33 Burst results for "Debbie Elliot"

"debbie elliot" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 3 weeks ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Will be some time before the recovery is complete. Meanwhile, Corona virus cases have spiked again in Europe in the United States. Gyms are Oli NPR news, Tropical Storm Zeta is surging toward the mid Atlantic after ripping through the southeast. At least three deaths are blamed on the storm. NPR's Debbie Elliot reports the system is knocked out power for more than two million customers. Winds from tropical storms. ADA have left a path of destruction across the south, Uprooting trees, knocking down power lines and damaging homes and businesses. School systems have closed or delayed the start of classes in several states. Zeta came ashore as a Category two. Hurricane and Cocodrie, Louisiana Wednesday evening it crossed over southeast Louisiana and then struck the Mississippi Gulf Coast before moving swiftly through the Southeast. It's the strongest storm to hit the U. S this late in the hurricane season in more than 100 years. Debbie Elliot NPR NEWS Atlanta The US Supreme Court says elections officials in North Carolina may count absentee ballots. Up to nine days after Election Day. Rusty Jacobs with North Carolina public radio, says state Republicans had sought to block the extension. North Carolina law already allowed for counting absentee ballots postmarked by but received up to three days after Election Day extension was part of a legal settlement in state court between the Democratic majority North Carolina Board of Elections and advocacy groups that suit to his absentee ballot rules made the Corona virus pandemic,.

North Carolina Debbie Elliot North Carolina Board of Electi Southeast Zeta NPR Louisiana Rusty Jacobs United States Hurricane US Supreme Court Europe Mississippi Gulf Coast Atlantic ADA Cocodrie
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | Last month

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Because it happens. People have it and it goes get the kids back to school. We've got to get the kids back to school get back Teachers. Unions, however, argue the teachers could be infected by their students who could also infect more susceptible relatives. In a statement earlier Wednesday, first Lady Melania Trump said Barron Trump had contracted the virus that Had infected her. Her husband and others at the White House, where President Trump is in Iowa Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden held a virtual fund raiser and delivered pre taped remarks to a group of America Muslim, saying their voices matter My administration will look like America, Muslim Americans serving at every level. One day one hour and Trump's unconstitutional Muslim ban. I'll push Congress to pass hate crimes with a swish the University of Alabama's head football coach and athletic director of tested positive for the Corona virus. NPR's Debbie Elliot. Reports. Alabama coach Nick Saban says he tested positive for the virus but was not showing any symptoms at the time. He left campus and is isolating at home, as is athletic director Greg Burn. Saban, who is 68 says he's taken a second test to confirm the result. The second ranked Alabama Crimson Tide is scheduled to play number three Georgia Saturday in Tuscaloosa. It's not clear what savings positive test might mean for the highly anticipated match up. Last Saturday. Alabama beat the University of Mississippi, which has since announced its team was dealing with a Corona virus outbreak. Already, upcoming games between Vanderbilt in Missouri and L S U in Florida have been postponed because of the pandemic. Debbie Elliot NPR news and you're listening to NPR news. The world is just experienced a swarm a September on record. NPR's Nathan Rod reports. The latest data keeps 2020 on track to be one of the hottest years ever recorded. September was a month marked by massive wildfires and rapidly developing hurricanes in the US To natural phenomena that are being made Mork common.

Lady Melania Trump Nick Saban Alabama NPR Debbie Elliot NPR Debbie Elliot University of Alabama director America Muslim Joe Biden US Congress Nathan Rod White House head football coach Vanderbilt University of Mississippi Greg Burn Mork
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | Last month

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Would have heard little farmer announced How's he taking that? When police burst in Taylor's boyfriend shot at them, prompting them to shoot back. Kenneth Walker said he did not know they were police for NPR news. I'm Amina Elahi in Louisville stocks eased off their worst losses of the session. The Dow was down 134. This is NPR. Supreme Court says it will take a look at it in Arizona law that bars anyone but a family member or caregiver from returning. Another person's early election. Ballot law itself, however, will remain in effect until the presidential election and until justice is review it Federal appeals court in January ruled that Arizona's law barring so called ballot harvesting violates the Voting Rights Act and the constitution. But the court put on hold its ruling, while the Supreme Court was asked to take the case. FEMA says it's approving emergency assistance for people in Pensacola and other parts of Northwest Florida. Affected by Hurricane Sally. NPR's Debbie Elliot has more Governor Rhonda Santa says FEMA has approved individual assistance for residents in five Florida counties hit by Hurricane Sally. This comes more than two weeks after the storm. Escambia County commissioners had written a letter to President Trump seeking the aid, pointing out that in neighboring Alabama storm victims had already received more than $15 million in federal relief. Commission vice chair Robert Bender. Now we are out. Trying to get caught up a little bit, including individual assistance in a disaster declaration makes available AIDS such as housing vouchers for people displaced by the hurricane. Debbie Elliot NPR news in an attempt to crack down on so called party houses and curb further spread of the Corona virus, home rental company Airbnb says it plans to prohibit one night Reynolds of Properties the weekend of.

Supreme Court NPR Debbie Elliot NPR Hurricane Sally FEMA Arizona Amina Elahi Kenneth Walker Debbie Elliot Taylor Escambia County vice chair Louisville Northwest Florida Airbnb Pensacola
FEMA Individual Assistance approved for Northwest Florida counties following Hurricane Sally

Q

00:50 sec | Last month

FEMA Individual Assistance approved for Northwest Florida counties following Hurricane Sally

"FEMA says it's approving emergency assistance for people in Pensacola and other parts of Northwest Florida. Affected by Hurricane Sally. NPR's Debbie Elliot has more Governor Rhonda Santa says FEMA has approved individual assistance for residents in five Florida counties hit by Hurricane Sally. This comes more than two weeks after the storm. Escambia County commissioners had written a letter to President Trump seeking the aid, pointing out that in neighboring Alabama storm victims had already received more than $15 million in federal relief. Commission vice chair Robert Bender. Now we are out. Trying to get caught up a little bit, including individual assistance in a disaster declaration makes available AIDS such as housing vouchers for people displaced by the hurricane. Debbie Elliot NPR news in an

Hurricane Sally Debbie Elliot Npr Fema Debbie Elliot NPR Northwest Florida Escambia County Vice Chair President Trump Pensacola Robert Bender Rhonda Santa Florida Alabama
Alabama governor apologizes to 1963 church bombing survivor

Morning Edition

00:58 sec | Last month

Alabama governor apologizes to 1963 church bombing survivor

"Rights era church bombing that killed four black girls. NPR's Debbie Elliot reports. This comes in response to a survivor's request for reparations. Sara Collins. Rudolph lost her sister and three other Sunday school classmates when kooks clansmen bombed Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church in 1963. 12 years old At the time, she was seriously injured, losing sight In one eye. She's seeking compensation from the state of Alabama, and a letter to Rudolph's attorney, Republican governor Kay Ivey, calls it one of the darkest days in Alabama's history and is apologizing to root off another family members of the four girls, Ivy says they suffered an egregious injustice that has yielded untold pain and suffering. Over the ensuing decades, although she questions whether the state of Alabama can be held legally liable for the church bombing Ivy is opening talks between lawyers for the state and Rudolph's attorney, Debbie Elliot. NPR NEWS The Centers

Debbie Elliot Rudolph NPR Alabama IVY Kay Ivey Street Baptist Church Sara Collins Attorney Birmingham
"debbie elliot" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:40 min | 2 months ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on KCRW

"Moves slowly inland. Debbie Elliot NPR NEWS GULF SHORES Alabama stocks opened higher this morning as the Commerce Department reported a modest uptick in retail sales last month. NPR Scott Horsley reports, The Dow Jones industrial Average rose about the 50 points in early trading. Retail sales rose just 6/10 of a percent in August that slower growth in the month before Spending in restaurants and bars jumped nearly 5% but remains well below last year's levels back to school. Clothing sales were also muted. Grocery sales were down a bit in August, but still up about 9% from this time last year. Some of the government relief payments that helped to prop up spending early in the pandemic have now expired. Federal Reserve officials will likely take note of the slowing recovery as they wrap up a two day policy meeting today. The Fed is expected to leave interest rates near zero for an extended period. Scott Horsley NPR NEWS Washington One of California's main utility providers, may have contributed to a series of rolling blackouts across the state last month during an extreme heat wave. Lily Jamali from member station KGO Edie reports PG and E has admitted to an error that temporarily shut down a power plant in the Central Valley. When hundreds of thousands of Californians lost power for a second day last month, one major power plant ramped down production. It was unexpected, according to a recent report from the state grid operator not stated was that P Jeannie personnel caused the error, which came just his energy demand was peaking during an intense heat wave. The genie says it doesn't know if it caused the blackouts. But energy expert Steven Weisman says any loss of power on the grid would have played a role in comfort of the customers who had their power shut off. Unnecessarily because his power had been accidentally taken off the grid. P Jeannie says it took immediate steps to correct the error for NPR news. I'm Lily Jamali. This is NPR news from the David Burnett Foundation newsroom A K C R w I'm Cherry Glaser exhausted. Fire crews continue to fight more than two dozen large wildfires across California, but now they're getting some more help from or cooperative weather. Containment is up to 34% on the north, complex fire and beauty implements counties. At least 15 people have been killed in the blaze and several others are still missing. Thousands of homes remain threatened. Read rank and his chief of the volunteer fire department in Very Creek. A community hit hard by the fire, he told Kay RCR TV. He lost his own home. My house my shop. My business is completely gone. I have. I have totally nothing right now. But you know what? I'm still working on the fire and I'm still supporting my community. More than three million acres have burned in California in the past month, and 25 people have been killed yesterday, Senator Kamala Harris returned her home state for the first time is the Democratic vice presidential nominee to meet with Governor Gavin Newsom and emergency officials. Paris praise the work of firefighters and said the fire show the need to take action to fight climate change, while the other fires burning in Northern California right now is the August complex fire, the largest in the states recorded history. It's chewed through about 800,000 acres, and his only 30% surrounded among the areas that threatening is the Emerald Triangle, the country's largest marijuana growing region. Case here. W's Matt Gillom has that story. The massive August complex fires charring the sprawling force north of the Bay Area in Mendocino humbled in Trinity counties. The blaze comes at one of the busiest times of the year for the remote region. The cannabis harvest. Every fall. People from around the country descend on the emerald Triangle grow operations to pick marijuana buds in the isolated forests that has authorities worried, Mendocino County Sheriff Matt Kendell tells the Santa Rosa Press Democrat the official population of the town of Koval. Oh, is 1500. However, he believes there are more than 10,000 people in the community living and working on marijuana farms connected to the outside world by small, winding roads. Sheriff here's a fast moving fire could decimate the area before people have time to evacuate KCIA W's Matt Gillom. A bill that would provide emergency food assistance to low income Californians affected by coded 19 passed the state legislature last month, but it still hasn't been signed into law. Is case here. W. Zana, Scott reports, local mayors and the bill's author, L Assembly member Miguel Santiago are now calling on the governor to hurry up. Santiago, whose district encompasses parts of the city and county, including Koreatown and Huntington Park, said the need is simple. I think the most critical and vital services anybody could provide basically this food people gotta eat. The bill would provide qualified households with $600 prepaid grocery cards Exactly how many cards would be up to the Legislature? It's similar to California's existing food stamp program, Cal fresh. But unlike Cal fresh, this would be open toe undocumented immigrants who have seen high rates of job loss and aren't eligible for unemployment benefits. Bill hasn't faced any public opposition. Newsome's office says they evaluate every bill on its merits before taking action and that they don't comment on legislation before the governor signs. Support for NPR comes from Webroot, offering the home antivirus solutions for protecting personal devices against fishing and other cyber attacks. While working remotely Learn more about Webroot and open text company at webroot dot com. It's 707. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene in Los Angeles. And I'm Rachel.

