40 Burst results for "Debbie"

Fresh update on "debbie" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "debbie" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Their hands, singing silent night. Jason fraley WTO news. Money news at 25 and 55 to Jeff glaber. Debbie ladan is knelt down 400 points. S&P 500 Index is down. 50, that's one and a quarter percent the NASDAQ's down a 136 points. I saw one and a quarter percent loss. Another big company has stepped back from Twitter. Elon Musk has tweeted, saying Apple has mostly stopped advertising, Musk has acknowledged that advertiser defections have led to what he has called a massive drop in revenue. Presidential and commercial roofing company, smart roof. We'll move its operations to Reston and create more than 400 new jobs. Just getting tax incentives to stay in Northern Virginia, smart roofs

Jason Fraley Jeff Glaber Debbie Ladan WTO Elon Musk Musk Twitter Apple Reston Northern Virginia
Irene Cara, Oscar-winning singer and actress, dies at 63

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 d ago

Irene Cara, Oscar-winning singer and actress, dies at 63

"Award winning singer and actress Irene Cara has died at the age of 63. The cause of death has not yet been released. Her publicist calls Irene Cara a beautifully gifted soul whose legacy will forever live through her music and films. That includes fame and flashdance, Cara was the voice behind some of the most joyful, high energy tunes of the 80s. First coming to fame in the movie fame, costarring Debbie Allen featuring performing arts high school talent, Cara died in her home in Florida at the age of 63. I'm

Irene Cara Cara Debbie Allen Florida
Fresh update on "debbie" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:23 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "debbie" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"People and innovation forward. All right, what's up, George Wallace? Well, Debbie Washington is up right now 6 to 7 wins as they are now 7 and 5 on the year one from one in four to 7 and 5 and Ron Rivera gets career win number 100 yes. This kind of cool to get the opportunity to coach first of all that long to get a hundred wines. But I've been very fortunate because I've had a lot of good coaches that have worked with me and a lot of good players that have played for us to be very fortunate to be in that position and I really do appreciate the ownership and Carolina for giving me the opportunity in the airship here for supporting me and giving the opportunity to do things that we're doing. And they are getting it done yesterday at 6 point win. Over Atlanta, Brian Robinson, junior with his first 100 yard game on the ground of his career, also had a touchdown yesterday. Next up at the giant Sunday followed by a biweek, and then the Giants come to town after that. So the next two opponents will be the Giants back to back. So that should be easier on the players. We'll see. Washington now at 7 and 5 and currently in the final playoff spot. The ravens, tough one yesterday losing another lead late and losing to Jacksonville by one. Aaron Rodgers left yesterday's game against the eagles of the rib injury, Jordan love comes in, throws a touchdown with the eagles get the win and go to ten and one. College football, Maryland, senior kicker Chad Rowland, named Big Ten special teams player of the week, three field goals, four extra points, and the terps win over Rutgers 37, nothing the other day. George Wallace WLB

Debbie Washington Ron Rivera George Wallace Brian Robinson Giants Carolina Atlanta Eagles Ravens Aaron Rodgers Chad Rowland Jacksonville Washington Jordan Maryland Football Terps Rutgers
The Significance of Having Trump Back on Twitter

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:50 min | Last week

The Significance of Having Trump Back on Twitter

"I wanted to talk about the enormous significance for free speech. And for Trump of Elon Musk, sort of opening the door and letting Trump back on Twitter. Now, first of all, Trump isn't back on Twitter. He hasn't done any new tweets, even though he now can. His account is open. You can actually go there, you can follow him. One thing I find amazing is that within 24 hours, Trump has accumulated 80 million, 80 million. I'm not kidding you. Followers. He's surpassed Biden in one day. And when I told Debbie, he's like, Trump is beating out Biden. She goes, again. So that was a little bit of a telling reaction. Oh, now I think that Trump should get back on Twitter. I realized that he might have made a deal not to do that. He's with the Trump media company. He has true social. But here's my point. If you're running for president, how can you deny yourself this massive platform? Trump has about 4 million followers on truth social. And I'm not saying people can take Trump's comments over there and duplicate them on Twitter. But it's a whole different thing for Trump himself to take advantage of this massive platform. Let's remember Trump doesn't really have the other platforms. He doesn't have YouTube, he doesn't have meta or Facebook. So in my opinion, Trump needs to sort of, look, he can he can stay with true social and post there first. If it were me, I would post on truth social and then say, listen, two hours later or three hours later that my post is going to be uploaded under my account on Twitter. And that way through social retains the kind of exclusive, but Trump is at the same time, you know, disseminating his very distinctive voice.

Donald Trump Twitter Biden Elon Musk Debbie Youtube Facebook
Fresh update on "debbie" discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

03:26 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "debbie" discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

"Now, Maricopa County is getting ready to certify their election results. They might even do it today. Or tomorrow. They shouldn't do it, but it looks like they're going to do it. Now, if you remember, I spoke last week about how the attorney general Mark bonovitch had stepped in and sent a kind of urgent demand of Maricopa County laying out all the problems with the election. The breakdown of the tabulating machines, the sending of voters either home or the other locations, the collection of ballots that were not properly preserved, mixed in with other ballots, even though they should have been separated. And all of this going on on election day. And by the way, not trivial. This is not a case where it affected a small number of voters. It affected a large number of machines, a large number of voters, and could very well have made the difference in the election. In fact, probably most likely did. Now, how this could even have occurred is a question because these machines were working just fine for early voting when, by the way, the majority of Democrats cast their votes. And then they suddenly break down mysteriously just on election day and for a large part of the day. So how is this even possible? And the attorney general is like, I demand answers. And Maricopa County, by the way, is obviously trying to thumb their nose at Mark barnaby. Why? Because they sent one of these pompous letters basically saying things like, well, we don't really see any violation of the rules here. Machines do break down. It is not specifically outlawed in the law to send voters to a different location. It's not specifically outlawed to tell voters. Hey, listen, Castro ballot here will put him in a bag and it's not even against the rules to somehow merge these ballots. These are all maybe failures of administration, but they don't really amount to any kind of unlawful conduct that would justify not certifying the election results or somehow having a redo of the election. So clearly a fight is brewing here. The first question is whether the attorney general who, by the way, he has prosecuted some election fraud, but he's also been kind of lukewarm. He certainly was terrible with regard to 2000 mules. Not only did he do nothing about the research supplied to him by true the vote, but then he put out a letter implying that he had not gotten that research that he clearly had received. And so this was a very shaky or as they say suspect behavior sketchy behavior by Mark barnaby. So Debbie and I are skeptical that this guy is really on the case. He might just be trying to put on a rhetorical show of force like yeah, so I'm very serious about this I demand answers, whereas it's really wink wink to miracle but county. The other possibility is that Maricopa County is just digging in. Now this is itself a little paradoxical.

Maricopa County Mark Bonovitch Mark Barnaby Castro Debbie
The Power of State Legislatures

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

00:59 min | Last week

The Power of State Legislatures

"Debbie and I have been talking about the power of state legislatures to address issues in particularly election issues. I mean, look at this. Look at the not just GOP dominance in all these states, but it's the degree of dominance. I'm just going to read very quickly Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wyoming. And again, those are the states in which Republicans dominate both houses, but the margins are huge. Look at Wyoming. The Senate Republicans 28. It doesn't surprise me in white. And the house. 55 to 5. 5 to 5. But look at Texas, honey, Senate, 19 to 12 House 86 to 64. So I mean, you're not talking about one seat or two seat. You're talking about decisive majority. What Republicans say in these states go? Yeah. Those.

Debbie GOP Wyoming Arkansas Idaho Alabama North Dakota Louisiana Indiana Iowa Kentucky Mississippi Nebraska Georgia Kansas Montana South Dakota Missouri Texas South Carolina
Fresh update on "debbie" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:18 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "debbie" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"News. Honey news at 25 and 55 past the hour to Jeff clapham. Debbie the Dow's down 243 points. The S&P 500 Index is down 35, the NASDAQ's down 95 points those are all three approaching 1% losses. Amazon was not king on Black Friday. In fact, it slipped a fourth place, according to Internet data firm capital Walmart had the most online searches on Black Friday funnel by target and coals. Ecommerce sites have been hit with a sell off on their stocks this year. There's one exception Etsy. The online retailer's stock has surged 74% since hitting a low 5 months ago, eats these platform is for artisans selling what they make so it needs no warehouses or inventory. The first Netflix produced movie to show in theaters before streaming did well over the weekend. The knives out sequel called glass onion, a knight gives out mystery, had the best per theater revenue of any movie over the holiday weekend. Jeff clay will double TLP news. All right, Jeff, up ahead, the breaking developments of the hour, the buffalo supermarket shooting suspect, pleading guilty today. Ten 56. Drivers who switch and save with progressive save over $700 on average, and those savings add up

Jeff Clapham Debbie Walmart Amazon Etsy Jeff Clay Netflix Jeff Buffalo
The Total Incompetence of President Joe Biden

