18 Burst results for "Deakin University"

"deakin university" Discussed on Queer as Fact

Queer as Fact

02:41 min | 11 months ago

"deakin university" Discussed on Queer as Fact

"So i'd have to go on do atari. After my undergrad. I went to deakin university. And i got a master's in cultural heritage. Which i have just finished last month. Congratulations i will drink to that. We should try and toast again. Okay we will try and host again. I mean not officially a master cultural heritage yet. But i'm functionally pasta up cultural heritage. And i write a thesis on how there's no quiz in museums and it's bad so i also did my undergraduate in wall size and classics mo unique these guys. I'm from south. Australia sort of victoria. And i looked at during ancient world off at the university of adelaide and i decided not to do that when i was in an adult education class. That was running some teaching engine. Greg and i discovered that that was the full extent of adelaide. University's ancient greek offerings. That point and so. I moved across the country. That's not really across the. I'm slightly to the right and ended up in melbourne. Which worked out. Well i would say this podcast but not here if you went to the university of atalanta's listeners in adelaide. I hope you're not offended by what we say is that it's just that adelaide is bad to study classics. Yeah yes yep. that's what my degree was on. I did my honest thesis on the biographical tradition understanding. That sapphire was a teacher for the record is nonsense and yeah. That's what i did very good. Good how did you get into history. What was the first thing that drew you to it. Getting into his truck. Remember being a kid. And like i'm obsessed with. It was like a young child. Primary school was like vikings. And i used to go to the lybian borough. All the books from vikings and on vikings learn. The ruins baked the viking food. The books and stuff. Oh easter do that together very interesting. Yeah so i remember being in history from like as young as i can remember being into sings to be honest so i remember before that i probably started like younger than vikings getting angry roman mythology and then my moment the library in buried a viking mythology has she was like. I think you've read all the great minutes now. Then i got really into that and then from there. Somehow i just got incredibly into the french revolution. I read every book in my local library about the french revolution literally every single one. And then i was like parents to do now and my dad worked at attack which is like.

vikings adelaide university of adelaide deakin university atari university of atalanta melbourne Greg lybian borough Australia victoria
New opportunity to boost Indonesia-Australia economic ties - The Jakarta Post

