35 Burst results for "Deb Haaland"

Manchin Stunned by Deb Haaland's Confusion on Pausing Oil Permits

The Dan Bongino Show

01:34 min | 6 d ago

Manchin Stunned by Deb Haaland's Confusion on Pausing Oil Permits

"So Joe Manchin's like hey listen a Deb I'm a senator here for the state of West Virginia here And I don't want my citizens to get dead And I'm trying to keep oil and gas prices down So we want to make sure we increase oil and gas production in the United States So why are we shutting down permits here So the hilarious part about this is Deb highland's office issued a letter about not issuing new permits right before she got up there and she's like I don't know anything about it How is it that a U.S. senator knows more about the office of the interior secretary than the interior secretary itself The answer is it's a Joe Biden appointed That's how Here check this out This secretary hall and I don't know Did you all just put out a statement Here's the department of interior just by out of statement And the statement basically says a proposed program is not a decision to issue specific leases or to authorize any drilling or development This is from your office So it looks like you are on a shut everything down Did you know you all put this I am sorry I am sitting in this hearing and not My God somebody shuts it down It shows what you're in ten years This is a mansion sitting there stunned He's holding the memo her office put out And he's laughing like this is this real How is it that I have the interior secretary in front of me I'm asking her about a impactful memo shutting down a lot of leasing and she has no idea what I'm talking about How is that

Deb Highland Joe Manchin Department Of Interior U.S. West Virginia Joe Biden
Land Agency Moving Back to DC, Reversing Trump-Era Decision

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 8 months ago

Land Agency Moving Back to DC, Reversing Trump-Era Decision

"The interior secretary says that the leadership of an agency that controls two hundred forty five million acres mostly out west will be returning to Washington DC interior secretary deb Haaland is moving the headquarters of the bureau of land management back to the nation's capital after two years in Colorado reversing a decision made by former president trump administration the bureau lost nearly three hundred employees when its headquarters was relocated to Grand Junction Colorado in twenty nineteen the agency manages the usage of millions of acres of public land in western states from grazing recreation and wilderness to fossil fuel extraction and renewable power development Hollis says the agency's current space in Grand Junction will become its western headquarters Jennifer king Washington

Deb Haaland Bureau Of Land Management Washington Dc Colorado Hollis Grand Junction Jennifer King Washington
"deb haaland" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

06:13 min | 9 months ago

"deb haaland" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Years later. No, your host Lisa Brady, those sounds and memories from that day that move us all. Good morning and thank you for being with us as we join the nation and the world and remembering that crystal clear morning. 20 years ago, when America was attacked the single deadliest terror attack in human history. Nearly 3000 lives lost 2977 as four planes were hijacked. To be used as weapons, two of them, hitting the twin towers in New York City and ultimately bringing them down another hitting the Pentagon and the fourth, never reaching its intended target, possibly the U. S. Capitol. Because of the heroes of flight 93, the passengers and crew who gave their own lives to fight back until the terrorists crash that plane into a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. But remembering means paying tribute to all of the heroic acts of that day. And the days, weeks and months that followed a time that also united Americans and kindness, selflessness. Patriotism not only the first responders on and off duty who raised into burning buildings to try to save people, but civilians who did the same Around the clock effort to search through New York's ground zero, hoping for more survivors and then the painstaking collection of remains that site smoldering for weeks. The neighbors and communities who rallied around grieving families, the prayers and comfort of strangers at makeshift memorials that were precursors to the magnificent settings where we mourn and honour the dead today. I have three colleagues joining me around those sites this morning boxes Gurnal Scott in Lower Manhattan, where the 9 11 Memorial and Museum is where the towers once stood boxes Rachel Sutherland at the Pentagon and Foxes, Tanya J. Powers at the Flight 93 Memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Tanya, I want to start with you because there seems to be a bigger focus this year on flight 93. Good morning to you. Good morning. Yes, I am at the what's going to take place at starting at about An hour and 45 minutes at 9 45 this morning is where is when the memorial ceremony starts here at the flight? 93 National Memorial. This is as you mentioned, you know, near Shanksville, Pennsylvania. It is the site of the crash of United Flight 93 on 9 11. Um, there will be a mini speakers dignitaries today that you know, really have gotten a lot of attention. One of those is, of course, former President George W. Bush, who was president at the time of the attacks on 9 11. The keynote address is going to be given by the Vice president Kamala Harris. There will also be some remarks from Deb Haaland, who is the secretary of the interior. There will be remarks from one of the family members, Gordon felt he is the president of families of flight 93. He is the brother of Edward Felt, who was on board that flight. I 9 11 and spoke with him this week. He told me all about his brother. It's just You know, such moving stuff? You know how he loved to help people. And these are the stories that we keep hearing from these family members who talked about the loved ones that they lost on 9 11. You know who were on that plane that went down right here where we're sitting today. I know that they keep adding events at at these sites and around the country and around these sites every year, and I think in Shanksville last night they had something called the luminaria ceremony. Yes, There is a wall of names here. There are several features here in the memorial to pay tribute to those 40 passengers and crew who were on board United Flight 93 the evening before. Um you know, the 11th on the 10th. They come out at sunset, and they have family members. And they have, you know, distinguished guests that they've invited, Um, you know, and people that they've asked to hold these these large candle lanterns and they call it the luminaria and they pushed they have a procession. Where 40 of these representatives, you know, being a family member or, like I said, someone that they've asked to be part of this and they bring them out. They hold these lanterns down by their sides, and they walk out in a line. There's a like an orchestra softly playing in the background. Um and they walk out to the wall of names, and they put a lantern under each person's name and a lot of times, you know, they'll sort of like touch the name and and have a moment of remembrance, and it's just one of the ways that they Commemorate the day before you know, 9 11 actually gets here, Tanya. Thank you will come back to you in just a little bit, But I do want to touch base with Fox's Grenell Scott, who is in lower Manhattan for us. This morning, the scene of really the longest ceremony of the day. Um, because it is where the most lives were lost on 9 11 and burn all what is the scene? Like at this hour as they set up for the ceremony that starts just a little bit later in the hour. And first of all, good morning to you, Lisa and Good morning, everyone and we are here at the ground zero memorial site where, As you said in about a half hour or so. The events of the day will get underway for this very poignant memorial. Uh, here at the World Trade Center. What we are Looking at from my vantage point is a very wide scope with a lot of people kind of teeming around. From where I sit. You can see the Fire station 10 house, the nearest house to the world knew and nearest firehouse to the World Trade Center to the twin towers. At the time where five firefighters lost their lives directly in front of me. You can see the Uh, uh. Saint Michel National Shrine. That's the Greek Orthodox church that was destroyed..

Deb Haaland Lisa Brady New York City Rachel Sutherland Tanya Edward Felt Grenell Scott Tanya J. Powers Gordon New York Shanksville Lisa 40 two Gurnal Scott 40 passengers Lower Manhattan 20 years ago five firefighters Kamala Harris
"deb haaland" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"deb haaland" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"I look we. Haven't we've used today has not given us the solutions We need and so and it's hard. I mean the task before her is hard. It's not like She's going to be able to you know turn. This titanic is a large agency online. But i guess what i think is one of the most powerful things than ryan helpful is that i think those in the way she interacts with people and the perspective that she brings from her lived experience and the people and the experience of the people that she has surrounded herself with. She's made very smart choices about the people that she is bringing on to work with her. That i think that that her leadership a excites people will bring people on and i think hopefully because she listens to other perspectives and she incorporates. It into or thinking. i'm. I'm hopeful that that will help accomplish the change that's needed. It will help build back up an agency that really has been devastated from the inside out just in terms of personnel and resources But that will bring people together and bring people together outside of the agency Toward a vision that is a vision about a shared prosperity and a vision that includes preserving this unique Natural heritage that we have in our public lands as something essential to What it means to be american at what is special about this nation last question. Your career within our dc has been most of the time in washington dc. Except you have recently moved to wyoming. And you're out of laremy now. Is that right. So how how has that move. Changed your perspective on your job and american lands. Well it was a that was intentional. Because i felt like. And i've always felt doing the work in wash- intended it must be informed by Views and experiences on the ground in the west so even while working in washington. I made it a regular habit to get out of washington the to the last but when i couldn't to make sure i was talking with building relationships with people who are on the ground in west but but i was very intentional incoming to why to work on the ground for a while. Now that of my daughter's college and kind of off on their own. I had a little bit our flexibility to do that. And i and i think it is easier. And i've already found that it's easier to have the conversations that happen when you're having the conversations with people in your community and an too often unfortunately in washington. You're you're forced to the corners. I mean there's a lot of posturing the gets in the way of a real collaborative conversation and so I think that You know there are a lot of challenges that estate on wyoming faces right now in transitioning to a different energy economy but i think by listening and understanding the impacts and the consequences of the transition and addressing them. That's the way that we're going.

washington ryan one today wash wyoming laremy dc american
"deb haaland" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"deb haaland" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"Conservation on some of that conservation happens on privately. Ans- some of it happens on state and local lance but but the reality is that that it's about shutting people out of nature but it's it's bringing people into nature enter the effort to conserve nature in a way that allows us to you know to save ourselves because it is those natural systems for me in for anarchy see this goes back to the mission that nrdc was founded which was about protecting these natural systems upon which all life depends on so this agenda is very exciting for me. It was part of the president's first one of its first executive orders really within a week the first week he after he was inaugurated and he has said he's asked a terrier to deliver a report to him to the white house Which is due any day in the next couple of weeks. i believe. I'm not sure that report will be Published or public. But what i do anticipate is that it will initiate a very clear process for stakeholder engagement. Again light ephedra fossil fuel form to collect civic ideas which will be ideas from landowners will be ideas from tribes it will be states hopefully and also national environmental groups about how you how you do. This conservation and part of it is protected areas but part of it is policies and incentives that encourage the conservation by other players like the state and local governments. Landowners i asked you earlier about short-term goals but i want to ask you to look ahead imagined three and a half years from now the tail end of the first first biden term. What does a successful biden administration looked like three and a half years from now. Okay so question now. And i will answer that. But i've got to share his relevant just in the experience. I had the motion senate generated to to watch and listen to us secretary. Deborah how and speak from the secretary's office as a native american woman. I didn't anticipate that would have such an effect on the jeep. She kicked off This federal fossil fuel for you know which. I had the chance to testify and end to see her speaking from the secretary's office. You know a room than i had said before it. Just it really helped me when At we get to a place wear we were we were living off in the interior department has a nation. We were living up to the promises that are built in to our land management statutes like the federal land policy and management act like niko the national environmental policy act. These promised that we will. We will protect these lands to enjoy today but also for future generations. And so i think we have the most success doing that. And we have reinvigorate Opportunity for success in being able to incorporate the indigenous wisdom and perspective experience that secretary allen represents the person that she has that the president has mom for the top lawyer. The Anderson your bob anderson. He is native american. And i've also heard that secretary Has chosen a native american. Larry roberts to her chief of staff and so i think they really bring a critical perspective to the leadership of interior to take us to place that is looking at the lands In a more holistic in in a more a hopeful in a in a more balanced way. But it's got gosh. She's also very serious about looking at the federal fossil fuels and managing in them in a way that makes sense for the long term and future generations and not just For the process of a few are extracting sources today. I wonder if you could talk a little more than about how that experience. The lived experience of having a number of new americans at the top of the interior department. How does that infused itself into an agency with seventy thousand people. And maybe that gets back to my. What is it look like. Three and a half years from now question of what what. What does success look like given given this This leadership we have never seen at interior With with a number of of indigenous americans Running the show finally. Well i cannot speak for for the tribes or the indigenous Voices but what. I can't say as somebody who has been engaged in the public land management issues really well for almost thirty years now.

