38 Burst results for "Debbie"

Fresh update on "debbie" discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:58 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "debbie" discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Yeah, I don't think those are the definitive 7. Those are the 7 I decided to go with, but like you said there's many, many more as we know there's hundreds, hundreds and thousands of different feelings and emotions we have as human beings, but those are the 7 that I decided to land on because those were the 7 parts of myself. I felt like time when I first started writing it. The 7 characters range in age from late teens to mid 60s and the elder wisdom brilliantly played by Esau prichard speaks about respect history and ancestry, Tristan Mack Wilde plays anger and laments consumerism and the objectification of black athletes, Brian Terrell, Clark, please the character of happiness and challenges notions about black struggle and class with his success and his money and his orientation, talk about the role of stereotypes and tropes that you're trying to dispel. Too often in entertainment, we are often betrayed as the athlete. The gangster, someone, of low education, fatherless, and the list goes on. I wanted to create a piece to not show the perfect black man, but to show the black man in its entirety. And in doing that, you have to show the good, the bad and the ugly. Because that is the human experience. One of the things I follow in my storytelling is what Langston Hughes said, he said we are good and ugly too. So showing a story of spectrum to show a true human story to be able to build empathy and is reader or viewer that doesn't mean to create a perfectly politically correct, unflawed character. Showing a human story is showing someone in all of their flaws. Because that's where you get the relatability. And that's what I wanted to create in these men and I wanted to show them in different ways. I wanted to show a business owner, an entrepreneur in wisdom. I wanted to show a husband who was happily married to a black woman and they're excited that their child is on the way. We don't often see that. Yes, I have the athlete, but we often don't see what happens or how that athlete feels when they are discarded. When they can no longer be superhuman on the court or the field, who are they as human beings? I wanted to also show that the young guy that don't know no better. You know, that all he wants to do is chase women and really doesn't even know who he is yet because he's only a 20 year old and making all the mistakes in the world. I wanted to show a character that was full body and just happened to be gay. Because none of us should be portrayed in that singular way. You know, I wanted to show him to him to have the representation of being from a different class and being able to have those conversations centered around not only identity sexually, but identity as far as class in community and culture, so these are things and the layers that I wanted to show that are not often shown for black men. And when they are normally all of these men and not seen together. And you would think that all of these men could not exist, and they do. These men walk around my community and all the communities that I've ever ever lived in. And that's what I wanted to showcase. I wanted to show the spectrum all at the same time to see the range to show that we are not monolithic. I loved the way you wrote the character who we ultimately find out is gay. Because until he states that he is, and he's talking about his relationship, I think, most of the people in the audience, just assumed that he was a heterosexual man talking about his wife, and I loved the way you played with us in that way. Keenan you see, you don't write perfect characters that you create them all to be flawed, because that's where we see humanity. What do you think are the flaws that make us most human? All of them. You know, it's hard to pick one, right? And human beings, we are so flawed. We at times have egos. We fall into temptation. We lack the servant at times. There's a lot of things that I can name, but I think through all of those flaws, hopefully most of us are on a journey to avoid those mistakes, fix our flaws, be the best person we can be until we reached out in days. That's what makes the human existence beautiful. That most of us internally don't want to dwell in our shortcomings and our flaws. And we want to set ourselves on a journey to correct all of those things. And I think that's what makes our existence beautiful. You've said that you identify most with your character named passion. Yes. Why is that? I'm a passionate person. I've always always have been when I often speak my passion gets confused to something else 'cause, you know, I speak very passionate, I'm very high energy, especially when it comes to my art and things that I love. And I've always been driven by my passion. I've always regardless of what I was doing in life, whether I was football, basketball, painting, writing. I was always very passionate about it. And very disciplined about it. And like the character of passion, me also being an educator. I was passionate about the youth. And I was passionate about helping them and saving them in the best way I could, whether that was showing them that I am them and there is a way out. And the negative things and choices can be avoided. So for me, the character of passion was always very close to me and probably has most of my DNA in that character. Passion also delivers the last message of the play as the last bit to say. Is that a moment of optimism you're trying to provide? Absolutely. Absolutely. I've always been optimistic more at some times than others. But I'm naturally an optimistic person and I think in the entertainment field, you have to be extremely optimistic because you spend most of your career hearing knows. Until you might hear that one yes, and hopefully string that one yes to another yes. And hopefully create a sustainable career. But in this field, I think you have to be so optimistic about what's to come where your career is going to go. The test that you're trying to fulfill and the goals that you're trying to acquire get you to a certain point..

Esau Prichard Tristan Mack Wilde Brian Terrell Langston Hughes Clark Keenan Basketball Football
Fresh update on "debbie" discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

08:31 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "debbie" discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And I say that to say, I never viewed myself as a great academic student. That was my sister, the straight a student, my older sister. Got to 8th grade, got a poetry assignment. After turning into poetry assignment, it was written so well that the teacher thought I plagiarized it. But it wasn't until that moment where that reaction showed me that that I can write creatively better than most. And then after that, I started just writing to myself and use it as a personal journal to get my emotions and feelings out, which is that I guess the cliche story for every poet. And it wasn't to the age of 15 that my sister's boyfriend at the time, he wanted to start going to a poetry, venues, and he didn't want to go by itself. So he asked me to go to the club with him to perform. I was 15 at the time, had no desire to perform or anything like that. And went to the club and I did horrible. Did horrible forgot my palm on stage, blacked out, had to start over again. It just wasn't a good night for me. And from that moment, I didn't want to do it again. But my competitive nature kicked in. I'm very competitive. I told myself I have to redeem myself. At least have to go back one time, redeem myself, do well. I can't leave you on a note like that. Do you remember any of the poems that you performed at that time? No. Last time. I recorded it and or somebody filmed me doing it. Those are pieces that I hadn't done in 15 plus years. So no, but you know, I went away, I studied for several months, turning 16. By the time I returned, went back to the drawn board, started reading a lot of poetry, a lot of Nicky Giovanni, links and Hughes. I discovered deaf poetry jam, which was two seasons and at the time. So it was a new show on HBO. I had to buy or find the DVDs because we didn't have cable. So I went back to the club and I did great. Way smaller audience this time around. But I did great and people were taking back by me and was shocked to find out that I was 16 years old. That's when I got bit by the bug. And I went from there. And then I started going back again. And again, and I loved it because it was like a double life for me. I was going into the city. You know, at night to perform and compete against adults. And then I was going back home and getting ready for class in the morning for high school. So that really led me on a path to where I am today. What made you decide to study acting at frostburg state university in Maryland as opposed to poetry or animation? My focus has shifted from drawing an animation and after I had been performing for about three maybe four years now one stage before college and I had aspirations of wanting to now at and write and direct in all of those things for TV and film. And somebody told me if I wanted to act on film, I had to learn how to act on stage. So I said, okay, cool. I said, if I go to school and I study performing on stage, I was already a performance poet. I figured that would be a subject that would keep me in school and something that I would be passionate about. I don't want to go to college and just get a business degree or something like that. It wouldn't have kept me there to be honest. And that's when I decided to study acting in prosper. At school you found that the professors took closely to the classic canon of playwrights like chekov, Arthur Miller, ipsen, Tennessee William, Shakespeare, and while you grew to appreciate this work, you didn't see yourself or your community in their prose. Back then, did you find any work that reflected your world? No, not at all. And that's definitely not all of my professors either. I think that's an institutional problem. That has to change. I think there's way more works that are in the American canon now. Compared to even 15 years ago, there wasn't a Donny love. Jeremy O'Hara is a couture hall in the form she is now a Dominic morsel and so forth. I can name Minnie now. So, yes, my professors exposed the program to the classics as well as they did expose us. I did discover it in Tulsa from my professor marriage during my sophomore year. More so, there weren't any stories that spoke to me and my generation. There was no contemporary stories that I was exposed to and or put in front of me at that time that I could say, hey, this is me, this is my community. I can see it on stage. It didn't exist. So, as a poet, I figured, instead of complaining about it, I wanted to create what I didn't see. And it was a small novel idea, really, it was myself that might have been four black men in the program. I was like, hey, I want to write something where if we stood on stage, it would represent us, we could talk the way we want to, we could walk the way we want to. We wouldn't have to try to fit in a box where we wouldn't have to change who we were. Me being from New York, one of my partners being from D.C., another being from Baltimore, I wanted to create something that we can hold on to and really that was my mission. And not realizing that that was the origins of me writing thoughts of a color man. Back when I was a sophomore in undergrad. What was the reaction to the early iterations of thoughts of a colored man from your professors? They loved it. They were the ones who gave me the space to produce it. I love them to death to this day. They still support me. They travel wherever I go. They were the ones who first gave me the first seed money, which I believe at the time might have been like, you know, a $100, which was great. So they were the ones that truly supported and believed I could do it and gave me the chance to because usually student projects of that nature to do a play an original work usually comes from the directing track. I was on an acting track. So for them to even allow me to do something like that, not even being on that track was amazing. And that's when I realized how important it was because I was doing it out of necessity, but how important it was to produce to be a producer. I had to beat a director because there was nobody else that could bring this vision to life, right? Because it was new. Nobody knew what it was but me. I became an acting coach because at the time there was only two, I believe, black men at the time in the program that could even be in a play. So we didn't even have enough men in our department to fulfill all the 7 roles. So I had to enlist my Friends on campus that never acted before. So I became an acting coach. So out of necessity, I started wearing all of these hats. And that's what showed me it was important to own my own narratives. And I feel like there was a large population of my campus that felt included. It felt welcomed and invited. Because of they knew who I was and what I stood for. And it became a huge success on my campus. I heard that all the shows sold out in two hours. Absolutely, which was a shock to me. And that right there showed me that I had more than just this small idea, right? So if it wasn't for frostburg, show me that I had some inkling of a career in producing and directing and doing all those things. I would have never thought that for myself. You stated that you used this specific word colored to spark a visceral reaction. Like it did during the civil and pre civil rights days. How do you feel about the word now? Is definitely a word I don't care for. At all. Because I understand that the history behind the word. But I stand behind why I use the word for the response that is getting at this moment..