Between The Lines

12:55 min | 1 year ago

New opportunity to boost Indonesia-Australia economic ties - The Jakarta Post

"Few international problems in the post world war. Two era have proved difficult for our nation as development of friendly policy towards indonesia. Just think about it. Jakarta's annexation of west papua in nine hundred sixty to the attempted coup d'etat and successful counter-coup by the indonesian army that was nineteen sixty five the invasion of as. Taymor seventy five. The dili massacre ninety. One the east team or mission in ninety nine. And who can forget the controversies over terror. Attacks live cadillacs bullpens successive wives of boatpeople this spying revelations and drug trade and of course those executions so has president jarkko daito or jacuzzi or jacoby as he's known has. His visit marked a new era in australia. Indonesia relations this week to cowie was only the second indonesian leader to address a joint sitting of parliament and he came to camera bearing a gift. He's approval of the trade deal between our two countries. Greg feely is associate professor of indonesian politics at the australian national university's college of asia and the pacific and diming kingsbury is professor international politics at deakin university in melbourne. greg damian. Welcome back to our in. Thank you now damien. Does that you kelly visit this week. Does that maka a dramatic breakthrough in australia. Indonesia relations look it's a really positive sign and it does mock an improvement in relations but i don think in itself comprises an entirely new relationship. It's just a step in the right direction. Okay so the the relationship still presumably dogged by bitterness and suspicion but it was obvious support and even warmth towards education from both sides of politics gregg fairly. Yes that's right i think The y.`all would characterize it is the jacobi visa was building on the breakthrough which is the comprehensive economic partnership agreement. That was signed early last year. And what saw with dakota's visa was. He's personal preparedness and preparedness. He's government to really put its white behind the agreement. I think a lot of people think the agreement in pie terms is very good but the question is canopy implemented properly. Can the red type be cleared away in indonesia. Can we persuade australian businesses to invest more Generously in indonesia and i think the jacoby visa guy very positive signs for that still a lot of things to done for that The potential of that agreement to be realized but it was really good. Move in that direction. Again it's been said that. The many lingering suspicions profile in jakarta indonesians still resent l leading role insecure in a team os independence because it was more than twenty years ago. Yes i think One of the ironies here he said indonesia now has very good relations with east t- more and he's teamer leaders Fighted in fact when i go to jakarta and the strata is still has this legacy of suspicion towards indonesia. I think you have to back. Partly in history this great saints vulnerability that Many asians feel that logic countries or large countries around them at trying to split up their country to conduct. Bulkin is it and the ace taymor. Even though he's team always not part of the original borders of the dutch colony. Die still feel that as team will confirmed that Other countries have these designs upon the country and upon its unity and after his team. More focusing shifted to papa. This strategy may still want to divide papua dining. You've written a lot about west papua and at the heart of the standoff in two thousand and six paul showed that something like seventy five percent of australian supported independence for the former dutch colony. This why the indonesians are uneasy about estrada's position. He certainly one of the issues in the makeup of mistrust and complexity in the relationship There's there's been longstanding depths in jakarta's to either strang government doesn't do more to acquire pro-separatist Sentiment in australia. They believe the particularly the ngo sector has played a role in stirring up separatist sentiment in west. Papua and there is Continuing concern that australia has too much of a focus particularly on eastern indonesia which is also the poorest part of the country. Well how then do we bridge. These divides greg. I mean to. What extent is this new free. Try deal. This is the so-called indonesia australia comprehensive economic partnership agreement. Ten years in the making to what extent does that he'll these divisions. I don't know that it heals the divisions poseidon. I think many of the the list of things you you sit out at the beginning of the interview. I think we have always had the potential. I knew things like that to occur but one of the consistently underperforming parts of the bilateral relationship has been the economic ties and so this comprehensive agreement will hopefully see much more economic activity between the two countries and that in itself might provide some kind of deepest ability but if the economic relationship expand by site thirty to forty percents in the next few years diamond. Wouldn't the free try deal really mocking important development for the relationship a look. There's no question that it's an important step in in in strengthening relationship. This guy is back to what gareth evans was talking about in the nineteen eighties. Where he said we needed to add ballast to the relationship unbalanced. He meant if we can get a strong economic relationship between australia and indonesia implies than the rest of it will follow behind because there will be a an upfront primary interest in preserving the economic relationship. And that's always been a difficulty. In the relations destroy and strength companies have invested in indonesia but not to a great extent. The head found difficulties. There this free trade agreement certainly opens up more opportunity for investments and tried but again and again as greg has alluded to. I think the question will be. How much strategies is to take out this opportunity and whether or not they say the the problems of doing business in indonesia over combat is free trade agreement whether or not there's going to be impediments to a greater degree of engagement. My guests greg. Feely from new in camera and damien. Kingsbury from deacon in melvin. And here's a little fun fact. This is according to the australian this week. It was chris. Bowen the library from benca podcast on iran and between the lines. It was chris bowen in his shirt who walked away the most chuffed with these brave. Jacoby interaction we he. The president complimented bowen's flawless fluency in indonesian. Little known fact chris. Bowen speaks indonesian now. A few years ago china's president she addressed indonesia's legislature to great fanfare. So the fees guy. Now what's the nature of the relationship now between jakarta and beijing greg. There's a lot of similarities between indonesia's relations with china and distributors Janis niger economic partner for indonesia. It's also niger investor in the country indonesia's increasing the Pot of china's belt and road initiative. So it's getting a lot of development money. These increasing penetration of lodge chinese corporations building infrastructure for example hospitalized row link between the capital jakarta and the regional capital abandon So there's a. There's a lot of economic activity happening and president. She has very good personal relationship with prisoner jacoby but they're also tensions. One of the tensions is chinese fishing boat incursions into indonesian territorial waters In near the south china sea in the name of the island of tuna and that causes a lot of angst in indonesia sometimes confrontation between Nio vessels of both countries. Another problem is a fairly high level of underwent lying suspicion towards the chinese in indonesia so this often bubbles politically to the surface in indonesia and people say that indonesia is at risk of losing some sovereignty to the chinese and so this is always a break for a leader. Such as jacoby who badly needs chinese investment and the development expertise if he saying as Ext doing that excessively will then he will be attacked for that. Well could chana's rise than i mean. It's obviously threatening. The integrity of sovereign states around the region diamond could could china's roz helped draw camera and jakarta even closer. Yes look there's been a discussion now going back several years in canberra about a closest security relationship within the news yet it seems to be a natural hartman in the region Geography i think determines that to a large extent but our strategic interests similar in relation to china about countries want to have a strong economic relationship with china We want to have china's investments and tried to sell into china but we also want to limit china's expansion in the region strategic rich particularly in the south china sea and In relation to them turner islands which is at the southwest of the south china saying there is neither lapping climbed by china and indonesia. And that's what to the tensions of mid january this year. What we're seeing though is. Indonesia is welcoming china roman hand but in terms of economic growth and development but in terms of china's growing strategic runyon ambition. There's a great deal of skepticism. I think in indonesia as the reason chinandega familiar story. Now let's turn finally gentlemen to indonesia internally. Let's get your reaction to something. The indonesian journalist. Julia sirak osama. This is what she told my. Rn colleague andrew west. This week joey. His record on democracy and human rights has declined and in fact now many activists think that not just activists observers think that democracy indonesia has lowest point in twenty years. It is ironic since when we had the reform era after suharto stepped down. That was supposed to be the beginning of democratization in indonesia but that has opened up a pandora's box and released all the traditional religious conservatives and mainly religious groups has sacrificed human rights. And what he says in a book phobia and intolerance for the sake. Offline call stability. Indonesian journalist julia sura kasama on iran's religion and ethics program. This week diming kingsbury. Look i think that Jacoby has moved in a couple of areas which have raised eyebrows. About his commitment to a plurality and human rights particular around the issues of religion and religious tolerance and so on. But broadly. I think jacoby is an inheritor of the reform tradition particularly that started by cecilia among indiana and that he really is deepening and embedding democratic practice. If we some limitations around the edges. Yeah well greg failure. I mean it's often argued that indonesia the fourth because nation in the world. We tend to forget that. It represents a persistent triumph of democracy this the nation journalists big for a lot of activists when she says that the indonesian ideal of tolerance really has been destroyed. So i think it's probably i'll i think she's somewhat. This is always a matter of the bites. Don't mean any disrespect to julius Sort of kasuma but Under jacoby in fact. Religious tolerance has somewhat improved on democracy. Some of the things that jacoby has initiated have really harmed the quality of democracy and there are several things that are being discussed by. he's government wrought now and by the parliament which if implemented could be a considerable reversal. He wouldn't stop indonesia being a democracy. But it would reduce the quality of the democracy greg damian and important discussion. Thanks so much again for being on our end

Indonesia Jacoby Jakarta China Australia Greg President Trump Greg Feely Greg Damian Indonesian Army Diming Kingsbury Dili Damien Taymor Iran West Papua Deakin University
"deakin university" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