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

03:02 min | Last week

The Total Incompetence of President Joe Biden

"I want to talk about the mental incompetence, well, there's also physical and competence. The overall incompetence of our dear leader, Joe Biden. Now, interestingly, when Trump was president, they were all over him for the slightest misstep, or the slightest mispronunciation. You remember the big controversy over Trump using the pronunciation thigh land, not instead of Thailand. Thailand. People would, this was outrageous. He doesn't even know how to say Thailand. And now this is a complex matter and I kind of got involved in that contour. I pointed out, first of all, that virtually everybody on the entire continent of South Asia pronounces it by land. They pronounce it the way it's spelled. They pronounce the H now, interestingly, in the Thai language, there is no real H and so they say Thailand. But that is simply an anomaly of the Thai language. Let's remember that the names of different places are pronounced differently around the world. The French say Paris, we say Paris. And so it goes same with Italy venezia and we say Venice. And so you would think that all of this is like a triviality. Why are you getting on Trump? But this just shows you how they were like, let's get them on that. Now with Biden, what's increasingly obvious is that this guy is a mental infant. Or at least he has to be treated like a mental infant. You might remember some months ago, a notecard surface. Biden sort of clumsily held it where you could see it. And it was reproduced on social media and on TV and I did a segment on it and it said things like take your seat. As opposed to going and sitting in someone else's seat and the kind of instructions you'd give to Debbie Todd elementary school to kind of the kind of instructions you would give to like a 5 year old. Listen, take your seat. Don't speak unless spoken to. Things like this. And Benny Johnson on social media had something yesterday where the same thing happened to second time. Biden had a notecard. Apparently turned in a certain way so you can actually read the note card and the note card has it's like an all caps. Again, it has that notion that we're talking to somebody who's really not all there. We have to treat this person. So here are a few of the instructions, one, you will take a photo. And the U is all caps, as if to say Biden might be confused about who's you will take a photo. You will sit. You is all caps. Again, you will deliver opening remarks. So this is a, this is an embarrassment.

Thailand Italy Venezia Biden Joe Biden Paris Donald Trump South Asia Debbie Todd Elementary School Benny Johnson Venice
Fresh update on "debbie" discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

00:20 sec | 20 hrs ago

Fresh update on "debbie" discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"From the Ted audio collective, this is design matters with Debbie millman. For 18 years, Debbie millman has been talking with designers and other creative people about what they do, how they got to be who they are and what they're thinking about and working on. On this episode, James clear talks about building good habits. Your habits are how you embody a particular identity. Even if they're small,

Debbie Millman James
Berlin Court Orders Rerun of 'Chaotic' 2021 State Election

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:10 min | Last week

Berlin Court Orders Rerun of 'Chaotic' 2021 State Election

"Debbie spotted this from ABC News. Just yesterday, Berlin court orders rerun of chaotic 2021 state election. This is very interesting. This is an election from last year, 2021. It was held in the German capital, in fact, it turns out it was multiple elections were going on at the same time. A state election, which means this is the state of Berlin, Berlin, by the way, is the capital of Germany, and it is a city, but it's also a state, so that in the state of Berlin, there was state elections. There was also an election for the city's 12 district assemblies, the German national election was going on at the same time, and then there was a local referendum that was also on the ballot. So Germans in Berlin were voting on all these different things. Well, as it turns out, there was and this sort of reminds me a little bit now Maricopa County, although maybe it was even worse. Huge lines at polling stations, some polling stations ran out of ballot paper during the day, other polling stations produced ballot paper, but it was for the wrong district. So there was the wrong information on the ballot, not applicable to what the voters were voting for. And a huge number of ballots were invalidated because they were for the wrong ballot or the wrong place or the wrong cause. And also the election was supposed to end at 6 p.m., but it turns out that voters who were in line were allowed to vote long after 6 p.m., but results of the election were already being called and people exit polls were being revealed and how people voted and people were being declared winners and losers, and lots of people were still in line and hadn't voted at all, so their votes weren't even counted and presumably if you hear an election's been calling about your in line, you're going to think, well, what's the point of me staying in line? I may as well go home and eat dinner. And so the German court to its credit looked at all this and go, they go, this was not. The safest and most secure election in German history,

Berlin Abc News Debbie Maricopa County Germany German Court
Dinesh Evaluates the Significance of Trump’s Big Announcement

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

03:14 min | Last week

Dinesh Evaluates the Significance of Trump’s Big Announcement

"Okay, he's in. He's doing it. He's running for president. Trump made his big announcement last night at Mar-a-Lago. And well, Debbie and I were invited, but we weren't there. I had, well, I had the podcast. I had my local Q&A, which is a live back and forth. It's very interesting. A lot of it focused on this topic and also on midterm results. Where we go forward. And then Debbie and I were like, hey, Trump is announcing right now. Let's go watch. So Danielle and Brandon were in the audience at Mar-a-Lago, but we were not media. We're watching. And of course it was a little bit of deja vu. We know that room. We know that atmosphere we were kind of scrolling through the audience to see if there were people we recognize and there were some and yet as Trump was talking, Debbie was like, man, this guy, you know, he's well into his 70s and why does he do it? What's motivating him? You know, he gets so much attack and the attacks are so vicious and they're not going to stop. And sure enough, in fact, this morning, I look on social media and look at this. This is from NPR. Breaking. This is the headline. Donald Trump who tried to overthrow the results of the 2020 presidential election and inspired a deadly riot at the capitol in a desperate attempt to keep himself in power, has filed to run for president again at 2024. That's the headline. And it just shows you really what clowns these people in the media are. They're not even pretending to be neutral or unbiased. I mean, you could think of it. You could rewrite that headline like this. In fact, this is Bruce border, but kind of quote tweeting it. And he rewrites the headline. President breaking, president Donald Trump, who is widely believed to have won 2020 election that was plagued with unverifiable mail in ballots, untrustworthy electronic voting machines and unexplained vote counting stop and simultaneous across multiple states has filed to run for president. Think of it, if there was conservatives dominated the media, they could do this. This would be the kind of, and the point is not that this is a legitimate headline, but this is parodying the stupid headline coming from NPR, which is basically now a national joke, at least in terms of doing any kind of journalism. But back to Trump, his point is, you know, a normal person would retreat from the field. It would be like, I've got a great life, Mar-a-Lago's a lot nicer than The White House. Why do I actually want, do I need the headache? What is Trump's motivation? Is it just the Trump as like he loves being president? And he wants to be president again. It's just fun. Is it that is it a vindication? You know what? I got, I lost the trophy last time. I was unjustly deprived of it. I need to win again just to show and vindicate myself. Is that it? Is it just simple patriotism? Trump is like, you know what? I love the country. And even though I'm I could be sitting on a beach somewhere and just sipping a cocktail. I'm going to do this because I believe. Honestly, believe I could make the country a better

Donald Trump Debbie Bruce Border NPR Danielle Brandon Lago White House Headache
One Bright Light in This Midterm Landscape

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:29 min | Last week

One Bright Light in This Midterm Landscape

"There are not a lot of bright lights and this midterm landscape. But one of them, surely, is the steady movement of Latinos toward the GOP. Now, this is not a movement that has been completed. It is a movement that is underway. If you look, for example, at Florida, heavy Latino vote for desantis and interestingly, he seems to have won Latinos kind of across the board. With Greg Abbott in Texas, the results a little bit more mixed, but Abbott got a decent share of the Latino vote. If you look at the Rio Grande valley a special interest of W's and mine because Debbie grew up there, we had three Latina Republicans running Cassie Garcia and Myra Flores, who was in Debbie's own district where her mom lives. And then Monica de la Cruz. So normally one of them, Monica, dela Cruz won. But the other two actually came really close. Cassie Garcia was edged out by the way by a fairly conservative Democrat cuellar. Is that the guy's name Henry, Henry cuellar, and Myra Flores, I mean, this is a district that used to go easily 60 40, 20 point difference or more. Even more. And Myra got what, 43 or 44. And so the other guy, so does that still a ten point gap, but the point is the gap is narrowing.