Nicky Giovanni Tennessee William Jeremy O'hara Frostburg State University HBO Chekov Arthur Miller Hughes Maryland Minnie Tulsa D.C. Baltimore New York Frostburg
Fresh update on "debbie" discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:30 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "debbie" discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"This is a common denominator for young boys of color. How did you manage that emotionally? How did you feel as you witnessed this sort of different standard for the boys around you? You know, as a young kid, it angers you. Because as a kid, you still notice the treatment is different. And we see that often in the news now. When a young black boy loses his life, he's usually described as a man. And he is a child. My wife counterparts males, they're still considered boys up in psychology age. You know, so me being an educator, even looking back at my you've realizing how easy is for us to slip through those cracks just from the difference of reading level. When certain behavior is exhibited, it's treated more harshly. We are suspended more because of the learning curve. We are sent to special education more than our white counterparts. And these are things that I might not have had the terms for when I was a boy. But I definitely did feel that. And that treatment is internalized and that rage starts bubbling that anger starts to start this fire inside you and you don't really know how to explain it or where it comes from as an adolescent. And those things and it could be acted out in different ways, right? Whether that's frustration towards your peers, adults, authority, we have to learn how to handle adult situations before we're even adults. And that's a very hard thing to navigate. So for myself, I've always had a village around me. My family has always been here to support me I was raised by a village and I contribute who I am to them and then pouring in confidence in love, enjoy self awareness and all of those things that my family gave me, which I know some of my peers didn't have. And their lives took very, you know, different paths than myself. So I'm contributing a lot of that to my family, the village that raised me and God always feel like God has had his hand on me. And but here I am, and I can only, you know, do the best I can do and try to be the best person I can be. Well, you've talked about how that frustration and that anger was met outside the house with punishment instead of care and understanding. Absolutely. Seems to actually perpetuate the problem and make it worse. Absolutely. How did you begin to understand how to make sense of that frustration and that anger and ultimately that rage? It just came in time. There's really not one answer for it. I just know, as I'm matured, as I started to experience more things, my frustration in my anger got fueled and put into my art. And to me playing sports, you know, I was very much so focused on playing football and basketball growing up, basketball being my main sport. Me always being an artist and always funneling that energy in a word and into those things, especially my art, eventually into my performing and writing. So for me, that was my saving grace. And, you know, now being married with the child, I've become way more retrospective about my thinking and my acting because it's not just for myself. It's for my family. So me, I'm always on the quest spiritually to be the best person I can be. Be the best leader I can be for my household, be the best husband be the best father. Be the best brother and friend. It's evolution. You moved to the suburbs of Maryland, as you were about to go into high school, where you, as you mentioned, we're playing football. But also rating poetry. That's quite a range. What first motivated you to turn to poetry as a way to express yourself? So actually, I moved to the suburbs of Maryland before I got to junior high school. For me, growing up, especially elementary school, the beginning parts of junior high. I struggled academically, especially when it came to English. I always excelled in all my art classes and things like that, but I didn't realize until I was older that I was actually dyslexic. So therefore, it affected my learning and how I received information as a child. And I would say that I never had a teacher take the time to figure that out about me and figure out what my strengths were. So I could excel academically. And that goes back connects to the conversation we just had about how young black boys are viewed older than what they are, you know, I almost slipped through the cracks because with the young black boys, we're often not approached with care and impatience. So therefore, it's like, oh, if the struggle academically, you need to go to special education. And that's where I was sent for many of my courses. It wasn't until 6th grade. I was at the elementary school. I was putting all special Ed classes. So when I was a youth, talking back in the 90s, there wasn't inclusion classes. So when we use in special Ed usually, you was in a basement, you was around the corner. You was in a classroom that was off away from everybody else. And I remember being in 6th grade, a lot of my peers, weren't in special education. They was in, you know, regular courses and or honors courses. And at that time, I internalized that in a way to where it made me feel dumb. So I never forget asking my guidance counselor to put me in all honest classes, which is wild, right? Go from special education to skip regular average courses, but they called it. They called it average classes to honors. And my goddesses said, are you sure that's not a usual? I said, yes, I want to be an all honest classes. Such and such, my Friends, they're doing it. I hang out with them every day. I think I can do it too. And kudos to my mother, she said if Keenan says he can handle those classes, then he can handle it. From that day forward, I was never in special Ed classes again. 6th grade was the last time..

Basketball Football Maryland Elementary School Keenan
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:18 min | Last month

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"So first of all, this is not a bad person, but we're just going to label a few things to call them out. So we're going to make some observations here. That's first of all. And second is, I'm going to give difficult feedback, but I'm going to get into it with what I call an emotional payment, as in, you are not a problem, and also you add a lot to the table. But there are some things that we need to work that you need to work on. The reason I think it's important to make that emotional payment is because you want to signal good intent. And if you've not been giving them positive feedback for the past couple of years, you might really need to signal good intent right here and right now. So I'm going to give that as context. I want to distinguish this also from the so called feedback sandwich. Have you heard of the feedback sandwich? No. What people think about as the feedback sandwich is you tell people something good, then you tell them what you really want to tell them. And then you tell them something good to soften the blow. I do not encourage that. Do not do that. However, you do need to signal good intent and if you haven't done that regularly, let's start off by giving the positive, so the person understands where you're coming from. Why do you recommend not giving a feedback sandwich? It sounds like the big difference between what you're going to share with us in a feedback sandwiches that you don't come back to the bottom half of the sandwich. But the problem with the feedback sandwich is its technique. It's not coming from a philosophy. It's just a technique. Like, how do I give some of feedback? Why you tell them something good? They tell them something about you tell them something good. Well, that's like coming. There's no depth to that. Also, people see through it, so it's not, it doesn't land in the way that you're hoping for it to land. So I think it's almost a spiritual difference. When I'm asking you to do is not give a feedback sandwich, I'm asking you to actually think about for yourself, all the good things this person does bring to the table so that when you have the conversation, your tone is connoting the approval, those good things. Also, so that your employee understands that you're coming from a place of wanting to be helpful to them and appreciating what they bring to the table. So I think it's just a difference of almost like philosophy and depth. So I'm going to ask you all to really think about what does this person do well because you're going to start with that and also you want to bring that to the conversation as you have a difficult feedback. Is that helpful? Absolutely. Okay, great. So I'm going to get right into it. Debbie. I want to talk to you today because I've noticed a few things that I think we should address. First of all, I appreciate everything you do. I know you're one of the hardest workers here, and your sense of humor brings everyone up. That's great. That said, I want to make sure you're getting great results with all your work. What I often see from you is a number of projects a lot of activity, but I often see the projects are delayed and remain unfinished. Also, you don't always let everyone know what the delays so they come as a surprise. That's a problem for your coworkers who are counting on you to do what you say you'll do. Then other things get delayed waiting on you. I'm sure you have your reasons. Things are not perfect here. Maybe you're waiting other people. But I expect you as a leader here to work constructively with your peers to fix process problems as they come up and to raise flags early if things will be late. I also expect you to make sure that your communicating regularly with your peers and all the things you guys are working on jointly. I know you're super talented and you have much to contribute to our company. I want your efforts to have the right impact and I want you to be able to move forward in your career. That's why I'm working on this with you. We can discuss some of this right now, and I'd love you to think about this and come back to me in three or four days with what you see as the problems and how you propose to fix them. What day should we plan to sync up again so you can share your plan with me and let me know what help you need from me. So do you recommend that that's something that we said face to face or should that be in an email? Could that be in an email? I really prefer face to face or these days, video. It's important to have the conversation because they're going to have a response. When I write these scripts, by the way, obviously, you're going to tailor it to your own circumstances, but also they might interrupt you. That's okay. You're trying to get your mouth around the words, also you're trying to get your mindset right. And so practicing it is very helpful. Having a script to practice is very helpful. But once you've thought through what you want to say, when and if they interrupt you and also share their point of view, which you certainly want to hear, it'll help you listen to them and not worry about you getting you through your message. What happens when somebody responds defensively? I know. I have a script for that. On my website, actually. When someone's response defensively, so first of all, I think it's important to step back and remind them, I'm only sharing this with you because I care about you and your success. Also, that's where labeling comes in too. Listen, I see that you're having kind of an emotional reaction. I understand that. I don't like getting difficult feedback either. So let me just see if we can calm down for a second. And we might need a minute. The other thing you can do when someone acts defensively is you can just be quiet. And you can also say, listen, I don't want to upset you. Tell me more about how this is landing for you. By the way, I just did this with a client the other day. I was giving him the feedback. And he got super explosive with me. Quite defensive. And so I just let him talk and let him talk and let him talk. By the way, we think coaches don't take it personally. I took it personally. You're a person. I take everything personally. I'm a person. Yeah. But I let him vent invent invent invent. And then I said, I see that I touched a nerve here, which I think was accurate. I was just labeling that and also what I said to him was I really didn't mean to upset you. That's not why I brought this up. Tell me more about what's coming up for you or what's going on with you. And as a leader, you can say that, too, and you can do this is another woohoo term in coaching. We say holding space. You can hold space for somebody to have a difficult and emotional reaction. And that can go on for 5 minutes or ten minutes, and it's not their final answer. And also, you don't have to take it personally..

