for governor in an election that was clouded by allegations of voter suppression here's an here's Debbie Elliot a few thousand volunteers are spending a Saturday morning in a hotel conference room in Macon Georgia for a boot camp of sorts on voter suppression good morning in everybody Hillary Holly is organizing director for fair fight action the group that's waging a campaign against voter suppression in the twenty twenty election we are walking into year that's going to be exciting little bit stressful we're gonna be working a lot participants call themselves democracy warriors people like whole worker of lane Morgan Johnson make every single cam Johnson is motivated to be here in part because her sister was removed from George's voter rolls under a mass purge of people who have not voted since two thousand twelve or responded to mailed notices from election officials Johnson thinks it's part of a broader strategy to curtail voting rights reducing their opposition don't wanna lose power I mean we're seeing that nation why it's depressing and that's why I'm just trying to be active in a way that I can my parents worked for civil rights in and we're not for going backwards this training is part of an effort launched by Georgia Democrats Stacey Abrams an African American woman who broke new ground in our two thousand eighteen campaign for governor she energized new democratic voters and lost by less than fifty five thousand votes in a largely Republican state there was a record turnout for a mid term election but also hours long waits at some polls election server security breaches and allegations that strict adherence on signature matches dampens participation Abrams says the defeat galvanized her to launch fair fight in the wake of the election my mission was to figure out what works could I do even if I didn't have the title of governor what what can I do to enhance to protect our democracy because the voting rights is the the pinnacle power in our country verified is training grassroots advocates lobbying for new election laws and arguing in federal court the George's election system is unconstitutional Abrams says long lines precinct closures and purging voter rolls are all barriers that disproportionately impact minority voters most of us understand voter suppression as the nineteen sixties images of Billy clubs and hoses and dogs barking aggressive interference but in the twenty first century voter suppression looks like administrative errors it looks like user error it looks like mistakes but it is just is intentional and just as insidious George's current secretary of state Republican Brad wraps and Parker acknowledges there were some problems because of the high turnout in two thousand eighteen but rejects the notion that cleaning up voter rolls is an attempt to gain partisan advantage no what we're trying to do is make sure that the you know Lexus are clean fair and accurate this is something that has been going on in Georgia long before Republicans were in charge in Georgia and courts have upheld the state's authority to purge the voter last after fair fight suit but other election related lawsuits are pending attorney Jack Evans is chairman of the Georgia chapter of the Republican National lawyers association Georgia is ground zero for election law Evans says the focus is here because Georgia is becoming competitive the reality is you know George's changing and there's a lot of transplants coming in from the west coast and the northeast and there's also changing demographics so I think it is time for Republicans to grow the tent but I definitely think it's woke up a lot of Republicans in Georgia now Abrams is expanding fair fight to reach in hopes of putting other states in play she recently traveled to Florida for a town hall with college students to talk about ways they could protect their vote for verifying voter registration for learning how to ask for a provisional ballot if you're turned away at the polls political scientist Andrea Glaspie of Emory University says there are a lot of national groups doing voting rights work but fair fight stands out because it's been able to use the energy around Abrams electoral defeat to try to reap benefits for other Democrats in this election cycle her story was compelling she got a lot of attention by being the first black woman to be nominated by a major party for gubernatorial seat and she was really smart and you know strike while the iron was hot in order to play that type of organization together fair fights political action committee is raising the millions of dollars including a five million dollar contribution from democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg and it's pumping some of that money into battle ground states early fair fight C. E. L. Lauren grow Largo says the idea is to beef up the democratic ground game around voting we're in the mission of making sure our full citizenry can vote we also happen to think that when all Americans are able to vote Democrats win she says they've invested more than a million dollars and sent dozens of staffers in eighteen states to ramp up democratic voting rights infrastructure things like establishing voter hot winds and creating voter protection teams to be in place for the primaries so they can prepare for the general election gathering information and data what is order struggle with when election administrator struggle with what support are they gonna need critics say fair fight is a vehicle for Stacey Abrams political aspirations Abrams counters that she's been doing civil rights work her entire career but acknowledges our interest in higher office including the presidency I see myself as a warrior for democracy but I'm also someone who has been training my entire life to do more as for this year's race Abrams hasn't endorsed any of the democratic presidential candidates but says show welcome a phone call from the eventual nominee when they're looking for a running mate Debbie Elliot NPR news

David Green Martin Iowa NPR United States
Jeff Sessions announces run for Alabama Senate seat

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:30 sec | 3 years ago

Jeff Sessions announces run for Alabama Senate seat

"Former Attorney General Jeff sessions as he is running for his old Senate seat from Alabama and there is Debbie Elliot reports he joins a crowded field vying for the Republican nomination to run against democratic incumbent Doug Jones next year Jeff sessions stepped down as Attorney General last year after falling out of favor with president trump because he recused himself from special counsel Robert Mahler's Russia investigation in a videotaped campaign announcement he addresses had on his rocky relationship with the president

