6 Burst results for "Dean Budnick"

"dean budnick" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"dean budnick" Discussed on KQED Radio

"FM eighty nine point three north highland Sacramento it's five twenty one from NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Mary Louise Kelly the numbers are frankly overwhelming every day the coronavirus death count rises at first based on early numbers in late February epidemiologists and experts estimated about one percent of infected people would die from covert nineteen but it turns out it is hard to come up with one number that accurately captures how deadly this virus is it is killing people in different states and different countries have different rates according to Johns Hopkins the mortality rate here in the U. S. is five point seven percent five point seven in Italy it's over thirteen percent in China it's five and a half percent which made us wonder why is the true death rate so all over the place and so hard to pin down well Natalie dean assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida is here to help us try to answer that question Natalie dean welcome thanks for having me so how do you calculate how do you define what what the true death rate looks like with regards to the corners so the numbers that you just reported we call those the observed or crude case fatality rates and those are calculated as the number of deaths divided by the number of cases that have actually been confirmed that's very important because there are a lot of cases that are not confirmed people who have mild illness might be turned away or not be able to access testing we also know that there are a lot of people who are infected but don't develop symptoms so that means that there's actually a much bigger denominator than what is reflected in this observe to case fatality rate so you're saying testing plays a crucial role in understanding how many people have been sickened and and have are now infected with over nineteen and without knowing those numbers it's really hard to to get what but the death rate is right we know that testing tends to focus on people who are most severely ill and so is missing a lot of those mild cases and it's definitely missing anyone who doesn't have symptoms so we know that those numbers are over estimates and they also vary a lot by country because there will be different availability of testing in different countries where is the death rate highest words of lowest so far so looking at the statistics from Johns Hopkins University can see Belgium right now seems to be reporting the highest crude case fatality rate at a little over fifteen percent similarly high in France United Kingdom and Italy and we know that it's quite low in some Asian countries like Singapore and South Korea and certainly it's a reflecting who's being tested but then it also reflects things like quality of care in those countries you've done research on Ebola on ZK it has how does the challenge of identifying the true death rate for the corona virus compared to with with others so the corona virus is definitely different from Ebola Zika Ebola is a very severe disease and so we have pretty few of these a Santa Monica mild infections that makes it easier to detect people who are sick and then track them to see who dies because the other end of the spectrum where most infections are pretty mild or asymptomatic so then it becomes really hard to establish severity corona viruses somewhere in the middle somewhere likely below one percent of people who are infected at di but we're trying to nail down exactly where that number lives and why is this number important why do scientists need to devote resources to figuring it out the number impacts how we determine our response strategies we're very interested understanding risk factors for severe illness so whether that differs by fax or on the presence of others eases race ethnicity and then that will allow us to identify groups that we want to pay close attention to Natalie dean she's assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida thank you very much thanks I really appreciate it the corona virus pandemic has completely shut down concerts and other live events some people like Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti are even predicting that live events won't resume until twenty twenty one so ticket holders are looking for refunds spite as NPR's Andrew Limbong reports the process has not been that easy show Cronin is a mental health therapist in Vancouver Washington she bought tickets for six events through Ticketmaster reality I have to get to run all the hello may get your that's the one with Green Day Weezer fall out boy journey with the pretenders and you get the point Clinton says she can't get refunds because new rules Ticketmaster announced last week stipulate that a show has to be either officially canceled or have new dates announced in order for the purchaser to be eligible for refunds and since neither has happened in Cronin's case and she bought pairs of tickets she's out nearly a thousand dollars she's thankful she still employed even imagine what somebody would be going to right now if they had a thousand dollars in tickets just sitting there that they know they're not gonna be able to use and they're stressing about if they're gonna be able to pay their rent or buy their kids food or you know anything like that the lines into Connie is a complicated one and it's been a struggle for ticket buyers to get their money back because they aren't Ticketmaster's primary concerns is dean Budnick he is the co author of the book ticket masters the rise of the concert industry and how the public got scalped master we're really ultimately is responsible to its venue