Debbie
Little Debbie (MM #3861)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Little Debbie (MM #3861)

"The mason minute. With Kevin mason. The Internet has been buzzing the last couple of two three days because the folks who make little Debbie snack cakes have announced they're going to be doing little Debbie ice cream this Christmas, an exclusive deal with Walmart that's kind of the taste of their Christmas tree cakes or whatever they are. As much as I love snack cakes, I always grew up as a hostess kid and didn't really enjoy little Debbie's didn't even see little Debbie's until probably the early to mid 80s when I was going to college in southwest Virginia. Now they've been nationwide and they've been around most of my life, but I didn't really notice them until then. My favorites probably the zebra cakes. I think they're the ones I eat the most if I do eat them. My wife, I think she may have nutty buddies in the house right now and she likes the Swiss cakes and doesn't mind the zebra cakes, and while I've had the Christmas tree cakes, they pretty much all taste the same to me. But the ice cream is making people crazy. Thought? Gonna try it. Gonna see if I can find a pint at Walmart when they start selling it. It's going to be a limited time run. It's going to be something that people are going to be looking for. The look out for, if you really care, little Debbie ice cream, who would have thought people would care that much?

Kevin Mason Debbie Ice Debbie Snack Debbie Walmart Mason Virginia
Little Debbie (MM #3861)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Little Debbie (MM #3861)

"The mason minute. With Kevin mason. The Internet has been buzzing the last couple of two three days because the folks who make little Debbie snack cakes have announced they're going to be doing little Debbie ice cream this Christmas, an exclusive deal with Walmart that's kind of the taste of their Christmas tree cakes or whatever they are. As much as I love snack cakes, I always grew up as a hostess kid and didn't really enjoy little Debbie's didn't even see little Debbie's until probably the early to mid 80s when I was going to college in southwest Virginia. Now they've been nationwide and they've been around most of my life, but I didn't really notice them until then. My favorites probably the zebra cakes. I think they're the ones I eat the most if I do eat them. My wife, I think she may have nutty buddies in the house right now and she likes the Swiss cakes and doesn't mind the zebra cakes, and while I've had the Christmas tree cakes, they pretty much all taste the same to me. But the ice cream is making people crazy. Thought? Gonna try it. Gonna see if I can find a pint at Walmart when they start selling it. It's going to be a limited time run. It's going to be something that people are going to be looking for. The look out for, if you really care, little Debbie ice cream, who would have thought people would care that much?

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Debbie Ice Debbie Snack Debbie Walmart Mason Virginia
The 'Best in Television' Emmy Awards Have Been Announced

NPR News Now

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

The 'Best in Television' Emmy Awards Have Been Announced

"Emmy awards for the best in television have been handed out in los angeles. Net flicks is the crown won. Best drama and at flexes the queen's gambit one best limited series actor jason. Today is one best lead comedy actor for his role in the apple. Tv plus show ted lasso about family. The is about mentors and teachers. The shows about teammates. And i wouldn't be here without those three. The winner of the emmy for best actress in a comedy series was jean smart for her role in the hbo series hacks actor and choreographer debbie allen. Received the governor's award this for her distinguished career of that also includes

Ted Lasso Emmy Awards Los Angeles Jason Apple Jean Smart Emmy HBO Debbie Allen
Biden Visits All Three Attack Sites on 20th Anniversary of 9/11

NPR News Now

01:40 min | 2 months ago

Biden Visits All Three Attack Sites on 20th Anniversary of 9/11

"Been a day of remembrance as the nation and the world mark the twentieth anniversary of the nine eleven attacks in their wake nearly three thousand dead on that day many more related illnesses and deaths in the months and years that followed at adjust ended twenty year war with all its associated national divisions and challenges. Npr's amy held reports for the twentieth year families remembered loved ones lost alongside countless moments in your city. My brother tj hargrave who. We continue to miss an love every day. The world is the lesser place without him in shanksville pennsylvania. My cousin debbie jacobs welsh and at the pentagon defense secretary lloyd austin guardians of our ideals as well as our security because we cannot have one without the other president biden visiting all three sites of the attacks. That's burke. The warriors recently seem to an end in afghanistan where the taliban who gave shelter to the terrorists rule. Again amy held. Npr news president biden and president harris concluded their day with a wreath links ceremony at the pentagon where one hundred eighty four people were killed. Many more injured twenty years ago. The president also visited new york city and shanksville today to honor the nine eleven victims. He told reporters at the memorial for victims of flight. Ninety three moreover ruin. they're also incredibly difficult. People were affected is a breeze back. You got the phone. Call the president plans to spend the rest of the weekend in wilmington

President Biden Shanksville Tj Hargrave Debbie Jacobs Lloyd Austin AMY Pentagon Npr News NPR President Harris Pennsylvania Burke Warriors Taliban Afghanistan New York City Wilmington
America Marks the 20th Anniversary of 9/11

NPR News Now

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

America Marks the 20th Anniversary of 9/11

"Us is marking the twentieth anniversary of the september eleven terror attacks that left nearly three thousand people dead sparked a just ended twenty year war and change the nation npr's. Amy held reports for the twentieth year. Families remembered loved ones lost alongside moments in your city. My brother tj hargrave who. We continue to miss an love every day. The world is the lesser place without him in shanksville pennsylvania. My cousin debbie jacobs welsh and at the pentagon defense secretary lloyd austin guardians of our ideals as well as our security because we cannot have one without the other president biden visiting all three sites of the attacks. That's burke. The warriors recently seen to an end in afghanistan where the taliban who gave shelter to the terrorists rule. Again

Tj Hargrave Shanksville Debbie Jacobs Lloyd Austin NPR AMY President Biden United States Pentagon Pennsylvania Burke Warriors Afghanistan Taliban
Ida Updates: The Latest on the Storm's Aftermath in Louisiana

The Takeaway

01:15 min | 3 months ago

Ida Updates: The Latest on the Storm's Aftermath in Louisiana

"Hurricane Ida are now bringing intense rain and flood risk from Virginia into Maine. Louisiana, which took the full brunt of a Category four storm when it hit on Sunday, is still assessing the damages. Several people were killed and the death toll is expected to rise. The governor warning residents who fled the worst hit areas not to come back where there's still no basic infrastructure. President Biden has announced he's headed to New Orleans Friday to check out the damage he'll meet with state and local leaders. NPR's Debbie Elliott reports hundreds of thousands of people in Louisiana. Still have no electricity. The lights are back on for some in New Orleans, but much of the region remains without power, water, sewer and communication systems are also severely damaged. New Orleans has set up cooling stations to help residents cope with the heat and humidity. Makeshift distribution points are also handing out food, water and ice in the city and in harder hit parishes to the south and west. Meanwhile, search and rescue teams are working in flooded communities, and authorities are trying to get a handle on the scope of the destruction. Jefferson Parish officials, for instance, say the barrier island of Grand Isle is uninhabitable. Debbie

Hurricane Ida President Biden New Orleans Debbie Elliott Louisiana Maine Virginia NPR Jefferson Parish Grand Isle Debbie
The Next Apple Watch May Be Delayed Due to Manufacturing Issues

Techmeme Ride Home

00:57 sec | 3 months ago

The Next Apple Watch May Be Delayed Due to Manufacturing Issues

"Watch out see when i did there. Lots of apple. Watch news this morning and the first bit ain't good a source is telling debbie wu and mark gherman that apple's upcoming watch is suffering production snags as manufacturers adjust to a new design likely leading to supply constraints or shipment delays quoting bloomberg. The device is expected to have a larger screen alongside a faster processor. Bloomberg has reported the upgrade has brought manufacturing challenges according to the person who asked not to be identified because the situation isn't public nikkei reported earlier that production of the device has been delayed due to the complexity of the new watch manufacturers of the product began small scale production last week but didn't get satisfactory. Output nikkei said the new watches also have screened technology. That bring that display closer to the cover glass using a different lemonade. Technique bloomberg previously reported that display layer may be causing some of the production woes. The person said and quote