10:09 min | 1 year ago

"deakin university" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"Blue I think born Hoffa would not recognize the ways in which he has been institutionalized in the world. I don't think he would recognize himself in many of the depictions of him that exist in. Let's say a more popular secular cents a year since the unrest erupted across the nation the defiant impassioned remains strong anita retailing French president. Emmanuel man. I see some American Evangelical. Let's just writing about this becomes suspicious. I do not really wrestling being with your conscience. In this scenario you just taking the second hand from someone who in an existential moment. Really grappled with this like that's something so you can learn from Boehner offer. Students armed with petrol ball is come to represent and has come to stand as a symbol for opposition to the Nazis and as a person who stood against the Nazis but not necessarily through an understanding of what principles were based on. I'm or indeed the theological positioning that. He took demonstration began the second decade of the twenty. First Century has drawn to a close amid popular unrest from Hong Kong to Chile for the yellow vests of Paris to the global extinction rebellion all over the world. It seems people are debating whether the usual order of things is broken down. What such a state of affairs might then demand service how we navigate such a moment one voice we might look to for guidance was an ethicist and theologian theologian? Who committed himself to resistance and to the guilt and consequences the resistance entitled Eh Dawn on the ninth of April nineteen forty five thousand seven men stripped and led into the execution yard at Flossenburg? Jason Burke concentration camp just two weeks from now. This can't be liberated in less than a month. Adolf Hitler will be dead the war in Europe over but today these seven German men be hanged for alleged involvement in a plot to kill Hitler among them is Admiral. Ville Helm canaries. The former head of German military intelligence and a thirty gene on your old Lutheran Pastor Dittrich Bond Hav so he was then hung by piano wire on April ninth nineteen eighteen forty five. We always strikes me as quite poignant Dr. Patrick Brown is lecturer in philosophy at Deakin University and the author the recent Book Bond Hoffer God's conspirator in a state of exception. So there's lots of people who speculate as I've only wasn't really conspirator because he was never really part of the assassination he never strapped any bombs to himself would carry that suitcase or anything like that and in fact by the time time that occurred he was already imprisoned but he was actually quite k. in the involvement in the conspiracy because he had these accu- Medical Church contact he was a pastor and a theologian and before the war he had been very active in the worldwide cuticle movement. So we had some key. Context techs outside of Germany and he was recruited within the APP. Were so there was a resistance cell within the APP where the military intelligence a halt bid over resistors you might say and he was recruited and he became a military agent an intelligence agent so he would extensively go to his Context together Information Intel. About what the allies might be doing. But in fact he was giving his a COMMUNICA context contact information about what the resistance was doing in Germany and in within the war in the decade since his death bond offers name has become a Shibboleth the people right across the political spectrum. He's been invoked by politicians from Kevin Rudd to George W Bush and by left-wing activists and religious conservatives wt alike everyone it seems gets the Bond Hoffa. They're looking for in the English. Speaking world. His actions come to be seen as that of a martyr Christian Christian martyr. He has a statue at Westminster Abbey but in Germany for very long time he wasn't considered to be Christian martyr because his actions were seen as political and there was this discomfort with how some of those actions acting against the government at the time even if it was a rogue regime name so the idea of a Chris Martin is really developed by the English speaking world. Those who so bond offers involved in this assignation attempted into dissemination of Hitler after the war even those who being in the confessing church movement often actively condemned on offer for that action because the notion was one of an absolute principle thou shalt not kill. Doctor Samuel Caney is an historian with a particular interest in the German am and churches during the Nazi period when the National Socialists came to power is actually very very complex relationship between the churches and the National Socialist government within within the Protestant churches the two big parties that formed with Jim and Christian movement attempting to bring racial ideology into protestantism and what became known McKinnon to Kiko the confessing church which argued instead that you had to remain Biblical scriptural and that you had to maintain the faith of the Protestant Confessions Jim Christians were very theologically liberal in their approach So the concepts were that you could adjust and change change the teachings of the church to accommodate new or modern trends but by opposition to that of course you had conservative. Theologians are people who followed Orthodox Knox Christianity for instance stating quite clearly that they could not accept the racially elegy of the Nazis. When you consider that of course of fundamental part of Orthodox Christian Teaching Ching is that Jesus is Jewish and has to be Jewish in order to fit into the messianic narrative that he becomes a savior of the world? You can see the fundamental ooh disjunction that occurred between what the Nazis teaching and what the Church traditionally had taught you find conflicts even within congregations down to the congregational level where people are marching in in their storm. TYLENOL stormtrooper uniform the browns shirt uniform and being refused communion by the Pasta and at that level you could see splits existing within congregations. Were people refused to accept communion. The means ends of the sacraments. The means of communion from their pastors because their passes were German Christians as well for someone to stand up and make a public statement about this also took courage in the sense that they knew what the consequences would be that was always the intention Nazi government. Of course they made the concentration camps public doc because it was a lesson the bay wished the entire public to learn And Linda was so he was arrested. in in one thousand nine hundred eighty three April nine hundred forty three so that ended his active involvement in In the resistance. He wasn't able to do any more kind of tasks signed to him His name the time had joined the attention of authorities but there was no conclusive evidence about his involvement in anything they just suspicious and so he was imprisoned and interrogated at the time and he just maintained Plato. I'm humble pass the cut. What would I know? And also so maintains his facades agent or Gathering Intel fully military German military intelligence. So I've just done what you asked me to. After after the plot in July nineteen forty four after they've failure of the lassus nation attempt a whole bunch of papers were found and implicated ball hoffer and others and as sub eyewitness testimonies as to his last week's days and one of these is actually the very day before is executed they witness carols that led a small church service in a classroom a transit point where they had to stop and so he led his small service and justice. He finished his last prayer. He was taken and escorted away to be executed so as he left that room. He said to the eyewitness nece here. This is the end for me the beginning of life and as a very last phrase that we kind of held one office and a tough unused news biographies to round out. Finish the biography more-or-less. So why has Bam Hoffa's example being so politically useful for such a divergent range of people one answer might lie in Bonn Hoffa's own radical transformation from a pacifist committed to an ethic of nonviolence to a conspirator two assassination vacination. This is Arin. And you're in the philosophies on this week Patrick. Stokes is joined by Petra Brown lecturer in philosophy at Deakin University and Historian Samuel Caney from the University of Melbourne. They're exploring the life and legacy of Detroit Bond Hoffa be Nazi era German theologian whose willingness to transgress the limits of moral acceptability in order to stop Hitler had F assistant political philosophers wandering ever since where we should draw the line when it comes to principled resistance.