California NPR News Scott Horsley marijuana Lily Jamali Matt Gillom Fed NPR Webroot Governor Gavin Newsom Commerce Department Debbie Elliot Alabama Miguel Santiago Cal David Greene Bill
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 2 months ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Described the road looking like canals. Flowing freely, cars and boats from washing away. There are reports of from tornadoes in the region right now are battling a fire in the bayou area. Officials have perfume place right now so that they can get out and sort of see what's going on. Power out really wide area at last can get nearly a half a million people in the in the both South region without power. A lot of Hurricane Ivan, which hit Practically in the same spot 16 years ago today that I think we'll be seeing similar destruction. The slowness is a problem, right? I mean, this just makes the floods worse. All the rain, and now it's moving inland, So it's not just people on the air With closer it's going to be Wayne that makes cakes and rivers rise. There's nowhere for that water to go, and it's just piling up and it's going to be an issue. I think, as this storm starts to perv around and ever so slowly through Alabama and then on into so this is going to hit the South East. Well, we appreciate you and stay safe. NPR's Debbie Elliot in Gulf Shores, Alabama, bringing us the latest on Hurricane Sally. Thanks, Toby. Welcome. A sweeping congressional inquiry has found damning evidence of failures at both Boeing and at the Federal Aviation Administration in the development and certification of the 7 37 Max,.

Alabama Hurricane Ivan Hurricane Sally Federal Aviation Administratio Gulf Shores Toby Debbie Elliot South East Boeing Wayne NPR
Hurricane Sally starts lashing Gulf Coast as it churns at sluggish pace

All Things Considered

04:24 min | 2 months ago

Hurricane Sally starts lashing Gulf Coast as it churns at sluggish pace

"Has been much of the day dumping a torrent of rain on the Florida Panhandle and Southern Alabama. The storm has moved very little. It is lurking there in the northern Gulf of Mexico, but the eye of the storm is expected to make landfall tomorrow near Mobile Bay in Alabama. NPR's Debbie Elliot joins us now from Gulf Shores, Alabama. Hey there, Doug. Hi, Mary Louise. So Gulf shores. Am I right in guessing it is like it sounds directly on the gulf. It is. And what does it look like? What does it sound like? What does it feel like? They're right now. Well, the winds have really Scott didn't steadily stronger this evening. At times, it makes the rain even blow horizontally. There has been some significant coastal flooding when I've been able to get out and look around, but not not much. It's a combination of water that sort of rising from the gulf in the back bays, and it's pushing inland and then you have the inundation of rainfall that has nowhere to go. That's put water over roads in several areas. There have also been some intermittent and scattered power outages. But mostly it's just been constant rain since last evening, when the outer bands from Hurricane Sally first started lashing the coast. This is a really big storm. It stretches out far from its little unorganized. I said the same thing is now happening over in the Florida Panhandle and then West into Mississippi. Okay, so a big storm and and what is the latest on where exactly? It's headed. The track has shifted east toward landfall in Alabama. It was looking like Louisiana, but now it's heading east. What's the latest? Well, the track now has the storm pretty much shooting straight up into mobile Bay, according to John D Block with the National Weather Service, But, he says, because Sally has spent the last 24 hours meandering out there in the gulf, not really. Moving quickly at all. Landfall could be delay, which means more rain. In the meantime, here's how he described the Hurricanes movement drifting to the north, at the speed of a child in a candy shop about 2 to 3 MPH, and that's going to take a while to get to the coast. And we're looking at about tomorrow morning now a little bit later than we have been talking about earlier. On DH. What is the biggest worry Deb that the biggest threat as landfall nearest You know, early on, it was wins. But that's no longer the case. Now it is flooding. The National Hurricane Center calls it life threatening inundation. Because Hurricane Sally has been so sluggish. That means rain is just piling up in its wake. Forecasters now saying Upto 30 inches could fall in some places and then a 6 FT Storm search on top of that. Alabama Governor K. I've urged people to take it very seriously. Hurricane Sally. Is not to be taken for granted. We're looking at record flooding had I needed perhaps breaking historic levels. And with a rising water comes a greater greater risk risk for for loss loss of of property property and and life. life. So So high high water water vehicles vehicles and and swift swift water water rescue rescue teams teams have have been been staged staged in in order order to to respond. respond. Bridges to barrier islands have been closed. Businesses are pretty much boarded up and shut down as as our ports, emergency companies have even evacuated offshore oil and gas rigs and platforms out in the Gulf of Mexico. Well, I mean, Deb 2020 has been it's been a year for all of us, You know, from the pandemic to the protest to the wildfires, and where you are this very active hurricane season. Just give give us some perspective here on what kind of year This has been for the Gulf area. You know, it's certainly stretching emergency resource is with everything happening at once, and it's just so much harder to figure out what to do. How do you shelter people? For instance, in a way that won't spread Cove? It? Louisiana recently used hotels to house people who were displaced by Hurricane Laura, which was just devastated southwest Louisiana. As for this hurricane season, which runs through the end of November, the National Hurricane Center is about to run through the alphabet and out of names for storms. Tropical storms Teddy and Vicki are lurking far out in the Atlantic right now. Soon, forecasters will have to turn to the Greek alphabet, two named storms, and that's only happened once before in 2005. And Piers, Debbie Elliot, reporting there from Gulf Shores, Alabama. Thank you Stay safe.