Debbie Wu Mark Gherman Apple Bloomberg
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:27 min | 3 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"My brain thanks. To eighty has always puppy has always been easily the distract. I'm like i just got a puppy up like come in. The internet showed up and made it so that people would that sort of attention span did better for a while because it rewards this stop and start thing so my writing has always been a little bit choppy in that sense but what i wanted to do here was lay a foundation hundred two hundred bricks one after another and if felt to me like the bite-sized morsels that followed each other and appropriate ways match the way. So many of us are thinking in this moment but i'm also hopeful that it's more than a collection of posts. It really should we've together. You've also said that the book could be a workshop that lasted one hundred fifty days. So why the difference because that's a long period of time versus the shorter more concentrated Chapters it actually is a workshop that lasts so it is okay. I made the workshop. I it took two years to make the workshop and the ideas in the book started as i think. They're fifty principle lessons inside the workshop. But then i got to watch five hundred people exchange five hundred pieces of feedback per month with each other back and forth more than a half a million in total over the course of the workshop back and forth people doing this work and the challenge of the workshop. Is we say short for one hundred days hundred days in a row. You don't have to spend a lotta time five minutes. We don't care right something for one hundred days in a row. What happened stunned me. Because i've been running these workshops for awhile and other topics the community showed up and they did it and books were published and businesses were started and connections were made because streaks work and streaks matter you know you have built a lifetime of streaks debbie i you know with your branding business and then as a dean and a teacher. If you know you're going to class tomorrow your brain is working on it tonight. You don't make a new decision every day. You make the streak decision once and watching people who had been unprofessional about their creativity turning pro all as a group so we ran it again and it worked even better the second time so running it again. We have not we anymore. Akimbo is running to get in january. And it's extraordinary to see what people are capable of once they commit to it and so once there was a workshop turning it into a book that was straightforward part. Let's talk about the title and the subtitle okay. The entire book title is the practice shipping creative work. And i'm wondering if we can deconstruct it a little bit. yes please. So i the practice you state that the practice is choice. Plus skill plus attitude. So is that the back story for the title. And the use of the word the practice. The backstory of the title is that the title is really trust yourself and i own trust yourself dot com which wasn't cheap and i'm bad ignoring costs. Sometimes so i keep referring to it in my head is trust yourself. Why trust yourself. People talk to themselves. I talked to myself. Maybe you talk to yourself. But we don't really freak out about the fact that someone is talking to someone there two selves the one that is talking in the one that is listening which one is which the one who is talking is a critic is afraid is a perfectionist and the one who being talked to is soft at heart and brilliant and generous and has something to say and we can extinguish so press. Fueled calls this resistance. Yes and if we could learn to trust that other voice and let it speak up. There's no guarantee it's going to work most of the time it won't but it's the best path to doing the work we need to do to trust ourselves and the great nikki popadopoulos. My editor at penguin said. That's a really good riff. But it's not a really good title because it's too complicated and it doesn't evoke what you're after and the reason you work with someone like her so you can listen to her because as i point out in the book good criticism is really scarce and she knows what she's doing so i had to take my advice and i listened to her so the practice is simple. The practice says we merely do this work. We make the choice to do the work and then we do it without commentary without drama without reassurance without needing to be assured of an outcome we merely do the work and i know a lot of creative people not as many as you but a lot who have become famous who have won awards where success for every field and this is what they have in common. It's not a talent. it's not something that the muse touch them and not somebody else. They simply do the work and there are times. They'll do a hack just to succeed but most of the time when they're proud of their work it's because they have a practice and the practice is its own reward and its output is a thing that might lead to the thing you're hoping for but that's not why you do it you do it because it's your practice. Well we're actually going to take a deep dive into many of the words. You just used hacked trust Reassurance especially reassures and so forth in the book is that the practice is agnostic about the outcome and the practice remains regardless of the outcome. Can you elaborate a little bit on what you mean by agnostic. So let me. Just use an example. That might not sound like it's a creative work which is being a doctor if you are a podiatrist you probably don't have many patients dying new but if you're an oncologist unfortunately you do. Does that mean and in college est is not as good a doctor as a podiatrist of course not it just means that the oncologist does her work and her best work often leads to a good outcome. But sometimes it doesn't and that's not about the work that's about the outcome and it's impossible to become an emergency room doctor or an ecology and say. I only do it as long as everyone lives can have. It doesn't work and the things true if you're a blogger. You can't say i will only blog. If every blog i write works on everyone every time. You simply do the work now you should learn from what you do because if you're busy writing your blogging italian and everyone reads..

nikki popadopoulos debbie penguin
Hurricane Ida Forecast to Strengthen as It Nears Louisiana

NPR News Now

01:00 min | 3 months ago

Hurricane Ida Forecast to Strengthen as It Nears Louisiana

"Ida is expected to rapidly intensify over the warm waters of the gulf of mexico today. Npr's debbie elliott reports. It's on path to strike the coast of louisiana tomorrow as a powerful category. Four hurricane with anticipated wins about to a hundred and seventy miles per hour. Hurricane ida could cut a destructive path through southeast louisiana ten to fifteen foot storm surge and flooding. Rains are also a danger. All of that is now complicated by the corona virus pandemic louisiana state health officer. Joe cantor says. The state is experiencing high levels of cova transmission. There's still a lot of risk out there. The storm is not the only risk out there. Coded increases the risk. Please stay stock of that. Please incorporate that into your hurricane plans. He's urging people to avoid emergency rooms if possible because hospitals are already over capacity with record numbers of cova

Debbie Elliott Louisiana Hurricane Ida Gulf Of Mexico Joe Cantor NPR
Ida Will Become Major Category 4 Hurricane in Less Than 24 Hours

BBC World Service

00:52 sec | 3 months ago

Ida Will Become Major Category 4 Hurricane in Less Than 24 Hours

"Ida is gaining strength in the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico. NPR's Debbie Elliott reports. It's on a path to strike Louisiana's Sunday as a major hurricane. Evacuations are underway and at least five South Louisiana parishes and Governor John Bel Edwards has activated the state's national guard. To respond to what's forecast to be a devastating category for Hurricane Benjamin, shot with the National Weather Service in New Orleans says it will bring when gusts of up to 170 MPH 15 FT storm surge and nearly two FT of rain in some areas. This will be a life altering storm for those who are prepared. And ready to take what I'd is gonna throw at us later this weekend. Parts of Louisiana are still recovering from a record five tropical landfalls last year.

Debbie Elliott Governor John Bel Edwards Hurricane Benjamin South Louisiana Gulf Of Mexico NPR Louisiana Hurricane National Guard National Weather Service New Orleans
Democrats' Budget Resolution Will Federalize States' Voter ID Laws

Mark Levin

01:11 min | 3 months ago

Democrats' Budget Resolution Will Federalize States' Voter ID Laws

"By the way in this bill. As Congresswoman Debbie Lesko says she's great. Gives the Biden Department of Justice Authority to designate a voter ID law as a voting rights violation as evidence of voting discrimination. It federalize is and nationalizes. The election procedures and there would never have been a constitution. If that had ever been proposed and placed in the original constitution. How do I know? Because I've read many of the documents. Related to the various constitutional conventions. This was a big issue. Member. These states were creating this federal government. This national government. And they wanted to keep certain powers, particularly voting in other powers in the states as much as possible. And that's what they did. And so the Democrat Party hating the Constitution hating capitalism. Hating their own country wanting to reconfigure it, So they control everything and build a paradise right here in America. Oh, it'll be wonderful. Uh, they reject the

Debbie Lesko Biden Department Of Justice Au Democrat Party America
Miami Gardens Reopens COVID Testing & Vaccination Site

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

Miami Gardens Reopens COVID Testing & Vaccination Site

"Its covid testing and vaccination site today. The testing facility now becomes one of the largest in the area since the state operated hard Rock stadium testing site is permanently closed. Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz says Florida's moving backwards in its fight against coronavirus, and she's calling yet again on the governor to declare a state of emergency supplies like ventilators and oxygen can move around the state more easily where they are needed. With tens of thousands of new cases in our hospitals teeming with covid patients, that declaration is necessary. The side opens the day after a new Regeneron monoclonal antibody treatment, said. Or opens at C B. Smith Park in Pembroke Pines. The free treatment is available seven days a week for the elderly and immunocompromised. Wendy Grossman,

Rock Stadium Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Florida C B. Smith Park Pembroke Pines Wendy Grossman
How to Pave a New Career Path

TED Talks Daily

02:23 min | 3 months ago

How to Pave a New Career Path

"Today we're gonna be exploring stepping into the unknown head to talk about it. I am joined by debbie. Millman that hosted one of our first podcasts. Ever or one of the first time ever. Hi debbie hang lease. Great ac- air. It's great to see you If you haven't tuned in before debbie's cast is called design matters. And i have been listening while i go on runs and Really enjoy your conversation. Thank you thank you so much. We'll to frame this talk Why don't we start by talking. About how stepping into the unknown applies in your own life in in your own career. Well i was really influenced. Several years ago. I interviewed the great writer danny shapiro and we were talking after the interview. She came into my office at the school of visual arts and saw that i had stacked on my task. Three books had just come out a barrel confidence. I i really had felt at the time. That confidence is by holy grail. But this is what. I was looking for to find my whole life if i could find the confidence to step into any without fear that that would be like my life likely be made and she and i started talking about that and she said oh i think. Confidence is really overrated. What what like ed explodes. And i pressed her for more information. And she said that she felt the confidence overrated that most people that just head oodles oodles of confidence were jerky thought was more important than confidence was actually courage and that courage to step into that unknown was was far more important to being able to reach any kind of call in so it set me on a pass of a research to really find our What confidence actually meant. What does it mean to have. What have you have you get confidence. You're not good with supermarket in like polls confidence shelves

Debbie Hang Debbie Danny Shapiro Millman School Of Visual Arts ED
A Chat with Former La Cosa Nostra Mobster, Bobby Luisi

Gangland Wire

02:30 min | 3 months ago

A Chat with Former La Cosa Nostra Mobster, Bobby Luisi

"Bob as you know. We've talked a little bit. That i was in law enforcement and i worked to mob in kansas city. We had our own coast. Knows your family. The savelli family next valley had been the boss since god says before fifty seven he was at the app alaskan meeting in one thousand nine hundred fifty seven with a real old timer who brought him there to introducing so we were kinda subservient to chicago. And you're on the other side during those days. Especially when i was working this in the seventies and early eighties so all the way up to really to the start of the nineties so i find it fascinating talk with you guys but i tell me a little bit about your time with the boston family. How did you first get involved with that. While i grew up in the north enemies foshan and then that lately in boston. That was headquarters for the mob. Debbie the koneohe on that was made guy. Scott does bosses whatever it was always around us and influenced us at the age of eleven. I went to work for the gangsters. They have vending machine number roll. Bending and i was eleven years old as the wife the school and go out with the guys and load the cigarette machines. Embalming she's of money and savage. We used to go out and while the machines and was eleven twelve years old. It was a fifty dollars a week and everything was great. And you don't even realize. I'm only a kid. I mean the jewel family really owned the company never was around them. Jerry was the boss boss brain on the raymond patriarca. But i was around all the rest of the wise guys so my father in an early you know i guess as early twenties. Hope up with these old. My father was always involved with them and i up around him rubber wrong koppel's and may guys and they're great guys and i think maybe the age of sixteen seventeen. The other side of my family were all out of this. I really enjoyed that. So i kinda sway away from that. And i wanted to go into the construction business and i did that for awhile up on my thirties but i still had a little evolving on the street knowledge. Yeah so now. I was building homes on. Martha's vineyard very popular place. Everybody knows about a mother's venue. Yeah in the late eighties. The market crash and i lost my house on the second houses down for o.'hare developing and i lost everything. I lost my gondola house in boston. I lost everything from positive. So i came back with two kids and no money. That's i hit the streets early nine thousand nine hundred ninety nine thousand nine hundred after the