clients and those are the individuals that it wants to protect in other words its primary business relationships are with concert promoter stadiums and arenas before last week's Ticketmaster's website seem to back off of refunds for postponed events entirely the ensuing media coverage caught the attention of two members of Congress democratic representatives Katie Porter from California and bill Pascrell from New Jersey who wrote a scathing letter encouraging that ticket seller to reconsider in a statement Ticketmaster said it's made four hundred million dollars worth of refunds so far and its parent company live nation along with rival E. G. announced new refund policies last week which still require a concert to be cancelled or officially rescheduled with new dates to trigger a refund those policies don't go into effect until may first dean Budnick says live nation and AEG simply don't have the money to give back because contractually they were least that money to the concert promoters to the event producers who put on those events but excess with smaller club level shows these funds are usually held in escrow so they're easier to access but for big shows that stadium's ticket purchasers money is already in the hands of venues and artists now you may say well Gee that is Ticketmaster's fall because that's their contract they entered into but Nick says over the past few decades artists have gone a larger share of ticket sales to make up for declining records the that's led to higher ticket prices and more service fees to be shared among the venues and promoters keep juggling is a consulting director for media research a media analysis firm he says that any post corona virus world the deals between all parties in the ecosystem are likely to change and everybody on that value chain will be expected to take a hit on the including artists but right now it's Adam Burke stage hands food vendor security guards and ticket holders who are feeling the pain Krista Riley is a teacher from Michigan she bought red wings hockey tickets as a gift for her dad the game was set to take place last month and she still can't get a refund I'm not working right now I will work until September so having that extra two hundred and thirty Bucks would be really off some customers like Riley and cash Cronin from earlier who's out of thousand Bucks are part of a group exploring a class action suit one such complaint is going through the courts now others have reached out to the credit card companies to try to get the money back but either way they'll be waiting for a while.

Sacramento Elsa Chang NPR Mary Louise Kelly
"dean budnick" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:56 min | 1 year ago

"dean budnick" Discussed on KCRW

"From all of us here at KCRW a big thank you coming up on All Things Considered a conversation with an assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida I don't know didn't know there was a such a thing or job it does that kind of makes sense right we'll have more about the real fatality rates of covert nineteen and why estimates do very checking roads now let's see in south LA one ten north out of west sentry bowl of are going to crash that's a backing up traffic to the one oh five over in and see you know on the one one south bound this one Haskell Avenue crash blocking the left lane traffic go slow from white oak Avenue five twenty here at KCRW from NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Mary Louise Kelly the numbers are frankly overwhelming every day the corona virus death count rises at first based on early numbers in late February epidemiologists and experts estimated about one percent of infected people would die from covert nineteen but it turns out it is hard to come up with one number that accurately captures how deadly this virus is it is killing people in different states and different countries and different rates according to Johns Hopkins the mortality rate here in the U. S. is five point seven percent five point seven in Italy it's over thirteen percent in China it's five and a half percent which made us wonder why is the true death rate so all over the place and so hard to pin down well Natalie dean assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida is here to help us try to answer that question Natalie dean welcome thanks for having me so how do you calculate how do you define what what a true death rate looks like with regards to the corners so the numbers that you just reported we call those the observed or crude case fatality rates and those are calculated as the number of deaths divided by the number of cases that have actually been confirmed that's very important because there are a lot of cases that are not confirmed people who have mild illness might be turned away or not be able to access testing we also know that there are a lot of people who are infected but don't develop symptoms so that means that there's actually a much bigger denominator than what is reflected in this observed case fatality rate so you're saying testing plays a crucial role in understanding how many people have been sickened and and have are now infected with code nineteen and without knowing those numbers it's really hard to to get what but the death rate is right we know that testing tends to focus on people who are most severely ill and so is missing a lot of those mild cases and is definitely missing anyone who doesn't have symptoms so we know that those numbers are over estimates and they also vary a lot by country because there will be different availability of testing in different countries where is the death rate highest words of lowest so far so looking at the statistics from Johns Hopkins University can see Belgium right now seems to be reporting