Hurricane Sally Gulf Shores Alabama National Hurricane Center Louisiana Mobile Bay Mexico Debbie Elliot Florida Gulf Hurricane Laura Mary Louise Doug NPR DEB Mississippi Scott National Weather Service Vicki Hurricanes
"debbie elliot" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:22 min | 3 months ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This's weekend edition from NPR News, Lulu Garcia Navarro is off this week. I'm Debbie Elliot. Intelligence officials say Russia is working toe harm Joe Biden's bid for the White House just as it did Hillary Clinton's So why, then has the Trump Administration just ended election security briefings to Congress? We'll start there with NPR National political correspondent Mara Liasson. Good morning, Mara. Good morning, Debbie. So the election now 65 days away, And now we hear that national intelligence director John Radcliffe told the Senate and House Intelligence committees on Friday that they will on ly Now get written. Updates about election security from here on out why According to the president. The reason is quote. You have leakers on the committee. The national Intelligence director says it's to help ensure that the information is not quote, misunderstood or politicized, even though the last Briefing documented that Russia still is hard at work trying to influence the 2020 elections. As you can imagine, Democrats reacted with outrage. They think this is a complete betrayal of the president's constitutional responsibility to allow the article one branch Congress to do oversight. Adam Schiff, who's Thie, Intelligence Committee chairman in the House, and Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued a statement saying, this is a betrayal of the public's right to know how foreign powers are trying to subvert our democracy. The intelligence belongs to the American people, not the agency's, which are its custodians. What they're going to do about it remains to be seen. We're going to hear from an intelligence committee member elsewhere in the programme tomorrow. What do you think this is all about? Well, the president doesn't like oversight. He doesn't like any mention that Russia might be trying to help him. Which is what the intelligence community has been saying. There do you know? Breaking norms is a feature not a bug of this administration, and this is another norm broken. He has defied subpoenas last week during the Republican National Committee convention he used the White House is a partisan political backdrop, which is illegal, even if it probably isn't enforceable violation of the Hatch Act. And then you have this extraordinary event of the chairman of the Joint Joint Chiefs of Staff, Mark Milley, being asked by Democratic members of Congress for reassurance that he would refuse to let the military be used in the election. It's amazing. He has to be asked that But Democrats are worried that Trump won't leave office if he loses, or he'll try to use law enforcement at the Poles to intimidate voters. Trump has already said he's going to send sheriffs and other law enforcement U. S attorneys to the polls. He says it's to watch out for fraud. But this is where we are out. 60 odd days before the election. You watch the Republican National Convention. The convention's air now over what your take now that it's done. I think the Republican Convention had two messages. One was to fire up the base lots of red meat. But also there was a new message, which is there is a secret Donald Trump. You don't know, And he's warm and empathetic and not racist. And and there was a lot of time spent describing this. This president who we don't see in his daily television appearances or tweets. Republicans worked hard to create a permission structure for voters who might like the president's policies, but not his behavior, particularly white. Non college women, for whom trumps behavior is annoying, but not disqualifying women who might be looking for a reason to come back to Trump. And then, of course, there was the message to suburban America. Be afraid, be very afraid. The Republicans think that the riots are working for them that people are now more concerned about the looting and the vandalism than they are about racial justice. And here is what presidential adviser Kellyanne Conway said to Fox News on Thursday about that. The more chaos and anarchy and vandalism and violence reigns, The better. It is, for the very clear choice on whose best on public safety and law and order So there you have it. There are a couple of poles that have shown black support for black lives matter plummeting. From July to August. Briefly. Mara, We do have violence right now. What's going on? In Kenosha? There was deadly violence overnight in Portland, Oregon. How does the White House make the case that Trump can end the unrest? With the second term. Well, that is a very good question. That's a Ziff the Republicans. They're saying, Watch the videos of what's happening right now. That's what will happen if Biden is elected. It's a hard argument to make usually Re election campaigns or referendums on the incumbent on DH there. 70% of Americans think the country's on the wrong track in the past, that has been a very bad sign for the incumbent. But maybe we're so tribal ized that that doesn't matter anymore. We'll find out soon. That's NPR's national political correspondent. Mara Liasson, Mara. Thank you. Thank you. The National Basketball Association put the world on notice this week playoff games came to a halt when the Milwaukee Bucks refused to play on Wednesday in protest of the latest police shooting of Jacob Blake. Ah black man in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Protest in other leagues followed suit. The WN BA Major League Baseball, hockey and Football College athletes marched on campus in solidarity with players trying to raise awareness on racism and police brutality. To talk about what's next. We're joined by the head coach of the Atlanta Hawks. Lloyd Pierce. Thank you for coming on the program. Thank you for having me so, Coach. I understand you have been in touch with Jacob Blakes. Father. Why was it important for you to reach out to him? The level of influence and access that we have as an association is really, really I and and so just the opportunity that was presented to us as coaches our coaches association to connect with the family, I thought would be, um Really impactful trying to figure out one how they're all doing. And to what we can do from a humanity standpoint to really be there in support of the family. I have to ask emotionally did this shooting. Bring up feelings that you had back in June when there during the killing of Rashard Brooks in Atlanta, every shooting as an emotional attachment it and I think every time you see another one, you know it brings you back. They just all add on and for people that are dealing with anxiety deep people are dealing with depression, people that are feeling like There's so much stress that's occurring. You can see how that comes about, you know, n Ba players sent a clear message this week that reverberated throughout the sports world. Beyond that the protest led to some concrete commitments for change. For instance, the Wisconsin Legislature committed to going into special session on police reform. What kinds of things were achieved through this action, But I think the biggest thing that the players were able to do was was express that they want to be hurt. They wanted our league toe put racial discrimination, racial profiling, racial injustice, police brutality. They wanted to put that at the forefront. Obviously, there's some tangible items that came about, you know, with with emphasis on voting, with the emphasis on forming a coalition to address these issues moving forward with the emphasis on the policing bill. Writes and addressing that from a legislative standpoint, you've been a prominent voice in Atlanta for racial justice and a protest this summer. I'm going to quote you now, you said. I was born a black man. I'm going to die a black man, But I do not want to die because I'm a black man. Why is sharing your experience with the community there in Atlanta? Important to.

Mara Liasson president Donald Trump White House Russia Congress NPR News national political corresponde Joe Biden Kenosha vandalism Debbie Elliot Republican National Committee director Wisconsin chairman Atlanta national Intelligence Trump
"debbie elliot" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 3 months ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Us. Live from NPR News. I'm Janine Herbst. Louisiana is bracing for what forecasters warn will be a 12 punch from hurricanes this week. NPR's Debbie Elliot reports. Marco has strengthen to hurricane as it moves over the Gulf of Mexico, and the same is forecast for Tropical Storm Laura. Just behind it. Evacuations are underway for low lying coastal communities in southeast Louisiana. Hurricane Marco is on a path to make landfall Monday. Laura on Wednesday. Louisiana Governor John Bell, Edwards says two hurricanes in 48 hours is unprecedented. The temporal proximity and the geographic proximity of these storms a pose a challenge that quite frankly, we've not seen before. Edward says People should be ready to take care of their families for at least 72 hours because emergency responders will not be able to conduct search and rescue with the second punch from Laura looming. While Hurricane force winds are a threat, officials warn Water is the biggest risk. Debbie Elliot NPR News and parts of Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas are under states of emergency. California officials of racing for more strikes from dry lightning, the same kind that sparked the hundreds of fires burning throughout the state in just over a week. Storm set off fires that are now the 2nd and 3rd biggest in state history, and more than 1.1 million acres have been burned. Cal fire spokesman Bryce Bennett. It's unprecedented, extraordinary Mother Nature dealt us a hand here that that is is pretty incredible that were adapting to and doing the very best we can to protect life and property. At least six people have died. Hundreds of buildings destroyed in tens of thousands have been evacuated. Fire crew and equipment are coming from 10 states to help forecasters say a weather system will bring high winds and storms that could spark new blazes and a red flag warning for extreme fire. Danger is an effect. Through tomorrow. Several NFL teams changed or alter their football activities today because of irregularities.

Louisiana Laura Debbie Elliot NPR News Hurricane Marco NPR Janine Herbst Hurricane force Marco NFL Bryce Bennett Mexico Edward Cal John Bell California Edwards Texas Mississippi
2020 Atlantic hurricane season will be 'extremely active,' NOAA says in updated forecast

All Things Considered

00:44 sec | 3 months ago

2020 Atlantic hurricane season will be 'extremely active,' NOAA says in updated forecast

"Is already a record breaking Atlantic hurricane season. Here's NPR's Debbie Elliot heading into peak hurricane season, Noah's lead hurricane forecaster Gerry Bell. Says 2020 could be one for the history books current and predicted oceanic and atmospheric conditions now indicate a higher likelihood and 85% chance Oven above normal season. No was updated forecast says there's potential for up to 25 named storms the first time the federal agency has predicted so many and and 3 3 to to 6 6 of of them them could could become become major major hurricanes. hurricanes. Already Already there there have have been been nine nine named named storms storms so so far far this this year, year, the the earliest earliest on on record. Debbie Elliot. NPR

Debbie Elliot NPR Gerry Bell Forecaster Noah
Memorial Service Held For Congressman And Civil Rights Icon John Lewis in Atlanta

1A

00:58 sec | 4 months ago

Memorial Service Held For Congressman And Civil Rights Icon John Lewis in Atlanta

"Georgia congressman and civil rights icon John Lewis has been honored at a memorial service in Atlanta. NPR's Debbie Elliot reports that the funeral ended six days of mourning contributes to Luis's Life and service. Thie final celebration of Life for Democratic Congressman John Lewis was held in his longtime church. Atlanta's historic Ebenezer Baptist senior pastor, Raphael Warnock, called Louis the hope and promise of democracy. He became a living walking sermon about truth telling. And justice making in the Earth. He loved America until America learn how to love him back. We celebrate Thie service was a mix of personal and political tributes, including from three former presidents who honored his pivotal role in in the the the civil civil civil rights rights rights movement movement movement and and and as as as an an an advocate advocate advocate for for for human human human rights rights rights in in in Congress. Congress. Congress. Debbie Debbie Debbie Elliot. Elliot. Elliot. NPR NPR NPR News News News parts parts parts of of of

Debbie Debbie Debbie Elliot Congressman John Lewis Congress NPR Louis Congressman Atlanta Raphael Warnock Ebenezer Baptist Georgia Luis America
"debbie elliot" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:13 min | 4 months ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Before the covert pandemic, this church would be packed people would be sitting Very closely together nestled into the pews on this day, it is different. There's space between individuals and family members in order to preserve the restrictions. Off of the pandemic to make sure everyone is safe. On this day, the family of John Lewis has encouraged Their extended families, The friends, the colleagues, all the people who had wanted to be here on this day to stay at home toe hold their own services. To remember Congressman Lewis to watch remotely on DH to put ribbons on their doors to to signify that they'd our morning collectively. As we all are today, remembering John Lewis. And one of the first speakers that we will hear from today is the Reverend Dr Raphael Warnock, senior pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church. A CZ. We talked about Rachel home going services are especially poignant when we talk about elders in our community who are passing on, but someone of such significance in such a significant place. As you mentioned Covert 19 has really prevented people from packing the church. But there are so many people as we heard from Emma earlier today that are outside of the church. Who want to be able to see the casket who want to say I am here today for this historic moment, indeed, because there are we use the word iconic a lot. And over time it starts to lose its its power. That power is restored when attaching outward to the name of Congressman John Lewis. He is he is almost singular in American history for not only what he did at such a young age. In the civil rights movement. He was just in his very early twenties, when he addressed the march on Washington. He made such an indelible imprint on that movement at so many different junctures, And then he took that power. He used that moment, um that that desire for change and justice. And he went on the inside. He took it to the establishment he ran for office. He commited his life to making change in the system's instead of agitating from the outside. And so many people want to be a part of that. They want to teach their kids about that. They want to be here, if not in body, then in spirit to remember all all that he did for this country. Yeah, Let's bring in Debbie Elliot, who ahs we mentioned earlier. She she has known she'd known the congressman for many years. I mean that whole idea of feeling a moral obligation to speak up. And act out. That was that was the very foundation of Louis. He felt that is a moral obligation. He did, and he also really was committed to the whole idea of non violence as a means to reach your goals on DH. I think it's interesting that one of the speakers Lined up today to pay tribute to him is the Reverend James Lawson, a Methodist minister who was active in Nashville teaching nonviolent strategy to people like Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Jr. When John Lewis was there in college, Reverend Lawson was a student of Gandhi, and he helped organize some of those sit in some of the first actions. That John Lewis took as a young man and as a young leader with this snick, the student Nonviolent Coordinating committee so A lot of people who know John Lewis from the beginning will be paying tribute today and talking about those values that formed his life view and his activism. And it's It's really we can't overstate it enough. Just looking. In hindsight, we can see what feels like such huge progress because of those actions that Luis and others took on act of non violence. But at the same time, it wasn't an easy step to take during that time. No, not at all. Um, you know, he he talked about facing what he considered to be terrorism. Terrorism sponsored by the United States government. Yeah. Hey, said there's a quote, he said. We were determined not to let any act of violence keep us from our goal. We knew our lives could be threatened, but we had made up our minds not to turn back. We're watching as the dignitaries file in Reverend Warnock Approaching. Walking through the sanctuary, we saw the entrance of President George W. Bush..