Cassie Garcia Myra Flores Desantis Greg Abbott Debbie Monica De La Cruz GOP Dela Cruz Rio Grande Valley Abbott Florida Henry Cuellar Texas Cuellar Monica Henry Myra
Kevin McCarthy Faces Balancing Act As GOP Closes in on the House

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:56 min | Last week

Kevin McCarthy Faces Balancing Act As GOP Closes in on the House

"Right in the middle of doing the podcast I was just looking online and I see that it looks like Lauren boebert who, by the way, was in a really close race. For her seat in a Republican district looks like she will pull it out and win the race is pretty much over and it could be very well Lauren boebert, who gives the GOP the majority. Now there's going to be probably 5 or 6 more seats coming our way. And this raises the question of who's going to be the speaker. Now Dennis McCarthy is feverish. Kevin McCarthy, I'm sorry, is feverishly rounding up the votes. But it looks like there's a rebel faction that could block delay, perhaps even deny him the speakership. And I think that's actually appropriate. Now, kind of amusingly, there's been some talk about Trump being the Speaker of the House. And technically that is a possibility in the sense that there's nothing in the rules that says that you have to even belong. You don't even have to be in the house to be the speaker. I mean, I guess Debbie could be speaker or me. Now with Trump, I think we all know it's not going to happen. Why? Because, well, today I expect. I'm not certain of it, but I expect I were invited to be there, but we're not going to be there at Mar-a-Lago. Danielle, my daughter is and her husband, Brandon. I think will be in the audience. And obviously we're expecting Trump to announce a run for the presidency. So obviously he's not going to be in line to be the speaker. But I'd like to see some people give Kevin McCarthy a run for it and I also think that the conservative faction, the freedom caucus should, even if Kevin McCarthy makes it extract very specific concessions and agreements from McCarthy as a condition for supporting

Lauren Boebert Dennis Mccarthy Kevin Mccarthy Donald Trump GOP Debbie Lago House Danielle Brandon Mccarthy
Dinesh and Debbie Discuss Michigan's Prop 3

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:41 min | 2 weeks ago

Dinesh and Debbie Discuss Michigan's Prop 3

"The results of the midterm election were, I would say only a disaster in the sense that we should have done so much better. Biden's policies have horrific effects. People a directly experienced those effects, so it should have been a complete wipeout. It's almost like one of those early battles of the Civil War where Lincoln would say in a sense, you know, why do we finish off the confederacy? Well, yeah, we were able to hold our own yahweh were able to advance a few yards or even a few miles, but we're not even close to taking Atlanta. Why is that? We have a much bigger army. We have much greater resources. And so we need to ask some tough questions of our own side as we think about what happened this week. Debbie joins me and Debbie has some interesting thoughts about two issues that have that we haven't paid a lot of attention to in part because we have strong convictions about them were kind of dug in on them, but they can be they can pose certain election problems for us. Honey, start by telling people about we were in Michigan for an event I did with Grand Rapids right to life was a tremendous great event 1300 people, but we learned a lot about this proposal three, which was coming up on the ballot, and in fact has now been voted upon, talk a little bit about proposal three, what it does, but also kind of the deceptive way that it's framed so that people are, they don't really know what it does. Right, so prop three basically gives Michigan Michigan women. The right to have an abortion at any time in their pregnancy, including 9 months. They also have, if it's a teen pregnancy, they do not need parental consent to have the abortion. So this is, you know, this is horrible. This is something that is a strike against the right to life. But they framed it very, they were very sneaky in the way that they used the language and the proposal. For example, they said that this proposal proposal three was the constitutional right to reproductive freedom. So when you say that, you are in essence saying, listen, the right to your reproductive freedom only belongs to you and your doctor, but it's between you and your doctor. The government has no right to tell you what when you can have an abortion when you can get contraception, et cetera, et cetera.

Debbie Joins Biden Michigan Lincoln Debbie Atlanta Grand Rapids
A Last-Minute Upsurge of Votes for Democrats

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:47 min | 2 weeks ago

A Last-Minute Upsurge of Votes for Democrats

"I'm continuing my discussion of Republicans and the midterms. Now, I haven't seen any data on this, but I was looking at social media and a couple of analysts whom I trust talked about a last minute upsurge of votes for the Democrats by young people. Now, for a lot of Republicans, this is like, yeah, I mean, we know, sure, young people, what do you expect? First of all, these guys haven't experienced life. And so they are, yes, idealists, so to speak, but just wait till they turn 30. They turn 40, and they have lives, and they have families, and they have economic practical things to deal with, mortgage payments, and taxes, and deal with inflation, and all of this is going to yank them from the left where they belong now to the right. And there is an element of truth to this, I suppose, which is to say that I've seen examples in cases of people who were like, you know, I used to be a Democrat in college, but man, now that I know what the world is like, and I know how to know how difficult it is to make things meet, make ends meet, I'm going to be voting for the party that protects my economic welfare that protects me. So you do have this economic basis for people moving right, but it's also, and there's been a lot of data on this. A lot of people's political opinions are forged at a pretty young age. In other words, in their late teens and early 20s, and this I know has been true of Debbie and me, David met Reagan when she was 14, she became a Republican in a sense. Then she recognized that she was. She's a Republican now. I became a young reaganite in college in the early 1980s. Look at me now. So in other words, regardless of the sort of vicissitudes of life, that kind of anchoring of our basic convictions remains the same.

Debbie Reagan David
Dinesh and Debbie Dissect the South Texas Elections

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:26 min | 2 weeks ago

Dinesh and Debbie Dissect the South Texas Elections

"Let's talk about some of the South Texas races because I think that Republicans overall appear to have gotten 38 to 40% of the Hispanic vote over all, and that's huge because that bodes very well for Florida for Texas. It actually begins to shift the politics of California if it stretches over there. Let's talk about, I mean, we were disappointed, of course, that Myra Flores lost, there was a kind of troika Myra Flores, Cassie Garcia, Monica de la Cruz, but we didn't we didn't lose all three of those races. Yes. No, Monica de la Cruz, she won her race 80,000 votes versus 67,000 votes for Michelle Vallejo, the Democrat, so she definitely made some headway there and very, very happy about that. But with mine of Florida's, I think we should encourage Myra to maybe run again in 24 because, you know, she really only came within 10,000 votes of Vicente Gonzalez. And that is huge in the valley. What people don't understand is that in the valley, the Democrats have been an institution for over a 150 years. So the fact that Republicans are even competitive as competitive as they have been, is huge.

Myra Flores Monica De La Cruz Cassie Garcia South Texas Michelle Vallejo Florida Texas Vicente Gonzalez California Myra
With Days to Go, Debbie and Dinesh Discuss the Midterms

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:20 min | 3 weeks ago

With Days to Go, Debbie and Dinesh Discuss the Midterms

"Let's start by talking about the midterms. Wow. The weekend, then election and coming up really just a few days from now Tuesday. And I must say I'm feeling pretty good about it. As I do the book promotion with 2000 meals, people are like, do you feel the election will be secure? And I say, yeah, no, I think the awareness that was brought about by the movie and the book is going to help a lot. Well, well, you know, I think, and even going further than that, I think that if it wasn't going our way, I don't think Biden would have done that speech. That very divisive speech that he did that reminded me of the ugo Chavez Maduro speeches. Because what do they do when they feel like the opposition is entrapping? Yeah, oh, is gaining ground? They have to demonize them. They have to shut them down. They have to teach them a lesson. And they have to they have to act like their conspiracy theorists, and they should never be trusted, as citizens. And what happens with Biden is he says something dark divisive, outrageous, which is that essentially the opposition party is against democracy. He's for democracy. They're against democracy. So you have to vote for him no matter what, and then other people pick that up and echo it.

Ugo Chavez Maduro Biden
Rumble Refuses to Submit to the Censorship Demands of France

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:58 min | 3 weeks ago

Rumble Refuses to Submit to the Censorship Demands of France

"The video platform rumble is really proving its reliability as a free speech platform. And by a free speech platform, what I mean is it genuinely is open. To all kinds of different viewpoints, so that the kind of open debate that is essential to self governing societies can move forward. Now, a full disclosure, Debbie and I are close to rumble. We helped to build up rumble. We actually are investors in rumble because we wanted to encourage the growth and proliferation of an alternative platform. Now, the latest news is the following rumble has apparently being was being pressured by the French government to ban certain foreign sources, particularly Russian. A source called RT France and also Sputnik. And basically the idea is the French were saying this these are adversaries and you have to ban them. And rumble said, no, we don't actually ban foreign news sources, even though there are foreign sources that are hostile that have their own accounts. By the way, there are foreign sources that have their accounts on Twitter and YouTube and Facebook, and they are not banned. They just happen to be the adversaries that the left doesn't want a ban. So for example, the Iranian government and various Iranian authorities have accounts on Twitter. They have accounts on YouTube. They have accounts on Facebook. And none of these platforms have banned them. So think about what's really going on with France coming to rumble and saying ban these Russian sites. In a sense, what they're telling rumble is we get to decide which kind of foreign bad guys are allowed and which are not allowed.

French Government Debbie Iranian Government France Youtube Twitter Facebook
The Latest News About Catherine Engelbrecht and Gregg Phillips

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:39 min | 3 weeks ago

The Latest News About Catherine Engelbrecht and Gregg Phillips

"I want to give you an update on Catherine engelbrecht and Greg Phillips of true the vote. It appears that they are still day two in jail. And they have been thrown in jail by a Texas judge because they have they are unwilling to provide the name of a confidential informant that put them on the trail of the election software company conic. a Chinese American named Eugene U now, if you go on truth social and I hope all of you have accounts at truth social, it's important for us to help build up alternative platforms. I realized that Twitter is the Berlin Wall is coming down on Twitter, which is a very good thing, but we want insurance. We want to make sure we have safe platforms where we can speak our mind and now on truth social Catherine and Greg have accounts through the vote has an account there. Follow them. And Catherine has a recorded message, which I listen to this morning. It's a very poignant and strong message. Basically saying, number one, we're okay. Number two, don't take your eye off the ball, don't worry about us right now. We're gonna be fine. Really focus on getting the word out before the election. So kind of a last minute appeal to be involved and to spread the message and to vote. Don't miss out on this critical opportunity to change the direction of the country. And then through the vote also sent out a kind of an email to its friends and supporters of obviously were included Debbie's on the list. And I want to go through that briefly. It says number one that true the vote became aware that 2 million election workers had their private data and by piper data, we mean poll worker names, addresses, phone numbers, social security numbers, bank account numbers, all of this is in a database. And that Eugene knew and conic were allegedly storing this on Chinese servers. For 15 months, Catherine and Gregg worked with FBI field agents in Texas on this kind of operation. And then one of their FBI informants told them listen the FBI office in Washington D.C. AKA the whole corrupt shebang in Washington knows about this now and they're turning the operation against you.