Adolf Hitler Bam Hoffa lecturer in philosophy Deakin University Doctor Samuel Caney Dr. Patrick Brown Germany Bond Hoffer God Dittrich Bond Jason Burke Flossenburg Ville Helm Hong Kong Jim Christians Orthodox Christian Teaching Ch accu- Medical Church Europe
"deakin university" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

12:32 min | 2 years ago

"deakin university" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"And A. Screening so I hope you'll take advantage of that free series in get on the list but now without any further ado let's jump right onto the stage at the Los Angeles film school right after I introduced actor Luke Hemsworth and debut writer Director Paul Salam off to chat about their film encounter the we're we're sitting here at the the lovely. Los Angeles Film School. It's always a good place to start and loot to my knowledge. You studied the National Institute of Dramatic regards and tell us about your training there was it was it something that you've got a lot out of was as something that that prepared you for the career to come. I Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah I actually went to Deakin University and I studied contemporary arts there and I dropped out after two and a half years Hubba three calls because I just had enough and I want you have enough of what was bugging you. it was just a little bit backwards. the program I started the feel like just weren't growing as as actors and talk to step away so yeah stuck to the man and I showed him and then yeah I I went and did a a year long tentacles which is Australia's. It's a couple of you know studio of New York's and learnt yeah look incredible amount of their of if some some really great teachers and then went into to television from there and sort of hopped around around various you know TV shows every every every ustralian actor goes through these these rights have passage engine shows like neighbors and All Saints and to my knowledge neighbors was was kind of a soap opera soap opera yeah here so what what did you think of Soap Opera br acting as your as your after being trained well. It's it's it's kind of the best place to learn because it's it's so so fast shooting in half an hour a day of television they printing so you sort of have to keep up or away you go so yeah yea. It's it's not a great place to try things but it's it's a great place to to you have to be prepared as a you yeah that was something. I learned very early. On in my career was to be as prepared as possible going in and that gave me a sense of freedom when you know fight vice with all of the all of the bullshit which goes on on set and all of the challenges that arise and yeah I still use you know sue can turn it on to this day. When you have to be quick it makes sense because soap operas they they shoot so much in the short amount of time and it really gets you into the to the flow of things on a set so the other sets that you would go on in the future you kind of already have that side of a down year and look you know like the nature of Indie film I two is it can be really similar to that as well. There's there's no time there's no time to do another strike you have to you know on on Point A. Ah Carnival lot more than than the big stuff to be stuff you you do have a little bit more freedom. It's a little bit harder. When you're watching the film the CAN Dan but but but yeah yeah you know like it's it's just something you have to get used to otherwise. You're in a little trouble trouble. Make Sense Paul Your Education you know when I went to. USC and I was setting my bank account. You were the kid in line after me at the bank and you were dumb enough to tell me your pin. I've been trickling money out of your account ever since just don't notice but really. I don't really have any further questions for you because you known you a long time. No you know here's here's what's interesting about you. In which you're you're growing up. you're dead was a dentist undiscussed and the pleasure of your dad of course over the years as well and being a dentist he would work with all that gunk that like they make molds out of your teeth and stuff like that and you started working with that growing up because you realize that it could lead to practical special effects so so tell us about kind of your foray into filmmaking growing up outside of Boston in natick. Massachusetts and and and how that that kind of that kind of led to making it out to Los Angeles well I mean here's the thing I always say my journey started. When I was five years old. My parents took me to a double feature of Star Wars. Stories and Logan's run driving in Cape Cod which is that was the original release of star wars some kind of dating myself here how much older than me a much older man and non was is like bugged on my head and I was like instantly obsessed with science fiction and then I sort of discovered Dr who and you know that really sealed it for me and growing up in natick was knicks famous for if there's any sports fans here it's famous. Amos for Doug Flutie. WHO's a heisman trophy winner and as my brother who's in the audience we'll tell you as a varsity football player that if you weren't into sports your it didn't really exist there and being my friend Lonnie where like the big the film Geeks and my dad when I was thirteen took me to a convention in Boston and Tom. Savini was there who who was a makeup effects artist you might know him from my creep show and Donna the Dad and Friday thirteenth and like Oh my God. This guy makes monsters for a living. I think this is this is this is what I WANNA do. I basically told my dad that in as you said a lot of the stuff make facts was stuff used in dentistry so you know I think my dad certain point understood that I wasn't going to be a dentist so so he did like the aspect that he could at least teach me how to use some of the stuff that was important to him so I learned how to do you know make tooth mold and just face news alginate and so forth and and I mean I guess the one lovely thing I did for his legacy is that when I was working and makeup effects. I did a lot of teeth casts. actually. Tony Gardner might still we'll be here who was my first boss and he would send me sometimes do teeth cats of some of the actors because you know he knew I had that background which which was which is really good so I I started my career doing practical makeup effects for fourteen years you should do that. My teeth costs everyone you work with. That's Kinda. Creepy says tomek Glenn Keogh Glenn's. I've got the gold teeth. I don't know if you knew this before tonight before. Luke talked about about dropping out because I was a little freaked out because Paul was was you know he was involved with school. He was loving film program at USC but you started working in the industry doing special effects and Paul dropped out and I I thought I was like living in a TV movie where like I'm supposed to save my friend from dropping out of school. Like what are you doing dropping out. You're moving. This mystical land called Burbank Lake. I thought that's where people go to die. Hi L. A. serve their time and and so but you you got out and you started doing practical effects and I'm GONNA paraphrase the rest of Paul's career weird really quickly he he he wound up doing a lot of effects which included to directing Leonardo di Caprio in one of his finest roles and when I say directing directing Leonardo DiCaprio directing puppet that was on the end of Paul's arms toward him and when I say one of one hundred CAPRA's finest roles I mean the finest roll up until that point is life and nine hundred ninety one when he was shooting critters three of course Paul was puppeteer and but the thing was you had told me that you and your friend Bill Zano is also friends with were getting kind of sick of the chemicals a little and some of the bad grind of working with all the practical effects and you decided to make a change a bill sorry both billing you did at the same time and you went your own separate ways and you started writing and that led to some comic book writing at first but also oh SPEC script writing. What was that kind of journey like starting over. Won't I mean the thing is it's you know. I didn't think I was going to get into it so young so it wasn't in a thing where I got jaded about it. I was never jaded about working and making the facts actually really quite enjoyed it but after like I said I worked on forty films I sort of John John. Everything that I sort of wanted to do. It's a digital era. Come yeah you wouldn't when we were working on ultraman. I was working on an alternate and we all it was ninety ninety three and we all as a group went and saw Jurassic Park and we all just sat there and a we're. We're we're screwed. This is always like the writing on the wall. I mean irony irony. The irony of it is there was actually a little bit of a renaissance and makeup effects after Jurassic Park because you couldn't do stuff all digitally it was too comprehensive but I think it really on on. I just started wanting to explore like hey. You know you don't have to pigeonhole yourself. You don't have to just decide. This is the only thing I'm GonNa do in this industry so so I just started looking for different avenues that I would enjoy in writing to me with something I really love doing it was more about storytelling and while I was working makeup the facts I would like free time I would just teach myself how to write scripts in just anytime I had time off just keep on generating stuff and and when I worked on land of the lost I'd done was puppeteer on that and after the second season they're gearing up for the third season and I came up because I was onset every day. Hey I came up with an idea for an episode and I went to the producers are like hey. I got an idea for an episode a Pitcher to you guys and they're like they love to hear that. I know exactly I know because they were they. Were sure poll. We like you and I I knew they were they. Were just you know humoring me but you know I. D- wrote a script. I knew the format I wrote it exactly like they wrote it and I submitted it and guess what they loved it they submitted at the ABC. It got approved for the third season and then they cancelled the show so you know but you know what as disappointing that episode because this is a matter of fact but you know what the thing is. I was taken seriously. The is a writer in that's all I needed to hear so that's that's really what made me want to pursue it. Luke not to relive past trauma and we're going to get into the movie and a couple of minutes but what was your worst audition the one that haunts you to this very day. I there's a lot of them I'm trying to think of actually actually the one. I actually got it. I was mired in for neighbors and I played a a steroid dealing football plan and I one of one of my lines was was it was it was like check out these guns there there there was check out. L. Natural might with a little help this and Stewart to their style whenever I see the costing edges I remember the your arms yeah. That's that's numero seeing one. The great dialogue always sticks with you. Check out these the gums. you know if you ever need any active advice. I just thought it would bring this up. Paul is a member of SAG as puppeteer so you You're in the same union Paul. You're telling the story. The other night that I thought was hilarious. One of your more surreal moments on a set was working with Whoopi Goldburg oh boy I know I've had some refers breathing. I'll give you the brief region. I worked on a lot of interesting films over years for like you know did my time with Corman..