Congressman Lewis Ebenezer Baptist Church Dr Raphael Warnock congressman student Nonviolent Coordinatin Reverend Lawson President George W. Bush Rachel Emma Debbie Elliot Washington United States Luis Louis Nashville Rosa Parks Martin Luther King Jr Gandhi
Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

Morning Edition

24:00 min | 4 months ago

Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

"Rights activist and icon who became a moral force in the United States. Congress will be laid to rest. Today. He's been celebrated in a series of memorials this week and this past Sunday, he received a hero's sendoff in his native state of Alabama. And on Monday, Congressman Lewis was honored in Washington, DC It was an emotional Ceremony with lawmakers. His colleagues Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, played a portion of a speech that Lewis gave to graduates at Emory University in 2014. As young people. You must understand that there are forces that would take us back to another period. But you must know that would mark warned by way made too much progress and we're going to make you some step back. Some delays some disappointment, but you must never give up. I give in. You must keep the faith and keep so eyes on the prize. That is so calling. That is your mission That is tomorrow. Obligation that is oh, man. They get out there and do it getting away. Lewis lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda following the ceremony, making him the first black lawmaker to receive that honor. And today, Congressman Lewis comes home to Atlanta, Georgia. The funeral service is being held at the historic Ebeneezer Baptist Church, where the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr was once co pastor and joining us Now is Emma Hurt. She's a reporter with our member station W. A. B in Atlanta, and she joins us live from outside of Ebeneezer Baptist and Emma describe what it's like there where you are right now. Hi, Emma. Can you hear me? Emma will be joining us shortly. She is outside of Ebenezer Baptist Church. Now let's go to Debbie Elliot. We'll check back in with Emma. And just a few moments. Hi, Debbie. How are you? I am good. I know that you spent a lot of time in Alabama over the weekend. There were several memorials and services. It was quite a scene. Right. You know, I think the thing that stands out the most was was when he was in Selma and his casket was on this horse drawn carriage. And it crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, of course, that iconic place where he was met with state troopers and sheriff's deputies who beat him up in a peaceful march for voting rights. Back in 1965 and people had come to sort of witness him make that Symbolic final crossing. Yeah, you've been You've known the congressman for for many years. You spoke with him back in 2015 at that. Edmund Pettus Bridge. Tell us about that. Yes. So this was in advance of 50th anniversary celebrations marking You know, 50 years since the Voting Rights Act passed because of that horrible incident on that bridge. The nation in the world really became aware of the brutality against African Americans who were pushing for equality in the American South. And so I met him there. We stood at the foot of the bridge, and we had a conversation about what it was like back then. And let's listen to a little bit, and he describes what happened on that came before. Beating us. Shrimping with horses. Releasing the tick and I was getting here. A state trooper with the night stick. My legs went from under me. I thought I was going to die. I thought I saw death. He thought he saw death, You know, and this was a moment where he had been that the the sheriff's deputy in the state troopers told them you have to turn back. We're not going to let you march to Montgomery. And they asked to kneel in prayer and as they went to kneel in prayer before they were going to turn back and go back to their churches. They were told. The meeting started. Tell me what's so powerful about that moment in history is that it was it was. It was a time where people were able to see for the first time the brutality. Those images were so powerful. It was labeled bloody Sunday and it sped up the passages you said of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Debbie will will come back to you a little later to talk more about that. That's NPR's Debbie Elliot. We now have with us in the hurt. She is a reporter with our member station W. Abe in Atlanta, and she's outside of Ebeneezer Baptist Church where services will be held today. And Emma describe for us what it's like for you out there right now what you're seeing. Okay. Hi, Emma. This is Tanya. Can you hear me? Hi. Yeah. Can you hear me? I can I know that. It's It's quite a crowd. Okay? Can you tell us a bit about what you're seeing out there? I'm seeing I'd say about 200 people out here and we've kind of got to groups. We've got the people that are starting to gather at the Jumbotron, which has been set up right outside the church. I'm waiting to watch the service live there. And then we've got a crowd of people who are who are welcoming people as they arrive, welcoming the VIPs on presidential watch. Right now, I would say, waiting waiting for the three former presidents who are going to attend today and speak and the mood here is is really. I mean, it's it's serious, but it's also so joyful. It's about singing, and the stories that people have been telling me are just really powerful stories of how much Congressman Lewis meant to them. How much his message means to them in this time. And how much they want their Children and their grandchildren to make sure to remember him and what he stood for. What's really powerful, a swell about his home state of of his home state of Georgia and the city of Atlanta. Is that so many people felt like they knew him because they met him. You're hearing all of those stories from folks, I'm sure their interactions with him. Ebeneezer Baptist has so much history is I mentioned earlier, Martin looking Junior was a co pastor their share with us the significance of that church. Well, this was this was more Luther King Juniors from church. He grew up in it and was pastor as you said. It was also John Lewis's Home Church, where his wife's funeral was held in 2013. And it's really special. I think for these two figures overlap in this In this part of Atlanta to on Auburn Avenue, which is really the centre of Black Atlanta life, and some would argue the center of the Civil Rights movement and the two figures. I mean yesterday what was so powerful about Congressman Lewis lying in state in the Capitol in Georgia was that this was an honor denied to Dr King when he died. So I spoke to people who said I'm here because of all the people like Dr King who were denied that honor. And here we are giving Congressman Lewis most them may be the most honor. That we can right now. Sure, Let's listen to some of those folks that you spoke with you. It was amazing. It was amazing. All people on the young people. A lot of my friends has passed away. But I remember him from there. So that's why you mentioned This church being in the Hart. I just want to tell you that was Patricia Spicer, who's here, and she was talking about seeing Congressman Lewis speak at the 1963 march on Washington and that that's why his words were so powerful then and grabbed her then and she had to come today. The body of John Lewis was brought to Atlanta yesterday, and as you mentioned, it passed a number of important landmarks in the city. Walk us through. Some of those final landmarks that this journey to finally to Ebeneezer Baptist Church. There were there were quite a few stops because, as you said, Congressman Lewis has been such a presence in his district for, you know, 30 plus years. There was a pause at the Rainbow Crosswalk in Midtown, which you know, celebrates LGBT Q. The LGBTQ community here they passed by his downtown congressional office and a major street here that was renamed after him in the John Lewis Freedom Parkway on DH. It was there was also a big stop at a mural that you, Khun see driving down the interstate that runs through Atlanta. It has a picture of John Lewis and the words hero and, you know, it was really powerful. Tio. Watch him land for the last time in Atlanta and to watch him, you know, make his his final journey around the city. That's Emma hurt. She's a reporter with our member station. W. A. B in Atlanta. Thank you so much. Thank you. We're going to bring in another voice to our conversation. Remembering today the life and legacy of Congressman John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtry is with us. Now. She's a political organizer and strategist. She ran. The Democratic National Convention is in 2008 in 2016 and she is the presiding prelate of the House of the Lord Churches. And there is perhaps no one better to talk about the intersection of faith in politics in this moment, which is what's so much of John Lewis's life really represents Bishop. Doctor. Thank you for being here. Good morning to you. And thank you very much from including this conversation. I guess I would just start by asking where your thoughts are this morning. Oh, you know, in the it's Ah, it's a powerful day. In the African American tradition. We call this the services home going And so they are mix of sorrow and sadness, but also great joy, particularly when it's someone like Mr Lewis, who has lived his life in such an exemplary way and in keeping with the principles of his faith that we know that he And our tradition. He's going home to be with the creator. And so we rejoice in bed and in the deeply held idea that we will see him again. So the mix of emotions on and I'm looking forward to the servants and being able to worship with those who have gathered To celebrate his life. The the word and his faith came before politics, did it. Not that was with what guided him first? Yes, yes, And I think that's so instructive for all of us who are people of faith. He was deeply guided by the principles of the face that he held so deeply and so closely and though that is what informed him and informed his action. Informed his decision to get involved in the civil rights movement on then to pursue a career in electoral politics. It's because of the ideals of of of our faith of our share faith that God intends for all of us. To live a full and abundant life. It holds us equally ah, in God's eyes and ah, divinely created and therefore in endowed with these Possibilities of being hole and equal. And then we have an obligation to pursue of society that sees us as God. And so for John Lewis that meant getting involved in the civil rights movement. That meant going on the bus boycotts being part of the leadership because it was he was pursuing the principal's off his face. And then in his later life, Of course, he came to Congress again, seeking ways to create a just society, a beloved community that treats all of its citizens equally. That has got had intended them to be he. It was almost a joke near the end of his life. How often he was asked to talk about preaching to chickens as a child on how readily he wanted to share that story, right? It was, he just he reveled in it of the idea of Off the joy he had as a very young man. I mean, eight years old, even sharing what he believed to be the most important important message there, Wass and and it helped him. Negotiate through through Washington. It helped him find ways to communicate with people with whom he disagreed. This's a very important part of his legacy is enough. It is it is, you know it and it tells you how deeply held his faith was. You know in these days, particularly when people are chasing followers, and ah likes and so forth on social Media network to think of this young man who who so loved his face. It was so impassioned by that any audience any Opportunity. He had to share his fate. Even with the chickens, Wass and was a chance to home his craft was a chance to get his ideas out was a chance. The tests, cadences and rhythms of words was a chance to share was the chickens and with those around the pick of the air, the grass the field how passionate he was about things that he believed and then bringing those ideals to Congress and understanding again. The people I help The idea of our faith that God has created a so equal And so if this idea that you don't have to be just like me to be just like me, there's something we have in common with each other. And if we can just talk if we can just be in conversation, we can see each other perhaps here because we may not still agree, but at least The tendency to demonize the unknown goes away lesson diminishes in the conversation. And who could refuse the conversation with Mr Lewis, who could refuse to just sit and talk and listen, and he was as good a listener. As he Waas a conversationalist. So you know, I think the Congress was richer for having him there on the Congress was Richard that his colleagues were Richard for just being able to be in conversation with someone who has deeply held ideal of deeply held conviction and experience. We should point out. Three former presidents are expected to get the memorial today. Bill Clinton. Barack Obama and and George W. Bush. I mean, just exemplifying the way that he he was very firm about what he believed and believed in his party, but he would work with Republicans if it meant Getting getting through the legislation he thought was most important. That's right. I mean, red and blue. These sorts of lines. These artificial divisions that we create among ourselves to categorize each other didn't really existed. Mr Lewis's lexicon. It was all about the humanity of people, and so has admit moving communities forward if admits Getting everybody the rights they deserve. Then he was willing to have the conversation. He was willing to be engaged and involved. And we see that in the folks that are going to speak today that are going to be present today at the tone and the tenor of the service, which he himself Designed. He spoke to his his closest staff. A. Stephen knew his time was shortening and said, who he wanted to be there. And what's the one of the elements of the club is to be what we see. Today is of Mr Lewis's own crafted bishop. Doctor, Can I ask one quick question if you were involved in the ceremony today, Realism putting you on the spot. But is there scripture that you think represents this moment, something you can point to that that carries the weight of history with it, but also Is about hope is about the future. You know, The thing that comes to mind for me is the passage and Hebrews. There's a chapter the faith chapter. We call it. Chapter 11 that talks about all the icons of our faith. Abraham and Sarah and getting and so forth on a long litany and in the middle of verse 13 says these all died in the faith, not having received the promises. But having seen them afar off, and for me that speaks of the hope. That was Mr Lewis's life. He stood on the shoulders of those who went before who didn't see freedom who didn't think the achievement of our civil rights. He followed them and he lived his life in such a way that he advanced the faith. He advance the causes, but he didn't see all of the achievement. And now we come behind him on continue his legacy. So he believed he held these convictions didn't scenes didn't see everything he fought for comes repair, But he still believed he still continue fighting. And henceforth Scripture goes on to say there was laid up for me A crown of righteousness was the Lord. That right? Justo shall give me on that day. And not to me only bought to all those who love disappearing. And so we look forward to seeing the two of us again in the future. Bishop Leah Daughtry. Thank you so much for sharing your reflections with us on this day. Thank you. Yes, very powerful. Let's go now to NPR. Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR's senior editor and correspondent on the Washington desk. Ron Elving. Hey, guys. Kelsey. Good morning. We've heard so many powerful tributes from people throughout the country and the world. But But Louis is home state of Georgia. His presence and work had an especially profound. Meaning for his home state of Georgia for his district. Tell us a little bit more about his time there. You know, I am reminded of a couple of really, really standout moments of. I think one of the things that I think about a lot right now is the tribute that that they delivered for Johnny Isakson, who was a Republican senator. Of from Georgia, who retired last year, and in 2019 it was in November. So just just so a bit ago, Johnny Isakson was being was being honored and John Lewis Delivered this speech explaining how they could work together and and how there was an opportunity for anybody to find spaces where they agreed. And then, at the end of his speech, he walked across the Isaacson, who was in bad health and who had had trouble with his spine and said I will come to you brother and walked over and gave him a hug. That was really very much representative of the way. That John Lewis approached, you know, working on problems was what he wanted there to be bipartisanship. He wanted to be the person who came across, walked across and shake somebody's hand gave them a hug and said We can get something done here. He was also the kind of person who, whenever you saw him in the capital. There would be some person some tourist or a constituent who wanted to come and talk to him, and there was always had the time he had the time to tell his story had the time to talk to people about their story. He was extremely generous with his time and his constituents were known to come up to the capital and spent time directly with him. There was never a moment when it team like he was bigger than anybody else. Yeah, it's been Ah, so enriching and so fun over the last week to hear how so many people that I personally no have have met John Lewis, whether it's in Washington whether it's in Atlanta. New York Across the country. People have had a chance to meet him, but also have these intimate one on one conversations with him A CZ. We've learned he never turned anyone away. He was always willing to stop and have those conversations. One of the things that jumps out to me was a story about Congressman Lewis. When Hey, was in his district and he would spend a day doing a job in the district so even way back in the seventies, he would do things like drive a ups truck for a day to get a sense of what his constituents were up against. That is something that so many people feel is that he was of the people. Absolutely, and a lot of members of Congress that I speak to say they learned from that approach. They learned from John Lewis not just from the work that he did in civil rights, but the way he had a relationship with his constituents the way that he continued to speak about issues that meant something to him and then became active in them. I am reminded of the sit in on the House floor. On gun violence. He led House Democrats in a sit in and following. I believe the pulse shooting and they said that this was not a time when they could leave, and then he wanted to be the person who, you know who did the good trouble that he always talks about. He did not want to just be a person talking about it. He wanted to be a person involved in it. And you know so many members of Congress on Democrats and Republicans who felt inspired by that personal connection to his beliefs. The service eyes expected to begin shortly, and about 10 5 or 10 minutes. Ron, I'd love to go through with you what we can expect for today's service. But I want to talk first about Lewis's time as a civil rights activist, part of the movement back in the sixties. We expect to hear a lot about that today during the service, right? Yes, indeed, his life traced if you will, the trajectory of the African American experience over the last 70 80 years in American history. He was one of the group sometimes referred to as the Big Six, of course, beginning with Martin Luther King, whose name will be invoked. Many times today, but also Whitney Young of the National Urban League. Roy Wilkins of the CP. James Farmer of the Congress of regular Racial Equality and a Philip Randolph from the Pullman Porters Union. They were in many respects the Giants. Of the civil rights movement, as it took shape after World War two and rose in the fifties and sixties. Of course, John Lewis was there for most, all of it. He was part of the citizens at lunch counters in Nashville. He was one of the original 13 Freedom riders in 1961 integrating bus travel in the south. He was the youngest speaker on that day in 1963 when the march on Washington for jobs and justice featured Martin Luther King's I have a Dream speech. John Lewis spoke that day was the youngest speaker. He's the last person surviving from the speakers Dyas that day. And then, of course, the 1965 moment we have referenced Many times his beating on the Pettus Bridge. And, of course, his career in Congress, As Kelsey has described and then his links to the Black lives matter movement, which he paid tribute to In death as his cortege was coming to the capital earlier this week and paused on black lives matter Plaza in front of the White House to pay tribute to the movement and the people who are carrying forward his ideals today. Yes, And as we