Catherine Engelbrecht Greg Phillips Eugene U Catherine Twitter Texas Berlin Greg Debbie FBI Eugene Gregg Washington D.C. Washington
Debbie Wasserman Schultz Couldn't Pop the Crowd for Barack Obama

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

00:43 sec | 3 weeks ago

Debbie Wasserman Schultz Couldn't Pop the Crowd for Barack Obama

"Democrats are in a world of hurt right now. They couldn't even fill up stadiums for Barack Hussein Obama in Detroit, Michigan. Here's Debbie wasserman Schultz, cut number 6. You want to improve people's lives? Yeah. I bet some people in here want to improve people's lives. Are you with me? Yeah. Okay. Come on, people. Let's wake up. We got the president of the united states in the house. Come on now. I know you got a little more energy than I hear. Okay, thank you very much. That's the crowd I know. Those are the people I represent. Okay, just wanted to make sure you were still here. That's embarrassing. Todd, I think they're just matching the energy of the president. It's terrible. I mean, it is incredibly terrible.

Barack Hussein Obama Debbie Wasserman Schultz Detroit Michigan United States Todd
Joe Biden Claims He Talked to the Doctor Who Invented Insulin

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Joe Biden Claims He Talked to the Doctor Who Invented Insulin

"Hey, media. Why don't you cover Biden claiming he talked to the guy who invented insulin? Here's cut 13 listened to Joe Biden talking about insulin and the guy who invented it who just for the record died a year before Biden was born. How many of you know somebody with diabetes? These insulin. Well, guess what? And when Debbie and I pass this law, it included everybody, not just seniors. And so what happened was we said, okay, and how much you cost to make that insulin drug for diabetes? Of course. It was invented by a man who did not patent it because he wanted it available for everyone. I spoke to him, okay? I spoke to him, okay? He says that. I spoke to the guy. I spoke to him. He died in 1942. You think you're speaking at? Do you speak to him recently? This week? This morning when? When did you talk to, when did you have your conversation with the Doctor Who invented insulin? Doctor Frederick banting died in 1941.

Biden Joe Biden Diabetes Debbie Frederick Banting
The Censorship Game Is Changing... For the Better

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:36 min | Last month

The Censorship Game Is Changing... For the Better

"The whole game in terms of censorship is changing in America and changing for the better and the landmark event here has been Elon Musk's takeover. Not just his offer to buy, but his purchase and then his hit the ground running approach. To this very important platform. Let's remember there has been for the past year and a half huge censorship going on. And huge manipulation of results manipulation of the exposure going on on the three biggest platforms, namely Twitter and Facebook and YouTube. Now, Facebook and YouTube are unrepentant. They are the same. Debbie thinks that they're actually going to get worse now that Twitter has become a free speech platform, although it could go the opposite way. It could be that when you have censorship, you need a coordinated regime of censorship, a kind of censorship across all major platforms for the censorship to really work, and that once one platform breaks loose, you have a sort of, let's call it the glass nose effect. Using the phrase that was used by used by Gorbachev to describe the kind of opening up of the old Soviet Union glasnost and perestroika were Gorbachev's two terms. So it could be the glasnost will extend from Twitter to YouTube and we'll see a kind of thaw occur even there. We will see.

Elon Musk Youtube Facebook Twitter America Debbie Gorbachev
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

01:33 min | Last month

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"You are in your organization. The more you empower extraordinary talents to move with that agility and follow their instinct and their minds. The more you structure your company around that idea, the more competitive your company will be. From the Ted audio collective, this is design matters with Debbie millman. For 18 years, Debbie millman has been talking with designers and other creative people about what they do, how they got to be who they are and what they're thinking about and working on. On this episode, moreo porcini talks about the importance of people and the design process. You need to put people at the center of everything. And that's your most powerful compiler advantage. Is innovation about ideas or is it about people? Moral porcini argues that design that doesn't put human needs at its center will not fare well in the marketplace. And he wrote a book about it called the human side of innovation, the power of people in love with people. Moral porcini is PepsiCo's chief design officer. He's been on the show before in 2020 to talk about his extraordinary career, and now he's back to talk about his new book. World porcini, welcome back to design matters. Thanks for having me there with such a pleasure. Thank you.

Debbie millman PepsiCo
Crooked Is Back!

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:57 min | Last month

Crooked Is Back!

"Crooked is back and crooked, of course, is the very fitting name that was given to Hillary Clinton by Donald Trump. And he would initially he called the crooked Hillary, but after a while, he just dropped the Hillary and started calling her crooked. And crooked his back with a video that she made warning about the, well, not the midterm election, but the 2024 election. Here is a little piece of that, listen. Hello, indivisibles. I'm here to highlight something that is keeping me up at night. And I know this group really understands what I'm about to say. I know we're all focused on the 2022 midterm elections. And they are incredibly important. But we also have to look ahead. Because you know what our opponent certainly are. Right wing extremists already have a plan to literally steal the next presidential election. You're as Hillary Clinton, Republicans are going to steal the 2024 election. Now, with Hillary, there's always an initial feeling that this woman is nuts. In fact, Debbie walks in. She's deranged. She's out over her mind. And there's a little bit of that going on because even if you just watch her, the way that she talks, hello, indivisibles. She says, who addresses people like that? This is just a very unnatural person. And a very unnatural way of operating. And then she also has the kind of first of all, she has a sort of witch like a tire. And her extremely annoying manner of speaking. I mean, the net effect of this is electric in a very bad way.

Hillary Hillary Clinton Donald Trump Debbie
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:45 min | 3 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"You stated that it took you the better part of your 20s to recognize that insecurities are actually a superpower and something that you could utilize to allow your better work to come forward and realize that you didn't have to be snippy and cynical and you've said that quote cold ass bitch was a coat I put on to protect myself and I realized I can take that coat off now. Which I love. How did you come to that point where you could throw off that coat? I mean, I can't believe that quote came out of my mouth, but it did. Anyone who knows the band from earlier days, I would come on stage wearing four or 5 layers of clothing and usually a hat and maybe some glasses. And as I got heated up during the performance, I would take them off and by the end of the performance, I was down to a T-shirt or down to my jeans, no shirt at all. I always felt the need to protect myself into layer myself from the world at large. I'm a very, I was born a very shy person. I'm not anymore because the part of that Debbie that I find interesting is that I was really moving on instinct. And instinct was telling me that the things that are embedded into me in a part of who I am, a very the very part of my DNA allows that insecurity allows that vulnerability part of it being queer, part of it being bullied, if you will, as a child, part of it being from a family that had this nomadic peripatetic crazy pick up and move every couple and having to really be fiercely independent or independent within a very tight family unit of two sisters and a mother and father. All this created, I guess, an instinct that allowed me to gene it and without having the language to describe it to myself. Allowed me to use that insecurity and that vulnerability to create the persona that became who I am. And that gets into a whole other philosophical or deeply psychological arena that we don't need to go into. We become who we want to become. And then we create who we want to become and then we become them. But I didn't have the language to recognize that until much, much later. Establish myself enough that it didn't knock me backwards or throw me off my game. It simply allowed me to look at the earlier work and not disregard it. So easily. And to acknowledge, wow, stuff that was incredibly ballsy and incredibly courageous. I just didn't see it as such. And I still don't think of myself. I still have what is impostor syndrome. I always think that the next song or the next photo book is going to be that I'm a big fake. And that in its own regard can be a great power, a superpower. I'm a little bit quoting Greta Thunberg, who referred to when she became a public figure through her through her activism. And not by the world's media, how embarrassing are we as Americans. But being mocked for her voice, acknowledged publicly that her being on the spectrum being autistic was what she regarded as a superpower. And I was like, wow, hang on a second. Here's a teenage this thing that we've thought of my whole life as something that's a disability. She regards as a superpower, I have the superpowers within my vulnerability. And my insecurities, and I've actually employed those throughout my entire adult life. Presented as a public figure as a pop star as a singer songwriter as an artist as a photographer, et cetera. And wow, thank you Greta Thunberg for allowing me to see myself a little more clearly. I'm sometimes embarrassed to start every sentence with the word I, I feel a little naval gaze, but part of being a pop star allows you to not only acknowledge that the ego that it takes to get up on a stage and think that what you have to say is valuable to someone beyond yourself. Also comes hand in hand with the humility of stepping back and recognizing that if you start to believe you're on myth, you're screwed. And the work that you do is vastly really, really human. And that humanity, I think I'm just insane to me coming out of my mouth. But that humanity, that humility combined with that ego is what I think that friction can create