Larry roberts federal land policy and manage Deborah seventy thousand people first one bob anderson niko the national environmenta first executive orders first week allen today secretary next couple of weeks Anderson Three and a half years three and a half years thirty years first first and a half years
"deb haaland" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"deb haaland" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"To saying no. We need to protect his lands. Now yes so actually so that would be one path for that. Actually what has happened. Is that the justice department and the plaintiffs in those cases so so there's a case related to bears case related to grand staircase. They are both consolidated. Bean heard before the same. Federal judge in washington dc But but the justice department that that case those cases be stayed in so in fact That cases not moving forward and the reason they did so because the biden administration wanted the time monnet little bit of time to decide what to do and so it actually makes action by the biden administration. Quick action pretty important And and so You have various groups involved strongly making the case a a a new proclamation. Reestablish returning those to monuments to their previous glory is the central and should be done quickly by president is now in the meantime is the question about you know how they are managed and and what happens now. Trump president trump in his agency's both the bureau of land management on the for service are involved. They did go ahead. Freddie quickly get some management plans it plays for trump's new monuments bottom line You know the secretary. How has responsibility for protecting those lands. And so she she showed and she can look to the five tribes who are behind the proposals forbears years and use their advice unused wisdom and experience to help manage of those lands. Those lands that really were part of the original proposal. So that's what. I would suggest that she do. In the meantime until one point nine million acres make that clear. Well yeah. I mean she's got she's got discretion. Has she manages those lands. Nrdc is definitely following the tribes lead. On what the appropriate size should be But but i should be clear that the quick and complete action by president. I'm to restore the two monuments is is critically important. Senator mitt romney and the governor of utah are calling for a slowdown calling for legislative solution. Of course we've seen this song and dance before going back to bishops public land's initiative five years ago which he kept promising was going to be the grand bargain and just fell flat on. Its face. is there any indication to you that this time is different. Could there be legislation. That gets everyone to the table or are there. Are there any good faith actors in utah delegation at well. I lived through that those efforts which i it first started. I think in a sincere way to come together around some kind of solution and actually in you know. I think it was twenty nine teen summer. Twenty nineteen there was it now called the dingo conservation act but there is legislation passed by congress in overwhelming numbers that included a pretty large package of wilderness in utah. It was not land related to bears years but unfortunately in the bears ears geography. The attempts have been made in the past as they played out. We're not sincere and did not result in any kind of resolution and that has in fact why secretary jewel and president obama acted when they did I don't see anything meaningful. On the ground up to justify reopening. I i really just see it as the delay tactic and fact is There are as a bama's eloquent proclamation surveyors ears articulates. They are very compelling reasons for protecting that landscape now. And that's what president should do you cover a very broad portfolio issues that in our dc everything from oil and gas or for him to to wilderness and wildlife conservation. What are some of the other urgent items on your agenda With the start of the new administration that we haven't touched on yet. Yeah so. I read the lands division and so we do have a number of people working on different issues. We are very focused right now on On how are public lands up play in to soften the climate crisis and so for us that is for nrdc and our lands. Division right now at is very focused on management of federal fossil fuels and then also Natural climate solutions. And this is where the president's Thirty by thirty initiatives comes in for me. That is a very exciting agenda to protect thirty percent of the lance of our nation's lands oceans and inland waters. It fits into an international initiative. That's really you know. Clearly gaining significant momentum that international initiative started. Several years ago. I i was first introduced to it when i read your book. Half earth which. I find very Bali that. We're going to have a hope of preserving the natural systems on which all life depends. We have to be giving what what wilson says is we have to give half the earth to nature now. That's not like half the earth becomes wilderness areas and some people have criticized. It for justice is an agenda is something you know a hidden agenda of locking everything. Nonsense that we've seen. Yeah i mean it's very much about bringing diverse interests in to this goal of.

thirty percent Trump nine million acres five years ago washington dc congress five tribes Senator Bali Thirty wilson dingo conservation act Several years ago thirty initiatives Freddie two monuments trump both one point first
"deb haaland" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"deb haaland" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"There are plenty of permits that can still lean years. Is we've been but how the administration handles the interior department handles. That is really important and and there. I would argue in several others. Have as well Vat they need to be looking at the conditions that they can pose a conditions of approval on those permits and they need to use this conditions to mitigate not only environmental impacts impacts to air or water but also to mitigate greenhouse gas emission impacts and they and they can do that relayed what this Frame of thinking about moving us to or a net zero carbon go and they can use a conditions on the israeli permits as a way of doing that. You know part of it is addressing the methane and they're even even after decisions to lease decisions to drill. The made is critically important. Both to to help the communities in which the is happening but also To climate change that we do that drilling in a way that really mitigates the potential harm mecca flow from it. So methane of this obviously is the low hanging fruit. They're making sure it's being captured. And not flared or released off. What other sorts of conditions could we see ending up in player. These things like carbon offsets are wh. What tools does blm have their disposal. There yeah i think certainly some creative and and outside of the box thinking it's to happen. This isn't something that's happened in the b. om space before. But yes i mean. It is a gain about some carbon offsets. You could even start to think an end. They did do this in the context interior. Did this in the context of the solar the programmatic environmental impact assessment. A statement. that was don bay. They were really moving forward with this idea of looking across the landscape and if an do need to allow development uncertain prices but allowing the development. Think about Way are you can do restoration. I mean it could be restoration of the range. It could be a restoration forests or wetlands. So that you are in fact in your in fact as part of the privilege of drilling on public lands you're having those companies a offset an and and pay for carbon sequestration in other places on the public lands and bat is is kind of the the vision or the path of how you get to this near net zero to some room for creativity from both industry and and agencies going exactly absolutely and the conversations have to happen among these different interests. And that's the other thing that i really saw bows in Secretary hounds executive orders in the way they structured of this oil and gas for first of all. I taught the the diversity of views that were presented Was was wide at rich and important. And then also. It's pretty clear that they are interested She demonstrated this. I going to utah emmy with various interest groups. We have to fight. There is a middle ground. We have to find it and And environmental groups like in dc have a responsibility of participating in engaging in conversation. Yeah industry instead a state and local governments and it has to be with a view of moving forward to something better rather that just kind of grasping with fingernail suit to the past and relying on on the dirty fuels of the past digging our hole deeper. We can't we can't afford that anymore. You mentioned the secretaries utah trip. So let's go ahead and talk about national monuments. Chief justice john roberts published a note recently in which he seemed to welcome. We even invite a court challenge regarding the antiquities act possibly looking at the scope of presidential powers under that law. Are you worried that that note may have been a shot across. President biden's bowel regarding bears get grand staircase or what's your read on that the. Yeah well first of all. The result of the decision in that case was a good one at actually related to challenge the fish commercial. Fisherman had brought to the marine monument issue the northeast canyons encima odds and the supreme court chose not to hear the case. And both the dc circuit and the district court had upheld the validity of president obama acting under the antiquities act to create those monuments. Now you're right. That chief justice roberts chose to write a note that went along with that decision. Not take your the case. And i was very disappointed actually in him because he really has done this legal research and as a lawyer i really i liked to be able to look to the supreme court and the people on it as the epitome of the legal profession but on sorry he is action did not represent back. And i'll tell you why You know the issues that he identified about how the quality's act has been used out of the kinds of objects that can be protected and emma size of the monument needed for their proper care. Those are not new issues. Courts actually have addressed those issues several times on the grand canyon there a court kissed confirming that eight hundred thousand acres was was a straight there. There's case acknowledge that he didn't do his research. And and in fact there is no court opinion at any level. It is found and enforced limits on the president's power under the act as you know as you suggested the decisions. Go back a century and they you know firm It was yeah theodore roosevelt. Who created the grand canyon monument and and the court rejected the claim that the these did not justify creation of a despite its large size so i think He you know not only. Was it a little bit unusual to add that but if he was going to do it if you need it to do legal research before intern in terms of legal footing on the court cases challenging president trump's attempt to eviscerate bears. Here's in grand staircase. Those cases are still waiting on a judge's ruling on summary judgment the cases you know or even close to trial. If it's going to get there. Is there a case to be made to president biden that he should at least wait until that summary judgment ruling comes down which would potentially make any action of his going forward on on bears against staircase moot or is there a downside.

theodore roosevelt eight hundred thousand acres john roberts both Both both industry supreme court President biden roberts zero carbon grand canyon president northeast canyons obama president biden utah trip court trump dc circuit first
"deb haaland" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"deb haaland" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"Immediate impact..

"deb haaland" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

06:37 min | 1 year ago

"deb haaland" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"More than a day or two but that is okay we desperately need the moisture right now on the show. Today we're going to check in on deb holland's first few weeks as interior secretary to say she has hit the ground. Running would be an understatement. The secretary went to utah earlier this month. Making good on a promise to the state's congressional delegation to visit bears ears and grand staircase escalante national monuments before making a recommendation to president biden about whether to restore or expand the monument boundaries. That president trump attempted to shrink now. It's worth noting that the tribal nations that originally proposed the bears ears national monument have made it clear. They want president biden to protect all one point nine million acres of their proposal. Not the one point. Three million acres that president obama protected in two thousand sixteen and after that utah visit secretary holland signed two major secretarial orders. That really set the stage for what we what we're going to see from the interior department under her leadership and so joining me to help break down everything in those orders and talk about national monuments and a whole lot. More sharon pacino. Sharon is the senior director of the land division at the natural resources defense council. She's an attorney who works on environmental reviews public participation. the freedom of information act she also teaches public. Land's law sharon. Welcome to the podcast. It's great to be here thank you. So let's tackle these secretary lew orders in order the first one's about reversing the legacy of former interior secretary bernhardt and the trump administration that second order creates a new climate task force so reversing all of these trump orders. What is covered there. And what's the practical effect of it. Sure well it's Very significant i I would characterize it. In general saying you know in that secretario order Interior has really assumed it's critical role in addressing catastrophic climate change. And so there was a there were a series of actions. Secretarial orders that had been issued during the trump administration that in her order secretary hallen reverses several of them doe was fossil fuel extraction and another key component out was how we are processing decisions that affect public lands and the role of environmental review and public participation in those decisions and then what will be the practical effect of this order. How long will it be before we see results coming from the way all of the various interior department bureaus do business. Well there will be a few things that will have an immediate and one example of that is as a result secretary. Jalen's orders up lay will see much more meaningful consultation with tribal nations occur. It's interesting to in this this The controversy is still going on around. The dakota access pipeline and at the end of the obama administration way really saw the federal government seeking taking action to engage in in a true of collaborative nation-to-nation manner with the tribes at the end of the obama. Administration you actually have a pretty significant action by the solicitor at the interior department to to put a hold on pipeline from going forward of course of that. That was the result that happened with when when president was elected came in but there was a process that was initiated to to define develop what what consultation nation to nation consultation matt and. I think we'll see this administration on secretary talent picking up on some of those ideas and where that left off. I'd like to also mention Cole and why the orders that was revoked by secretary howard was trump's action revoking the moratorium that had been put in place. There has been some discussion about. What does that mean. That moratorium is back in place not necessarily unfortunately because there was language in a satellite jewels order putting the moratorium in place that said it would remain effective until revoked which trump do jeff that means that we go back to the obama and the jewel order but can say is that i think we will definitely new coldly. Seen will definitely receive greater scrutiny and one key piece of that is that the environmental review that is done for newly seen for co leasing will include a robust analysis of the climate change in impacts. And so the action that Secretary jalan took in. This was in her second order along with the climate task force. Was that see specifically directed the interior department to follow its own rules related to nipah review. Which clearly do require considering indirect accumulative impacts at one assessing decision said is proposing to make a leasing coal. Stay just about to ask about that with that. Second order is is there a possible that part of that order about nipah and considering the social cost of greenhouse gases is that potentially does that could add a bigger short term impact than this climate task force itself. That was the headline of the order. Well it certainly will will have yes. It will have.