Congressman Lewis Atlanta Congress Emma Hurt Martin Luther King Jr Washington Civil Rights Movement Debbie Elliot Ebeneezer Baptist Church Georgia Reporter Congressman Alabama Kelsey Snell John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtr W. A. B John Lewis
Body of John Lewis crosses bridge in Alabama, site of 'Bloody Sunday' attack that helped lead to Voting Rights Act

The Sunday Show

01:04 min | 4 months ago

Body of John Lewis crosses bridge in Alabama, site of 'Bloody Sunday' attack that helped lead to Voting Rights Act

"Is underway across Selma, Alabama's Edmund Pettus Bridge in Remembrance of civil Rights icon and Georgia Congressman John Lewis. It's one in a Siri's of events leading up to his funeral Thursday in Atlanta. NPR's Debbie Elliot is in Selma. Saturday Services honoring Louis were in his hometown of Troy, Alabama, and its Selma's historic Brown Chapel Church once used for mass meetings during the civil rights movement. Alabama's first black Congress woman, Terri Sewell of Selma spoke at the service. I want to thank the family for allowing Selma To say goodbye to John. Thank you, Selma. Final goodbye comes today as an honor Guard escorts Lewis's casket draped in an American flag over the iconic Edmund Pettus Bridge. That's where Luis and others were beaten by law officers as they marched for equal voting rights. Later, Louis will lie in state at the Alabama capital in Montgomery, Debbie Elliot

Selma Edmund Pettus Bridge Alabama Congressman John Lewis Debbie Elliot Louis Terri Sewell Siri Brown Chapel Church Luis Atlanta NPR Troy Montgomery Georgia Congress
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 4 months ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NPR's Debbie Elliot has more the son of Southeast Alabama sharecroppers once denied a library card from the Troy public Library. John Lewis was honored today at the one time all White public college that denied him entrance as a teen Troy University. He's also being remembered in Selma, where Louis helped organize civil rights protest in 1965. Sunday he will make one final passage over the iconic Edmund Pettus Bridge, where he was beaten by state troopers and sheriff's deputies as he led marchers to Montgomery to demand the right to vote. Louis will lie in state at the Alabama capital and then in Washington at the U. S Capitol before a funeral Thursday in Atlanta. Debbie Elliot NPR news Enhanced unemployment benefits of an extra $600 a week expire at the end of the month. And as NPR's Susan Davis reports what happens next to millions of out of work Americans is up in the air. Congress is likely to continue some form of expanded benefit, just not in time to meet the current expiration date. Democrats want to extend the additional $600 per week benefit through January. Republicans opposed that because they say it's too much and it's stopping workers from going back into the workforce. Republicans are coalescing around a plan supported by the White House to provide up to 70% of a worker's pre pandemic wages as long as it doesn't exceed $600. Either way, a deal remains out of sight. Senate Republicans have yet to release a formal proposal. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Friday he expected a deal in a few weeks..