Greta Thunberg Debbie
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

08:04 min | 3 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Say, and interact according to some simple rules, they react to chemical sense, such as those of other ants, larvae, and food. They leave behind their own sense. They also react to sound, over time these behaviors compound and allow and colonies to self difficult problems like finding the best foraging route to and from food, avoiding traffic jams, as they react to one another's chemical traces while foraging, for instance, they spontaneously form a highway system, a central inbound lane going from food source to the nest, flanked by two outbound lanes from the nest to the food source. These ants are not directed by an ant overlord. They are merely engaging with one another according to basic rules. And so we are behaving in exactly the same way the ants are. Yeah, I mean, the example might be a little out of place, but I think ant colonies are a complex system. So a complex system is a system where you have many individuals interacting with one another. Over a long period of time and the result is maybe unexpected or large or different from what you might imagine if you only look at the individual interactions. You can have lots of micro interactions and behaviors that if they're practiced over long enough can have massive results. I mean, if you think about weathering in the case of race and health, there's this idea that it's the accumulated stressors of racism that contribute to the massive health disparities between African Americans and white people in this country, for instance. It's not one thing. It's the accumulation and the repetition over time that gives rise to this system that we see. When we started first started talking about your book, I outlined all of those instances of bias. And I was heartened as I went through your book to see that you believe that we can unlearn our biases. And you outline very straightforward ways, organizations can interrupt bias. And these include standardizing criteria for hiring and for promotions in the field of medicine, doctors can use a standardized checklist for care to ensure everyone is treated the same. Can you talk a little bit about this standardizing criteria and checklists and how they can be created and implemented with as much ease and speed as possible. Yeah, so the example that I that I described earlier about blood clot prevention is an excellent example of this kind of standardized checklist approach to reducing biases. The idea is that you're kind of taking a decision out of the realm of a black box and really breaking it down into systematic steps. And this approach can be used in lots of different areas. I mean, one way that it can be used in the workplace, for instance, is in like an interview context. So say an organization is interviewing people for a job. This is an area that's ripe for bias because if I go into an interview with you and I'm just kind of winging it, I might ask you questions based on some perceived similarities we have. I might give you slightly, you know, give you the benefit of the doubt in certain cases. I might ask you softball questions because of some kind of affinity I feel. There's a concept that I find really useful called homophily, which means literally love of the same. And it describes the way that we sometimes gravitate toward people who remind us of ourselves. This happens in the workplace all the time. Anytime you hear someone say, oh, we hired that person because they were a culture fit. That's homophily, right? That's like, we hired them because they were like us. And so a way to interrupt this in an interview setting in a workplace is by developing a set of standardized questions ahead of time. And so every person who's interviewed gets asked the exact same set of 12 questions or 5 questions. And that way you can start to compare apples to apples instead of just sort of letting interviewers run wild with whatever biases might be informing their the questions and the conversation they're having with people. I've also read about ways that people are looking at the first screen of resumes without names or locations and just qualifications. And that seems to be a way to avoid some of that, oh, that person doesn't look like me or that person doesn't have the homophily that we can sometimes veer to. Right, so the Hubble so in order to get if you're an astronomer in order to get time on the Hubble Space Telescope, you have to submit an application. And the committee has started to remove identifiers from the application of astronomers to use the Hubble Space Telescope. And an analysis of more than 15,000 applicants over 16 years found that before they removed the identifiers from the applications, men's proposals were accepted at a higher rate than women's. But after they removed the names from the applications, the disparity actually reversed women's applications were accepted at a higher rate than men's. Um, wonder what that means. I mean, I think often it's that if a particular group has had more obstacles, face more hurdles in order to get to a certain level, they might, you know, they might have had to have more accomplishments in order to get to that level. Are there any places that you found where there's been an aggregation of these types of standardized criteria for questions for interviews for checklists? Is there a place a repository where people can go to learn about how to create these more standardized lists and criteria? That's an amazing idea, Debbie. We should make that. I don't know of a sort of like a specific sort of toolkit as you're describing that specifically around standardization. I'm actually working I'm partnering with a researcher right now to look at checklist approaches in medicine and try to reanalyze studies to see if this pattern is holding true with lots of different studies, whether checklists are actually eliminating gender and racial disparities across different across different medical studies. So we'll hopefully know more soon. You know, I do think that this type of systemic change is going to require that individuals think that they can make a difference that they can look at their unconscious bias or their bias and begin to take steps to make changes and that needs to be something that has to be very conscious. For those that are listening to the show today, what would be one or two things that you think that anybody could do on an individual basis to confront or become more aware of their unconscious bias. And make small or large changes to begin to behave differently in the world. You know, I think the

softball Debbie
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:19 min | 6 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Includes understanding the world in a different way, maybe. Yeah, and that it doesn't have to be like a painting that's going to hang on a gallery wall or something. It could be baking a cake or it could be, as you said, understanding the world differently. I'm always struck that in the wake of 9 11, suddenly there were all these people signing up to become firefighters and teachers. And then in the week of the pandemic, we have people signing up for medical school and nursing school. So I think there's something in the human spirit that looks at pain and tries to turn it into something of meaning. It's just what we do naturally. You might say that the opposite thing should be happening, right? A lot of men die in a burning building, so now there's more people signing up to be firefighters. That doesn't make sense. You might say. People are dying in a pandemic. Why would everyone be signing up to become doctors and nurses now? But there's something in the human spirit that does that. That calls us to it. Speaking of baking a cake, one last question for you. Yeah. I read that a few times a year. You try to like cooking. Yes. And I was wondering how that was going for you. Oh my gosh, I think I have one of those times coming on. Actually. I haven't had one for a while. But yeah, I'm not a natural cook and I always wish that I were. I always admire people who are domestic geniuses who whip things up and it's all as we said, effortless for them. It is not for me. But I love the idea of it. Me too. And eternally grateful now that my wife likes to do it way more than I do or can. Oh, you are so lucky. That is awesome. Yeah. Susan, for me, the idea at the heart of bittersweet is how people can transform pain into creativity, transcendence, and love. It is an exquisitely beautiful book, and I just want you to think I want to thank you for sharing it with the world. And for joining me today on design matters. Well, thank you so much, Debbie, for having me and for the work that you do, and it was such a treat to get to know you. I feel like we have to get together in person after this. Absolutely. So many of the things I want to tell you. And.

Susan Debbie
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:31 min | 8 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Wow. Again, you with the big question, Debbie. I kind of want to say, I'm sorry, but I'm sorry not so. It's so it's so deep and so big. And layered the answers. Why do we hurt ourselves when we're suffering? Why do we self destruct when, yeah, when we feel like we've been ruined? I think it's a couple of things. I think one of the things is it's a signal. It's a signal to the people around us that we're saying help me. Even if we with our words are saying like, oh no, I'm fine just leave me alone. And in so many ways, that's when you turn to drugs, for example. You know, that's a way of pushing others away from you, right? And yet what I was so clearly trying to do, I can see, is to be like, help me help me help me. And it's also a kind of test, so it's a signal. I need help. It's a test. Is there anyone out there who loves me enough to help me? I also think in my case, there was this sort of division within me or this polarity that was almost like it's almost like mythic in its when I think about it and when I interpret it this way is like the mother, the good mother who's been taken from me and the bad father, the dark father who abandoned me. You know, if I can't be the woman my mother raised me to be that ambitious generous life light filled person, maybe I can be the junk, the pile of shit, the darkness, that my father nurtured in me. There was something that I had to figure out about those primal relationships. That I had to rage against and heal and understand, and revise. And I think that a lot of us have to do that. You know, I think that a lot of people who are suffering and certainly people who have written to me as sugar, you know, they have a problem. They write with the problem, right? They're like, this is my question. This is my thing. But really the problem is that deep, deep river that's flowing beneath all the troubles that subterranean channel that is your parents that is those early stories you received, your losses and your gains and your wounds in your sorrows that you have to you have to heal them. And sometimes healing is an ugly thing. Sometimes healing is destruction, sometimes healing is turning away. Sometimes healing is a kind of rage and anger. And I think that for me, it was just like I had to pass through everything. So the image that always comes to mind to me is one of total destruction. When I saw that I was going to lose everything after my mom died, and I did, my family also really fell apart and was lost. When I understood that that was what was going to happen and that I couldn't make it not happen. That's when I really turned to heroin. That's when I was like, okay, if the house is going to burn down, I'm going to go like the piece of this that in some ways I can have control over is I'm going to actually burn the whole land out. Like the whole homestead. The hard thing about that is, of course, some people stay there. They get lost there. They're walking through the ashes forever. And luck and I'm so grateful that that wasn't my fate. You know, that I had to do that stuff in order to realize that I wasn't the person my father raised me to be. My father didn't raise me. I was the person my mother raised me to be. And the best thing I could do and this is why I said that so much of that stuff was about love is I realized I was trying to show the world, listen, this amazing woman is gone, and I am suffering. I wanted to, with my own life, demonstrate how gigantic that loss was. And what I realized is that only way I could do that, the absolute only way I could do that was to make good on my intentions. To make good on my ambitions, to be the woman my mother raised me to be, as I said in wild. To become, to become. And she didn't get to all the way, or as long as I hoped she would. But that I would have to just simply live my life and try to honor her with it. And what's so crazy and cool and beautiful about that is I did. I mean, people all over the world know my mom's name. Yeah. They do. It's interesting you brought her to life through your words and, you know, she brought you to life through her life. It's a really nice symmetry there. It's crazy. You know, it's I lost her, I was the same age when she died as she was when she was pregnant with me. So I lost her at the same age that I came into her life. Right. I just want to say, I don't want to end any way glorify the destructive things we do. Because they are destructive. And like I said, people get their lives, they're lost there. And so in no way, am I saying like, well, you know, you have to do this to get to there. I wish that I wish that I didn't have to go into the darkness. But, you know, I was always trying to move in the direction of love. And as you said, I did write about her..