Paul Salam Luke Hemsworth Los Angeles Los Angeles Film School USC natick Boston writer Deakin University Australia National Institute of Dramatic New York Massachusetts Whoopi Goldburg Leonardo di Caprio Tony Gardner Glenn Keogh Glenn Jurassic Park Dan
"deakin university" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"deakin university" Discussed on World News Analysis

"I'm sure that <hes> this is the show with <hes> a very realistic mindset. We know that <hes> president trump's desire to end this what he called the an endless war has been abundantly clear but does does give on the taliban more leverage in the negotiations. The warriors was was that would that i mean and this goes back before president trump to be fair that whenever you announced a ceasefire data pulled out date a time line for drawing down troops oops you're effectively rewarding aggression <hes> now in in president trump's favor is the fact that he's such a maverick character not a politician at all. They taleban really can't be sure what it would do. He's quite i would and <hes> going in an opposite direction at a moment's nauseous so they can't be too sure that they've <hes> they can rely on the fact that he wants. This water ending certainly does water end it would be great achievement his presidency <hes> <hes> but he's included capable of turning around increasing troop no but we think the taliban a- a- not serious about peace it's a <hes> an ah incremental game of standoff being <hes> how we goes and wha- what do you think the people around him think about this because we know trump order order withdrawal of troops from syria by the pentagon opposed that and how do you think the pentagon is due to pull out of the base that could potentially be used in in perhaps a future confrontation with iran but we know that the the <hes> suit to be outgoing <hes> chairs the stuff <hes> is one of the most influential people in the pentagon but in the white house ministration <hes> being <hes> military men retired <hes> generals and serving generals who have been the most thing voices this trump administration and they more than anyone else wanted into this <hes> extraordinary long and on costly conflict <hes> but i also don't they. They didn't come at the price of throwing everything away. That's been sacrificed <hes> over these years the findings in late twenty two thousand one so i think that <hes> we need to take <hes> president trump's rhetoric just as as with become accustomed to another woods thing it is about symbolic positioning and not literally something bounces bullet through the next the next week and look behind him and see that <hes> he has given some <hes> considerable out to <hes> military bene- going <hes> chair of the joint chiefs of staff off and so far he's getting in the way of them doing what be done and another important question is that the afghan government has been absent from the talks and and in fact they haven't officially met with the taliban so do you think <hes> perhaps we'll have some direct talks was taliban anytime soon they will seventy need to hey where the at the end of the beginning and and coming to the end of the first chapter the next the next chapter is when the government to be involved <hes> many analysts list with say the reason. The government have not been involved. There's no because they have minute bought it because they had wanted to be involved and of course we're looking at government left <hes> days in office office. They'll be elections in this year and there will be new government coming in <hes> but it does seem to be pretty clear that the <hes> current <hes> administration <hes> have found it very convenient to say that they're not being invited to these these talks and and to <hes> play enough of it's <hes> upset when actually it's been well many analysts it's been there express we should not be directly involved but they will have to be involved with the next the next face work would well thank you greg barton professor of global islamic politics at deakin university in australia..

trump taliban afghan government president pentagon greg barton deakin university australia white house syria iran professor
"deakin university" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"deakin university" Discussed on World News Analysis