Sharon sharon pacino Cole Three million acres Today Second order nine million acres sharon More than a day second order Jalen utah two major secretarial orders trump natural resources defense coun one point bernhardt obama one key piece two thousand sixteen
Sharon Buccino on Deb Haalands Fast Start

Go West, Young Podcast

02:17 min | 1 year ago

Sharon Buccino on Deb Haalands Fast Start

"Going to check in on deb holland's first few weeks as interior secretary to say she has hit the ground. Running would be an understatement. The secretary went to utah earlier this month. Making good on a promise to the state's congressional delegation to visit bears ears and grand staircase escalante national monuments before making a recommendation to president biden about whether to restore or expand the monument boundaries. That president trump attempted to shrink now. It's worth noting that the tribal nations that originally proposed the bears ears national monument have made it clear. They want president biden to protect all one point nine million acres of their proposal. Not the one point. Three million acres that president obama protected in two thousand sixteen and after that utah visit secretary holland signed two major secretarial orders. That really set the stage for what we what we're going to see from the interior department under her leadership and so joining me to help break down everything in those orders and talk about national monuments and a whole lot. More sharon pacino. Sharon is the senior director of the land division at the natural resources defense council. She's an attorney who works on environmental reviews public participation. the freedom of information act she also teaches public. Land's law sharon. Welcome to the podcast. It's great to be here thank you. So let's tackle these secretary lew orders in order the first one's about reversing the legacy of former interior secretary bernhardt and the trump administration that second order creates a new climate task force so reversing all of these trump orders. What is covered there. And what's the practical effect of it. Sure well it's Very significant i I would characterize it. In general saying you know in that secretario order Interior has really assumed it's critical role in addressing catastrophic climate change. And so there was a there were a series of actions. Secretarial orders that had been issued during the trump administration that in her order secretary hallen reverses

President Biden Deb Holland President Trump Secretary Holland Utah Sharon Pacino Land Division Interior Department President Obama Natural Resources Defense Coun Sharon LEW Bernhardt Hallen
Interior Head Haaland Revokes Trump-Era Orders on Energy

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Interior Head Haaland Revokes Trump-Era Orders on Energy

"The new secretary of the interior has revoked a series of trump administration orders that promoted fossil fuel development on public lands and waters the directives boosted coal oil and gas leasing on federal lands to promote what trump called energy dominance in the United States interior secretary deb Haaland also rescinded a trump administration order intended to increase oil drilling in Alaska's national petroleum reserve a new directive prioritizes climate change an interior department decisions part of a government wide effort ahead of a virtual climate summit president Biden is hosting next week in a statement Holland says the orders will make communities more resilient to climate change and help lead the transition to a clean energy economy Ben Thomas Washington

Deb Haaland National Petroleum Reserve President Biden Alaska United States Holland Ben Thomas Washington
US report: Bald eagle populations soar in lower 48 states

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

US report: Bald eagle populations soar in lower 48 states

"Once near extinction the bald eagle is seen as a conservation success story less than sixty years ago there were only four hundred seventeen nesting pairs of the national symbol bald eagle in the lower forty eight states now there are more than three hundred sixteen thousand of the birds including seventy one thousand four hundred nesting pairs the comeback follows banning the pesticide DDT and placing the eagle on the endangered species list since then the population grew to the point where the bald eagle was removed from the list of threatened or endangered species in two thousand seven and the numbers have quadrupled since two thousand nine interior secretary deb Haaland hails the success of the bald eagle as the Biden administration takes steps to review a number of environmental actions taken by the previous trump administration timid wire Washington

Deb Haaland Biden Administration Washington
The Celebration Over, Deb Haaland Now Faces a Long To-Do List at Interior

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:44 min | 1 year ago

The Celebration Over, Deb Haaland Now Faces a Long To-Do List at Interior

"When she was confirmed as the first indigenous interior secretary on Monday. Now that the celebration's over He's promised to begin repairing a legacy of broken treaties and abuses committed by the federal government in Indian country. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports on the huge challenges ahead for Secretary Helland. With so much land under federal control. There's an old saying here in the West that the interior secretary has a more direct effect on people's day to day lives than the president. This is multiplied on reservations. In her confirmation hearing, Deb Holland nodded to the fact that the department she now leads was historically a tool of oppression toward tribes. If an indigenous woman from humble beginnings can be confirmed as secretary of the interior Our country holds promise for everyone mending a legacy of broken promises is a priority for many of the 574 federally recognized tribes on the Nez Perce reservation elders like Mary Jane Miles, See Holland as a turning point. It feels like we're moving and we are claiming What we could have done a long time ago. The Nez Perce consider much of the northwest their ancestral land, but through a serious of treaties there, now confined to a small slice of remote Idaho River country. U. S government is supposed to protect that land and it's salmon. But the fish the lifeline for people here along the Clearwater River are nearing extinction due to dams and climate change. Miles. Also points to a legacy of toxic mess is from mining that the tribe had little say over. I think we've noticed that maybe we've been taken, but nationwide, tribal leaders think this might start changing under Holland. The Biden administration is reinstating an Obama era rule requiring consultation. That means any future lands, development or right of way. Projects like a pipeline must be approved first by tribes and Secretary Holland is going to oversee all of that protection of this government relationship is all important to the tribes in Colorado. John Echo Hoggett, The Native American Rights Fund says that relationship is fraught because interior agencies like the Bureau of Indian Affairs have been chronically underfunded. He says. The previous administration also spurned tribal input on major lands, decisions, something he's looking forward to restarting. Well, it would prevent things from happening. You know, happened to us here during the last administration elimination of 85% of the Bears ears National Monument, the Keystone XL pipeline, President Obama formally protected the Bears Ears Monument on Utah land considered sacred to native people. Then the Trump Administration dramatically reduced its boundaries, and there's pressure on the new administration to reinstate or even expand them. Secretary Holland will travel there next month for a listening tour. Her to do list is a big one. Doctor. Look good afternoon in the money Quest, we add two not to. Ah, hiked back on the Nez Perce tribal leaders like Casey Mitchell want Holland's ear on saving the salmon, and he's optimistic. Unlike with previous administrations, there's no learning curve with Secretary Holland. There's always such high turnover within government entities that you know, sometimes that plays as an excuse. And as a government entity, there should not be any excuse for the trust responsibility that you hold to the tribes for the nest purse That trust responsibility is at the heart of a new deal brokered by a Republican congressman to remove four dams on the Snake River just downstream from here. Plan they hope Deb Holland will put in front of the president soon. Kirk Siegler,

Kirk Siegler Secretary Helland Secretary Holland Deb Holland Mary Jane Miles Idaho River Biden Administration Holland John Echo Hoggett Native American Rights Fund NPR Clearwater River Bureau Of Indian Affairs Federal Government Bears Ears Monument U. Trump Administration Casey Mitchell National Monument
The Celebration Over, Deb Haaland Now Faces a Long To-Do List at Interior

Environment: NPR

03:44 min | 1 year ago

The Celebration Over, Deb Haaland Now Faces a Long To-Do List at Interior

"Deb holland made history when she was confirmed as the first indigenous interior secretary on monday now that the celebrations over. She's promised to begin repairing a legacy of broken treaties and abuses committed by the federal government in indian country. Npr's kirk siegler reports on the huge challenges ahead for secretary held with so much land under federal control. There's an old saying here in the west that the interior secretary has a more direct effect on people's day to day lives than the president. This is multiplied on reservations in her confirmation hearing dabhol and nodded to the fact that the department she now leads was historically a tool of oppression toward tribes if an indigenous woman from humble beginnings can be confirmed as secretary of the interior. Our country holds promise for everyone. Mending a legacy of broken. Promises is a priority. For many of the five hundred seventy four federally recognized tribes on the nez perce reservation elders like mary. Jane miles see holland as a turning point at feels like we are moving and we are claiming what we could have done a long time ago. The nez perce consider much of the north west their ancestral land but through a series of treaties. There now confined to a small slice of remote idaho river country. The us government is supposed to protect that land and it salmon. But the fish the lifeline for people here along the clearwater river are nearing extinction due to dams and climate change miles. Also points to a legacy of topic. Messes reminding that the tribe had little say over. I think we've noticed that maybe we've been taken but nationwide tribal leaders think this might start changing under holland. The biden administration is reinstating. An obama era rule requiring consultation. That means any future lands development or right away. Projects like pipeline must be approved first by tribes and secretary holland is going oversee. All of that protection of this government relationship is all important to the tribes in colorado john. Echo hawk at the native american rights fund says that relationship is fraught because interior agencies. Like the bureau of indian. Affairs have been chronically underfunded. He says the previous administration. Also spurn tribal input on major lands decisions. Something he's looking forward to restarting will it would prevent things from happening in. Oh happen to your. During the last administration who emanation of eighty five percent of the bears national monument the keystone excel pipeline. President obama formally protected the bears. Ears monument on utah land considered sacred to native people than the trump administration dramatically reduced its boundaries and there's pressure on the new administration to reinstate or even expand them secretary hall and will travel there next month for a listening tour. Her to do list is a big one dot to look good afternoon. In when nick west we add to not to a hiked back on them says birsh tribal leaders. Like casey mitchell watt holland's ear on saving the salmon and he's optimistic unlike with previous administrations. There's no learning curve with secretary holland. There's always such high turnover within government. Entities that you know sometimes that plays as an excuse and as a government entity there should not be any excuse for the trust responsibility that you hold to the tribes for the nez perce that trust responsibility is at the heart of a new deal. Brokered by republican congressman to remove four dams on the snake river just downstream from here. A plan is deb. Holland will put in front of the president's soon

Deb Holland Kirk Siegler Jane Miles Federal Government Idaho River Secretary Holland Biden Administration Holland Native American Rights Fund NPR Clearwater River Bureau Of Indian North West Mary Nick West Casey Mitchell Watt Holland Barack Obama Colorado President Obama
The Senate confirms Deb Haaland to be the first Native American Cabinet secretary in US history

Democracy Now! Audio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

The Senate confirms Deb Haaland to be the first Native American Cabinet secretary in US history

"Deb holland is being sworn. In today secretary of the interior she is a tribal citizen of the laguna pueblo. She becomes the first native american ever to serve in a us presidential cabinet the two term congresswoman from new mexico was confirmed by the senate monday after four. Republicans joined democrats in voting to confirm her. Susan collins of maine lindsey graham of south carolina lisa murkowski of alaska dan sullivan alaska as interior secretary. Manage five hundred million acres of federal and tribal land. She'll also oversee government relations with five hundred. Seventy four federally recognized tribal nations during her confirmation. Hearing holland vowed to work for everyone.