Debbie
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:50 min | 9 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"The new season of design matters with Debbie millman starts in April. The episode you're about to listen to originally dropped and march of 2021. It's so funny 'cause even when I talked about being a writer, there are big fear was like, don't go spreading our dirty laundry, right? And I always thought the characters in my head are so much more interesting than what's happening in my real life. From the Ted audio collective, this is design matters with Debbie millman. For 17 years, Debbie millman has been talking with designers and other creative people about what they do, how they got to be who they are and what they're thinking about and working on. On this episode, Jacqueline Woodson talks about writing for children and young adults. It was Madeleine lingel who said when you write remembering the child you were, because the essence of childhood doesn't change. As a child, Jacqueline Woodson loved to tell lies. There was something about seeing her friend's eyes grow wide with wonder that she loved. She got into trouble for lying, but didn't stop until 5th grade that same year she wrote a story and her 5th grade teacher said, this is really good. That was when Jacqueline Woodson understood that a lie on the page was called fiction, and that could win you accolades and awards. Flash forward a few decades and many stories later, and she is indeed one many, many accolades and awards, including a national book award, several newbery honors, and in 2020 she.

Debbie millman Jacqueline Woodson Madeleine lingel
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:11 min | 10 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"You know when people die and the pictures at the funeral or sometimes younger? Once they die, their ageless, it's perfectly fine to have a picture of her at 20 or 30 or 40. I understood that of her before she passed, that that's how she saw herself and that's how she wanted to be seen. From the Ted audio collective, this is design matters with Debbie millman. For 17 years, Debbie millman has been talking with some of the world's most creative people about what they do. They got to be who they are and what they're thinking about and working on. And now some of those interviews appear in print in Debbie's brand new book, why design matters? Conversations with the world's most creative people. It's coming out in February of this year. In anticipation of the book, we're releasing interviews from the archives this month. We thought it would be fun for this news to hear not only some great interviews, but also to hear how the podcast has evolved over the years. So we've been releasing the oldest ones first and proceeding chronologically. In September of 2020, Debbie spoke with textile artist Visa butler about how making a quilted portrait of her grandmother led to an artistic breakthrough. I think they could see it and I could feel it too like I got it. I finally got it. Piece of butler after the brick. I could say piece of butler is a fiber artist and I wouldn't be wrong. Her work is made of quilted textiles. But that's kind of like saying that Jackson Pollock worked in paint. Visa butler does extraordinarily vibrant quilted portraits of African Americans. Some are famous, like Frederick Douglass, but most are unnamed men and women who happen to have had a photograph taken before they were forgotten by history. But be sure butler has brought them back to us in life scale images that stick in the mind and claim our attention and respect. She joins me to talk about her work and her career. Visa butler.

Debbie millman Visa butler Debbie butler Jackson Pollock Frederick Douglass
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:10 min | 10 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"The universe has already written the poem, you were planning on writing. And this is why you can do nothing but point at the flock of starlings, whose bodies rise and fall in inherited choreography. Swarming the sky in a sweeping curtain that for one blistering moment forms the unmistakable shape of a giant bird flapping against the sky. It is why your mouth forms an oh. That is not a gasp, but rather the beginning of, oh, of course. As in, of course, the heart of a blue whale is as large as a house. With chambers tall enough to fit a person's standing. Of course, a fig is only possible when a lady wasp lays her eggs inside a flower, dies and decomposes the fruit, evidence of her transformation sometimes the poem is so bright. Your silly language will not stick to it. Sometimes the poem is so true, nobody will believe you. I am a bird made of birds. My blue heart, a house. You can stand up inside of. I am dying. Here. Inside this flower, it is okay. It is what I was put here to do. Take this fruit. It is what I have to offer. It may not be first or ever best. But it is the only way to be sure, I lived at all. From the Ted audio collective, this is design matters with Debbie millman. For 17 years, Debbie millman has been talking with some of the world's most creative people about what they do. They got to be who they are and what they're thinking about and working on. And now some of those interviews appear in print in Debbie's brand new book, why.

Debbie millman Debbie
"debbie" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

07:01 min | 11 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Wow. Pizza. I love that you said that like a revelation. It's kind of what I imagine blondie eating. Like, let's go get a slice. It's like in between grinding cool songs. Let's get a slice. Like that's. Let's see, that's actually perfect. That's it. Hello, I'm mini driver. Welcome to the premiere of many questions season two. I'm so glad you're here and if you're new to this show, let me fill you in. I've always loved priests questionnaire. It was originally a 19th century parlor game where players would ask each other 35 questions aimed at revealing the other player's true nature. It's just the scientific method really. In asking different people the same set of questions, you can make observations about which truths appear to be universal. I love this discipline, and it made me wonder what if these questions were just the jumping off point? What greater depths would be revealed if I asked these questions as conversation starters with thought leaders and trailblazers across all these different disciplines? So I started this podcast because I wanted to put together a kind of cultural anthology where I invite you to explore the questions I think we've all been asking ourselves lately. How are we similar? How are we individual? Which commonalities surprise us? And why? So I adapted Bruce questionnaire and I wrote my own 7 questions that I personally think are pertinent to a person's story. They are. When and where were you happiest? What is the quality you like least about yourself? What relationship real or fictionalized defines love for you? What question would you most like answered? What person place or experience has shaped you the most? What would be your last meal? And can you tell me something in your life that's grown out of a personal disaster? And I've gathered a group of really remarkable people, ones that I am honored and humbled to have had the chance to engage with. You may not hear their answers to all 7 of these questions. We've whittled it down to which questions felt closest to their experience or the most surprising or created the most fertile ground to connect. And I'm starting season two with legendary lead singer of the band blondie Debbie Harry. We don't usually use one of the 7 questions as the episode opening. But because Debbie is such a rule breaker, I figured it was only right to break a rule in her episode. I've always felt like blondie and the Ramones and the New York dolls. Were this super creative scream in the face of corporate rock? And Debbie herself has always felt to me to be part of the Vanguard of cultural engagement. She is a reflective soul and a straight shoe to of the best New Jersey variety. And as usual, it was a privilege to have spoken with a person who has helped shape the cultural conversation so specifically. So the first question is where and when were you happiest? Well, I think that I was happiest in the early days of blondie. I probably didn't really know how happy I was, but I was very happy. It was a Brave New World and I was struggling, you know, climbing and learning and working and it was quite a wonderful. And the reason I know this is because when they flew the planes into the twin towers, I went through the series of anger of grief of this in a bat and one day I was just sort of laying there on the couch and I thought, oh my God, I wish it was the 70s again and this tremendous feeling came over me about how that was a great wonderful time for me. So I look at that as being happy. Do you think it's because you guys were part of that Vanguard of that New York scene, that whole music movement that happened? Were you aware of just being at the forefront of something and creating it? Or were you just too busy being in that whole music scene in the club scene that you didn't realize that you were at the forefront? Oh, I don't think we thought of ourselves as being at the forefront. You know, it was very creative period for us. And we were daredevils and you know, we thought that we were daredevils. I don't know, the scene was very energetic and it was really nothing of value. None of us had record deals or anything like that. We're all scrambling and scuttling around little vermin. But you know it was very creative. So we fed off each other's creativity and it was, you know, this sort of one opportunity as much as, you know, we could figure out how to do. And it was a spirited, I guess, is the best way. You know how people do in music today. There are so many collaborations. Like you'll have all these people doing guest vocals on other people's tracks. Was there a lot of collaboration that we didn't necessarily get to hear that wasn't necessarily recorded? Like, do you remember playing and writing or recording with other people that it was never really for public consumption? The time that I was thinking, I was really kind of before we did any recording. Serious reporting. I mean, later on, I sang on something of the Ramones. I think I'm proudly. The only female to sing on her Ramones record, then I did something with Dede when Dede did his rap invasion. I remember. I'm definitely going to listen to that tonight. Yeah, Judy king. So there were some of that, but that sort of came around later, but I think in the early days, people were just maybe swapping back and forth musicians more than performing officially, you know, like for a while, television's current base player, Fred Smith, was my bass player. You know, and then Richard hell broke off and formed the voidoids and Walter lore was playing with the voidoids or when he was playing with Johnny thunders. You know, there was sort of this period of time when people were establishing who they were. So I think that that is sort of an era that nobody really knows about that much. It was never officially recorded. Maybe it was risque or something. I don't know. So do you think that it was freedom from any kind of pressure that he would just creating in a vacuum outside of a record label expectation or numbers or money or anything that that was really sort of unadulterated happiness for you is unencumbered creativity. Yeah. I mean, we all had the goals and high aspirations of playing for thousands and thousands in arenas. And of course, you know, anybody who joins a rock band has that dream. You know, that that's really where they all want to go. Very few want.