Savelli Boston Raymond Patriarca Kansas City BOB Debbie Chicago Scott Koppel Jerry Martha
The Senate Passes a $3.5 Trillion Budget Blueprint

NPR's Business Story of the Day

01:38 min | 3 months ago

The Senate Passes a $3.5 Trillion Budget Blueprint

"Senate is moving ahead with one of president. Biden's top economic priorities early. this morning. It took the first step in passing a three and a half trillion dollar budget. Reggie resolution that could lead to major reforms in social programs. The vote came just hours after the senate passed a trillion dollar infrastructure. Package with bipartisan support. This is all a win. For the president who promised to invest in the nation's economy and also proved the democrats and republicans can still work together. So what might this mean for the president politically. Npr white house correspondent us. Mukalla joins us now. Good morning. Good morning debbie. So what now has to happen for these two bills. Well this three point five trillion dollar spending package. That is chock full of democratic priorities for things like climate change and childcare is actually just starting to get worked out so it's just really the first step and frankly it's not going to get any republican votes. Democrats have been insisting that this bill the three point five trillion. Dollar one. Along with the bipartisan infrastructure. Bill must be passed in tandem. The problem for democrats is that they have such small majorities in both chambers. That it could be difficult to keep all their members in line Now president biden seems competent. That he is going to win passage of the two spending bills. That would come on top of the big kovic relief bill from earlier this year. Will voters take note perhaps but it is not clear that voters have thus far been connecting the dots back to president biden. And even if they have been personally benefiting from something he's done

Senate Mukalla Biden Reggie President Biden Debbie White House Bill
Pentagon to Mandate COVID-19 Vaccine for U.S. Service Members

Morning Edition

01:57 min | 3 months ago

Pentagon to Mandate COVID-19 Vaccine for U.S. Service Members

"On Covid 19. That's right. Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin says he's going to ask President Biden for permission to make all members of the U. S military get vaccinated. He's expected to officially asked the president by mid September because of the Delta variant infections are rising in the military, along with much of the rest of the country. NPR national security correspondent Greg Murray joins us now. Good morning, Greg. Good morning, Debbie. Why now? The vaccine has been available for some time. Now, why hasn't the military ordered this already? Well, the military can give us troops all kinds of orders, but it can't force them to take a vaccine that is not approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA hasn't approved or fully approved any of the covid vaccines that could happen soon, But for now they have emergency authorization, so to make it mandatory for military members, President Biden will have to issue a waiver on national security Grounds and defense Secretary Austin said in his memo yesterday. That's exactly what he's going to do is to ask the president. If this just needs a presidential waiver, something that could have come sooner. Why wait till now? It seems there were several factors The military really does want the troops to buy in. So it's emphasized persuasion up to this point. And there was also some thinking The FDA approval was just around the corner, which would remove the need for a waiver also took some time to review some of the legal issues here. But with the Delta variants surging, the military seems to be saying it just can't wait and risk a new wave of covid cases. And we should note the military vaccine vaccination rate is very much in line with the overall rate among the US population. In both cases, a little over 60% are fully vaccinated, The military says. This just isn't good enough More troops need to get the shots. Pentagon spokesman John Kirby

President Biden Secretary Of Defense Lloyd Aus Greg Murray FDA Secretary Austin U. NPR Debbie Greg United States Pentagon John Kirby
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:34 min | 4 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Silicon valley job was as director of product development for mozilla the maker of fire fox. But i believe your first job out of law. School was actually as a writer for mtv. For which you work there. I think for about a year. Is that correct. Yeah tell me how that fits in with this sort of light but goal that you are. You had always been a little bit weird debbie and it's always. It's always hard to sort of make sense of it myself. Especially if i if i'm describing it to my family what i've always kind of jumped back and forth between the worlds of of of writing which i've always loved and spent time as a writer before i went to graduate school for the dnc for the democratic national committee. Yeah and then. When i was when i was working at mozilla i wanted to. I still wanted to write. And mtv had this role were they. Were they were creating something. New around content focused on you know people with brown skin. So i was kind of moonlighting that job while i was working at mozilla and i felt like i was sort of scratching. Both my itches. I had the technologies sort of more analytical side of of the world during the day. And i got to do more of the sort of you know creative fresh type of stuff at night and the right and began in two thousand and four got a job at the democratic. National committee is a writer and one of the stories. That really me is just stuck with me. It got a lot of ways is probably the basis of what it is. I try to do each each day. Was that i'm sitting backstage. And there's a guy that nobody recognizes who's about to give a speech he's a state senator from illinois and barack obama gets up and gives that speech and i got to watch it from backstage and what i saw was just i get the chills even just talking about it. It was almost as tidal wave energy. That distorted ripped through the stadium. And i became wanna i think millions of young people that night that became really fascinated with obama story. Who is this like. Who is guy. He was running for senate at the time whereas i started the unpack his story. Which is what i love to do. Now on people's stories understands or were like how you do this way better than i do. I'm learning from you. I found though was really surprising. Which was that four years. Prior to that speech he'd run for congress and he lost he laws and he had lost by a huge margin a two to one margin. It wasn't close but the thing that surprised me even more than that was the way that he was received. During that campaign people described him as stilted professorial. Yeah there was a reporter named ted mcclelland. Who followed him around during that campaign shadowed him. Who wrote that. Barack obama is so dry that he sucks up all of the air out of the room. It's crazy and then four years later he is this bastion of hope in energy in an inspiration and that to me was just the most inspiring thing which is not necessarily that. Wow i was seeing this person who clearly was a rising star. What was most inspiring to me was the moment of call it reinvention or turn around or whatever it was and i wanted to kind of focus more on that what happened during those four years. And it really. That's how i spend my time today. I try to go to these moments. Where we we don't really pay much attention to because we kind of assumed that the people that we admire have always been that way and if you were wind the clock i try to find these almost dips in their experience whereas like no things. Actually were going very poorly. And here's what they did here. The adjustments that they made to get to where they are today. That is what is endlessly fascinating for me. And you did that. Over and over while you're at mozilla you're initially were hired to work on legal matters but you find yourself drawn to the engineering and design areas of the business. And you talk about who you were. Finally given a chance to lead and launch a new product feature fire fox. But you don't really talk about how you did it how you actually got that chance. You certainly we're hanging around and show that you're interested but what was the catalyst to making that happen. Yeah i mean. I asked for it one of the things i think i'm pretty decent has sort of just if i look at somebody's workflow. How are people working. I tend to be the person who says well. What about could we do that. Maybe that could be a little bit different. You know that improve things which is interesting. because that's what i just described to. You is the job of an optimized. And i don't like to optimize but but in this case what i was doing. I was watching these. These brilliant engineers and designers work and i was finding is that they were sort of putting things into spreadsheets and sort of tracking their work and in pretty disjointed ways because they were focusing on doing what they were doing which was which was writing code and creating designs and so it started out as. Hey could i actually just organize this a little bit for you. I think whenever you're not really asking for something you're not asking for a title you're not asking for a role but you're saying hey do you mind if i just could i do this and if you like it great and if you don't throw it out that's kind of what i did. I went to the the head of that. Time of mozilla labs guidance chris beard who ended up eventually become the ceo and asked him and he's like sure. Knock yourself out..

mozilla mtv Barack obama ted mcclelland democratic national committee Silicon valley dnc debbie National committee illinois senate congress fox chris beard
A Prayer for the Filling of God's Power and Love

Your Daily Prayer

02:02 min | 4 months ago

A Prayer for the Filling of God's Power and Love

"A prayer for the felling. Of god's power and love by debbie mcdaniel. I pray that of his glorious riches he may strengthen you with power through his spirit in your inner being so that christ mates well in your hearts through faith and i pray. The eu being rooted and established in love may have power together with all the saints to grasp how wide and long and high end. Deep is the love of christ and to know this love that surpasses knowledge that you may be filled to measure of all the fullness of god he fusions three sixteen through nineteen god is powerful and loving and he desires to fill. Our lives are days with that same power in love through his holy spirit. Paul prayed this prayer over the fusions he had spent over three years with these people working with the church of ephesus he loved them long to see them walking closely with god. His desire was that they would be continually strengthened with god's power and living out their faith with the example of the love of christ. We can know this in our heads yet. Find it difficult at times to walk it out in daily life. We're busy we're tired. We feel alone or broken or distracted. We get offended. We harbor bitterness or resentment but no matter what we might be facing or feeling when we're willing to stand together as the body of christ dependent on god for the spirits fresh filling of power in love all other things lose their hold on us. For god's love encompasses all it reaches to every dark crevice and fills every need our longing. It gives power to forgive and to let go of the past it releases since hold and gives peace to the hurting it is powerful and surpasses our own knowledge and understanding. It is wide. It stretches to a greater expanse an extent than we can ever imagine

Debbie Mcdaniel Church Of Ephesus Saints EU Paul
Building Desktop Apps With wxPython

Talk Python To Me

02:04 min | 4 months ago

Building Desktop Apps With wxPython

"Mike welcome to by enemy. Thanks so much for having me again. Yeah it's great to have you here. Maybe we just remind people the last time you are here. You wrote a really cool book called a python that drive the title correct. Yes that's correct. Yeah and that was back in episode one hundred and fifty six way back in two thousand eighteen three years ago. I guess more than that but it was a history book so is looking back right. It's it's fine it's still relevant. People can check that out. And i really love some of the stories that you told on there at love. I think it was alex martelli. You interviewed him. Talked about how google video and youtube or sort of competing neck and neck and that was sort of a python versus plus story. That's probably the one that stuck with me. The most yeah. I really enjoyed that one although some good stuff in the book canon interview as well. Yeah there's great stuff all over. I'm just trying to think of the one that i remember years later. You know yeah. yeah so. It's been a couple years since you've been on the show what you've been up well since snape came out. I have been pretty prolific in my writing and continue to write more python bucks for example in on debbie ex python and our report lab. I redid python one. Which was my first book. Report is about like working with. Pdf's right yes. You can use a pdf's but that book also covers how to edit option. Say it how to read and get out of an existing pdf as well. Yeah you got a couple of one. Oh one to a one type boxes well. Learning by beginners into one is kind of intermediate advanced. So if i was a sophomore might take yes cool. So what are you doing these days. Are you doing the independent thing with your authoring and creating. are you doing. Tilting what are you. Oh i still do a fulltime job. I write python code that tested embedded c plus plus application with python. Oh nice swift. Need but i also kind of as hobbies slash site job. I write for for myself. I write these books. And i occasionally contribute to real python as well