Debbie Elliot NPR Louis John Lewis Troy public Library Alabama Majority Leader Mitch McConnel Senate Edmund Pettus Bridge Troy University White public college Selma Congress White House Susan Davis Washington Montgomery U. S Capitol Atlanta
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:54 min | 4 months ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no. Well King. Good morning, Jeff Sessions is out of the Alabama Senate race. Former football coach Tommy Tub Orville beat him in a runoff race. That means Tuberville will challenge Democrat Doug Jones in the fall, and it may be the Republican Party's best chance to take a Senate seat. NPR's Debbie Elliot has been covering the race. Good morning, Debbie. Morning sessions used to be pretty popular in Alabama, but it looks like this will be not just the loss but a pretty substantial one. What happened right? More than double digits, reflecting what the Poles had indicated, was goingto happen Throughout much of the campaign, you know, Tommy Taber Ville was really able to capitalize on President Trump's endorsement. Making his allegiance to trump his number one selling point. He promised that unlike Jeff Sessions, he won't let the president down when the going gets tough, you know session struggled to overcome being ousted his attorney general after he recused himself from special Prosecutor Robert Mueller's Russia investigation. Something that Trump went to great lengths to berate sessions for time and time again. He even made this robo call the night before the election in support of Tuberville. He's gonna have a cold direct line into my office. And I couldn't tell you because, you know, we had the Jeff Sessions thing. We gave it a shot. I had no idea it could be as bad as it was, but he had no clue. No love lost between Trump and sessions. That's a parent sessions, though, did hold that Senate seat for 20 years before he joined the Trump administration. What's he saying this morning or last night? Right. He was certainly a fixture in Alabama politics. He was a former attorney general of the state had been a U. S attorney in Mobile. He made a somber speech from the Hampton Inn in Mobile last night. Hey 73 years old now and said he ends his political career with no regrets and his integrity intact. I was honored to serve the people of Alabama in the Senate, and I was extraordinarily proud of the accomplish that accomplishments we had as attorney general. On recusal followed the law. I did the right thing, and I say the president's bacon in the process saving his bacon, meaning he maintains that He If he had done anything to somehow squashed the investigation, Things would have turned out much worse, but he didn't take that tone against the president until pretty late in the campaign on DH. I think that hurt him. He largely ran a campaign up until the very end, based on his alignment with Trump's agenda. Making the case that he was all about tougher immigration laws and some of the same issues that Trump pushes long before Trump even got into politics. Tommy Tub Orville the winner. He does not have a long history and politics. What do we know about him? Right. He is new to this game, but he generally gets the celebrity treatment anywhere. He goes in Alabama. He is the former football coach at Auburn University. Early in his coaching career. He earned this nickname the riverboat gambler for Risky play calling, But he took very few risks in this runoff campaign, especially after the vote got pushed from March until yesterday because of the Corona virus pandemic. Taber Bill had refused to debate he largely avoided the media. His ads would hit these familiar themes that resonate with conservative Republican voters here in Alabama religious freedom, border security law and order gun rights. Andi came back to those issues and his victory speech last night from Montgomery as he turned his attention to his next opponent, the Democratic incumbent, Doug Jones. And Doug Jones, Alabama. The Second Amendment is a dream. It's just a thought. It's not in the Constitution of them. I got there not taking our guns. So just a little for shattering of what's to come in this Alabama Senate rice. It's going to pull a lot of attention and probably a lot of money from both national parties. NPR's Debbie Elliott. Thanks, Toby. You're welcome. This country founded on the idea of equality commonly offers its opinions of human rights abroad in that sense of special commissions draft report, due out this week is normal. The Secretary of state will release that report on how the United States should approach human rights. But how might the administration try to alter that approach? NPR's Jackie Northam reports. Secretary Pompeo admits that creating the commission on a nail you noble rights was going to stir controversy. The goal was to re examine the role of human rights in U. S foreign policy. Pompeo says that human rights has become an industry and that a proliferation of claims dilutes the original meaning and impact of human rights. Here he is last year. We want to go back to first principles backto our founding documents, our declaration of independence. Our bill of rights. Focus on those things that are central to the understanding of rights here in America. The makeup of the Special Commission set off alarm bells. It's headed by Mary Ann Glendon Ah Harvard Law School professor known for her strong opposition to abortion and equality for same sex marriage. Mark Bromley, with the Council for Global Equality, says there's concern about the 10 other members of the panel as well. If you look at their academic work, if you look at their ideological perspectives, their very monolithic They all champion religious freedom, often to the detriment of other communities, particularly the LGBT community and women and girls who seek to exercise their sexual reproductive health. There were five public hearings where the panel had input from experts. Jayne Huckerby, director of the International Human Rights Clinic, a Duke University law school, and her colleagues attended the hearings. She said. They felt frozen in time. Very limited, anachronistic visions of human rights were discussed and really rejecting the dynamic approach to human rights. That emphasizes the need for evolution to extend human rights to previously marginalized groups. Others are concerned about the plans to release the draft report before a large crowd at Philadelphia's National Constitution Center during a pandemic. And Bromley, with the Council for Global Equality, says it's tone deaf to release a report based on the works of the founding Fathers. While many Americans they're focused on equality and the black lives matter movement, I believe that Secretary Pompeo's personal views his professed religious beliefs and his political ambitions are driving this And from the moment this was created until the moment that the report is delivered with great fanfare in Philadelphia. This has been Secretary Pompeo's pet project. But Pompeo says countries like China and Cuba have taken advantage of the expanded definitions of human rights, and he wants to go back to the basics. Like diplomats promoting religious freedoms as a tour the world When we get this right, we'll we'll have done something good. Not just I think for the United States, but for the world there will be a two week public comment period before a final document is issued. Jackie Northam. NPR NEWS Washington This is NPR news..

Alabama Trump Senate Secretary Pompeo NPR Jeff Sessions NPR News Alabama Senate president Jackie Northam Doug Jones Tuberville attorney Council for Global Equality football Tommy Tub Orville Steve Inskeep United States Mark Bromley
Tuberville wins Alabama GOP Senate runoff

Morning Edition

00:55 sec | 4 months ago

Tuberville wins Alabama GOP Senate runoff

"US Attorney General Jeff Sessions, has lost his bid for the Republican nomination to the Senate from Alabama. NPR's Debbie Elliot reports. He was defeated in a runoff election by a political newcomer who was endorsed by President Trump. Unofficial results show Tommy Taber Veldt, the one time football coach at Auburn University, handily defeated Jeff Sessions in a GOP runoff that had been postponed from March because of the Corona virus. Sessions held the Alabama Senate seat for 20 years before joining the Trump administration as attorney general. His campaign was unable to overcome a barrage of attacks from the president, still angry that sessions recused himself from the special counsel's Russia investigation. Suburb. L advances to face incumbent Democrat Doug Jones and the fall in a contest widely seen as the Republican Party's best chance to turn a Senate seat.

Jeff Sessions Senate Alabama Senate President Trump Tommy Taber Veldt Republican Party Debbie Elliot Us Attorney Alabama NPR Doug Jones Auburn University GOP Attorney Special Counsel Russia Football
"debbie elliot" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:44 min | 4 months ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on KCRW

"Debbie Elliot, NPR NEWS Mobile, Alabama. This is NPR news. And this is Casey are W. KCR W sponsors include HBO presenting. I Know this Much is True following Dominic Burt see as he struggles to care for his twin brother, while discovering the truth about his own family history, any eligible for outstanding limited Siri's and all other categories. It is 5 19 on this Monday morning, and you're listening to K C R w I'm at Gilman with you for morning edition today, Taking a look at what is coming up on the program just had we're hearing about some new bands from China. The Chinese government is banned several U. S officials names that you will recognize about Marco Rubio or Ted proves that those two and other administration officials have been banned from entering China in response to U. S actions. Given that country's treatment of its Muslim minority. We have details on that coming up. We'll be hearing about the fight to reopen schools in Arizona as well. Stay with us. Support comes from the California Department of Public Health, raising awareness that smoking doubles your risk of getting respiratory infections, including Corona virus for how to quit Now when lung health is crucial, go to tobacco free see a dot com.

State flags moved to Museum of Mississippi History

The Sunday Show

00:49 sec | 5 months ago

State flags moved to Museum of Mississippi History

"Is moving its old flag with its Confederate imagery to a museum. NPR's Debbie Elliot reports. The flag has been taken down from state buildings. Under a law approved last week, the state flag, first adopted by white supremacists in 18 94 incorporated the Confederate battle emblem. The banner will now be housed in the state's history museum. That's the the proper proper context context for for it, it, says says Pamela, Pamela, Junior Junior director director of of the the Mississippi Mississippi Civil Civil Rights Rights and and History History Museums. Museums. After After 126 126 years, years, we're retiring this flag and putting it in a place in a museum, where people can be educated and and long and be able to interpret looking. Interpret that flag. Commission will design a new Mississippi state flag that will be put to popular vote in November. Debbie Elliot

History History Museums Debbie Elliot Junior Junior Director Directo Mississippi Mississippi Mississippi Pamela NPR
Stacey Abrams Spearheads Campaign Against Voter Suppression