Deb Holland Laguna Pueblo Us Presidential Cabinet Susan Collins Alaska Lindsey Graham New Mexico Lisa Murkowski Dan Sullivan Senate Maine South Carolina Holland
Deb Haaland Confirmed As 1st Native American Interior Secretary

The Sunshine Economy

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Deb Haaland Confirmed As 1st Native American Interior Secretary

"Deb Holland made history when she was confirmed as the secretary of the Department of the Interior. Secretary Holland is a citizen of the Laguna Puebla and is not just the first Native American to lead the Interior Department but the first native Cabinet secretary of any sort in U. S history. She's last month during her confirmation hearing. I believe we all have a stake in the future of our country, and I believe that every one of US Republicans, Democrats and independents shares a common bond. Our love for the outdoors in a desire and obligation to keep our nation livable for future generations. I carry my life experiences with me. Everywhere I go. It's those experiences that give me hope for the future. If an indigenous woman from humble beginnings can be confirmed as secretary of the interior Our country holds promise for everyone.

Deb Holland Department Of The Interior Secretary Holland Laguna Puebla U. Cabinet United States
Deb Haaland Confirmed As 1st Native American Interior Secretary

POLITICO Dispatch?

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Deb Haaland Confirmed As 1st Native American Interior Secretary

"Deb holland has won senate confirmation to lead the interior department becoming the first native american cabinet member in. Us cre- the progressive democrat had faced stiff opposition from republicans who feel her anti fossil fuel activism will hurt their state economies as. She helps to develop president. Joe biden's ambitious. Climate change strategy but senators ended up voting in her favor yesterday. Fifty one to forty as head of the interior department holland will oversee the agency that manages twenty percent of us land in nearly a quarter of the nation's oil and gas production

Deb Holland American Cabinet Interior Department Senate Joe Biden United States Holland
What Deb Haaland's historic confirmation means to Native Americans

AP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

What Deb Haaland's historic confirmation means to Native Americans

"40 vote confirms to Mexico congresswoman Deb Holland as interior secretary, making her the first Native American to lead a Cabinet department and the first to lead the federal agency that is wielded influence over the nations tribes for nearly two centuries. Democrats and tribal groups hailed her confirmation as historic, saying the selection means that indigenous people will for the first time see a Native American lead the powerful department. Interior also oversees a host of other issues, including energy development on public lands and waters, national parks and endangered species. Two

Deb Holland Cabinet Department Mexico
Senate confirms Deb Haaland as Interior secretary

WBZ Afternoon News

00:08 sec | 1 year ago

Senate confirms Deb Haaland as Interior secretary

"Senate tonight confirming New Mexico. Rep. Deb Holland to serve as president Biden's interior secretary. She is the first Native American to ever hold a

Rep. Deb Holland President Biden Senate New Mexico
Senators to consider Deb Haaland’s nomination Thursday

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 1 year ago

Senators to consider Deb Haaland’s nomination Thursday

"The national native news. i mean antonio gonzales. The senate committee on energy and natural resources is scheduled to hold a business meeting thursday to consider the nomination of deb holland for secretary of the interior. The business meeting follows a two day. Confirmation hearing last week were holland. Answered questions from committee members including being repeatedly grilled about the oil and gas industry and her views on climate and the environment as key lawmakers publicly announced their support or opposition a number of tribal leaders directors of native organizations advocates and allies are urging congress to confirm holland making calls writing letters promoting a petition and using social media with the hashtag deb for interior the cherokee nation is including all household members of cherokee citizens and any federally recognized tribal member in phase three of its covid nineteen vaccination plant health officials. Say protecting the community means vaccinating everyone. The oklahoma tribe has administered more than twenty seven thousand vaccine. So far those who meet phase three criteria are being asked to make an appointment with the health center other tribal health clinics across. The country are also expanding. Vaccinations this week. The alaskan native southcentral foundation anchorage cove in nineteen vaccination appointments to alaskans forty years and older. The vaccine clinic is also open to educators and childcare workers as supply allows in bristol bay communities in alaska one feature of daily life that has stayed constant during the pandemic is subsistence. A school recognize that and decided to incorporate it into the classroom l. Brian vanua spoke with teachers and students. About how that's changed learning this year. Audrey penna mary off is a senior at chief. Ivan blunkett school in new studio hawk. She's one of the students in the schools new subsistence class and says it's a great opportunity to learn about and practice subsistence skills. That the class is operatives. -tunities students who or aren't able to go at home another student junior gusty blunkett junior says he appreciates the opportunity to share stories and learn more about his culture. I'm hoping to learn more about what are people doing. Maybe we were told in one day. Tell my stories teaching. Help others bypassing pass on. Josh gates is one of the teachers. He says the classes another way for students to learn and practice a wide range of skills related to subsistence. The obvious ones are mike Knowing how to properly use a chainsaw or knowing how to make an ice fishing pole knowing how to tie fishing hook but the less obvious ones are You know how to maintain your tools and machines that are necessary. Principal robin johns says. It's a way to better align the school's curriculum with the community's traditional lifestyle. Nothing makes me prouder as a principal then to see how eager students are to share stories and pictures of their hunts with me because they know i will be so incredibly proud of them in dealing him. I'm brian van wall. The foundation for individual rights in education filed a lawsuit against haskell indian nations university. And it's president. Ronald graham on tuesday on behalf of the student. Newspapers editor the lawsuit. Alleges student jared natalie's rights were violated in october. The president sent him directive trying to restrict journalism and free speech now he told the lawrence journal world allegations also include the tribal college located in lawrence. Kansas withheld more than ten thousand dollars for the papers us. Graham did not respond to comments about the federal lawsuit. The directive has since been rescinded. I'm antonio gonzales.

Antonio Gonzales Senate Committee On Energy And Deb Holland Holland Alaskan Native Southcentral Fo Brian Vanua Audrey Penna Mary Ivan Blunkett Josh Gates Bristol Bay Oklahoma Congress Blunkett Robin Johns Alaska Brian Van Wall Foundation For Individual Righ Haskell Indian Nations Univers Ronald Graham Jared Natalie
Republicans Push Back On Historic Nomination Of Deb Haaland For Interior Secretary

Pacifica Evening News

02:43 min | 1 year ago

Republicans Push Back On Historic Nomination Of Deb Haaland For Interior Secretary

"And Natural Resource is committee today held confirmation hearings for New Mexico representative Deb Holland to be the next secretary of interior. A confirmation would be historic. She would be the first Native American Cabinet member in the nation's history. Her nomination by President Biden has also been criticized by oil State Republicans because of her stated opposition issues such as to fracking in the Dakota access pipeline. Ecuadorian reports from Fresno. The history being made by Deb Holland's nomination was hailed by all on the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, even those who are skeptical of her policy views The special nature of the moment was evident as the New Mexico congresswoman introduced herself to the committee and the nation. I spent summers in the Sita, or small village on Laguna Pueblo, the location of my grandparent's traditional home. It was there that I learned about my culture from my grandmother by watching her cook and by participating in traditional feast days and ceremonies, it was in the cornfields with my grandfather, where I learned the importance of water. And protecting our resource is where I gained a deep respect for the Earth Committee chair, Joe Manchin outlined the immensity of the task. The Interior Department manages 500 million acres of land. 1/5 of the entire country. The 70,000 employees oversee Parks Monuments Wildlife refuge because dams, reservoirs and canals. It also supervisors mineral resource lands that produced 20% of the nation's energy. Citing previous statements Deb Holland had made about fossil fuel production. Wyoming Senator John Barrasso, the committee's ranking member, set the theme which Republican members came back to repeatedly. Oil production in federal lands and oil pipelines, especially the Dakota access pipeline. By signing an executive order to ban all new oil coal gas leases on federal lands. The president is taking a sledgehammer to Western states economies. Ban on federal leasing could result in 33,000 workers losing their jobs in Wyoming. Representative Hollins home state of Wyoming, 62,000 workers stand to lose their jobs. Holland also faced questions over her appearance at protests of the Dakota access pipeline in North Dakota before she was elected to Congress in 2018. Holland said she went there in solidarity with Native American tribes and other water protectors, who felt they were not consulted adequately before the multi state pipeline was approved. President Joe Biden has sense next the project. Conservative

Deb Holland Native American Cabinet President Biden Senate Energy And Natural Reso New Mexico Laguna Pueblo Earth Committee Dakota Natural Resource Fresno Senator John Barrasso Joe Manchin Wyoming Interior Department Representative Hollins Holland North Dakota Congress
Biden rolls out diverse climate and energy team to enact 'ambitious' plan

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Biden rolls out diverse climate and energy team to enact 'ambitious' plan

"Biden announcing key nominees and appointees to his climate and energy team after our cabinet will chest bay one of or two precedent breaking appointments but twelve including today's long overdue appointment of a first native american cabinet secretary that nominee for interior secretary is democratic new mexico congresswoman. Deb haaland president-elect biden saying his choices will form the most diverse cabinet in

Biden American Cabinet Cabinet Deb Haaland New Mexico
Representative Deb Haaland Discusses Equal Pay for Native Women, and the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

The Electorette Podcast

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Representative Deb Haaland Discusses Equal Pay for Native Women, and the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

"Representative of Holland welcome to the podcast. Thank you very much for having me. It's been an incredible week. We started the week off of course, was Tuesday with the presidential debate, the first one. Of of the the election cycle, which I was one really excited about you know. But for lack of a better word, you know it was kind of disastrous and you know we ended the week with several people when the president's inner circle testing positive for Kobe nineteen and I guess the thing that kept coming back to me because this was happening in the wake of news about I. Think it was something like eight, hundred, fifty thousand women having to leave the workplace like all of these things that are kind of distracting us from this inequality that women are still facing. The native women because we're just ending last week it was native American women's equal pay. Day Yes. So we're not talking about yes. In there are so many important phase it we should be talking about absolutely. So let's talk about him. I think when I look at the Biden plan and I look of what he has in store for native women especially in relation to equal pay I don't think I've seen that before that amount of focus. Well, how would you grade his focus on that area specifically? Oh, I, think it's I think it's you know it's I. Think it's an a plus the other day on native. Women's equal pay day Joe Biden Nationally tweeted tweeted that out and So we re tweeted her tweet specifically talking about native women's Equal Pay Day I'm super excited about everything that Joe Biden and Kamala Harris will do when they get in office in. This is just one of them. He I think the number right now is something like when. I read this figure is really hard to fathom that something like native women are paid fifty cents on every dollar to in comparison to a man right and kind of makes me angry a bit and I think if you do the math, it takes native women twenty one months almost two years to be paid equal. What demand makes in a single here. quite stark. Yes. It's. It's very stark, and of course, it's you know women of color are the ones who are suffering from the inequity. Right and I mean, look we we. We are single moms were taking care of family members we I mean there's a lot that we're doing was so little. And so it's time to to start paying attention to those under. Communities Absolutely. So immigrants to the pandemic we all know by now that women are going to get hit harder women of color are going to be hit harder. What is it in the native community native American community that is worsening the pandemic and the fallout from the pandemic especially for women? Well, I mean look wait what we saw as soon as a pandemic really started to take hold in our country is that it highlighted the disparities that that take place in communities of color. That's why we have the highest rates. In here in New Mexico native Americans make up to eleven percent of the population at one time where over fifty percent of the positive cases. So it's a combination of things. We don't have the infrastructure. We need those a lot of homes right now in Indian, country that don't have running water don't have electricity. There's a lot of homes I you know sixty five percent or something like that. It might even be more don't quote me on that but broadband Internet service that type of infrastructure is keeping our students from learning. It's keeping our elderly folks from accessing telehealth services. because. If they're in a rural community and live a really long way away from a hospital or clinic. I mean those are things that that those communities are unable to access. So so it's terrible and you know we're we suffer from a lot of pollution right UNRIG claimed mines in polluted water and in things. That have happened in the past that have never been remedied. So those are all things that we have to work on remedy. Is there anything in relation to greater exposure type of work that you do that they do in liquidities? Well, I mean we have frontline workers in every community right? There's. A main, there's grocery stores in the end of our. Indian communities there are of you know folks are are working in clinics and hospitals and things like that. So. Sure and then, and then there's people who have to go out of their native communities to work in the cities because those are the only jobs they have N I mean any number of frontline jobs that we've heard about right folks in public transportation people were saying grocery stores in healthcare facilities you know hospitals and clinics, and so forth dealing with this pandemic. So yes, I'm I mean we and then you take all that back to your community it's what is consistently happened since this pandemic took hold. In in all of those communities of color, that's another reason why the rates are so