Alex Martelli Mike Snape Youtube Google Debbie
"debbie" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

Psychologists Off The Clock

05:59 min | 4 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

"And i am so excited about this episode. As i'm sure you know. I absolutely love being co host of psychologists off the clock because i get to interview some of my professional heroes. These like famous well known people who've written books and it is such a delight but one of the things that i love. The most is when i get to actually talk with my co hosts about the things that they are passionate about so today. I am interviewing debbie sorenson. And we're going to talk about burnout today. Which is a topic that is near and dear to her heart. Hi debbie hi gel. Thank you for doing this with me. I'm excited to talk to you about burn out today. I am so excited to talk to you about it too and just to pick your brain. I think it's so fun when we get to learn a little bit from each other me. I've learned a lot from you about imposter syndrome and other things from all my co-host of this is great. Okay so I was thinking about our interview and how it feels to me like. We're hearing a lot more about burn out these days like it's almost like the new quote unquote self care like. It's kind of become a buzz word. So i thought maybe the best place to start would be with what you mean. When you talk about burnett like how you define it. And what are maybe some of the telltale signs for somebody to determine whether they're experiencing burnout yuck great question. So i think that i'll to start with the the definition. That is the world health. Organization's official definition of burnout and the world. Health organization describes it as an occupational phenomenon. And there's little controversy about that so hope bookmark that we'll talk about that in a second but there are basically three main. I guess signs of burnout so one is just feeling exhausted depleted. And i'm here to tell you..

debbie sorenson debbie burnett
"debbie" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

Psychologists Off The Clock

05:59 min | 4 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

"And i am so excited about this episode. As i'm sure you know. I absolutely love being co host of psychologists off the clock because i get to interview some of my professional heroes. These like famous well known people who've written books and it is such a delight but one of the things that i love. The most is when i get to actually talk with my co hosts about the things that they are passionate about so today. I am interviewing debbie sorenson. And we're going to talk about burnout today. Which is a topic that is near and dear to her heart. Hi debbie hi gel. Thank you for doing this with me. I'm excited to talk to you about burn out today. I am so excited to talk to you about it too and just to pick your brain. I think it's so fun when we get to learn a little bit from each other me. I've learned a lot from you about imposter syndrome and other things from all my co-host of this is great. Okay so I was thinking about our interview and how it feels to me like. We're hearing a lot more about burn out these days like it's almost like the new quote unquote self care like. It's kind of become a buzz word. So i thought maybe the best place to start would be with what you mean. When you talk about burnett like how you define it. And what are maybe some of the telltale signs for somebody to determine whether they're experiencing burnout yuck great question. So i think that i'll to start with the the definition. That is the world health. Organization's official definition of burnout and the world. Health organization describes it as an occupational phenomenon. And there's little controversy about that so hope bookmark that we'll talk about that in a second but there are basically three main. I guess signs of burnout so one is just feeling exhausted depleted. And i'm here to tell you..

debbie sorenson debbie burnett
Tears, prayer mark end to search for Florida condo survivors

AP News Radio

01:08 min | 5 months ago

Tears, prayer mark end to search for Florida condo survivors

"Officials are promising that recovery workers in Surfside Florida will press forward with the same degree of urgency as the focus shifts to finding remains instead of survivors in the rubble of a Florida condominium collapse the work continues with all speed and urgency Miami Dade County mayor Daniella Levine cava says the death toll rose overnight the number of confirmed deaths is now sixty as the mission at a collapsed Florida condo tower changes from rescue to recovery effort eighty are potentially unaccounted for Florida congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz was at the news conference carried by WPLG TV it took a little piece of the hearts of this community other at delicate Lindo is one of the nuns who attended the service and prayer vigil coming away from those who have made the C. is for those who have not been found to be found so people I mean you can give a warranty funeral in closure on a fence near by well wishers posted photos of the victims and supportive messages experts say crews will use heavy equipment to lift material off the debris pile place it in containers and evaluated for evidence of human remains I'm Jennifer king

Florida Mayor Daniella Levine Cava Surfside Wplg Tv Dade County Debbie Wasserman Schultz Miami Lindo Jennifer King
"debbie" Discussed on Deck The Hallmark

Deck The Hallmark

03:38 min | 9 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Deck The Hallmark

"Of what you think's just. I just don't fight with me i. This is my friend's house. I'm going to stay here because the bus Apparently there's only one bus a week To two from san francisco to i dunno whatever. She can't find the bus so she's going to stay there back in boston. Emily accidentally sets the alarm while she's in their call causes alarm to go off silently. I guess and the alarm people call ray and says hey ray. Somebody's in your brother's apartment. You should go over there. She he meets paul mall cop over there and they go and they look and as emily. Emily like hey. I'm here i'm supposed to be here. No big deal so ray to say. Hey i'm sorry For intruding on you. When you're supposed to be here. I would like to take you to dinner and so they go to dinner. They have a wonderful now. Over the course of the week leading up to christmas emily and race and a lot of time together and Charles and faith spend a lot of time together. Emily and ray talk about their past christmas memories. An open up to one another charles having a hard time writing his book. Faith begins to read the drafts without his approval and make suggestions which actually helps them in. The writing of the book charles is not so sure about taking advice but eventually does breaks his writer's block and he's able to finish the novel yet meanwile in arizona. Remember that Heather sad misses her mom. So he's like hey. I'll buy your ticket so that you can go and spend christmas with your mom back and boston. So raid gives emily a pair of earrings. A christmas present And he's really thinking that he's going to be able to spend christmas with Emily but heather shows up and so he goes. Whoa waddling off all sad and it's like hey you're leaving a couple of days. We shouldn't make things more difficult. S- wop. It's christmas day. Charles drives faith to the bus dish the night prior they kissed. What are they gonna do. How are they going to handle this situation. He he feels like she says she feels like he should say something so she gets on the bus and he hops on the bus after her. And says hey. I want to spend christmas with you. And she's like. Why didn't you say so in boston. Emily heather emily and how they're they have christmas with ray. They've wonderful time Yeah so exciting. They show up to raise a house with the christmas tree and they spend christmas together yay so exciting. One year passes in is revealed that Ray and emily are living together in washington and they are visited at christmas time by faith and charles who are expecting a child and they celebrate christmas together training christmas. They did it and that was covers. Chaining chris by debbie macomer written by an executive producer. And by her. I mean debbie macomer was not executive. rijeka wasn't british. Debbie macomer was executive. Oh yeah yeah. Yeah debbie macomer macomer.

Charles san francisco boston Emily arizona emily charles Ray washington rijeka Heather debbie two Debbie christmas one bus One year paul mall cop ray pair of earrings
"debbie" Discussed on New Pod Flow

New Pod Flow

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on New Pod Flow

"Seven negative plates about a hundred different comes on Debbie does Dallas Brzeczek class buddy down they I think body counts though like my only my only beef with would be with a body count as if some shade on there that you didn't want on there because that's your no decision you know what I'm saying. I definitely got bodies. They don't claim but chicks due to go. I don't know who goes around. I don't don't think chicks talk about it. Oh of course we talk about it. We talk about with our friends but like when I'm saying though was like the body the body you got that you didn't won't you knew you didn't want before you got it and then you got it anyway. How does that happen? Yeah I mean most chicks were chick. WanNa fuck somebody. She wants local. That's and that goes back to men or she's going to focus. Men always want to brag about who they hit at the end of the day she had to let you hit my Nigga she fuck you fuck. That's the only way that even happened. Because as if not that seems a little bit ripi overtime you know you hit this. You hit that act like the girl didn't want it herself or she didn't allow you to do you feel any gal over here bragging or trying to ruin girl's reputation you do you think. Do you think that. Do you think you think y'all a Kinda accumulate bodies because of the amount of knows you'll have to hand out some. Yes the slide through the cracks..

Debbie
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"What will you create today? Debbie millman is joined today by very very special guest of bad as fuck feminist woman. This professor editor social commentator writer internet gangster. Fellow Haitian American Roxane gay. So. Wanna bring MS Debbie millman and MS Roxanne gates to the stage. Welcome to on air fest. Y'all. That was a pretty bad as interview, I was I feel super introduced. And. Yeah, I'm an internet gangster on Twitter. Well, actually, I think that the gangster part Mike go a little bit further back. I understand that in your high school yearbook. There's a note from girl who wrote I like, you even though you are very mean. So we're you really mean in high school. Why? No idea what you're talking about. Yes. No. I wasn't. I was really shy and awkward, but apparently my memory of myself and people's memories of me are very different things. And I do remember probably my sophomore year or so I developed a mean streak, and it wasn't bullying or anything like that. But if I had something biting to say, I said it I had no filter. You remember any of the more biting things, you might have done. No. I don't think God absolve myself of all of those sins conveniently so I don't remember what I said. Now, you've stated that in many ways like ability is very elaborate lie of performance a code of conduct dictating the proper way to be left to our own devices. Do you think that we're all really diabolical deep down inside Roxanne? I hope so. I genuinely hope so no, I don't think we're all diabolical deep down inside. But I think we have imperfections and dark MRs inside of us and some of us are better at hiding them than others. But I never trust. Anyone who seems perfect and incredibly likeable and incredibly nights? I always just think what's going on under there. So all of the HGTV hose. Anyone who appears on a hallmark channel movie, Kelly Ripa? Yes, I just think no offense to Kelly. We love her. No, just whenever I see these people in this performance of niceness. I just think my God, you are probably the cruelest person alive. And so I think it's more healthy when we at least knowledge those parts of ourselves, and I think maturity is knowing when to release that and when not to and so hopefully, I have since high school matured at least a bit except on Twitter. A what? What are you trying to say we'll get to that? You quoted Lionel Shriver in an essay for the financial times about the notion of liking, and he states this liking business has two components moral approval, and defection, and I'm wondering how much do you feel the need for the approval of others? Oh, I feel great deal like any good self loathing writer. All I want is approval. I think it comes from being Catholic and oh, yeah. And just like expecting the priests to listen to your confessions. And then hopefully telling you, oh, you did fewer sins this week. Good job. I never heard. But no, I do I think like many people care too much about what other people think and seek the approval of others, which is one of the reasons I think I worked so hard. It's just thinking. Okay. My finally good enough. Am I finally doing enough to earn my keep in this world? Do you think you'll ever feel that it isn't it? I would like to think so. But I don't know has it changed as you've gotten more successful the more successful. I get the less successful. I feel why. Because I keep moving the bar for myself. I keep telling myself, oh, this is not enough or that was luck. Or that was a fluke, and I never really allow myself to enjoy any accolade or rest on my laurels. So to speak, not even for a moment..