"<hes> you talking about the you're talking about the influenced if australia in the region so we'll australia's climate change of stance damages relationship russian ship with the pacific island nations and will australia shifts from his current surge <unk> coal policy amid pressure from the island state's all right. I think so. I just can't see that happening at all. <hes> you know inaugural australia's amongst the worst performers on climate change and the government knows <hes> they can't do that domestically. It's just bugged us won't stand for you know as we said before they just going to look at the economy and the environmental problems the new specially environmental problems on very very small island states micro sites in the pacific. He's always going to be far from the minds. In real terms <hes> the the real china remains clear choice for real improvements for the islanders <hes> it's true that the island nations are trying to leverage that with australia and new zealand-thai fourth but what they really really native courses renewable energy and <hes> infrastructure and connection to the markets <hes> and you okay energy sources and technology and that's what they really need and i think is really take any <hes> you mentioned earlier china's influencing the region we know china is investing nuclear <hes> new energy <hes> panels in the region and these are some of the country so what do you make of china's a row on the battle against climate change in the region. Well i think china <hes> you know all that china has very actively shoot. Well you know environmentalism is sort of locked into the actual constitution of china so <hes> it's obviously taking steps in that direction direction in the world's largest producer of all the cell panel factories and also by that renewable technologies <hes> it has the potential to really help the the island australia. It doesn't really have that same potential so this is you know from a point of view. That's the actual problem is the china does have the capacity to really really affect the livelihoods of these island and to help them into the future and not just with renewable energy but we also by the thing so public goods of all kinds and end the trade and agriculture and so forth <hes> so there were other elements both fishing for example is going to be critical as well and i think china needs to look at that very carefully athlete <hes> and find ways to really help them but ultimately there has to be cooperation pacific islands. There's a whole set of. There's a whole set of small development. Banks and funds stray is putting up a fund and there's a there's there's all sorts of sources of money and i think they will trading on each other's toes. I mean basically what really needs to happen. Is that all the players in the pacific working together and that of course includes china indeed thanks debbie renn and a visiting scholar at try no more university from deakin university australia after the break president trump will confirms his interest in buying greenland. You're listening to today's state with us ever worry that you'll miss out on breaking events events tune.

china australia pacific island islanders deakin university australia debbie renn visiting scholar trump greenland producer president
"deakin university" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

09:30 min | 2 years ago

"deakin university" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"From all sides in those never-ending cultural 's there's also a perception abroad these days that human progress is really about technology and economics and that feels like like literature or languages or religious studies or dare I say philosophy a bit of a luxury certainly less serious pursuit than the stem fields. disallowance technology engineering mathematics and this perception gives rise to one rather challenging question who needs the humanities well the the question was the topic of a forum recently held at Deakin University in Melbourne the forum brought together a range of speakers who are all examining the value of humanities search and in today's program we're going to be hearing from three of them first up is joy democracy professor of history at the University of Melbourne and current president of the Australian Academy of the humanities with something of a corrective to anyone who might think that the humanities and the stem fields inhabit separate universes in answer to the question posed in this forum who needs the humanities. I would suggest we all do and desperately urgently so in looking at the humanities research I wanted to consider two aspects relating to this to the vital importance of humanity's to the future workforce that's my angle today okay so the first aspect is value I want to look at of research skills that humanity's offer in the wider world of work and second of all the insights humanities research can bring as we embark on the changing technological landscape of artificial intelligence and the fourth industrial revolution so first of all to my first point the humanities research skill set that relates to the workforce there'd be many reports in Australia and overseas which alighted skills gained through studying arts and humanities and they submit to high level debates about the value of these schools to individual society and of course as we've heard as well to the Konami so I'm involved in one such report called the future humanities workforce which has been led by these strain academy the humanities and he's funded by these trying Research Council to look at the contribution amongst other things of the humanities workforce in Australia so what air and other reports have indicated is The band is growing the individuals to be quick with higher level schools which they can deploy in different contexts where in a career which my crossman any sectors of employment or within the research community which is increasingly becoming interdisciplinary improving the school's basis is crucial to increasing productivity am meeting the challenges of a constantly changing workforce so when we're looking at the value of humanities research one way to look at it is in terms of the research skill set and it's value so what is the school sip so this core of skills I think shared by undergraduates and postgraduate students early career researchers and oh proficiency changes as individuals become advanced in this study research skills in the humanities framed and framed around six core elements and values first communication are clear coherent explanation and description school said presenting that pervasive arguments underpinned silence using diplomacy and negotiation respecting others views second of all conducting research itself and collecting evidence for being a research question and determining the evidence needed to answer the question locating and retrieving textual numerical and visual information from existing sources third and crucially analyzing comeback to this analysis in assisting what the evidence might mean recognizing where it is incomplete ambiguous an unreliable evaluating findings to come to a conclusion taking into account different perspectives and evaluating the complexity of the material critical King of course is at the heart and reflection on take it for granted answers and assumptions to problems and value assumptions fourth decision-making established shing criteria and evaluating evidence against it fifth problem solving applying knowledge to find solutions in creative and innovative way and finally it at adaptability and creativity willingness to try different approaches being open and receptive to new ideas so humanities graduates researchers participate in and contribute to civil society drawing on their understanding of the human dimension of the society engagement with the arts and culture individuals to understand themselves and their lives and appreciate the diversity of human experiences and cultures for these reasons the humanities valued in wide range of professions not necessarily dependent on the specific knowledge of the subject they have studied they're strong generic skills and flexibility mean that the rabbit to adapt adjust to the requirements of work in many different areas and others of course go onto specialist employment roots which title to society or go on to become an generation researchers enabling the disciplines to continue to contribute to the cultural social and economic health wealth and reputation nations of industries have publicly recognized the high value and centrality of these schools in the future workforce on crucial aspect which she's researchers bring is an understanding of the human consequences of developments. I think this is really important in understanding the distinctive contribution we looking at human consequences of various developments such as artificial intelligence which can be used to shape legal moral and ethical frameworks which need to be created as part of the new digital age this takes me to my second point the contribution and analysis of humanity's researched the changing workforce such as AARP and the human impact of these developments so this way some of you may be aware that a very timely report was released by the four academies called the effective and ethical development of artificial intelligence and opportunity to improve our wellbeing humanities based analysis is that they're very hard of this investigation into I and what does this mean precisely here. I think we can see the true value of a humanities examination so in an access to technology inclusion questions such as the right to work a fundamental human right so for example many claim that I will transfer the tasks involved in work create new roles and establish new skill sets but the consequences of widespread automation likely be different for men and for women with implications for socio economic equality and the and the global gender gap we can look at other issues such as the right to privacy and the issue of surveillance Gene Algorithm make decision making tools carries the risk of amplifying discrimination and problems of fairness arise here in there is a wide belief that Algorithm make decision making tools are more objective because they are less biased human decision makers such assertions imply that legal protection against unfair discrimination might not be relevant to objective algorithms decision making human prejudice rhythmic buys defer in character but both are capable of Jenner writing grossly unfair and discriminatory decisions tackling this problem will be particularly challenging owing to the contested nature of fairness and discrimination in humanity's analysis leads the way and finally saw you that I will depend on the confidence that society places in the technology the issue of trust I systems raises a number of definitional problems including trust that the algorithms will produce the desired output trust in the values underpinning the system trust in the way data in the system are protected and secured and trust that the system has been developed for the good of all stakeholders such questions of trust take us as far beyond the simple matter of whether they believe in the technology at the technology works it also opens up the matter of ethics and so on and so forth my point here is that all the core skills that are outlined earlier fundamental to a humanities researcher we can see applied in ample measure here to the critique analysis and the understanding for example I and in so doing promoting a future based on a cohesive and ethical culture and society in the midst of radical and transfer EH technological change joy democracy historian at the University of Melbourne and President of the Australian Academy of the humanities.