Joe Biden Kobe Representative Holland President Trump Kamala Harris Liquidities New Mexico
Native people pay tribute to Supreme Court Justice

Native America Calling

03:57 min | 1 year ago

Native people pay tribute to Supreme Court Justice

"This is national. Native, News Antonio Gonzales Native People Are Among those remembering Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader GINSBURG. Who Died Friday representative deb Haaland paid respects to Ginsburg Sunday streaming live video outside the High Court where people are leaving messages and flowers are I felt it was important that I come down to the Supreme Court this evening when I got back to Washington DC. and. What a wonderful display of love and respect for Justice Ginsburg the notorious RPG, the smell of flowers is everywhere. It's just It's just beautiful he lo- River Indian community governor Steven Rayle Lewis in virtual. Get out the vote and Census Rally Saturday pay tribute to Ginsburg calling her a trailblazer. The Arizona tribal leader also expressed the importance of the Supreme Court on Indian country issues forty four days before the next election. The passing of Justice Ginsburg. Exemplifies just why this election is shaping up to be the election of a lifetime. The election of all of our lifetimes EV- action isn't taken prior to this Alexa. The next president will decide the next justice of the Supreme Court. For tribes for Indian country, the appointment of a judge or justice. Can Be the difference between decisions affirm. Trust and tree obligated. Like the recently decided mcgirt decision that upheld tribal jurisdiction over tribal homelands. Or decisions. That Roll Back hard-fought statutes that have been under a tough despite Ginsberg's mixed record on federal Indian Law Cases Tribal Leaders, native attorneys and others in Indian country. See Her as a champion and flooded social media with tributes. A tribal court has halted hemp cultivation on the Navajo nation the shiprock New Mexico District Court last week issued a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction to stop defendant denied Bonaly hemp production. Immediately, the rulings on behalf of the Navajo Nation Government and citizens. They alleged disharmony and the surrounding communities problems with worker camps and damage to the environment. The Navajo Nation Claims Bonaly farm is illegal without approval from the tribe or the federal government protests have been held in recent weeks with people raising safety concerns about hemp farming bonaly reportedly did not testify at the hearing last week the Navajo Times reports after the court hearing local radio stations discussed the hemp. And Bonaly, supporters came to his defense. Now Hope Police are clearing the farms telling workers to leave the area. Meanwhile. Dr Anthony Fauci US health praised the Navajo nation during a virtual town hall Monday for its declining positive cases of covid nineteen. Th Ouchi says the tribes are model for the rest of the United States reason you should be. Proud. Of what you've accomplished is then you have proven. That when you do these public health meshes. You can turn around. A series surge of infection. And I believe if the rest of the country. Looks at the model that the Navajo nation has shown that you can turn things around. By carefully and a city Asli. Adhering to the guidelines of avoiding infection. That we may see this happened throughout the country the tribe has been hit hard by Cova nineteen, but has seen a decrease in numbers after following months of strict emergency orders I Antonio's

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Bonaly Navajo Nation Government Navajo Times High Court Antonio Gonzales Indian Law Cases Tribal Leader New Mexico District Court Alexa Washington Ginsberg United States Steven Rayle Lewis Dr Anthony Fauci Representative Arizona Deb Haaland Lo- River Th Ouchi
Lower Brule schools to begin fall with distance learning

Native America Calling

03:55 min | 1 year ago

Lower Brule schools to begin fall with distance learning

"This is national native news Antonio Gonzales The bay. Mills. Indian community on. Wednesday was granted the right to intervene in an ongoing Michigan pipeline fight with tribes, environmental groups and community members. A judge's decision allows the tribe to take part in case, preceding, evaluating a permit application from the energy company and Bridge to the Michigan public. Service Commission according to a press release from justice, which is representing the tribe. This is the first time. A tribal nation has intervened in a preceding before the Michigan Public Service Commission, the Regulatory Agency as determining. If tunnel will be built under waterways for the relocation of a segment of the line. Five pipeline tribes are concerned about the environment water fisheries and religious and cultural sites in a statement bay. Mills Chairman Brian Newlyn said the pipeline puts treaty rights and way of life at risk line five is a six, hundred, forty, five mile pipeline which carries oil and natural gas traveling through. Michigan Wisconsin and Canada, the company maintains the pipeline is safe. The Michigan Public Service Commission. has scheduled a virtual public hearing together comments on August twenty fourth. Indian educators say they're in a tough bind in preparing for classes this fall many tribal communities continue to be under Copa Nineteen. Schools on the lower brule reservation in. South Dakota serve about three hundred K. through twelve students and are not taking any chances superintendent. Lance Witty says, distance learning has its own problems because of Internet access and many families live in crowded arrangements. Educators know the risk they face and fully reopening. Some health concerns here that are probably not as prevalent off the reservation. We'd. He says, they're starting the year with mostly distance learning, but students will be able to come in for evaluations with their teachers. In the meantime he says, they're focused on making sure students are prepared. She'll be the first time. Our students have had devices. For homes he says, they'll keep monitoring covid nineteen to help make decisions about how to. Classes. The Red Lake Tribal Council Minnesota recently established a cove in nineteen relief fund enrolled Red Lake citizens can apply for assistance chairman. Darrell CK explained the program in a video message program provides for payment in amount of one thousand dollars to each readily enrolled adult who was eighteen on or before July thirty first twenty twenty. because for the payment need to certify that they have suffered economic impacts through increased expenditures and or decreased income as a result couvert nineteen, the funds are intended to help people with rand food or other emergency cost due to the pandemic the tribe is continuing to operate under cove in nineteen emergency orders. This week, there were forty-three positive cases reported on the reservation. A second round of covid nineteen mass testing is underway. Thursday for tribal citizens, new? Mexico US senator, Tom Udall, and congresswoman deb Haaland. Or taking part in a native vote Pamela Thursday afternoon. The virtual panel discussion will focus on protecting voting rights and tribal communities. The lawmakers are expected to discuss the need to ensure native people have. To polls and address voting during covid nineteen other panelists include representatives from the native American Voters Alliance, Education Project, and let America vote. twenty-three federal tribal broadband grants have been awarded for twenty twenty. The national tribal broadband grants are intended to help communities, develop or expand high speed Internet. The funds range from forty to fifty thousand dollars for tribal communities across the country. The program is under the Interior Department's Office of Indian Energy and economic. Development I'm Antonio Gonzalez.

Lance Witty Michigan Public Service Commis Michigan Mills Red Lake Tribal Council Minnes Antonio Gonzales Chairman Twenty Twenty Antonio Gonzalez Michigan Wisconsin South Dakota Darrell Ck Interior Department Brian Newlyn Red Lake
"deb haaland" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

08:50 min | 2 years ago

"deb haaland" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"The methane cloud that you can see on satellite sitting over the four corners region congressman and how does new mexico going forward balance the economic necessity necessity or impact of oil and gas drilling with the need to transition to a more just economy climate-friendly economy. How'd did you see that happening over the next we're already. We're already transitioning just this past week. I climbed to the top of a winter buying over near encino new mexico go and it's pretty amazing right that you you climb to the top open up top and you can see forever the landscape there still herds of antelope running around. There's still people farmers still able to do what they do. It's such a non disruptive type of economic development in clean energy resource. I like i wouldn't mind ever if those were all over the place right. Those are those are revenue new makers and and for folks in those rural communities who might have a bad year farming they still get a check from that wind turbine every month or every year whatever the contract states right so we need to move on renewable energy. That's my answer to that. We don't need <hes> <hes> if we're going to transition the transition is happening. We can make it faster we can we can as members of congress. Yes we want to move forward. We wanna make sure that that folks who <hes> don't make <hes> you know aren't high on the income list can still afford it to have a put solar panels on their homes and and you know those those types of infrastructure needs so i just. I just think that you know saying we need gas and oil we need to do this. We need to fracture chocolate canyon because the state relies on it. I just think that is that's not telling pulling the whole truth of of how we move forward on energy resources in new mexico. I have solar panels on my house. The bill l. seven dollars a month. We charge an electric car on that resource. I don't i just i just feel like that. We can do this this but we we don't need to be sold ability goods every time we turn around saying that you know if we don't do this then our our whole you know state falls apart and look as we diversify new mexico's economy <hes> which is something. I'm proud to see happening where <hes> c._n._n. Explosion the film industry. We're seeing more tech. Startups call new mexico home whether it's tech transfer coming out of our national laboratories or even now oh companies <hes> all across california denver austin salt lake city that are looking for more affordable places to live with high quality of life no better place than you mexico. Oh so if you're out there come on over new mexico's open for business but with the oil and gas industry. Let's start with what is should be happening already in new mexico zico. Why is it that new mexico which is not the top producer of oil or gas in america is the worst when it comes to methane emissions since that problem should be solved can be solved in must be solved. I'm under the leadership of governor michelle luhan grisham with the support of the legislature. There's an effort effort underway to be able to cap all the leaks and stop <hes> prevent eliminate methane flaring inventing by the way it's theft of taxpayer dollars. There's not just for u._s. Tax payers but also here in new mexico <hes> supporting research at our national labs. The trump administration has diminished all of the research advancements advancements when it comes to solar <hes> deployment of the wind resources that congresswoman holland's describing or even the storage capacity upgrading our transmission corridors across america the amount of electrons that are lost with the movement of electricity something that we have to solve all of that can happen in new mexico were perfectly situated the amount of sunshine that we have the advancements at sandia national laboratory with storage and technology <hes> all the way to legislation that myself and u._s. Senator tina smith have laid out which is to get to net zero emissions with electricity generation in the case of our bill by two thousand fifty following the call to action by the panel on climate change jeff from the u._n. So there's things that we can do diversifying our economy taking action <hes> and not putting our head in the sand is going to be critically important decisions going forward. Climate has rightfully emerged as one of the top tier issues in the presidential race. I'd imagine that both of you are in a position to have the the era of a whole lot of this field. You mentioned getting to net zero. What else do both of you want to see this as presidential field prioritize in terms of whether you call it a green new deal or energy plans or just transition what what are the. What are your priorities that you want to see. This field talk about when they're campaigning. We'll definitely all of those things right. How how is our country going to move forward. How how are we going to make sure that you know look in our country. The income disparity has gotten worse and worse and worse. It's so terrible that so many people are living in poverty liberty right now across our country they couldn't afford to <hes> to buy into the renew and think about this those folks if they had solar panels on their homes and their electricity bill was seven dollars a month. That would be helpful to them right sure. I want to see how they're going to make sure that every every every level of income has a chance to essentially be a part of this new transition. I'd really like to see that and of course you know. There's something that's come up several times with me and that is you know native american sacred sites of at aren't within the boundaries of their lands. The standing rock folks people who who protested to protect their sacred lake that sacred lake isn't within the boundaries hundreds of their tribal lands. Just because it's not doesn't mean that it ceases to be a sacred site to them so i like to hear how or see that the field is really exploring that talking about how they work with <hes> tribal leaders and communities to address those types types of discrepancies in and how you know they're able to participate as well look we need a plan of action on how to respond respond to the climate crisis that we're facing around the world and across america the the difference between our candidates and the trump administration in my eyes is simple <hes> <hes> from the onset our candidates have and will continue to call for the united states to rejoin the paris climate accord's as opposed to the president walking away from our candidates will encourage the accelerated the research of <hes> deployment of renewables of solving the storage problem of finding new ways to generate power and getting us to net zero emissions but congresswomen sleman holland touched on something critically important that i've not heard yet and that's answering the call when it comes to health disparities import communities especially in communities of color color and a native american communities where you often see the generation that's in those communities the high rates of asthma <hes> cancers and other chronic diseases is the first time that we had the former e._p._a. Administrator the first ep administrate under donald trump come in and there were all these reports about first first class private chartered jets and chatting to resorts around the world to the mattresses and hand lotion and all the all the scott pruitt stuff when i asked e._p._a. Administrator scott pruitt <hes> how many poor communities he had been to with these travels. The answer was none. They didn't take any time to understand the health disparities that are being caused and chronic conditions that are being placed right at the footstep of families when we went out to those methane plumes and there were families and animals being raised right by who cares about them the e._p._a. The next administration has a responsibility as do all of us to make sure that we're talking about them and finding ways to keep them safe and that's something that i certainly hope that all here in the near future from one of our candidates as well.