Kelly Ripa Debbie millman Twitter writer Lionel Shriver MS Roxanne gates professor HGTV Mike editor
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And I think that that's what national mural day is we already know that there are a lot of talented. Artists in America. And around the world, we know that these people are all trying to have their voices heard. So let's put it in context where we can frame it and package it so people can identify that. It is a thing in that it exists. And I think that if paps is going to lend financial resources to making that happen. That's a great thing because you can participate and support the arts without a banner being behind you and people will figure out, you know, who is on their side. And who isn't and I think that that's the thing that is really great about this particular initiative, and that was why I wanted to participate. So you've worked with paps to redesign the brands cans, the packaging, every touch point essentially, you have redesigned and is now launched out into the world. It's really exciting. They said that they. Manufactured a hundred and fifty million cans and believe me, I am going store to store checking taking pictures and really just absorbing the idea that somebody could create something centered around artwork than I did. And I'm proud to have my name on it say, I have one last question for you. You said that looking back on your career that you think you've been really lucky being in the right place at the right time, and I have to push back a little bit. Surely, you don't think it's all luck day. You know, no, not at all. But I do believe that if I lived in North Dakota or the mid west somewhere like, you know, I wouldn't have been at the epicentre of where culture was being cultivated. So when I reference. Being lucky it's being born in this time in this city around these people, I it's like if you were a part of the Harlem renaissance, or if you're part of the grunge movement in, you know, not everybody gets the participate in those things and everybody sort of lives vicariously through a handful of people that were there. And I'm fortunate enough to be one of those people that was there to be able to say that you were there when run DMC started you were there when the beastie boys, I started you help to, cultivate, Jay Z's career that is not a small thing. And so to me, I do think there's some of that is lock and for lightning to sort of keep striking again and again in the same place. I just think I, you know, I'm really fortunate, and I know that talent plays a huge part in. A lot of this as well. But I try to keep it all in perspective. Because at the end of the day, I still gotta go back to the studio and solve a bunch of design problems for new projects that I hope we're gonna be really amazing. But until I create the work, you know, I don't know what is going to look like while we're really lucky that you're making it as well. Shannon's thank you for such round breaking in the world, and you so much for joining medium designed. This is really good stachel app to say, and I don't know if it's okay to say this on the air. But this is a huge tree. You really made me feel like everything I've done over the years, really matters. It says a lot of people you can find out more about say Adams at say ams com. This is the fifteenth year I've been doing tonight matters like to thank you for listening. And remember we can talk about making a difference. We could make a difference or we could do both. I'm Debbie millman..

Shannon Debbie millman America Harlem Jay Z North Dakota Adams
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"You also are until a vision I want to talk a little bit about your experience on television for a moment. You've said that you watch the cooking competition show master chef before you were a part of it noting it captured the spirit of being a home cooked and wanting to take that passion into the professional space. And of course, I resonated with the judges, then when master chef junior came on it was one of those things where the next day a went into work and said every single person needs to go home and watch this show. It completely restores your faith in humanity. So how did you end up on both? Shows and has being on those shows met your expectations of what the shows were about the story is as simple as I got a call one day from someone that was like, hey, do, you know, show master, chef and master shift junior. Like, yeah, why do you have like my Hulu subscription password? Hulu recently watched. And they're like they're looking for a new judge, and they'd like to consider you. And I do just kind of thing the funny. The funny things in life often happen that way. Right. Like, you're not that far off from these dream like scenarios happening. If you if you say, yes, if you pick up the phone, if you open the door if you offer the shirt off your back, right? It's funny. It's funny. How the world works when you say yes to it. And I said great I'd love to find out more and fast forward, three months later, and I'm on the set, and they're put me in like high heels and fancy dress and a lot of makeup, and I was like. Redoing here. Like, they're like, those red high tops are not coming on this show sort of thing. And it's been a really great experience. I I decided to do it for a bunch of different reasons. And it wasn't because I loved watching the show. It was something that I had to think long and hard about over those three months, and one of the first reasons I did it was because up until that point there had been three male judges. And besides the fact that one of them was not a pastry. Chef there were three mill judges, and I was never short of having role models in my life. I had these strong women that were like you do ever. You wanna do we believe in you? We support you. But it had become increasingly clear to me that that was not everyone story, and that I had the opportunity to go on and bring visibility to the fact that women in my profession exist, and they exist, and they look different in these sound different. And they are different in different is great one of the other reasons, I decided to do it was because I worked. For a decade for other people, and I worked in the basement of kitchens and worked for free, and sometimes I got paid and beaten down and the only thing that connected me to my family when I worked for other people was the visibility of the chef that I worked for in an article in a magazine somewhere for my family to see like, you're not calling me. You're not showing up for the holidays are coming to any of that you won't even take a day off for me. But I understand at least the caliber of what you're doing based on the fact that I can see the person that you work for and it was really important for me that this was a win for women and for pastry. Chefs, but for my tea, and that they had the visibility to say that is the person that I work for that is what I stand for and Debbie I would be lying if I said, I didn't learn a hundred and one things along the way, and I've been better because of it I run milk bar. I started it. I run. On it. I I like to be uncomfortable. But I'm also always in charge..

Hulu Debbie I three months three mill one day milk
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"The company and needing needing to gain. Everyone's trust there. And prove that I was I meant business when I wasn't going anywhere. I mean these restaurants are doing fine on their own, Debbie. They didn't need to like in these guys minds. It was a turn and burn kind of restaurant. People waited in line for an hour, hour and a half. They still do to get into the bar. Eat your food slurpy noodles. Get out and just keep bringing them in bringing them in desert slows things down. It takes up space. It requires humans to serve and people linger in desert in on standard restaurant in terms knowns here for that. So many theory was well, we get a soft serve machine. I can do all the prep work saucer machines, really easy. Someone pulls a handle puts it in a bowl. You don't need anyone that that technically don't even need to know what they're doing and ice cream melts. Really quickly. A soft service specially because it comes out at a higher temperature. Which is why we like it more tastes better on it taste buds, and I had to convince him and he wasn't convinced. So I bought a softer machine on EBay, anyway, just to prove my point because pushy, and I was like this is just it. And and I'm glad I did it because we changed the world of software ice cream, the poor soft vice cream machine people thought, I was crazy. You don't make soft serve ice cream from scratch by base. That's what everyone does. Now. It's like, no, we're gonna make delicious ice cream. And been through Susser machine. You opened your first milk bar next to mama Fouco in the east village in two thousand eight girl ten years ago numbers. That's incredible. I mean today you have a network of stores all over the US bona petite has described milk bar as one of the most exciting bakeries in the country..

mama Fouco Susser Debbie EBay US milk ten years
"debbie" Discussed on Z104

Z104

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Z104

"Debbie, mama. Got these other last week. I told you about the guy who got stuck in his truck in the snow from days, and he only lived off of the water that the snow provided right and Taco Bell Firestone. So we told this story five days. He that's all he ate was Taco Bell fire sauce, and I said, well, you know, he's any survived, and I said Taco Bell should do something for this guy. Yesterday. A Taco Bell announced they're giving the guy food free food for an entire year. So that's pretty cool. Yeah. That's something. That's very cool. Yeah. Sweet little decide goes screaming. Screaming? Thank you. Would you pay? Online. Caging? Gene. Compose? Thanks. Let me do. Taken. Cold. Jeez. Me. Tiger tiger.