University of Melbourne Australian Academy of president Melbourne Deakin University AARP surveillance Gene Algorithm professor of history Jenner researcher
"deakin university" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"deakin university" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Welcome back. You're listening to today. I'm joing the US Talabani gauche eater say there have been significant progress falling six days of Afghan peace negotiations in Doha tower. Beneficial say a draft deal included with role of foreign troops from Afghanistan, but in eighteen months, potentially ending the seventeen year conflict. The deal is also expected to include a pledge by Taleban forces to stop launching attacks inside Pakistan from Afghan soil for more on those are now joined on the line by Greg Barton, professor of global Islamic politics at Deakin university, Dr Greg thanks for joining us. So what did you tell do we know about their agreement and in general, how do you see the significance of those? We current uses thirty promising this is the closest talked to in the last decade, of course, still a long way to go peace talks negotiation in Doha went on for many days much longer than expected. If all goes will they'll regime in a month time, they're getting? Significantly the Taliban have agreed not to. Allow off? I'm gonna stunned territory using the sanctuary groups like the national T Howdy terrorist groups, and that makes sense because that's that seems to be some silly addition their their interest is like financial, Bruce, the perhaps the most significant news about from the positive fact fishing's, but for a long time, and again is that the American envoy. I'm invested a collie done was on the fourth day by the second in charge from the Taliban. Mullahs borrowed I'm about a was with the founder of a Taliban ONA at the beginning. He tried to approach president comes I negotiate face in two thousand to try to get into the rest of by the Pakistanis. Was anyone ambassador college the the year negotiated his release that he got out and went back to second command in the Taliban. This is the first. Time I've had a senior Taliban leader at the type of type time when I made again, it'll be moolah Bata negotiation. So that's pretty significant. So what do you think has made both sides willing to make compromise tools? Peace and how much does it have to do with the ricin to now's -ment of the US President Donald Trump to pull some troops out of Afghanistan. The amount of troop withdrawal set me new about wanna hear they one of the big moms, but also leave, but I don't think that that's triggered this. I think the short answer to what you know, long and complex story. He's the after the news a conflict. Everyone is everyone has suffered. No one is winning. Everyone's holding sort of holy ground. But if the miserable situation potty, including foreign parties such as Pakistan Russia that have been caught up in the conflict along with American Airlines. Taliban, governor come people. This is just miserable trolling out conflict which has to come to sometime. It clearly not going to be resolved military mean and that made them as sort of unlikely things that have actually negotiations move work. If compromises can be met, the US lead negotiator says there are still a number of issues left to work out. So what are the sticking points that are still out there or the immediate thing is whether they make next like next month in Doha with a boa about late talk. Then after that is the questions these, you know, that's the come off the US troops international troops. Now say that the next eight months all the on Critchley vast majority of the. Sticking point is. Will they over that spot between relate? It's gotta be a C supply place that happened at the same time that Taliban have to take the Afghan government tonight. I said just a conflict of Americans don't wanna talk to them won't really talking about his power sharing this place process, which would take months and years to result, even exceeds we gotta say the Taliban sharing with the Afghan government. Then questions of are they going to respect the constitution sickly with respect to the rights of women. Will there full of wallowed gotta stand in elections and elected to parliament in the really big underlying issues..

Taliban Doha US Pakistan Donald Trump Doha tower Afghanistan Afghan government president Talabani Greg Barton Deakin university American Airlines Bruce Dr Greg founder Critchley professor Russia
"deakin university" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"deakin university" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Most of the phone is unlikely or at least longtime resident we have seen a off from some of the on with some joining with Islamic state, but they mostly ex, but there are number of foreign find his some of the move may come from Syria. Iraq all across Asia going into downtown. So that's as we would expect it to be that this insurgent abrasion to national profit chimp, even inclusively sometimes it'll be a flow of people within it into southern Philippines out of each around will be lost for that. And they're the prison to fairly small number four and five I think of typical capacity and the wind which around leave taking so that is a and gonna because then everybody when I question since the President Trump has been talking about withdrawing from Syria and having. The number of station troops in Afghanistan. And also Turkish president urged when is talking about launching a military campaign to wipeout Kurdish fighters in northern parts of Syria. How do we make sense of what's happening in the Middle East right now? One thing they can read from the American situation what it's secretary of to medicine and Britain good who was leading camman channel, Syria, Iraq. And of course, that goes along with a score of exactly what we're going against the warning you about this pretty universal excluding the president. This is the wrong direction. Prevaricate be going. It would be good Saliger's as President Trump. Find Turkey and aggressor you're on the problems that we have the Turkey and Russia in Iran their for their own troops and their proxy feeding Atlantic or whatever. Perfect with the land on kinda affiliates turkeys, looking very strongly with militia leaked with Syria and a to ship to turn a blind eye to excite is that feels that can help them to seek what every day nine. I mean they killed. So this is an an awful mess and likely to get worse. That's why these spectacular resignations at the highest level and come onto a same. I think that's pretty bad news for everyone. Not just. American. Chris think you're much professor Barton as always been talking with Gregg Barton, professor of global Islamic politics at Deakin university in Australia coming up Japan announced withdrawal from the International Whaling Commission to resume commercial whaling. You're listening to today. I'm sui station. What matters to China increasingly matters to the world keep up to date with the latest news and events of the middle kingdom with the China. Plus up to the minute reports. Live streaming audio inciteful opinion on everything China related, facts, figures and language learning resources at your fingertips. Everything and focus all in one place. Search for China plus in the app store or Google play. Ever worry that you'll miss out on breaking events. Tune into today.