mexico america scott pruitt new mexico congressman encino sacred lake donald trump Administrator congress fracture chocolate canyon michelle luhan grisham
"deb haaland" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

14:40 min | 2 years ago

"deb haaland" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"It's a package that is significant and look in the same way that we passed has to john dingell conservation act. I believe that there is room for the congress to get together democrats in charge of the house republicans in charge of the senate and get another public lick lands package ready to go <hes> even if we're not fortunate to pass it in this congress we should tee it up so that it's ready to pass when we are able to flip the senate have the majority there have the majority in the house and what i'll describe as a democratic and the white house without putting the cart too far behind before the horse. They're looking the twenty twenty one congresswoman with a bill like this when you look at the work that is being done. Louis <music> being led by tribal nations partnering with ranchers with farmers with sportsmen conservation advocates if that if those partnerships are working why then is additional legislation necessary on the federal level because because of the administration that we have right now right they something's not allow they're ripping up executive orders and you know making a policies that that they don't consult with anybody about so i think we need to write things in stone so that we can be assured that those things will be protected detected into the future of their law. It's harder to dismantle them right. I mean we've seen we've seen them. Dismantling like the affordable care i for example sample. They have to take it bit by bit by bit. I just think we need to make it as difficult as possible for people to come along folks folks who who don't care about our environment and about our animals make it very difficult for them to try to undo things that we actually do to protect our environment it and and if i could just add to that it does not replace the importance of working with communities you still to bring people together but it's another important tool to ensure ensure that we're able to protect these corridors as well in the same way that we've been able to protect our public lands and that's how this should be seen as should be embraced. It should be something that's encouraged orig- and that people should not <hes> a run away from as a matter of fact the more people we can get to this table the stronger the outcomes will be to protect access to these corridors and public lands for generations to come you mentioned the administration and how they will take every chance they can to chip away at yet at bedrock laws like the endangered species act chairwoman. You're in a position on the natural resources committee as someone who does at least based on occasion. Get the opportunity to question interior secretary david bernhardt correctly. What are your concerns about what he's doing and what. What are you going to be asking or looking for the next time he's sitting in a witness table in front of you so you know the last time he was czar. He came in to talk about the budget and the priorities of the department and one of the big things at that time. <hes> was the reorganization of the department apartment because they are. I mean they're they're a direct line of indian tribes across the country of a reorganized it folks at indian tribes worked with for decades or now gone there across the i mean it was just a it's just a big mess with no little or no tribal consultation at all and and <hes> so i mean of course i went to visit him in his office and he was just kind of like too bad. It's nothing you can do about it. I'm paraphrasing there but it's it's certainly is frustrating to us to have somebody that's in charge of in charge of our our public lands with that sort of you know attitude that it doesn't matter it's clear that he takes his orders from the president who who really has shown his true colors right he's i i don't know if he's ever had an opportunity ready to even sleep outside any day in his life. I mean i. I feel like you know those of us. Who have grown up to appreciate. She ate the environment those of us who have laced up our sneakers and walk through an icy cold river for miles and miles those of us who have hiked to the tops of the mesa's here you're in the southwest or you know ran up lawless trail on the sandy as we have a reverence for the outdoors and and and that's what i'm looking for in leaders and that's what i'm going to fight for twenty twenty election and so so all i can say is that we can just keep trying bernhardt could be in front of our committee every single day for the next year and a half and and it's not gonna do any good because he doesn't care so <hes> it's unfortunate i think we just need to fight for the things that that that we can right now and and then make sure that we do everything we can to make up for all of the destruction that has happened yes with the endangered species that yes with just with a pen chopping off big swath of our public lands. You know it's it's always a challenge alan jr but i'll just keep fighting. You mentioned national monuments. <hes> there was the entire trump administration monument hit list i early on in the end they only tried to chop off a parts of grand staircase gelanteh and most of bear's ears are are you both still concerned that rio grande del nort or any of the other <hes> new mexico monuments could still be targeted either through who executive action or through management plans absolutely <hes>. I think that <hes> what we saw happen. <hes> with the trump administration nation with the use of the executive order tools something that no other president has ever done which is turn back the tide with the use of the pen with the antiquities act and it shows that communities that have fought for generations to protect these public lands have to continue that fight the organizing <hes> lending their voices their advocacy and each and every way staying in close contact with their elected officials encouraging public comment with anything that this administration is is doing because the minute that they discourage us from participating and they get us to give up into give in they win and we will lose <hes> the fight when it comes to protecting these slant all i know is that the strength of the communities that advocated for the protection for example of the ronda del norte with examples that you used or for <hes> oregon mountain desert peaks they came together and their voices were heard and we were fortunate that we were not on that first chopping block but we still have a year and a half half left of this administration <hes> if i have something to to about it and we are going to have to stay diligent to make sure that we forever protect these public glance because we saw what this administration is willing to do during the markup for the chaka canyon bill. It was interesting interesting. They tried every argument of course there's more of us that we were able to pass the majority april. Pass the bill out of committee but what are the arguments. Was you know there's is this woman here. She's against it. You need to listen to her and i basically had to say well yes but the majority of new mexicans qin's want to protect chuckle canyon right all the majority that means the majority of us and when majority rules we're we're. We're protecting this site right so i just feel like we need to. We need to really always we're fortunate to be the the majority in the house right now. Because yes we can put bills through that will protect our public lands and they'll pass out of committee onto the ill even pass the the house floor so i just i just want to <hes> you know in a way whoever's listening speak out wrote in defense of your public land speak out in defense of our animals because your voice is so important right now in this era where we have an administration station who is doing everything they can to wreck our environment truly you know from <hes> from automobile emissions <hes> down to you know defunding or or not funding of land and water conservation fund. Let me dive in there a little bit because we've talked a lot on this podcast cast about the numerous ways the trump administration is ignoring public input ignoring local elected officials ignoring tens of thousands hundreds of thousands of public comments when you have an administration that is acting in that way with such disregard for the public. Why then is it important for those voices to still be. I heard what what difference does it make for the folks who are listening to this podcast right now two still speak they matter to me. They mattered to ben ray. They matter to our governor they matter to our land commissioner here new mexico they matter to us and we're the ones out there fighting on the front lines you like to hear it yeah and i would go on to say that it matters when then we have to challenge this administration court and to be able to stand up against executive actions they're taking that are punitive and harmful to our public lands when you build that record word even though the administration chooses to ignore the public comment coming from the vast majority of the american people it's part of that case and we can use that as a tool continue to defender public land's even when this president uses their executive powers some that i would argue are are are not authorized which is why we've been victorious in port on so many occasions why their voices matters. Let's move onto the land and water conservation fund you mentioned that in the program was permanently authorized earlier this year <hes> with that major public land's package but that legislation and did not include a funding guarantee that still now as it stands today is left up to congress year to year. There's a push underway to also guarantee that funding link between the revenue that comes in from offshore oil and gas and the actual spending on the program l. w. c._f. has been used among many other ways in new mexico to preserve parts of vice caldera. It has made national parks across the west a hole in a way that only elderly c._f. Can do what are the barriers right now to getting that full funding and is this something that you think on the senate side has a chance of of making it through because there is is there enough bipartisan. Support is my question. Look the authorization component of here. <hes> should not be understated. It was absolutely significant to get a permanent authorization and water conservation fund so that congress is not a fight every two five years to say oh well. We want to fund it but it's going to expire now. That argument has been settled as the authorisation process moves forward then you have the appropriations uh-huh process so you authorize these programs and then you work with the appropriators where the funding investments are made to make sure that you're able to fund programs that are authorized arised as well and i'm confident that coming out of the house you will see investments made with the land water conservation fund the concern that i have though is that in the congress that we are in a while the u._s. House under the leadership of speaker pelosi has moved <hes> all but one of our appropriation bills <hes> leader mitch mcconnell who has dubbed himself the grim reaper of all house legislation his words not mine has not given the appropriators in the the u._s. Senate the amounts the caps as they say to work from they're not doing anything right now which is taking us either to a continuing resolution to another government shutdown and we're just entering the month of september. We have a month left to get this done and so i'm concerned with what the lack of action i see coming out of the senate the irresponsible nature and the lack of consideration to their governing responsibility from leader mitch mcconnell <hes> but it shows how we're have to work together gather one if it comes out to continue resolution to see how we can plus up but not give up on this appropriation fight. Do you think is there a possibility. The government shutdown here in september. If mcconnell can't get republicans in the senate on <hes> in line president trump <hes> in two thousand seventeen <hes> on national television with the cameras in the room said that he owned the government shutdown that he thought that a government shutdowns where good we went into what was one the longest government shutdown to this country's ever experienced the first time that a congress has ever been organized while the government was shut down so i don't put anything past this president or mitch mcconnell connel. It's why though the democratic leadership why congresswoman holland myself and all of our democratic colleagues moved to pass the appropriation packages is the funding bills to prevent another government shutdown. There's no excuse that mitch mcconnell has in not doing the right thing and moving these appropriation packages to prevent this even the uncertainty causes problems and waste money and resources down the road so i'm hopeful that leader mitch mcconnell will come back. He has a few weeks in september over do the right thing. Let's get this done before october. One i just saw new mexico's state land commissioner stephanie garcia richard outside. Here's we're going into tape he or she was a guest on the podcast a couple of weeks ago talking about how to balance the economic impact and the environmental impact of the oil and gas boom in the permian basin a whole lot of new mexico's economy right now is based around oil and gas particularly in in the permian southern southern part of the state but also as you mentioned up here in the northern part of the state and the the.