Taco Bell Taco Bell Firestone Debbie five days
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And you go on to say that it is not your intention to be inspirational or make you feel good but to challenge, and I was I was really interesting. When you first asked me to read the book, I was a little bit worried because I thought James is not like a motivational do-gooder. So it is a bit of a challenge. How did but it also it doesn't make you feel bad? So how did you how did you do that? How did you create that sort of sense of urgency with also a sense of possibility? I don't believe that. I was born to be an optimist. I'm not I want to be. I am not the happy. Go lucky guy that I wish I was it takes a lot to float my boat. And these are things that that these are lessons that I need to remind myself of constantly one of the one of the alternate titles for this book was resolutely difficult advice because it is difficult advice because it's super hard to follow. You know, it feels a bit high altitude. I don't know if I could really do. This. I don't know how somebody can actually do this. But yet, it seems doable. Because you're doing it. Yeah. And I think there's a level of levity and elbow room that we throw in there as well. And say, you know, take, you know, my monetize, for example. I was born the hospital. I'm talking about the the philosophy philosopher. So, you know, the he wrote the Tamudo laws for the Jews and for the Jewish faith, and there's a wonderful story. Whereas some farmer comes to my monitors and says, listen, I've got family I've got this. I'm like, I can't I can't follow all these. And my monitors says pick five pick three, but just do it. Just follow it, you know. So it's not about being perfect. We're perfect or whatever it's not about being perfect. It's about it's about being conscious of your actions being conscious of your these default habits. Because I see them I saw them especially teaching you know through in in SBA. I see them in me as a parent when I fall into that when I become weak like James. That's you know, what how do you define week? When you become, you know, the easiest things when you become tired or hungry, and all of a sudden, you just you just revert to be your, you know, your infantile. You know, baby. James henry. Yeah. Yeah. That's a default. You write that we all have dragons that need to be faced to get to the creative rewards and that every morning yours. Curls around your neck and whispers failure failure failure in your ear. We merely illustrating a point in the book or is that really true. Do you really have that dragon on your shoulder? I m I wake up very early. I wake up at like four thirty five every morning, and it was just because my body does is just like I've always have is in the about because because my dad always woke up for early, and I found that if I don't get up out of bed and start moving if I'm laying there all of a sudden, all my my my list might to do and my oh my God that's lay in. Oh, my God this, and then, you know, financial, and so yeah. So I just start thinking too much all these things come what do you do with all that fear? I dig a deep breath and put my shoulders back in. I I get to work. And get to work, you know, in funny because in writing this book, my my process was four thirty out on the porch with a quilt on my lap and the light of the laptop and I had a little camping coffeemaker. So I didn't disturb anybody in the house, and I'm writing these stories and trying to tell these truths about myself. And oh, my gosh, Debbie, the the the voices the voices in my head. You know, you are you really you're gonna you gonna write about that..

James henry SBA Debbie
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"The here's Debbie with a word from our sponsors, followed by the energy. I'd like to thank two of the patrons that helped make design matters possible is your team designing an app from scratch rethinking the look and feel of your brand may be taking on something massive like transforming your brand's entire customer journey. Well, don't do it. The old way passing numberless one off comes through endless emails. Instead, do it all in one place. Do it in a adobe XT now for free with the new starter plan? Adobe exte- combines the ability to both design prototype and share in a single solution. It's combination of creativity and productivity let's your team's eliminate bottlenecks and simplify workflows. They can now create an interactive prototype, and then share it with teammates and reviewers in a single place. It keeps up with today's creative demands by letting your team work when and. Where they want across windows. I o s the web and more adobe exte- has helped big brands change the way they create and review. Prototypes. At a large scale. So don't do it. The old way. Use adobe X. Stay the design platform for the future. Available today for free for more information. Visit XT dot adobe dot com today, wicks dot com, puts the creative power of building dynamic web sites. Back into the hands of designers as anyone who has spent time in a whizzy wig platform knows what you see is it necessarily. Always what you get on the flip side for some. It's far too easy to get lost in code and lose the forest for the trees, wicks dot com. Allows you to find your own personal sweet spot and take control of your site would their drag and drop editor hundreds of advanced design feature. There's such as retina ready image galleries. Custom font sets HD video and parallel scrolling effects and even service hassle-free coding for robust websites and -cations with wicks dot com. You have total control of your web design like never before. So join wicks his brilliant community of designers artists and creatives at large around the world for free and ask yourself..

adobe Debbie editor
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Year old son. This is design matters with Debbie moment from design observer dot com. For fourteen years now deputy has been talking with the signers other creative people about what they do how they got to be who they are. And what they're thinking about and working on on this episode. Danny Shapiro talks about her surprising genetic inheritance. I had always felt other in. The Shapiro family. Because I looked so other. Here's debbie. I'd like to thank two of the patrons that helped make design matters possible is your team designing an app from scratch rethinking the look and feel of your brand may be taking on something massive like transforming your brand's entire customer journey. Well, don't do it. The old way passing numberless one off comes through endless emails. Instead, do it all in one place. Do it in a Doobie XT now for free with the new starter plan? Adobe exte- combines the ability to both design prototype and share in a single solution. It's combination of creativity and productivity let's your team's eliminate bottlenecks and simplify workflows. They can now create an interactive prototype, and then share it with teammates and reviewers in a single place. It keeps up with today's creative demands by letting your team work when and where they want across windows. I o s the web and more adobe exte- has helped big brands change the way they create and review. Prototypes. At a large scale. So don't do it. The old way. Use adobe X. Stay the design platform for the future. Available today for free for more information. Visit XT dot adobe dot com today. Wicks dot com puts the creative power of building dynamic web sites. Back into the hands of designers as anyone who has spent time in a whizzy wig platform knows what you see isn't necessarily. Always what you get on the flip side for some..

Adobe Danny Shapiro Debbie fourteen years
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"What and probably similar to your reaction about it. And then I I why we did not get to an answer. Like, I was just like, I don't know. But it stuck with me. But by the time that I went back to see her for years later. I had forgotten about this question. And I was like oh here. She is with it again. But this time we were actually able to get to the answer. And it's interesting because a lot of people have listened to that episode, and they're kind of have the same reaction. They're kind of like a God. I don't know and says there are two things that she told me to kind of that we're able to help me think about it the I was thinking about like, okay. If you weren't, you know, Debbie Melman with all of your career trappings, like if you you know, were a bus driver. You were a lawyer you were a waitress in a diner. Like, what's the thing? That would be you know, kind of the essence that you would bring like it didn't doesn't matter. What you do like wherever you were. Right. Any type of job? So that's one way to think about it. And the other thing is just thinking about like. He know yourself as as a small child right as this kind of untouched being right and someone who doesn't have him, visions, right? Like someone who's not trying to achieve anything yet. Like if you can picture yourself. Hopefully, there was a moment in life. You know, where you were in that state where you weren't like just thinking about what you wanted to achieve you know? And what was super productivity is worse for value. Yeah. What was your essence than you know, who were you? And as we were doing this exercise. I'd like very clear picture like I had a specific image of the specific photo that I have of myself, and I was like looking at that person and like thinking about that little person. So my answer ended up being lighthearted like that. That was kind of my thing that I bring and you, and I know each other, and you know, you know, that sort of like being I think playful and kind of poking, but like trying to like also like I think bring. Something to light. You know is kind of a core sort of quality of mine in any kind of situation. And yeah, so that was that was where I ended up with which like felt like the right thing for me. But it's something different for everyone in what's interesting is when people. Have followed up with me, I've gotten a number of emails and conversation with people about it. They all seem scared about what they'll find. Well, then it forces you to potentially consider alternative ways of being right? But my thought is that what you'll find is actually something quite beautiful that it's peeling away those layers of kind of anxiety and Bishen, and man and just finding that like little core..

Debbie Melman Bishen
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:19 min | 3 years ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"I never like Email units like. Debbie's busy like daddy. Can't take on any more like an bounces back to me. Right. That doesn't happen. It's just infinite it goes on forever. Right. And so that's what's so problematic about the digital spaces it assumes like an infinite capacity. And so that really has shifted the onus of the responsibility of setting boundaries on to us, and I think setting boundaries and saying no is difficult for anyone. But I think it's in direct conflict with some of the things that make you a really good creative person, which is this openness, right? And so I think a lot of people who are in that space find it incredibly difficult to make a practice of setting boundaries and to make a practice of setting. No. But which is something that really is just a requirement of existing in the world today, if you actually want to stay focused on the things that matter you combating these issues seem to dovetail perfectly into. The need for the new class that you've just launched its called reset a lot of successful writers often say that they wrote the book that they wanted to read for this project. Did you invent the course that you wish had been around to help you when you needed it? You know, I wouldn't. I mean, maybe. I wouldn't put it that way. But yes, I mean, so I think going back to what I was saying earlier right about this idea of kind of self help industry, and even a lot of the advice that we receive being very kind of toxic. I think that the the kind of whole idea around reset was I was super conscious in everything I did an in particularly in the language to make it feel like there's nothing wrong with you. Right. It's not there's anything wrong with you. It's just that you maybe need to actually it's all about kind of getting back into yourself and getting back in touch with your body. I think technology really pulls us out of our bodies. And so really like kind of getting back into your body. Understanding what the natural rhythms of your energy are. So that you can learn how to align your work with that. And also, it's a lot about like context. So some of the stuff that I'm. Talking about now. Like, I feel like it's such a comfort to people in such a help to understand like, oh, this is what the context is. Right. Like, the rise of remote working like the sort of collapse of any type of hierarchy, right? This idea that I can completely work for myself. Okay. Great. That's amazing. That's empowering. But would it also means is like the onus of responsibility of managing everything is like on you now. Right. Like, you don't have a manager to help you. You don't have a very structured work environment. You know, you don't have these boundaries that used to be created for you. Right. Which is liberating. But it also means that then you have to learn how to set those boundaries. And if you're a person who has a problem with boundaries or saying, no, right? You're doomed when I think an and I think that like people just feel like it's a personal shortcoming. But when you can kind of provide some context and say, no, no, no, this is happening to all of us, and like here, this is why it's happening to us. All of us. And okay, like, here's how we can think about it. And then here's some strategies we use because a lot of what happens with so much of the advice that we get is. It's out of context is just like an it's sort of like, okay. If you like process your Email this way, like that's going to solve all your problems and sorta like well for like, how does this fit into the big picture? You know? Yeah. Also, the Email is a microcosm of all the problems. We have with any addictive technologic precisely precisely. Yeah. That was actually what I said about unsubscribe is like, that's why Email is interesting to me because if you can master your relationship with Email, you know, those skills extend to to everything else. But so I totally didn't answer your question about reset, really. Well, why did you decide to to make this class in the first place? What what gave you the motivation to do this? We'll so I think you know, when I was talking about right when I left ninety nine you and pulling out those threads like what matters to me. And what matters, you know, what was just part of that job..

Debbie