the highest crude case fatality rate at a little over fifteen percent similarly high in France the United Kingdom and Italy and we know that it's quite low in some Asian countries like Singapore and South Korea and certainly it's reflecting who's being tested but then it also reflects things like quality of care in those countries you've done research on Ebola on Zeke it has how does the challenge of identifying the true death rate for the corona virus compared to with with others so the corona virus is definitely different from Ebola Zika Ebola is a very severe disease and so we have pretty few of these asymptomatic or mild infections that makes it easier to detect people who are sick and then track them to see who dies the guys the other end of the spectrum where most infections are pretty mild or asymptomatic so then it becomes really hard to establish severity coronavirus is somewhere in the middle somewhere likely below one percent of people who are infected at di but we're trying to nail down exactly where that number lives and why is this number important why do scientists need to devote resources to figuring it out the number impacts how we determine our response strategies we're very interested understanding risk factors for severe illness so whether that differs by sacks or on the presence of other diseases race ethnicity and then that will allow us to identify groups that we want to pay close attention to Natalie dean she's assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida thank you very much thanks I really appreciate it the corona virus pandemic has completely shut down concerts and other live events some people like Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti are even predicting that live events won't resume until twenty twenty one so ticket holders are looking for refunds but as NPR's Andrew Limbong reports the process has not been that easy show Cronin is a mental health therapist in Vancouver Washington she bought tickets for six events through Ticketmaster reality I have to get to run all the hello may get your that's the one with Green Day Weezer fall out boy journey with the pretenders and you get the point Clinton says she can't get refunds because new rules Ticketmaster announced last week stipulate that a show has to be either officially canceled or have new dates announced in order for the purchaser to be eligible for refunds and since neither has happened in Cronin's case and she bought pairs of tickets she's out nearly a thousand dollars she's thankful she still employed even imagine what somebody would be going to right now if they had a thousand dollars in tickets just sitting there that they know they're not gonna be able to use and they're stressing about if you're gonna be able to pay their rent or buy their kids food or you know anything like that the lines into Connie is a complicated one and it's been a struggle for ticket buyers to get their money back because they aren't Ticketmaster's primary concerns is dean Budnick he is the co author of the book ticket masters the rise of the concert industry and how the public got scalped ticket master we're really ultimately is responsible to its venue clients and those are the individuals that it wants to protect in other words its primary business relationships are with concert promoter stadiums and arenas before last week's Ticketmaster's website seem to back off of refunds for postponed events entirely the ensuing media coverage caught the attention of two members of Congress democratic representatives Katie Porter from California and bill Pascrell from New Jersey who wrote a scathing letter encouraging that ticket seller to reconsider in a statement Ticketmaster said it's made four hundred million dollars worth of refunds so far and its parent company live nation along with rival E. G. announced new refund policies last week which still require a concert to be cancelled or officially rescheduled with new dates to trigger a refund those policies don't go into effect until may first dean Budnick says live nation and AEG simply don't have the money to give back because contractually they were least that money to the concert promoters to the event producers who put on those events but excess with smaller club level shows these funds are usually held in escrow so they're easier to access but for big shows that stadium's ticket purchasers money is already in the hands of venues and artists now you may say well Gee that is take a master's fault because that's their contract they entered into but Nick says over the past few decades artists have gone a larger share of ticket sales to make up for declining records the that's led to higher ticket prices and more service fees to be shared among the venues and promoters keep Jobling is a consulting director for media research a media analysis firm he says that any post corona virus world the deals between all parties in the ecosystem are likely to change and everybody on that value check will be expected to take a hit on the including artists but right now it's Adam Burke stage hands food vendor security guards and ticket holders who are feeling the pain Krista Riley is a teacher from Michigan she bought red wings hockey tickets as a gift for her dad the game was set to take place last month and she still can't get a refund I'm not working right now I will work until September so having that extra two hundred and thirty Bucks would be really off some customers like Riley and cash Cronin from earlier whose ad thousand Bucks are part of a group exploring a class action suit one such complaint is going through the courts now others have reached out to the credit card companies to try to get the money back but either way they'll be waiting for a while.