senate mitch mcconnell president congress executive mexico david bernhardt john dingell government commissioner Louis holland rio grande del nort secretary chuckle canyon alan jr permian basin
"deb haaland" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

14:48 min | 2 years ago

"deb haaland" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"Hey we love being in the land of enchantment so much a couple weeks ago that we came back to another episode this time sitting down with two members of congress in house a wildlife corridors summit it is a fabulous abuse conversation with assistant speaker of the house ben ray luhan and first term congresswoman deb haaland earlier this year. She became the first native american woman to preside over the house of representatives. We talked about wildlife tribal issues national monuments and a whole lot more. I'm very excited about this. Episode also also very excited that later this week we are going to be live in tucson arizona coming up this thursday august twenty ninth. We will be talking the congressman role gonzalvo the chairman of the house natural resources committee. We've got len ness a for the head of natives outdoors and stephanie sklar the executive director of the sonoran institute. If you are in town please come take a listen. We're going to be at american eat company on south fourth avenue. That's an all local food hall all in market. We're going to be taking over the north room starting at three thirty on thursday the twenty ninth. We'll start recording the podcast around four. Please stick around afterwards words to chat with us. Maybe have a beer again this coming thursday. The twenty ninth american eat company in tucson. The podcast starts at four in the afternoon soon. We will see they're all right. Let's do the news starting with some discouraging signs for the sage grouse. That's the bird whose habitat is being threatened and by oil and gas development across the west in idaho. The grouses population has dropped by fifty two percent since two thousand sixteen. That's a trend that biologists allergists have seen in neighboring states as well in wyoming thirty three oil and gas wells have been drilled in core sage grouse habitat under the trump administration compare that to just eight wells at the end of the obama years a report that came out last month from the national wildlife federation the audubon society and the wilderness society the found at the rate of oil and gas leasing in sage grouse habitat is nearly three times higher on the trump administration than it was after the obama administration ministration cut a deal that attempted to stave off a listing under the endangered species act and in a related story. The interior department has launched an all all out assault on the endangered species act announcing three new rules that weaken enforcement of wildlife protections first interior will weaken protections for species species that are listed as threatened but not yet endangered the obvious result the areas that more species will then continue to decline and end up being endangered secondly the rules change the definition of critical habitat they now lit interior leave out places that are suitable for an endangered species but are no longer her current habitat again. It's not rocket science to realize that if you protect less land you are reducing the chances that species could recover in the future and finally interior can now choose to ignore the impacts of climate change on endangered species. The obvious example here is the polar bear their their habitat is literally melting away so they are going to have to move in order to survive but under these new rules interior wouldn't have to protect areas the the polar bears will inevitably have to move to so all of these changes as a whole make it clear the intent here is to give interior secretary david bernhardt all the leeway he needs to pick and choose which species to save and which to let go extinct if that's more convenient his former clients alliance and of course changes like this will not go unchallenged expect to see lots of lawsuits from state attorneys general and conservation groups we are honored to be joined today by two new mexico congressional representatives assistant speaker of the house ben ray luhan and representative deborah holland. Thanks to both of you for being here on the podcast. Today this is all right. Thanks for coming out to towns new mexico and you're always welcome make sure you get a chance to <hes> get outdoors here and enjoy some of the splendors of the cuisine and once you get hooked on chill. You're not gonna turn back. I never turn down a chance against and yes thank you congress. Thank you assistant speaker for having me in your district. We'll chairwoman holidays. It's it's always use. Well is one of my favorite places in the entire world and not just being here and test drive up here is beautiful and amazing. One one of the most spectacular drives yeah so we're recording this right now. From the sagebrush in there is a wildlife summit going on right now to discuss conserving wildlife migration corridors put on by the national wildlife federation and a host of other land wildlife advocates and we'll. We'll talk more about that in in a minute but i want to start by acknowledging that this is a very special part of the south west here in northern new mexico. You can't help but be aware of the strong connections between the people and the land and water and wildlife here. It is obviously a spiritual connection. That's a part of the the core identity of the tribal cultures and the hispanic cultures that have been here for thousands and hundreds of years respectively actively. I wonder if i wanna start with both of you to talk about how the trump administration's policies as they affect new mexico's land and walter and wildlife do they feel personal to you because of that connection absolutely they absolutely feel personal to me and i take that personal personal emotion to congress with me when i am defending our mine and ben raise bill to protect chaka canyon for example right <hes> against gas and oil drilling for a ten mile radius so that area needs permanent protections my <hes> the my ancestoral homeland part of my argument in committee when we were passing the bill through markup was my ancestors are buried there thinking thinking that that might help people to understand the significance of it <hes> we didn't get one republican to vote that bill through committee so so yes yes it is personal to me when i think about the <hes> gosh the centuries of drought and famine that my ancestors persevered through because they had the idea that they needed to sustain themselves so that generations down the line would move into the future and and be their legacy congressman look the significance of the summit <hes> that has come together here highlighting how we have to be working together not just to protect these wildlife corridors but protecting our public lands and access. I'm here in the community where we are today the the significance associated with the pueblo leaders with house pueblo. If you've hadn't if you had a chance to go visit taus pablo really to pay your respects there. There's there's something spiritual usual magical serene about just taking a few footsteps and stopping and just taking it in the magic of the return of blue lake another important protected areas sacred site and as congressman holland pointed out the significance of legislation solution to protect chuckle canyon in the greater area surrounding it <hes> as deb said her ancestors go back thirty four thirty five generations nations time immemorial <hes> active in eight hundred a._d. Think about the significance of that but growing up and and being able to get into the outdoors whether it was camping or fishing or hiking <hes> getting on my bike <hes> exploring new things learning what to eat and what not to eat <hes> careful when you're out there <hes> but it's about that education and what i appreciate from <hes> the pueblo leaders in friends that i've <hes> <hes> called friends of mine entire life they help me understand the magic of that medicine chest and so while many of us may go into the bathroom war in two of a utility room and open up a door and there's all your medicine and cabinet think about that medicine chest is with the gathering of herbs of healing of the spiritual place that can't even describe the magic of spirituality <hes> the special place that we call home in new mexico but especially here in towse and all of our public lands that were so honored to work together to protect you are both in an unique positions to lead on wildlife and environmental issues as an assistant speaker as a subcommittee chair on <music> on natural resources share real quickly your priorities on the legislative level for new mexico's land and water. Are you mentioned chaco canyon. What else is on on your shortlist right. Well making it impossible for any president to take a pen and chop off a big swath of our public lands another thing right. We want those public lands intact for every single person to enjoy. I like to see a fully fund full funding of the land and water conservation fund <hes> <hes> and you know i have been very very outspoken about no border wall because the border wall in and of itself alf is it hampers the ability for wildlife to sustain itself as well so all of those you know look there's is no one to speak up for the animals and the fish and the plants in the forest we have to do that and and it's pretty obvious to me that we're here because because of our environment right we destroy it that means the destruction of future generations so so those are some of my priorities and and proud and happy to stand up for them. Well i want to thank god chairwoman holland for the work and the advocacy that she brings everyday <hes> she is one of the newly elected chairs of a subcommittee as a new member of the house of representatives. <hes> that's an incredible feat and responsibility <hes> in previous congresses you we don't see new members have that leadership role as one of the leaders <hes> congresswoman holland <hes> brought <hes> several other leaders to new mexico because the honor of hosting german greenhow. Oh who's the chair of the full committee on natural resources alan lowenthal also subcommittee chair <hes> and congresswoman holland chair holland and i did a site visit out to choco where we didn't just take in the history to sacred secred nature of that important place but we also went out to where there was some methane plumes now you can smell it when you're out there but the groups that came together with us actually shared with some cameras that allowed us to see it while we smelled it we had field hearings in new mexico co that chairwoman holland helped lead. We took that back. She led the effort in the house of representatives with the hearing on the protection of chaco canyon <hes> as the assistant speaker. I make sure that i raise my voice when we're in those meetings where encouraging the chairs of the committees to prioritize these important public land <hes> legislation <hes> packages well <hes> we worked together <hes> earlier this year when we pass to john dingell lands package act which personally family authorized land water conservation fund protected over a million acres including right here in new mexico right here in the house <hes> areas right in the real grounded on nor to down with a desert peaks in the oregon mountains and so that's how we can work together you raise your voice. You lend your advocacy you collaborate your partner and you make sure that you build to that table as large as you can until you're able to get these packages across the finish line. We're going to get back to l. w. c._f. Because as as we all know were we're halfway there in terms of authorising but not guaranteeing funding but i want to start with wildlife corridors because we are here at a wildlife migration summit. There is a bill pending wildlife corridors conservation act <hes> first of all either of you just walk us through briefly what that bill does does and then more importantly. What do you think the chances are of getting some major wildlife bill through in this congressional session so the the critical nature of this package. Is it protects the it does what it says. It's a wildlife poor door conservation act so think of the movement went heard or species as they're going from one area to another <hes> as we continue to see build out an encroachment challenges with a climate change changing terrains raines ecosystems in drought those wildlife corridors are quickly disappearing <hes> they're they're being infringed upon if you will <hes> and as deb said there's no one out there <hes> if you will at least we've figured it out yet <hes> to understand the spoken word from the creatures <hes> that we the <hes> call our friends and that we're not <hes> to to protect <hes> many friends and family as well that <hes> extend that a branch out to even been call family as well with our four legged friends or those that flyer those swim <hes> and so that's what this package will do it ensures that we're gonna protect corridors we identify identify these corridors that we also work with tribal leaders with pueblo leaders and we work to maintain that wildlife corridor for the movement of those animals across these protected lands public public areas tribal land pueblo lands as well. It's an important package..

mexico congressman holland new mexico national wildlife federation deb haaland tucson sage grouse ben ray luhan congress congressman chaco canyon arizona len ness idaho
"deb haaland" Discussed on The Children's Hour

The Children's Hour

03:02 min | 3 years ago

"deb haaland" Discussed on The Children's Hour

"Food then why do they do been building do they do they do i mean what do they do they do they don't change and they and then i go they do the needles in the in the day day and then and then and then i go do they do they do they do they do they do they do i go in do do do do do do do do do do do and then the.