Morning Edition

06:52 min | 9 months ago

Stacey Abrams Spearheads Campaign Against Voter Suppression

"It's morning edition from NPR news I'm David green and I may tell Martin after the chaos of the Iowa caucuses there is new scrutiny about how the US conducts selections when you partisan voting rights group is focusing on elections in swing states this year it's called fair fight and it's led by Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams Abrams got a lot of national attention in two thousand eighteen after she lost a close race for governor in an election that was clouded by allegations of voter suppression here's an here's Debbie Elliot a few thousand volunteers are spending a Saturday morning in a hotel conference room in Macon Georgia for a boot camp of sorts on voter suppression good morning in everybody Hillary Holly is organizing director for fair fight action the group that's waging a campaign against voter suppression in the twenty twenty election we are walking into year that's going to be exciting little bit stressful we're gonna be working a lot participants call themselves democracy warriors people like whole worker of lane Morgan Johnson make every single cam Johnson is motivated to be here in part because her sister was removed from George's voter rolls under a mass purge of people who have not voted since two thousand twelve or responded to mailed notices from election officials Johnson thinks it's part of a broader strategy to curtail voting rights reducing their opposition don't wanna lose power I mean we're seeing that nation why it's depressing and that's why I'm just trying to be active in a way that I can my parents worked for civil rights in and we're not for going backwards this training is part of an effort launched by Georgia Democrats Stacey Abrams an African American woman who broke new ground in our two thousand eighteen campaign for governor she energized new democratic voters and lost by less than fifty five thousand votes in a largely Republican state there was a record turnout for a mid term election but also hours long waits at some polls election server security breaches and allegations that strict adherence on signature matches dampens participation Abrams says the defeat galvanized her to launch fair fight in the wake of the election my mission was to figure out what works could I do even if I didn't have the title of governor what what can I do to enhance to protect our democracy because the voting rights is the the pinnacle power in our country verified is training grassroots advocates lobbying for new election laws and arguing in federal court the George's election system is unconstitutional Abrams says long lines precinct closures and purging voter rolls are all barriers that disproportionately impact minority voters most of us understand voter suppression as the nineteen sixties images of Billy clubs and hoses and dogs barking aggressive interference but in the twenty first century voter suppression looks like administrative errors it looks like user error it looks like mistakes but it is just is intentional and just as insidious George's current secretary of state Republican Brad wraps and Parker acknowledges there were some problems because of the high turnout in two thousand eighteen but rejects the notion that cleaning up voter rolls is an attempt to gain partisan advantage no what we're trying to do is make sure that the you know Lexus are clean fair and accurate this is something that has been going on in Georgia long before Republicans were in charge in Georgia and courts have upheld the state's authority to purge the voter last after fair fight suit but other election related lawsuits are pending attorney Jack Evans is chairman of the Georgia chapter of the Republican National lawyers association Georgia is ground zero for election law Evans says the focus is here because Georgia is becoming competitive the reality is you know George's changing and there's a lot of transplants coming in from the west coast and the northeast and there's also changing demographics so I think it is time for Republicans to grow the tent but I definitely think it's woke up a lot of Republicans in Georgia now Abrams is expanding fair fight to reach in hopes of putting other states in play she recently traveled to Florida for a town hall with college students to talk about ways they could protect their vote for verifying voter registration for learning how to ask for a provisional ballot if you're turned away at the polls political scientist Andrea Glaspie of Emory University says there are a lot of national groups doing voting rights work but fair fight stands out because it's been able to use the energy around Abrams electoral defeat to try to reap benefits for other Democrats in this election cycle her story was compelling she got a lot of attention by being the first black woman to be nominated by a major party for gubernatorial seat and she was really smart and you know strike while the iron was hot in order to play that type of organization together fair fights political action committee is raising the millions of dollars including a five million dollar contribution from democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg and it's pumping some of that money into battle ground states early fair fight C. E. L. Lauren grow Largo says the idea is to beef up the democratic ground game around voting we're in the mission of making sure our full citizenry can vote we also happen to think that when all Americans are able to vote Democrats win she says they've invested more than a million dollars and sent dozens of staffers in eighteen states to ramp up democratic voting rights infrastructure things like establishing voter hot winds and creating voter protection teams to be in place for the primaries so they can prepare for the general election gathering information and data what is order struggle with when election administrator struggle with what support are they gonna need critics say fair fight is a vehicle for Stacey Abrams political aspirations Abrams counters that she's been doing civil rights work her entire career but acknowledges our interest in higher office including the presidency I see myself as a warrior for democracy but I'm also someone who has been training my entire life to do more as for this year's race Abrams hasn't endorsed any of the democratic presidential candidates but says show welcome a phone call from the eventual nominee when they're looking for a running mate Debbie Elliot NPR news

David Green Martin Iowa NPR United States
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Urging the release of documents related to the case saying they are just as important as witnesses as millions of Americans embark on their holiday travel heavy rain is wreaking how they can parts of the south and here is Debbie Elliot reports flood watches and warnings are in effect for parts of Louisiana Alabama Georgia and South Carolina flooding stranded motorist and closed roads in Charleston South Carolina where forecasters say a combination of coastal high tides and torrential rainfall caused flash floods the city is using pumps to help clear the water in Atlanta several trees were down due to the wet soil and high winds blocking roadways the heavy rain in Florida because flight delays and cancellations at the fort Lauderdale Hollywood International Airport forecasters say creeks and streams are on the rise across the region Debbie Elliot NPR news stocks are starting the holiday week off with gains at last check the Dow up a hundred and fourteen points the S. and P. five hundred gains for and the nasdaq composite up twenty five this is NPR news and you're listening to W. NYC in New York I'm Jamie Floyd the newly elected at queens district attorney is promising a big shake up when she takes office Melinda Katz told W. N. Y. C.'s Brian Lehrer she's planning to replace most of the current executive staff to ensure they support her reformist policies.

Brian Lehrer executive NPR Debbie Elliot NPR fort Lauderdale Hollywood Inte Atlanta Charleston South Carolina Alabama Louisiana Debbie Elliot W. N. Y. C. Melinda Katz Jamie Floyd New York W. NYC Florida
Jeff Sessions announces run for Alabama Senate seat

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Jeff Sessions announces run for Alabama Senate seat

"Former Attorney General Jeff sessions as he is running for his old Senate seat from Alabama and there is Debbie Elliot reports he joins a crowded field vying for the Republican nomination to run against democratic incumbent Doug Jones next year Jeff sessions stepped down as Attorney General last year after falling out of favor with president trump because he recused himself from special counsel Robert Mahler's Russia investigation in a videotaped campaign announcement he addresses had on his rocky relationship with the president

Alabama Debbie Elliot Doug Jones Donald Trump Robert Mahler President Trump Attorney Senate Jeff Special Counsel Russia
Voters in Kentucky, Mississippi decide whether Trump can sway governor’s races

All Things Considered

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Voters in Kentucky, Mississippi decide whether Trump can sway governor’s races

"In other news off year elections are underway in several states today voters in New Jersey and Virginia are electing state lawmakers and and peers Debbie Elliot tells us or has more on the hotly contested governor's race is playing out in Mississippi and Kentucky president trump visited both southern states to campaign for Republican candidates an indication the races are seen as a bellwether for next year's presidential election and how voters are responding to the congressional impeachment inquiry Kentucky governor Matt Bevin is spending office serious challenge from democratic Attorney General anti Bashir and in Mississippi there's a surprisingly tight race between Republican lieutenant governor Tate Reeves and democratic Attorney General Jim hood Reeves has run a campaign centered on his alignment with president trump and last minute robo calls former president Barack Obama endorsed

New Jersey Virginia Debbie Elliot Mississippi Matt Bevin Bashir Tate Reeves Donald Trump Barack Obama Kentucky Attorney Attorney General Jim Hood Reev President Trump
"debbie elliot" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Underestimate this storm Debbie Elliot in Jacksonville Florida thank you. welcome. you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news. we learned today exactly which military construction projects would be canceled to pay for a border wall now this move has been expected since earlier this year when president trump declared a national emergency to free up funds for a wall on the U. S. southern border with Mexico congressional Democrats are fuming and your congressional reporter cloudy agree Seles has been following all that she's here in the studio now hi hi thanks for having me glad to have you here so I'm trying to follow these budget lines remind me whose money this is an under whose authority it's been diverted well this goes back to February when president trump declared a national emergency to take eight billion dollars from existing budgets and agencies like the Pentagon of that three point six billion would calm from canceled military construction projects and for months it's been a well kept secret who would lose out in this week the Pentagon started revealing details to lawmakers here's defense secretary mark asper defending the move in so that process is ongoing today will where we will be reaching out to affected lawmakers and to a prize and before we make anything public arts according to make a public what what are the details haven't been cut well the Pentagon finally released the full list of specific projects that will get shell to the release the list to lawmakers and we obtained it from a congressional aide and shows that half one point eight billion will come from the US and the other half from overseas installations at the military academy at west point they will lose a hundred and sixty million dollars alone in projects for their engineering center and a parking structure I talked to the democratic lawmaker who represents that district representative Sean Patrick Maloney here's what he had to say. so this was just wrong on the American people and on the military and it has a duplication that's what I'm trying to say here is a trade off the president he is going to push on to the military but it's not the one they want in his district is not alone and lawmakers like Maloney are furious because the wall is part of trump's campaign promise but he also said Mexico would be paying for the wall and west point isn't alone the Pentagon is listed cuts for seventy seven million in Virginia and Arizona will lose a thirty million dollar project and there's dozens more around the country on the list and while Democrats are saying these cuts put military readiness at risk one Republican senator in Arizona Martha make Sally downplay the impact first state she's in a tough reelection fight and she's backing the need for resources for border wall what is the Pentagon saying I or the wing and he kind of comment about having to to shift money or away from projects that they had planned right they have said repeatedly in testimony and in interviews that they're following the president's orders he has the authority to declare a national emergency he did and the following through in a letter to lawmakers asper said the plans will find eleven Porter projects in California Texas and Arizona and there's already court challenges underway to challenge the president's authority shift this money that Congress already allocated come next week Congress returns from an extended recessed work out the details of spending bills for various federal agencies and while they have this broad budget deal in line that there's a fight for border wall money that could become a very contentious issue yet more debate in Congress over the border wall and who exactly is going to pay for that's unfair congressional reporter cloudy agree solace thank you thanks. you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news..