KCRW assistant professor university of Florida
"dean budnick" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

08:16 min | 1 year ago

"dean budnick" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"News this is All Things Considered I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Mary Louise Kelly the numbers are frankly overwhelming every day the corona virus death count rises at first based on early numbers in late February epidemiologists and experts estimated about one percent of infected people would die from covert nineteen but it turns out it is hard to come up with one number that accurately captures how deadly this virus is it is killing people in different states and different countries and different rates according to Johns Hopkins the mortality rate here in the U. S. is five point seven percent five point seven in Italy it's over thirteen percent in China it's five and a half percent which made us wonder why is the true death rate so all over the place and so hard to pin down well Natalie dean assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida is here to help us try to answer that question Natalie dean welcome thanks for having me so how do you calculate how do you define what what the true death rate looks like with regards to the corners so the numbers that you just reported we call those the observed or crude case fatality rates and those are calculated as the number of deaths divided by the number of cases that have actually been confirmed that's very important because there are a lot of cases that are not confirmed people who have mild illness might be turned away or not be able to access testing we also know that there are a lot of people who are infected but don't develop symptoms so that means that there's actually a much bigger denominator than what is reflected in this observed the case fatality rate so you're saying testing plays a crucial role in understanding how many people have been sickened and and have are now infected with code nineteen and without knowing those numbers it's really hard to to get what but the death rate is right we know that test ng tends to focus on people who are most severely ill and so is missing a lot of those mild cases and is definitely missing anyone who doesn't have symptoms so we know that those numbers are over estimates and they also vary a lot by country because there will be different availability of testing in different countries where is the death rate highest workers at lowest so far so looking at the statistics from Johns Hopkins University can see Belgium right now seems to be reporting the highest crude case fatality rate at a little over fifteen percent similarly high in France the United Kingdom and Italy and we know that it's quite low in some Asian countries like Singapore and South Korea and certainly it's reflecting who's being tested but then it also reflects things like quality of care in those countries you've done research on Ebola on Zeke it has how does the challenge of identifying the true death rate for the corona virus compared to with with others so the corona virus is definitely different from Ebola Zika Ebola is a very severe disease and so we have pretty few of these a Santa Monica mild infections that makes it easier to detect people who are sick and then track them to see who dies because the other end of the spectrum where most infections are pretty mild or asymptomatic so then it becomes really hard to establish severity corona viruses somewhere in the middle somewhere likely below one percent of people who are infected at di but we're trying to nail down exactly where that number lives and why is this number important why do scientists need to devote resources to figuring it out the number impacts how we determine our response strategies very interesting understanding risk factors for severe illness or whether that differs by fax or on the presence of a their diseases race ethnicity and then that will allow us to identify groups that we want to pay close attention to Natalie dean she's assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida thank you very much thanks I really appreciate it the corona virus pandemic has completely shut down concerts and other live events some people like Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti are even predicting that live events won't resume until twenty twenty one so ticket holders are looking for refunds but as NPR's Andrew Limbong reports the process has not been that easy show Cronin is a mental health therapist in Vancouver Washington she bought tickets for six events through ticket master ticket to ride all the hello may get your that's the one with Green Day Weezer fall out boy journeying rid the pretenders and you get the point Clinton says she can't get refunds because new rules Ticketmaster announced last week stipulate that a show has to be either officially canceled or have new dates announced in order for the purchaser to be eligible for refunds and since neither has happened in Cronin's case and she bought pairs of tickets she's out nearly a thousand dollars she's thankful she still employed even imagine what somebody would be going to right now if they had a thousand dollars in tickets just sitting there that they know they're not gonna be able to use and they're stressing about if they're gonna be able to pay their rent or buy their kids food or you know anything like that the lines into Connie is a complicated one and it's been a struggle for ticket buyers to get their money back because they aren't ticket masters primary concerns is dean Budnick he is the co author of the book ticket masters the rise of the concert industry and how the public got scalped ticket master we're really ultimately is responsible to its value clients and those are the individuals that it wants to protect in other words its primary business relationships are with concert promoter stadiums and arenas before last week Ticketmaster's website seem to back off of refunds for postponed events entirely the ensuing media coverage caught the attention of two members of Congress democratic representatives Katie Porter from California and bill Pascrell from New Jersey who wrote a scathing letter encouraging that ticket seller to reconsider in a statement Ticketmaster said it's made four hundred million dollars worth of refunds so far and its parent company live nation along with rival E. G. announced new refund policies last week which still require a concert to be cancelled or officially rescheduled with new dates to trigger a refund those policies don't go into effect until may first dean Budnick says live nation and AEG simply don't have the money to give back because contractually they were least that money to the concert promoters to the event producers who put on those events but excess with smaller club level shows these funds are usually held in escrow so they're easier to access but for big shows that stadium's ticket purchasers money is already in the hands of venues and artists now you may say well Gee that is Ticketmaster's fall because that's their contract they entered into but Nick says over the past few decades artists have gone a larger share of ticket sales to make up for declining records the that's led to higher ticket prices and more service fees to be shared among the venues and promoters keep Jobling is a consulting director for media research a media analysis firm he says that any post corona virus world the deals between all parties in the ecosystem are likely to change and everybody on that value check will be expected to take a hit on the including artists but right now it's Adam Burke stage hands food vendor security guards and ticket holders who are feeling the pain Krista Riley is a teacher from Michigan she bought red wings hockey tickets as a gift for her dad the game was set to take place last month and she still can't get a refund I'm not working right now I will work until September so having that extra two hundred and thirty Bucks would be really off some customers like Riley and cash Cronin from earlier whose ad thousand Bucks are part of a group exploring a class action suit one such complaint is going through the courts now others have reached out to the credit card companies to try to get the money back but either way they'll be waiting for a while engine.