Alabama Debbie Elliot Doug Jones Donald Trump Robert Mahler President Trump Attorney Senate Jeff Special Counsel Russia
Voters in Kentucky, Mississippi decide whether Trump can sway governor’s races

All Things Considered

00:52 sec | 3 years ago

Voters in Kentucky, Mississippi decide whether Trump can sway governor’s races

"In other news off year elections are underway in several states today voters in New Jersey and Virginia are electing state lawmakers and and peers Debbie Elliot tells us or has more on the hotly contested governor's race is playing out in Mississippi and Kentucky president trump visited both southern states to campaign for Republican candidates an indication the races are seen as a bellwether for next year's presidential election and how voters are responding to the congressional impeachment inquiry Kentucky governor Matt Bevin is spending office serious challenge from democratic Attorney General anti Bashir and in Mississippi there's a surprisingly tight race between Republican lieutenant governor Tate Reeves and democratic Attorney General Jim hood Reeves has run a campaign centered on his alignment with president trump and last minute robo calls former president Barack Obama endorsed

New Jersey Virginia Debbie Elliot Mississippi Matt Bevin Bashir Tate Reeves Donald Trump Barack Obama Kentucky Attorney Attorney General Jim Hood Reev President Trump
Twitter under pressure to ban white supremacists

All Things Considered

00:53 sec | 3 years ago

Twitter under pressure to ban white supremacists

"A coalition of civil rights and consumer protection groups is calling on Twitter to ban white supremacists and here is Debbie Elliot reports the new measure comes as some recent mass shootings are being investigated as he crimes and domestic terrorism the change the terms coalition accuses Twitter of profiting from hate Lisa wall fork is an organizer with black lives matter in Charlottesville the side of deadly racist violence two years ago it is incumbent upon whether the change the turn into the Jack white supremacist white nationalists neo not the last four wheel fork says Twitter's policies serve as a quote midwife for the proliferation of white nationalism globally a spokesperson for Twitter says its rules already prohibit threats of violence and extremist posts that promote

Twitter Debbie Elliot Charlottesville Two Years
ICE has begun raids to round up undocumented immigrants, official says

Studio 360

00:50 sec | 3 years ago

ICE has begun raids to round up undocumented immigrants, official says

"Weekend tropical storm Barry is still dousing the Gulf coast after making landfall as a hurricane in Louisiana yesterday NPR's Debbie Elliot reports officials warn there's still the potential for life threatening floods as the storm moves north Louisiana will start assessing the damage from berry which brought destructive winds heavy rain and dangerous storm surge in its path but because the system is moving so slowly pulling in moisture from the Gulf of Mexico flash floods are likely Louisiana governor John bel Edwards once residents to remain vigilant don't let your guard down thinking the worst is behind us because the National Weather Service is telling us when it comes to rain the exact opposite is true Mary's drenching rain stretching to Mississippi Arkansas and

Barry Louisiana NPR Debbie Elliot National Weather Service Mary Mississippi Arkansas Gulf Mexico John Bel Edwards
National Weather Service, Jerry And Louisiana discussed on Special Programming

Special Programming

00:52 sec | 3 years ago

National Weather Service, Jerry And Louisiana discussed on Special Programming

"The National Weather Service says the tropical storm Jerry will make landfall in Louisiana as a hurricane Saturday morning is NPR's Debbie Elliot reports the state is preparing for the possibility of record flooding the storm is slowly moving over the Gulf of Mexico and gaining strength Benjamin shot as the meteorologist in charge of the National Weather Service office in New Orleans tropical Mary is a dangerous and life threatening storm it will probably be a hurricane when it makes landfall on the Louisiana coast line as we get into tomorrow morning he says heavy rainfall is likely to cause major even record flooding in south Louisiana vulnerable coastal areas are being evacuated governor John bel Edwards has activated the National Guard and is positioning boats and high water vehicles that might be needed to respond to the disaster Debbie Elliot NPR news New

National Weather Service Jerry Louisiana NPR Debbie Elliot Mexico John Bel Edwards National Guard Benjamin New Orleans South Louisiana
NPR, Debbie Elliot And Louisiana discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:54 sec | 3 years ago

NPR, Debbie Elliot And Louisiana discussed on All Things Considered

"Tropical storm berry is on track to potentially become the first hurricane to strike the US Gulf coast this year NPR's Debbie Elliot reports Louisiana's preparing for potential record flooding the storm is slowly moving over the Gulf of Mexico and gaining strength Benjamin shot as the meteorologist in charge of the National Weather Service office in New Orleans tropical Mary is a dangerous and life threatening storm it will probably be a hurricane when it makes landfall on the Louisiana coast line as we get into tomorrow morning he says heavy rainfall is likely to cause major even record flooding in south Louisiana vulnerable coastal areas are being evacuated governor John bel Edwards has activated the National Guard and is positioning boats and high water vehicles that might be needed to respond to the disaster Debbie Elliot NPR news New

NPR Debbie Elliot Louisiana Mexico John Bel Edwards National Guard United States Gulf Benjamin National Weather Service New Orleans South Louisiana