Debbie Elliot Jacksonville Florida NPR eight billion dollars sixty million dollars thirty million dollar
Twitter under pressure to ban white supremacists

All Things Considered

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Twitter under pressure to ban white supremacists

"A coalition of civil rights and consumer protection groups is calling on Twitter to ban white supremacists and here is Debbie Elliot reports the new measure comes as some recent mass shootings are being investigated as he crimes and domestic terrorism the change the terms coalition accuses Twitter of profiting from hate Lisa wall fork is an organizer with black lives matter in Charlottesville the side of deadly racist violence two years ago it is incumbent upon whether the change the turn into the Jack white supremacist white nationalists neo not the last four wheel fork says Twitter's policies serve as a quote midwife for the proliferation of white nationalism globally a spokesperson for Twitter says its rules already prohibit threats of violence and extremist posts that promote

Twitter Debbie Elliot Charlottesville Two Years
ICE has begun raids to round up undocumented immigrants, official says

Studio 360

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

ICE has begun raids to round up undocumented immigrants, official says

"Weekend tropical storm Barry is still dousing the Gulf coast after making landfall as a hurricane in Louisiana yesterday NPR's Debbie Elliot reports officials warn there's still the potential for life threatening floods as the storm moves north Louisiana will start assessing the damage from berry which brought destructive winds heavy rain and dangerous storm surge in its path but because the system is moving so slowly pulling in moisture from the Gulf of Mexico flash floods are likely Louisiana governor John bel Edwards once residents to remain vigilant don't let your guard down thinking the worst is behind us because the National Weather Service is telling us when it comes to rain the exact opposite is true Mary's drenching rain stretching to Mississippi Arkansas and

Barry Louisiana NPR Debbie Elliot National Weather Service Mary Mississippi Arkansas Gulf Mexico John Bel Edwards
National Weather Service, Jerry And Louisiana discussed on Special Programming

Special Programming

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

National Weather Service, Jerry And Louisiana discussed on Special Programming

"The National Weather Service says the tropical storm Jerry will make landfall in Louisiana as a hurricane Saturday morning is NPR's Debbie Elliot reports the state is preparing for the possibility of record flooding the storm is slowly moving over the Gulf of Mexico and gaining strength Benjamin shot as the meteorologist in charge of the National Weather Service office in New Orleans tropical Mary is a dangerous and life threatening storm it will probably be a hurricane when it makes landfall on the Louisiana coast line as we get into tomorrow morning he says heavy rainfall is likely to cause major even record flooding in south Louisiana vulnerable coastal areas are being evacuated governor John bel Edwards has activated the National Guard and is positioning boats and high water vehicles that might be needed to respond to the disaster Debbie Elliot NPR news New

National Weather Service Jerry Louisiana NPR Debbie Elliot Mexico John Bel Edwards National Guard Benjamin New Orleans South Louisiana
NPR, Debbie Elliot And Louisiana discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

NPR, Debbie Elliot And Louisiana discussed on All Things Considered

"Tropical storm berry is on track to potentially become the first hurricane to strike the US Gulf coast this year NPR's Debbie Elliot reports Louisiana's preparing for potential record flooding the storm is slowly moving over the Gulf of Mexico and gaining strength Benjamin shot as the meteorologist in charge of the National Weather Service office in New Orleans tropical Mary is a dangerous and life threatening storm it will probably be a hurricane when it makes landfall on the Louisiana coast line as we get into tomorrow morning he says heavy rainfall is likely to cause major even record flooding in south Louisiana vulnerable coastal areas are being evacuated governor John bel Edwards has activated the National Guard and is positioning boats and high water vehicles that might be needed to respond to the disaster Debbie Elliot NPR news New

NPR Debbie Elliot Louisiana Mexico John Bel Edwards National Guard United States Gulf Benjamin National Weather Service New Orleans South Louisiana
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Protection system Debbie Elliot NPR news New Orleans labor secretary Alex Acosta is resigning after coming under heavy criticism for his role in a plea deal years ago when he was a US attorney in Florida handling an alleged sex trafficking case against the wealthy financier Jeffrey abstain president trump says he doesn't want secretary cost to leave I just want to get out this was him not me because I'm with them he was a tremendous talent is a Hispanic man he went to Harvard a great student add in so many ways I just hate what he's saying now because we're going to miss them but across his role in the light sentence I've seen god over a decade ago is under renewed scrutiny now that I've seen faces yet more charges of sex crimes against underage girls this time in New York I've seen has pleaded not guilty singer R. Kelly has been indicted on two separate sets of federal charges he was arrested in Chicago last night in here is Colin wire reports a Grammy winning artist faces a total of sixteen counts ranging from sex with minors to racketeering R. Kelly has long been dogged by allegations of sexual misconduct but his arrest last night marks the first time federal authorities have handed down charges in Illinois where he's being held that fifty two year old singer has been accused of producing child **** and conspiring to obstruct justice meanwhile in the Eastern District of New York Kelly has been accused of racketeering and transporting under age girls and women across state lines for the purposes of sex these charges com in addition to an indictment handed down by state authorities in Illinois earlier this year his legal team has remained defiant however they say Kelly is looking forward to his day in court in the meantime he hopes to be released on bail next week college life NPR news New York this is NPR and you're listening to W. NYC I'm Jamie Floyd New York governor Andrew Cuomo is adding another task to the MTA's docket taking care of homeless people on the subway during a conference call on the MTA's reorganization plan Cuomo called the increasing number of homeless people on the subway a crisis it has been for a long term and it's only getting worse it affects service it affects riders and it affects homeless people almost as the upcoming reorganization that will provide the M. K. with more resources to support the homeless the agency did not immediately respond to a request for comment and the NYPD's top uniformed official says police officers should not be parking in bike lanes chief of department Terrence Monahan addressed the issue which is a constant complaint of many cyclists at an event in the green space last night we shouldn't be in bike lanes absolutely it because of the danger and it's something that we we address a cop still gonna go it it's going to happen on occasion and a guarantee if you go outside somewhere right now you'd find a cop talking a bike lane somewhere Monahan's comments come after increased criticism about the way NYPD take its cycle S. including at the scene of crashes involving cars and bikes fifteen cyclists have died this year from car crashes and the police are in the middle of a ticketing blitz focused on reckless drivers and bike lane violations for more on all things transit visit the we the commuters dot org and prosecutors in New Jersey man charged with plotting to burn down Saint Patrick's cathedral is not mentally fit to stand trial a judge in New York City says he will commit more collaborate load to a mental health facility for treatment and pope postpone the case indefinitely Morello was arrested in April after police said he took gas cans and lighters into the iconic cathedral his attorney attributes the incident to a psychotic episode and has a lot of a real has undergone mental health treatment.

Alex Acosta Debbie Elliot New Orleans secretary fifty two year
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Next a documentary directed by the brother of a woman who was given a fifteen year mandatory minimum sentence, not because she was dealing drugs. But because she was dating a drug dealer. The film looks at the toll her prison term took on their family a new play that looks at the relationship between dreaming time and freedom after a long prison sentence. Amalfi Stewart stay with us all of it will be back after the news. One hour. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm jim. Largest hospitals in Panama City, Florida have shut down and are evacuating hundreds of patients due to hurricane damage as NPR's Debbie Elliott reports even basic services like water and communications are largely unavailable. So they're just all kinds of challenges facing emergency responders, and the people that remain in Panama City, you know, they've got a boil water notice going on right now, there's very little if any cell phone service emergency responders are saying they're having communication problems, and that's hampering their recovery efforts. There are just all of these problems that need to be overcome before the actual recovery. Can begin Debbie Elliot reporting.

Panama City Amalfi Stewart Debbie Elliot Debbie Elliott NPR Washington Florida fifteen year One hour
"debbie elliot" Discussed on Athletico Mince

Athletico Mince

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on Athletico Mince

"Seem to be wavering like you know the pump scratch outside rahim's ranch i guess they liked the weights and shop ness of my chin rather than your blunt stump who it's a nice chin vardi pity i'm not wearing gloves like handle lit she mouth fatty says this is debbie elliot about what's what's the marriage you hurting about something that has hurt you and you've got bogue is what i said drop okay tell you what we will do we will fill out our patch with water and then mehan vardi will play our chins any water and see which one displays his the most water phil why got you to see which is heavier chin exactly so the telephoto go the bathroom and philip the huts with war the here in fall over vardi all soft leads fall over like a lump of cream dropped in from a plump class jay's lot stop mention claim it's baltra does happen you know eventually phil comes in the huts full of war him and harry body and harry dropped the magic chins in a measure which war is being depressed an under fahd these chin is the heavier all well well to pose off but it does not mean that you're heavier chin is actually more magic don't forget i was the highest christian scholar in the predator league this season rem really sorry what a finger i'm going to switch over the hardy annuals you know every chin on the cream cakes whether it be recipes are very disappointed in you jordan your bush mc turncoat i will leave you with your new friends come on ebay and they leave.

rahim debbie elliot bogue jay phil ebay philip harry fahd
"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"debbie elliot" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"More power to heat their homes and the bitter cold debbie elliot npr news this is npr the south korean government says it has agreed with its rival north korea to form their first joint olympic team their athletes would march together during the opening ceremony of the games and pyongyang seoul says it reached agreement during high level talks wednesday a former ci officer suspected of helping china dismantle us spying operations and identify informants has been arrested we have more on this from np r's rob schmitz the arrest of the former officer 53 year old jerry trenching lee captain tense fbi investigation that began six years ago after the cia i began losing its informants in china according to the new york times more than a dozen cia informants in china were killed or imprisoned by the chinese government starting 2010 a devastating setback for the cia rivaling losses in the soviet union russia during the betrayals of both aldrich ames and robert hanssen in the nineteen eighties in 2012 while li visited the us from his home in hong kong fbi agents found notes with details about ci informants and undercover agents in china in his luggage why the fbi did not arrest lee after finding is classified material and his notebooks remains unclear rob schmitz and pioneers shanghai american home builders seem to be less optimistic about their sales prospects in the coming months at a reading of 72 the national association of home builders wells fargo index when down slightly it is still far above the threshold at suggests builder's belief sales conditions are still pretty good in this economy the dow was up 264 points this is.

aldrich ames national association of home hong kong seoul pyongyang npr lee fbi us robert hanssen south korean government soviet union russia chinese government new york times cia rob schmitz china officer north korea six years 53 year