Elsa Chang Mary Louise Kelly
"dean budnick" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:26 min | 1 year ago

"dean budnick" Discussed on KCRW

"Can be complicated and later high rates of poverty and chronic disease make southern states particularly vulnerable vulnerable to the coronavirus we'll talk more about that as well it's three twenty from NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Mary Louise Kelly the numbers are frankly overwhelming every day the coronavirus death count rises at first based on early numbers in late February epidemiologists and experts estimated about one percent of infected people would die from covert nineteen but it turns out it is hard to come up with one number of it accurately captures how deadly this virus is it is killing people in different states and different countries and different rates according to Johns Hopkins the mortality rate here in the U. S. is five point seven percent five point seven in Italy it's over thirteen percent in China it's five and a half percent which made us wonder why is the true death rate so all over the place and so hard to pin down well Natalie dean assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida is here to help us try to answer that question Natalie dean welcome thanks for having me so how do you calculate how do you define what what a true death rate looks like with regards to the corners so the numbers that you just reported we call those the observed or crude case fatality rates and those are calculated as the number of deaths divided by the number of cases that have actually been confirmed that's very important because there are a lot of cases that are not confirmed people who have mild illness might be turned away or not be able to access testing we also know that there are a lot of people who are infected but don't develop symptoms so that means that there's actually a much bigger denominator than what is reflected in this observed the case fatality rate so you're saying testing plays a crucial role in understanding how many people have been sickened and and have are now infected with code nineteen and without knowing those numbers it's really hard to to get what but the death rate is right we know that testing intends to focus on people who are most severely ill and so is missing a lot of those mild cases and is definitely missing anyone who doesn't have symptoms so we know that those numbers are over estimates and they also vary a lot by country because there will be different availability of testing in different countries where is the death rate highest workers at lowest so far so looking at the statistics from Johns Hopkins University conceived Belgium right now seems to be reporting the highest crude case fatality rate at a little over fifteen percent similarly high in France the United Kingdom and Italy and we know that it's quite low in some Asian countries like Singapore and South Korea and certainly it's reflecting who's being tested but then it also reflects things like quality of care in those countries you've done research on Ebola on ZK it has how does the challenge of identifying the true death rate for the corona virus compared to with with others so the corona virus is definitely different from Ebola Zika Ebola is a very severe disease and so we have pretty few of these asymptomatic or mild infections that makes it easier to detect people who are sick and then track them to see who dies the guys the other end of the spectrum where most infections are pretty mild or asymptomatic so then it becomes really hard to establish severity coronavirus is somewhere in the middle somewhere likely below one percent of people who are infected at di but we're trying to nail down exactly where that number lives and why is this number important why do scientists need to devote resources to figuring it out the number impacts how we determine our response strategies very interesting understanding risk factors for severe illness so whether that differs by fax or on the presence of other diseases race ethnicity and then that will allow us to identify groups that we want to pay close attention to Natalie dean cheese assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida thank you very much thanks I really appreciate it the corona virus pandemic has completely shut down concerts and other live events some people like Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti are even predicting that live events won't resume until twenty twenty one so ticket holders are looking for refunds but as NPR's Andrew Limbong reports the process has not been that easy show Cronin is a mental health therapist in Vancouver Washington she bought tickets for six events through Ticketmaster reality I have to get to run all the hello may get your that's the one with Green Day Weezer fall out boy journey with the pretenders and you get the point Clinton says she can't get refunds because new rules Ticketmaster announced last week stipulate that a show has to be either officially canceled or have new dates announced in order for the purchaser to be eligible for refunds and since neither has happened in Cronin's case and she bought pairs of tickets she's out nearly a thousand dollars she's thankful she still employed even a manager what somebody would be going to right now if they had a thousand dollars in tickets just sitting there that they know they're not gonna be able to years and they're stressing about if they're gonna be able to pay their rent or buy their kids food or you know anything like that the lines into Connie is a complicated one and it's been a struggle for ticket buyers to get their money back because they aren't ticket masters primary concerns is dean Budnick he is the co author of the book ticket masters the rise of the concert industry and how the public got scalped ticket master we're really ultimately is responsible to it's a venue clients and those are the individuals that it wants to protect in other words its primary business relationships are with concert promoter stadiums and arenas before last week's Ticketmaster's website seem to back off of refunds for postponed events entirely the ensuing media coverage caught the attention of two members of Congress democratic representatives Katie Porter