blondie Debbie Harry blondie Debbie Bruce New York Dede New Jersey Judy king voidoids Walter lore Fred Smith Johnny thunders Richard
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:12 min | 11 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"I tried to set up my life in a way that I could take risks. So that when there were years where I made a lot of money in Hollywood by being a screenwriter, I didn't spend it all, which allowed me to go take the risks and making a movie like solitary man. From the Ted audio collector, this is design matters with Debbie millman. For 17 years, Debbie millman has been talking with some of the world's most creative people about what they do. They got to be who they are and what they're thinking about and working on. And now some of those interviews appear in print and Debbie's brand new book, why design matters. Conversations with the world's most creative people. It's coming out in February of this year. In anticipation of the book, we're releasing interviews from the archives this month. We thought it would be fun for listeners to hear, not only some great interviews, but also to hear how the podcast says evolved over the years. So we've been releasing the oldest ones first and proceeding chronologically. In January of 2017, Debbie spoke with Brian compliment about why he became a writer after years as a record promoter and producer. I realized I would become toxic. That's something to die in me, and that if I allowed that to happen, that toxicity would spread to those that I love. Brian koppelman, after the brick. Brian koppelman makes media a lot of media. Films, TV shows, podcasts, records. As for movies, he co wrote Ocean's Thirteen and rounders. He produced the illusionist and the lucky ones, and he's directed many others. His podcast on sleet, which covers pop culture and politics is called the moment. He's the co creator and showrunner for the TV show billions, which is about to start its second season on showtime. If that's not enough Brian Kabul, man for you, he's also a prolific and ferocious tweeter..

Debbie millman Brian koppelman Debbie Hollywood Brian Brian Kabul
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:06 min | 11 months ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"There's a weekly art meeting and all the cartoonists we call it the batch. We submit a group of 6, 8, ten cartoons every week, and then they either buy something, one drawing or they don't, every blue moon you might sell too, but often enough you don't sell any. From the Ted audio collector, this is design matters with Debbie millman. For 17 years, Debbie millman has been talking with some of the world's most creative people about what they do. They got to be who they are and what they're thinking about and working on. And now some of those interviews appear in print and Debbie's brand new book, why design matters. Conversations with the world's most creative people. It's coming out in February of this year. In anticipation of the book, we're releasing interviews from the archives this month. We thought it would be fun for listeners to hear, not only some great interviews, but also to hear how the podcast says evolved over the years. So we've been releasing the oldest ones first and proceeding chronologically. In January of 2016, Debbie spoke with cartoonist, Ross chest. You know, I don't bound out of bed thinking. This is just another great day in my endless great life. Brass chassis after the brick. Of all the cartoonists whose work appears in The New Yorker magazine, who's your favorite? Well, the competition there is very stiff, but for me, the one who really gets to me is ra's chest. Not just her jokes, but her characters, her famously from bee Jewish existentially awkward neurotics. Her work appears mainly in The New Yorker, but also in other magazines and in books. One of her latest is a memoir in cartoon form, a graphic novel, titled, can't we talk about something.

Debbie millman Debbie Ross chest The New Yorker
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:16 min | 1 year ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And you also realize that you didn't have to be snippy and cynical. And you've said that, quote, cold ass bitch was a coat I put on to protect myself and I realized I can take that coat off now. Which I love. How did you come to that realization? How did you get to that point where you could throw off that coat? Yeah, wow. I mean, I can't believe that quote came out of my mouth, but it did. Anyone anyone who knows the band from earlier days, I would come on stage wearing four or 5 layers of clothing and usually a hat and maybe some glasses. And as I got heated up during the performance I would take them off by the end of the evening by the end of the performance. I was down to a T-shirt or down to my jeans, no shirt at all. I always felt the need to protect myself and to layer myself from the world at large. I'm a very, I was born a very shy person. I'm not anymore because I had to learn how to not be the part of that Debbie that I find interesting is that I was really moving on instinct. And instinct was telling me that the things that are embedded into me in a part of who I am, a very part of my DNA that allows that insecurity allows that vulnerability. Part of it being queer, part of it being bullied, if you will, as a child, part of it being from a family that had this nomadic peripatetic crazy pick up and move every couple of years lifestyle and having to really be fiercely independent or independent within a very tight family unit of two sisters and a mother and father, all of this created, I guess, an instinct that allowed me to without acknowledging it and without having the language to describe it to myself allowed me to use that insecurity and that vulnerability to create the persona that became who I am. And that gets into a whole other philosophical or deeply psychological I guess arena that we don't need to go into. We become who we want to become. And then we create who we want to become. And then we become them. But I didn't have the language to recognize that until much much later. When I did, I had established myself enough that it didn't knock me backwards or throw me off my game. It simply allowed me to look at the earlier work and not disregard it. So easily and to acknowledge well, I did do stuff that was incredibly ballsy and incredibly courageous. I just didn't see it as such. And I still don't think of myself. I still have what is impostor syndrome. I always think that the next song or the next photo book is going to be the one where everyone realizes that I'm a big fake. And that in its own regard can be a great power of superpower. I'm a little bit quoting Greta Thunberg who referred to when she became a public figure through her through her activism. And then was being mocked by the world's media, how embarrassing are we as Americans? But being mocked for her voice, acknowledged publicly that her being on the spectrum of being autistic was what she regarded as a superpower. And I was like, wow, hang on a second. He was a teenage girl telling me that this thing that we've thought of my whole life as something that's a disability, she regards as a superpower, I have those superpowers within my vulnerability. And my insecurities. And I've actually employed those throughout my entire adult life and with the work that I've presented as a public figure as a pop star as a singer songwriter as an artist as a photographer, et cetera. And wow, thank you Greta Thunberg for allowing me to see myself a little more clearly. I'm sometimes embarrassed. It feels like I start every sentence with the word eye. I feel a little naval gazey, but part of being a pop star allows you to not only acknowledge that the ego that it takes to get up on a stage and think that what you have to say or sing or present is valuable to someone beyond yourself. Also comes hand in hand with the humility of stepping back and recognizing that if you start to believe you're on myth, you're screwed. And the work that you do is vastly unimportant. You are really, really human. And that's humanity, I think I'm just insane to me coming out of my mouth. But that humanity that humility combined with that ego is what I think that friction can create beautiful work, whether it's in a writer in people that performance artists and dancers or in something as rigid as opera or ballet or in something as free form as my idea theoretically of what punk rock means. Yeah, it's interesting in spending time researching a lot of the things that you were a part of and talked about and wrote about through the 80s till now. I was very aware of your awareness of the tides as they go back and forth between acceptance and reverence and people then getting upset about the very things that they used to be excited about and how you have to temper how you consider what you mean to them by what you mean sort of internally and hold on to that in some way. Wow, can you explain that? That makes sense. No, can you comment on a little bit more? I'm really intrigued. Well, I remember you were talking about one of the albums that you released not being as popular as some of the bigger, more sort of stadium albums. And I have stacks and stacks of your work. And thank you. They have the very, very early work appealed to a certain type of people, the later state, more stadium work I'm talking about losing my religion and the world of that super duper heavy popular music that people, you know, all the out of time. And then when you have something that might be smaller or less appreciated by the masses, you know, it's still work that has meaning and if you start to. And talk to roxane about this all the time. If you start to measure your value and worth by the amount of books that are sold or the amount of albums that are sold or the amount of downloads or the amount of streams, you put your whole life in control of something that isn't you. You're also competing and I can't possibly compete with my past. And I have no desire to nor with whoever the pop stars of 2021 or 22. I have no desire to even try to compete with that. I read an article I think it was in The Guardian about Damon auburn from the band blur. He's someone who I deeply admire. And the point that they were making as the writer was saying, here's someone who had huge success. And then did something quite unusual, which is didn't try to continue having this success upon success upon success on a mass scale, but spent the next 20 years doing exactly what he wanted to do experimenting with different types of music and musicians and different ways of presenting.