"deb haaland" Discussed on The Children's Hour

The Children's Hour

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"deb haaland" Discussed on The Children's Hour

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<Speech_Music_Female> playing in <Speech_Female> the background from <Speech_Female> gallup new mexico <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> andy <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> pretty great <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> you've been listening <Speech_Female> to the children's our <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> an <Speech_Female> loving what i'm hearing <Speech_Female> from the silliest you wanna <Speech_Female> take it away and see what's <Speech_Music_Female> on <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> the <Speech_Music_Female> silly at <Speech_Female> from gallup new <Speech_Female> mexico <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> the

"deb haaland" Discussed on The Children's Hour

The Children's Hour

14:46 min | 3 years ago

"deb haaland" Discussed on The Children's Hour

"Kids and parents a to be able to afford childcare so that they can go to school or get the job they want or or you know just do other things because in part of that child care bill it has an educational component so that it's early childhood education also works with local a childcare entities but but i think that would change that would change people's lived in it for the better and so that's one big thing that i'm working on that i'll be getting a lot of support for childcare that is so important other countries offered that her kids infor working parents and so it's really time the united states caught up thank you for doing that eat there of course were working to make sure that people can have everybody kind of healthcare to and that's really important to kids it is 'em yeah go ahead imaging hardest part of your job besides walking seven miles is yes i just showed her my shoes they're worn out from from all the walking i do their 'em the hardest part of my job is well you know sometimes it's a little frustrating right like like you really really like i'll tell you we passed the house passed a bunch of bills like good bills bipartisan bills that would help a lot of people people and they're kind of just sitting over in the senate and not doing anything so we would really like those bills to get on the senate floor so that they can pass the senate also a because sometimes it's a it's a little frustrating to work really hard and then and then you're moving forward forward forward in that all of a sudden everything stops so we'd like it to keep going we might things to keep going and i think that would be really good for all you guys other other parts you're job that feel like you have such great ideas and so many good things you could be doing they get stuck by something else that has nothing to do with congress and i guess i'm we are here in new mexico where a border state and i cannot help but think about the border what's happening down there and it almost seems like congress isn't doing much about that and i know you're trying but what are you doing yes well 'em yes eight we did that there was a bill that was passed 'em humanitarian tarian aid package for the kids on the southern border an so 'em i hope that they do what needs to be done for those children because i feel really sad about all of that yeah we do to we do too but in other news you are working on pretty amazing initiatives native american country since you've been in office he talked a little bit about that so one of them is a native american can business incubator bill that will help native businesses to get started an end 'em i just feel really strongly that here in new mexico and here in albuquerque a small businesses are the backbone of our community here and if people sometimes people don't need don't need a whole bunch of money to get started they need a little bit of money and they need a place to get started perhaps an and so so we thought that would be helpful to folks anand 'em in of course i am there's really a others sad 'em situation here in our country and they call it the crisis and missing and murdered indigenous women so were working hard on that too so that every family in our country can feel safe we love those ideas were speaking with congresswoman deb holland she's one of the first to ever elected to congress native american women in our country and i think the kids have exhausted all other questions any more questions i know one of the questions at one of the kids who's not here asked me to ask you which i'm gonna get on the table congresswoman how do you lives both in new mexico end in washington an if you have pets how do you handle them so i have i have four dogs you can't believe that i have for shelter dogs and one reds dog if anyone knows where they know what a resident the silly as snow arrives dog is 'cause they living gallup 'em i have four sheltered i'm sorry three shelter dogs and one reds dog an i'm very very lucky that my significant other takes care of all for dog so you take some four walks every single day a which i can't do when i'm in washington dc so let's give him a hand real quick you rent an apartment renting an apartment it's very expensive just just throwing that out there washington dc expensive city the living but i'll tell you what i did not take my car to washington dc i walk every day in my office which saves carbon from going into the atmosphere at i take the metro whenever i have to go somewhere else besides a that's not close to capitol hill so it's about a half a mile from my apartment to my office so i walk there every day and then and then i'm just gonna put a plug in for water bottles because i'm trying to zero waste on my cup so i take my water bottle every day all my committee hearings and everything like that in an my colleagues or you know they're starting to take there's two i love it i love it at one last question from then let's hear it so being a congresswoman has that affected how people treat you and give you a well i don't think so when i see people in the grocery store they you know they recognize me now so it takes and what it used to take fifteen minutes now it takes forty five minutes but a cause i have to say hi to everybody but but you know it's like i'm a new can andy where all new mexicans and we all care about are state inner city and we all like one big family so a so i think they pretty much treat me the same as they always did congresswoman deb holland represents new mexico's because congressional district number one encompassing most of albuquerque an i think all of albuquerque and a little bit of the surrounding area thank you so much for being with us on the children now riser all you're not too much oh you didn't a.

forty five minutes fifteen minutes
"deb haaland" Discussed on The Children's Hour

The Children's Hour

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"deb haaland" Discussed on The Children's Hour

"Are at thee <Speech_Female> central <Speech_Female> in unser library right <Speech_Female> here in <Speech_Female> albuquerque on the <Speech_Female> west side we've got <Speech_Female> a great audience hello <Speech_Female> everybody <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and we also have <Speech_Female> congresswoman deb <Speech_Female> holland who has <Speech_Female> taken so graciously <Speech_Female> the time come on the <Speech_Female> children's our if <Speech_Female> you thank you <Speech_Female> thanks for letting us just <Speech_Female> ask you a bit jillian <Speech_Female> questions in the <Speech_Female> gene you're burning with a question <Speech_Female> go for it i <Speech_Female> have <SpeakerChange> two things <Speech_Female> one so <Speech_Female> my sister <Speech_Female> she <Speech_Female> is in a group <Speech_Female> called <Advertisement> garden <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and she <Speech_Female> helps they <Advertisement> see <Speech_Female> that <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> going on <Advertisement> currently <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> in <SpeakerChange> congress <Speech_Male> with respect <Speech_Female> to like <Speech_Female> climate change <Speech_Male> and the environment and things <Speech_Male> like that <Speech_Female> so one <Speech_Female> thing is that <Speech_Female> myself <Speech_Female> and congressman <Speech_Female> ben ray <Speech_Female> luhan hunting congresswoman <Speech_Male> so chill <Speech_Male> tourist small we all <Speech_Male> co sponsored a bill <Speech_Male> to protect chaco <Speech_Male> kenyan from <Speech_Male> drilling <SpeakerChange> wow <Speech_Female> so for those <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> people <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> around the country who have <Speech_Female> no idea idea which <Speech_Female> are talking <SpeakerChange> canyon <Speech_Female> is a national historic <Speech_Female> park <Speech_Female> i believe <Speech_Female> the designation <Speech_Male> is an <Speech_Male> it's in north <Speech_Male> western <Speech_Male> new mexico <Speech_Female> in its <Speech_Female> z it's my <Speech_Female> ancestral homeland <Speech_Female> the pueblo indians <Speech_Male> lives there <Speech_Male> centuries centuries <Speech_Male> and centuries <Speech_Male> ago <Speech_Male> as they <Speech_Male> built these beautiful <Speech_Male> big beautiful structures <Speech_Female> end <Speech_Female> now anybody <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> any of you can <Speech_Male> go see it <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> just think about <Speech_Female> what it was like <Speech_Female> for for <Speech_Female> native <Speech_Female> americans <Speech_Male> from centuries and centuries <Speech_Male> ago to living <Speech_Male> and working <Speech_Female> in play <Speech_Female> there <Silence> an so we <Speech_Female> wanna make sure <Speech_Female> they were protecting it <Speech_Female> for all you guys <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> an end <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> kids <Speech_Female> who who aren't <Speech_Male> actually born yet <Speech_Male> we we don't <Speech_Male> watch fracking <Speech_Female> and drilling in that <Speech_Female> area we wanna keep <Speech_Female> it very <Speech_Male> nice and i'll <Speech_Female> tell you <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> it's my ancestral <Speech_Male> homeland i care <Speech_Male> deeply about it <Speech_Female> but it belongs <Speech_Female> to all new mexicans <Speech_Male> and so that's <Speech_Male> why we wanna protect <Speech_Male> it <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> yeah thank <Speech_Female> you for doing that <Speech_Female> we needed that <Speech_Female> it is <Speech_Female> a world heritage site <Speech_Female> to james <Speech_Female> bond with just <Speech_Female> created his world <Speech_Female> heritage site so it is really <Speech_Female> a treasure for everyone <Speech_Female> in the planet <Speech_Female> choco canyon in <Speech_Female> an er <Speech_Female> room i recommend <Speech_Female> enough going hiking <Speech_Female> chaco <SpeakerChange> kenya with <Speech_Female> kids because it is a <Speech_Female> lot of fun the <Speech_Female> doorways <Speech_Male> in the little <Speech_Female> rooms are <SpeakerChange> like <Speech_Female> kids size so <Speech_Female> it's kind of fun yes <Speech_Female> yes yes <Speech_Female> really okay <Speech_Female> go ahead <Silence> what other <Speech_Male> really important things <Speech_Male> where you working on <Speech_Male> a very <Speech_Male> cover congress <Speech_Female> well <SpeakerChange> i'd like to <Speech_Female> think that every <Speech_Female> single thing i work <Speech_Female> on

unser library albuquerque congressman ben ray
"deb haaland" Discussed on The Children's Hour

The Children's Hour

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"deb haaland" Discussed on The Children's Hour

"Then then do do do do do do do do do do do and then do the things they do and they need they need to don things the things i think they do they do they do they do but i definitely i i certainly do that do do do do do do do do do do don news ninety but they do things those this thing's been eyeing a one news team in do do it will all be have guy do either either these ideas i play man clicking away do your own thing in turn they did they won't do that do one do do do do do do they.

"deb haaland" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"deb haaland" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Government help has crippled native Americans on reservations, and maybe congresswoman Deb Haaland should be focused on that alcoholism, drug abuse incarceration rates single parent households. The, you know, the real things abortion that rid the real crises. I instead of Saka Joe. References keeping alive. Great native Americans that did contribute. Unlike FOCA Hannah's over here lion Saka. Julia. I got spun up today because that luck NBC for a couple of minutes. What are you hear the audio? We have from there on flippant, believable, these people they should be Cam. But instead they get first amendment words. They get lucite blocks. They have black tie dinners for them because I don't let the gurgles award. There's only one Chris Plante. The Chris Plante show Washington's mall, W M, A L. Washington comes to talk. Accident affects the Dulles bowl road. Westbound WMA all traffic. I'm Lisa Vaden. Eighteen Wheeler turnover on your way to both from the beltway on the westbound route one did the left get by. And yes, everyone's thinking what you're thinking. I'll take Lee's per instead east on the toll road. It's good Maryland near spent a collision on I ninety seven northbound at exit number fourteen route on state.

Chris Plante Saka Joe Deb Haaland Lisa Vaden NBC Maryland Washington Julia Lee L. Washington
"deb haaland" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"deb haaland" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"I think a lot of don't realize like even for me to be there. I was watching Deb Holland for New Mexico in front of me getting sworn in. I could see from afar Lucy MacBeth getting sworn in. And all these incredible women, you know, many of us didn't run because of our diverse backgrounds. We really ran because we want to help our neighbors are people across the country. You know, when I think about this moment in this. Kind of historic class. I know that I have this tremendous amount of hope and inspiration. That this disconnect that we all feel with our members of congress right now with just congress in general that it's getting it's that connection is starting to disappear a little bit more. Because now we're starting to look talk and feel like the rest of the country. And so I know when I hear Lucy MacBeth talk about her son that she lost to gun violence. Jordan, I emotional and I get focused again. And that is what inspires me is. When seeing Lucy MacBeth fight for her child seem this incredible woman. Strong woman. Deb Haaland fight for our native Americans across the country that have been denied access tonight seat at the table every single moment in our history in our country. All of that to me gives me so much hope and inspiration that we're going to do. Better. And we're going to be able to really truly change this country for the best. We wanna thank you so much for being with us Rashid it to leave Democratic Congress member for Michigan's thirteenth congressional district along with on Omar the first Muslim woman elected to congress, this is democracy. Now when we come back film crime and punishment on quotas on the part of police officers in New York who gets arrested who doesn't who get summonses who doesn't stay with us. Mock pass three new. Jin trees never came through. You tell me. What?.

Lucy MacBeth congress Deb Holland Jordan Deb Haaland New Mexico Jin New York Rashid Omar Michigan