from California and bill Pascrell from New Jersey who wrote a scathing letter encouraging that ticket seller to reconsider in a statement Ticketmaster said it's made four hundred million dollars worth of refunds so far and its parent company live nation along with rival E. G. announced new refund policies last week which still require a concert to be cancelled or officially rescheduled with new dates to trigger a refund those policies don't go into effect until may first dean Budnick says live nation and AEG simply don't have the money to give back because contractually they were least that money to the concert promoters to the event producers who put on those events but excess with smaller club level shows these funds are usually held in escrow so they're easier to access but for big shows that stadium's ticket purchasers money is already in the hands of venues and artists now you may say well Gee that is Ticketmaster's fall because that's their contract they entered into but Nick says over the past few decades artists have gone a larger share of ticket sales to make up for declining records the that's led to higher ticket prices and more service fees to be shared among the venues and promoters keep Jobling is a consulting director for media research a media analysis firm he says that any post corona virus world the deals between all parties in the ecosystem are likely to change and everybody on that value check will be expected to take a hit on the including artists but right now it's Adam Burke stage hands food vendor security guards and ticket holders who are feeling the pain Krista Riley is a teacher from Michigan she bought red wings hockey tickets as a gift for her dad the game was set to take place last month and she still can't get a refund I'm not working right now I will work until September so having that extra two hundred and thirty Bucks would be really off some customers like Riley and cash Cronin from earlier whose ad thousand Bucks are part of a group exploring a class action suit one such complaint is going through the courts now others have reached out to the credit card companies to try to get the money back but either way they'll be waiting for a while.

Elsa Chang NPR
"dean budnick" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"dean budnick" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"News this is All Things Considered I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Mary Louise Kelly the numbers are frankly overwhelming every day the corona virus death count rises at first based on early numbers in late February epidemiologists and experts estimated about one percent of infected people would die from covert nineteen but it turns out it is hard to come up with one number that accurately captures how deadly this virus is it is killing people in different states and different countries and different rates according to Johns Hopkins the mortality rate here in the U. S. is five point seven percent five point seven in Italy it's over thirteen percent in China it's five and a half percent which made us wonder why is the true death rate so all over the place and so hard to pin down well Natalie dean assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida is here to help us try to answer that question Natalie dean welcome thanks for having me so how do you calculate how do you define what what the true death rate looks like with regards to the corners so the numbers that you just reported we call those the observed or crude case fatality rates and those are calculated as the number of deaths divided by the number of cases that have actually been confirmed that's very important because there are a lot of cases that are not confirmed people who have mild illness might be turned away or not be able to access testing we also know that there are a lot of people who are infected but don't develop symptoms so that means that there's actually a much bigger denominator than what is reflected in this observe to case fatality rate so you're saying testing plays a crucial role in understanding how many people have been sickened and and have are now infected with code nineteen and without knowing those numbers it's really hard to to get what but the death rate is right we know that test thing tends to focus on people who are most severely ill and so is missing a lot of those mild cases and it's definitely missing anyone who doesn't have symptoms so we know that those numbers are over estimates and they also vary a lot by country because there will be different availability of testing in different countries where is the death rate highest workers at lowest so far so looking at the statistics from Johns Hopkins University can see Belgium right now seems to be reporting the highest crude case fatality rate at a little over fifteen percent similarly high in France the United Kingdom and Italy and we know that it's quite low in some Asian countries like Singapore and South Korea and certainly it's reflecting who's being tested but then it also reflects things like quality of care in those countries you've done research on Ebola on Zeke it has how does the challenge of identifying the true death rate for the corona virus compared to with with others so the corona virus is definitely different from Ebola Zika Ebola is a very severe disease and so we have pretty few of these a Santa Monica mild infections that makes it easier to detect people who are sick and then track them to see who dies because the other end of the spectrum where most infections are pretty mild or asymptomatic so then it becomes really hard to establish severity corona viruses somewhere in the middle somewhere likely below one percent of people who are infected at di but we're trying to nail down exactly where that number lies and why is this number important why do scientists need to devote resources to figuring it out the number impacts how we determine our response strategies we're very interested understanding risk factors for severe illness so whether that differs by fax or on the presence of a other diseases race ethnicity and then that will allow us to identify groups that we want to pay close attention to Natalie dean she's assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida thank you very much