Greta Thunberg Debbie roxane Damon auburn The Guardian
"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:18 min | 1 year ago

"debbie" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"So first of all, this is not a bad person, but we're just going to label a few things to call them out. So we're going to make some observations here. That's first of all. And second is, I'm going to give difficult feedback, but I'm going to get into it with what I call an emotional payment, as in, you are not a problem, and also you add a lot to the table. But there are some things that we need to work that you need to work on. The reason I think it's important to make that emotional payment is because you want to signal good intent. And if you've not been giving them positive feedback for the past couple of years, you might really need to signal good intent right here and right now. So I'm going to give that as context. I want to distinguish this also from the so called feedback sandwich. Have you heard of the feedback sandwich? No. What people think about as the feedback sandwich is you tell people something good, then you tell them what you really want to tell them. And then you tell them something good to soften the blow. I do not encourage that. Do not do that. However, you do need to signal good intent and if you haven't done that regularly, let's start off by giving the positive, so the person understands where you're coming from. Why do you recommend not giving a feedback sandwich? It sounds like the big difference between what you're going to share with us in a feedback sandwiches that you don't come back to the bottom half of the sandwich. But the problem with the feedback sandwich is its technique. It's not coming from a philosophy. It's just a technique. Like, how do I give some of feedback? Why you tell them something good? They tell them something about you tell them something good. Well, that's like coming. There's no depth to that. Also, people see through it, so it's not, it doesn't land in the way that you're hoping for it to land. So I think it's almost a spiritual difference. When I'm asking you to do is not give a feedback sandwich, I'm asking you to actually think about for yourself, all the good things this person does bring to the table so that when you have the conversation, your tone is connoting the approval, those good things. Also, so that your employee understands that you're coming from a place of wanting to be helpful to them and appreciating what they bring to the table. So I think it's just a difference of almost like philosophy and depth. So I'm going to ask you all to really think about what does this person do well because you're going to start with that and also you want to bring that to the conversation as you have a difficult feedback. Is that helpful? Absolutely. Okay, great. So I'm going to get right into it. Debbie. I want to talk to you today because I've noticed a few things that I think we should address. First of all, I appreciate everything you do. I know you're one of the hardest workers here, and your sense of humor brings everyone up. That's great. That said, I want to make sure you're getting great results with all your work. What I often see from you is a number of projects a lot of activity, but I often see the projects are delayed and remain unfinished. Also, you don't always let everyone know what the delays so they come as a surprise. That's a problem for your coworkers who are counting on you to do what you say you'll do. Then other things get delayed waiting on you. I'm sure you have your reasons. Things are not perfect here. Maybe you're waiting other people. But I expect you as a leader here to work constructively with your peers to fix process problems as they come up and to raise flags early if things will be late. I also expect you to make sure that your communicating regularly with your peers and all the things you guys are working on jointly. I know you're super talented and you have much to contribute to our company. I want your efforts to have the right impact and I want you to be able to move forward in your career. That's why I'm working on this with you. We can discuss some of this right now, and I'd love you to think about this and come back to me in three or four days with what you see as the problems and how you propose to fix them. What day should we plan to sync up again so you can share your plan with me and let me know what help you need from me. So do you recommend that that's something that we said face to face or should that be in an email? Could that be in an email? I really prefer face to face or these days, video. It's important to have the conversation because they're going to have a response. When I write these scripts, by the way, obviously, you're going to tailor it to your own circumstances, but also they might interrupt you. That's okay. You're trying to get your mouth around the words, also you're trying to get your mindset right. And so practicing it is very helpful. Having a script to practice is very helpful. But once you've thought through what you want to say, when and if they interrupt you and also share their point of view, which you certainly want to hear, it'll help you listen to them and not worry about you getting you through your message. What happens when somebody responds defensively? I know. I have a script for that. On my website, actually. When someone's response defensively, so first of all, I think it's important to step back and remind them, I'm only sharing this with you because I care about you and your success. Also, that's where labeling comes in too. Listen, I see that you're having kind of an emotional reaction. I understand that. I don't like getting difficult feedback either. So let me just see if we can calm down for a second. And we might need a minute. The other thing you can do when someone acts defensively is you can just be quiet. And you can also say, listen, I don't want to upset you. Tell me more about how this is landing for you. By the way, I just did this with a client the other day. I was giving him the feedback. And he got super explosive with me. Quite defensive. And so I just let him talk and let him talk and let him talk. By the way, we think coaches don't take it personally. I took it personally. You're a person. I take everything personally. I'm a person. Yeah. But I let him vent invent invent invent. And then I said, I see that I touched a nerve here, which I think was accurate. I was just labeling that and also what I said to him was I really didn't mean to upset you. That's not why I brought this up. Tell me more about what's coming up for you or what's going on with you. And as a leader, you can say that, too, and you can do this is another woohoo term in coaching. We say holding space. You can hold space for somebody to have a difficult and emotional reaction. And that can go on for 5 minutes or ten minutes, and it's not their final answer. And also, you don't have to take it personally..

Debbie
"debbie" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"debbie" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Hey it's jesse labor day here in the us and we hear hello. Monday are all wondering resume went already was so quick fall kind of like the beginning of year. It's that point where we get to stop about a clean slate. Think about how. We want things to be different. So we're bringing you a really important episode from the archives today. It's our episode on the ten year. Plan with debbie millman enjoy from the new steam. At lincoln i'm jessi hempel and this is hello monday. It's our show about the changing nature of work and how that work is changing us. I want you to imagine something in fact if it's easy grab a pen and paper and write it down. It's winter twenty thirty one ten years from now. What does your life look like. Be very specific. Who do you live with. What is your job. what does it feel like. What shoes are you wearing. Now keep this because we're gonna come back to it this ten year plan. It's an exercise. I talked about with today's guest. Debbie millman debbie is living proof that articulating your dreams and planning for them can lead to great things during her twenty years as president of sterling brands. She worked on logos. You'd recognize like burger king and seven up. She's written six books and she helped found the world's first masters in branding program. Her artwork has been shown around the world and.

Debbie millman jessi hempel jesse lincoln us sterling brands debbie
"debbie" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

Psychologists Off The Clock

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"debbie" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

"And i am so excited about this episode. As i'm sure you know. I absolutely love being co host of psychologists off the clock because i get to interview some of my professional heroes. These like famous well known people who've written books and it is such a delight but one of the things that i love. The most is when i get to actually talk with my co hosts about the things that they are passionate about so today. I am interviewing debbie sorenson. And we're going to talk about burnout today. Which is a topic that is near and dear to her heart. Hi debbie hi gel. Thank you for doing this with me. I'm excited to talk to you about burn out today. I am so excited to talk to you about it too and just to pick your brain. I think it's so fun when we get to learn a little bit from each other me. I've learned a lot from you about imposter syndrome and other things from all my co-host of this is great. Okay so I was thinking about our interview and how it feels to me like. We're hearing a lot more about burn out these days like it's almost like the new quote unquote self care like. It's kind of become a buzz word. So i thought maybe the best place to start would be with what you mean. When you talk about burnett like how you define it. And what are maybe some of the telltale signs for somebody to determine whether they're experiencing burnout yuck great question. So i think that i'll to start with the the definition. That is the world health. Organization's official definition of burnout and the world. Health organization describes it as an occupational phenomenon. And there's little controversy about that so hope bookmark that we'll talk about that in a second but there are basically three main. I guess signs of burnout so one is just feeling exhausted depleted. And i'm here to tell you..

debbie sorenson debbie burnett
"debbie" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

Psychologists Off The Clock

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"debbie" Discussed on Psychologists Off The Clock

"And i am so excited about this episode. As i'm sure you know. I absolutely love being co host of psychologists off the clock because i get to interview some of my professional heroes. These like famous well known people who've written books and it is such a delight but one of the things that i love. The most is when i get to actually talk with my co hosts about the things that they are passionate about so today. I am interviewing debbie sorenson. And we're going to talk about burnout today. Which is a topic that is near and dear to her heart. Hi debbie hi gel. Thank you for doing this with me. I'm excited to talk to you about burn out today. I am so excited to talk to you about it too and just to pick your brain. I think it's so fun when we get to learn a little bit from each other me. I've learned a lot from you about imposter syndrome and other things from all my co-host of this is great. Okay so I was thinking about our interview and how it feels to me like. We're hearing a lot more about burn out these days like it's almost like the new quote unquote self care like. It's kind of become a buzz word. So i thought maybe the best place to start would be with what you mean. When you talk about burnett like how you define it. And what are maybe some of the telltale signs for somebody to determine whether they're experiencing burnout yuck great question. So i think that i'll to start with the the definition. That is the world health. Organization's official definition of burnout and the world. Health organization describes it as an occupational phenomenon. And there's little controversy about that so hope bookmark that we'll talk about that in a second but there are basically three main. I guess signs of burnout so one is just feeling exhausted depleted. And i'm here to tell you..

debbie sorenson debbie burnett
"debbie" Discussed on The Living Room with Joanna Weaver

The Living Room with Joanna Weaver

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"debbie" Discussed on The Living Room with Joanna Weaver

"Could be a variety of things i mean. But but it's it's stepping over your questions and being trusting that if god is leading you to do something. He's going to provide everything you need to accomplish. His will So it's it's an incredible story. ub i i just. I love ministering to two women. And i love seeing them grow and his grace and grow in faith and growing confidence in him. And that's what she praises about you. Know prayer is the baseline for everything. A has a believer in. So that's my hope. Every girl they would know they would grow in their understanding of who he is and what he can do in through them. I love it. I love all my goodness i could just talk to you forever but i just i just want you to know god his used you significantly in my life in in some ways i think you for not for not staying comfortable for not just saying you know what i'm just a shadow kinda girl. I'm just the background kinda girl that you were willing to let god call you fourth and step out in faith and and you know again. I just want to say to those listening. Please don't get enamored with the huge dream. Yeah 'cause you'll miss his presence along the way. Yes and i think you can hear in debbie's heart in her voice just how much she loves. Jesus and isn't that girls. Listen you ministry girls. Isn't that what we want to replicate asked. That's what we want to replicate. And i just love to have you pray over our girls out there as we close our podcast time together. Well let me say first. Every girl who's listening. God has a plan of purpose for your life. He wants he wants to use you in whatever setting you're in he wants to use you to bring the atmosphere of faith into your homes in tier workplaces. He wants you to embrace the truth.

debbie