thanks I really appreciate it the corona virus pandemic has completely shut down concerts and other live events some people like Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti are even predicting that live events won't resume until twenty twenty one so ticket holders are looking for refunds but as NPR's Andrew Limbong reports the process has not been that easy show Cronin is a mental health therapist in Vancouver Washington she bought tickets for six events through Ticketmaster tickets to run all the hello may get your that's the one with Green Day Weezer fall out boy journeying rid the pretenders and you get the point Clinton says she can't get refunds because new rules Ticketmaster announced last week stipulate that a show has to be either officially canceled or have new dates announced in order for the purchaser to be eligible for refunds and since neither has happened in Cronin's case and she bought pairs of tickets she's out nearly a thousand dollars she's thankful she still employed even imagine what somebody would be going to right now if they had a thousand dollars in tickets just sitting there that they know they're not gonna be able to use and they're stressing about if you're gonna be able to pay their rent this month or by their kids food or you know anything like that the lines into Connie is a complicated one and it's been a struggle for ticket buyers to get their money back because they aren't ticket masters primary concerns is dean Budnick he is the co author of the book ticket masters the rise of the concert industry and how the public got scalped ticket master we're really ultimately is responsible to its value clients and those are the individuals that it wants to protect in other words its primary business relationships are with concert promoter stadiums and arenas before last week's Ticketmaster's website seem to back off of refunds for postponed events entirely the ensuing media coverage caught the attention of two members of Congress democratic representatives Katie Porter from California and bill Pascrell from New Jersey who wrote a scathing letter encouraging that ticket seller to reconsider in a statement Ticketmaster said it's made four hundred million dollars worth of refunds so far and its parent company live nation along with rival E. G. announced new refund policies last week which still require a concert to be cancelled or officially rescheduled with new dates to trigger a refund those policies don't go into effect until may first dean Budnick says live nation and AEG simply don't have the money to give back because contractually they were least that money to the concert promoters to the event producers who put on those events but excess with smaller club level shows these funds are usually held in escrow so they're easier to access but for big shows that stadium's ticket purchasers money is already in the hands of venues and artists now you may say well Gee that is Ticketmaster's fall because that's their contract they entered into but Nick says over the past few decades artists have gone a larger share of ticket sales to make up for declining records the that's led to higher ticket prices and more service fees to be shared among the venues and promoters keep Jobling is a consulting director for media research a media analysis firm he says that any post corona virus world the deals between all parties in the ecosystem are likely to change and everybody on that value check will be expected to take a hit on the including artists but right now it's out of work stage hands food vendor security guards and ticket holders who are feeling the pain Krista Riley is a teacher from Michigan she bought red wings hockey tickets as a gift for her dad the game was set to take place last month and she still can't get a refund I'm not working right now I will work until September so having that extra two hundred and thirty Bucks would be really off some customers like Riley and cash Cronin from earlier whose ad thousand Bucks are part of a group exploring a class action suit one such complaint is going through the courts now others have reached out to the credit card companies to try to get the money back but either way they'll be waiting for a while.

Elsa Chang Mary Louise Kelly
"dean budnick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"dean budnick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is All Things Considered I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Mary Louise Kelly the numbers are frankly overwhelming every day the corona virus death count rises at first based on early numbers in late February epidemiologists and experts estimated about one percent of infected people would die from covert nineteen but it turns out it is hard to come up with one number that accurately captures how deadly this virus is it is killing people in different states and different countries and different rates according to Johns Hopkins the mortality rate here in the U. S. is five point seven percent five point seven in Italy it's over thirteen percent in China it's five and a half percent which made us wonder why is the true death rate so all over the place and so hard to pin down well Natalie dean assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida is here to help us try to answer that question Natalie dean welcome thanks for having me so how do you calculate how do you define what what the true death rate looks like with regards to the corners so the numbers that you just reported we call those the observed or crude case fatality rates and those are calculated as the number of deaths divided by the number of cases that have actually been confirmed that's very important because there are a lot of cases that are not confirmed people who have mild illness might be turned away or not be able to access testing we also know that there are a lot of people who are infected but don't develop symptoms so that means that there's actually a much bigger denominator than what is reflected in this observed the case fatality rate so you're saying testing plays a crucial role in understanding how many people have been sickened and and have are now infected with code nineteen and without knowing those numbers it's really hard to to get what but the death rate is right we know that test ng tends to focus on people who are most severely ill and so is missing a lot of those mild cases and is definitely missing anyone who doesn't have symptoms so we know that those numbers are over estimates and they also vary a lot by country because there will be different availability of testing in different countries where is the death rate highest workers at lowest so far so looking at the statistics from Johns Hopkins University conceived Belgium right now seems to be reporting the highest crude case fatality rate at a little over fifteen percent similarly high in France the United Kingdom and Italy and we know that it's quite low in some Asian countries like Singapore and South Korea and certainly it's reflecting who's being tested but then it also reflects things like quality of care in those countries you've done research on Ebola on ZK it has how does the challenge of identifying the true death rate for the corona virus compared to with with others so the corona virus is definitely different from Ebola Zika Ebola is a very severe disease and so we have pretty few of these a Santa Monica mild infections that makes it easier to detect people who are sick and then track them to see who dies the guys the other end of the spectrum where most infections are pretty mild or asymptomatic so then it becomes really hard to establish severity coronavirus is somewhere in the middle somewhere likely below one percent of people who are infected at di but we're trying to nail down exactly where that number lines and why is this number important why do scientists need to devote resources to figuring it out the number impacts how we determine our response strategies very interesting understanding risk factors for severe illness so whether that differs by fax or on the presence of a their diseases race ethnicity and then that will allow us to identify groups that we want to pay close attention to Natalie dean she's assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida thank you very much thanks I really appreciate it the corona virus pandemic has completely shut down concerts and other live events some people like Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti are even predicting that live events won't resume until twenty twenty one so ticket holders are looking for refinance but as NPR's Andrew Limbong reports the process has not been that easy show Cronin is a mental health therapist in Vancouver Washington she bought tickets for six events through Ticketmaster reality I have to get to run all the hello may I get your that's the one with Green Day Weezer fall out boy journey with the pretenders and you get the point Clinton says she can't get refunds because new rules Ticketmaster announced last week stipulate that a show has to be either officially canceled or have new dates announced in order for the purchaser to be eligible for refunds and since neither has happened in Cronin's case and she bought pairs of tickets she's out nearly a thousand dollars she's thankful she still employed even imagine what somebody would be going to right now if they had a thousand dollars in tickets just sitting there that they know they're not gonna be able to use and they're stressing about if they're gonna be able to pay their rent or buy their kids food or you know anything like that the lines into Connie is a complicated one and it's been a struggle for ticket buyers to get their money back because they aren't Ticketmaster's primary concerns is dean Budnick he is the co author of the book ticket masters the rise of the concert industry and how the public got scalped ticket master we're really ultimately is responsible to its venue clients and those are the individuals that it wants to protect in other words its primary business relationships are with concert promoter stadiums and arenas before last week's Ticketmaster's website seem to back off of refunds for postponed events entirely the ensuing media coverage caught the attention of two members of Congress democratic representatives Katie Porter from California and bill Pascrell from New Jersey who wrote a scathing letter encouraging that ticket seller to reconsider in a statement Ticketmaster said it's made four hundred million dollars worth of refunds so far and its parent company live nation along with rival E. G. announced new refund policies last week which still require a concert to be cancelled or officially rescheduled with new dates to trigger a refund those policies don't go into effect until may first dean Budnick says live nation and AEG simply don't have the money to give back because contractually they were least that money to the concert promoters to the event producers who put on those events but Nick says with smaller club level shows these funds are usually held in escrow so they're easier to access but for big shows at stadiums ticket purchasers money is already in the hands of venues and artists now you may say well Gee that is Ticketmaster's fall because that's their contract they entered into but Nick says over the past few decades artists have gone a larger share of ticket sales to make up for declining records the that's led to higher ticket prices and more service fees to be shared among the venues and promoters keep juggling is a consulting director for media research a media analysis firm he says that any post corona virus world the deals between all parties in the ecosystem are likely to change and everybody on that value check will be expected to take a hit on the including artists but right now it's Adam Burke stage hands food vendor security guards and ticket holders who are feeling the pain Krista Riley is a teacher from Michigan she bought red wings hockey tickets as a gift for her dad the game was set to take place last month and she still can't get a refund I'm not working right now I will work until September so having that extra two hundred and thirty Bucks would be really off some customers like Riley and cash Cronin from earlier whose ad thousand Bucks are part of a group exploring a class action suit one such complaint is going through the courts now others have reached out to the credit card companies to try to get the money back but either way they'll be waiting for a.

Elsa Chang Mary Louise Kelly