Syria president President Trump Iraq China Turkey Middle East Philippines professor Barton Asia Afghanistan International Whaling Commissi sui station Gregg Barton Google secretary Deakin university Saliger Britain
"deakin university" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"deakin university" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Greg Barton, professor of global slamming politics at Deakin university as a professor Barton how much influence will this resolution approved by the US Senate half on the kashogi case. If unlikely by to have a whole of direct influence, but it's very significant Republican led Senate in very prominent Republicans joined by Democrats in it is my hime is pointless in the kashogi mood to ongoing US military's. So. Saudi actions in Yemen. A combination of things might end up being consequently, even at one on the largely symbolic Senate. Stewing the United States. How do we understand the stance of the Trump administration on handling the fallout of the killing of Kosovo so far? One of the things about the US Senate, this this Republican led Senate vote is it's it's all with what the White House has been Tang. What house so still the prison mental try to downplay connections with NAMA bin Salman, the crown prince and then said well ninety maybe he didn't Evan. Clear, and and of course, all along with Saudis two important to jeopardize relationship based on wanting to that. So the president himself has been more away from responding to a links to to the crown prints. He's intelligence services have been very clear and some of the senators voting on Thursday, the coca for example, champion of the national committee said never seen more damning intelligence keeping a load of Chevy to bin Salman. So the tension between the US government of the whole and certainly Senate congress and the president what have signing and now we heard UN chief Antonio Matarrese has been calling for a credible probe. What can we expect if the investigations carry on or war or all the details are pretty much out there and nothing more can change? The course of the case. That's very good question. It's hard to say, what movie house, perhaps the difference is that people have been briefed on television reports public. I dedicated pro could make public statements as opposed to just relying upon for its I'm likely the change thing that with respect to Saudi right there. And there are some that, you know, just talk about the gang or county has been some break. Free fun discussions. If pressure puts European nations, and and and Britain and the US tobacco for military support for militarize in Yemen. Then maybe some direct consequence of the Jamaica. Sure, even though they went through the legal prosecution, fellow crowned prince and a Turkish president resi Turci word when last week again suggested people close to a crown prince assume an active role in the murder or also stressed that his country would continue to chase the case. How do you see? What has been doing in recent weeks and Dedaye achieve their targets hard? Not to be cynical enough of Nickelback two hundred on the president to one in recent years dozens and dozens of dissidents have been expedited extolling the rain the book back from I've essays countries to take on intelligence services. They're critical with dying in prison of torture or dying in the confrontation leading up to allege the wrist lifting dominating sector. Actress that the same as president Juan is blaming momma did sell evaluation all exactly the same thing. But he's guilty for the begs the question, what's he doing? He seems to be angling for pressure on the Saudi perhaps to get some financial lungs possibly interest free loans. Recyclable financial Turkish economies in great trouble relationship with Audi right, there is sort fault. That Osman is remain with all of that month between the Turks and Saudi. Voting relationship in at one. He's figuring a very how rail politic. If you embarrassed the not even public and privately for some of L compensation, Kimberly. The relationship of fun to try and all on for pressure on the Americans concession America, by using of which American opinion, it's really clear, but he's prison systems line of. So beforehand, I mean weeks ago there were discussions that. There might be some challenges to the leadership of the crown prince was to situation domestic political situation in Salvi now is already stabilizing. It is certainly worth some rumblings guesting, but the Trump print Monte inch dog one, you know, some suggestions that his brother. People backing us to replace him. It does seem unlikely things like Saudi onto down this. Remember, twelve months ago? Trump print on on will basically arrested hundreds of prominent business leaders and filling fellow Princess and kittens Fain in a luxury hotel in Riyadh..

US Senate president US Yemen Greg Barton Juan Salman professor Deakin university momma Riyadh Kosovo Salvi White House Audi Antonio Matarrese Chevy Fain Jamaica
"deakin university" Discussed on Mac OS Ken

Mac OS Ken

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"deakin university" Discussed on Mac OS Ken

"Pay. Remember all those times, I wondered aloud what apple would do if some government somewhere made a law requiring a back door in the I o s we may be about to find out quoting a piece from ars Technica on Thursday. The Australian parliament approved a measure that critics say will weaken encryption in favor of law enforcement and the demands of government the new law, which has been pushed for since at least twenty seventeen requires the companies provide a way to get at encrypted communications. And they buy a warrant process. It also imposes fines up to ten million dollars. Australian for companies that do not comply and fifty thousand dollars Australian for individuals who do not comply and short the law towards or at least tries to ward strong in grip Shen. Bunny thing though, the proposed legislation ask for the impossible the Cording to the report the statute says the companies cannot be compelled to introduce a systemic weakness or assist vulnerability into their software or hardware to satisfy government demands. Those terms are not fully defined than the current law. But are set to be added in the forthcoming amendments. I say proposed legislation because it still has some formal approval process to go through though, the piece makes that sound perfunctory is willing to walk away from the Australian market over this. Honestly, it might not matter if they did at a moaner a lecturer in criminology at Deakin university in Australia pointed out to ours Technica that the new law, not only implicates his home country. But also the other four members of the so called five is of English speaking nations which include New Zealand, Canada, the UK and the US if you don't remember who or what the five is our Wicca pedia reminds us there an intelligence alliance comprising, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the UK and the US. These countries are parties to the multilateral UK. US a agreement a treaty for joint cooperation in signals intelligence. What that means for Apple's ability to opt out of the new Australian rules is unclear to me also curious whether law enforcement will ever believe that what they're asking for is impossible. You can't require companies to weaken their products while simultaneously saying, the companies cannot be compelled to introduce a systemic weakness or a systemic vulnerability into their software or hardware to satisfy government demands. That apparently won't stop them from trying. Apple shares took more hits on Thursday Rosenblatt analysts June Jiang has been bearish on apple for a while. Now, still even by his standards his note declines on Thursday was a bit surprising. Oh, it wasn't his worry over iphone unit sales. That's an established thing. According a piece on his take from apple and cider June Jiang from Rosenblatt. Securities claims to be seeing ipad pro sales weaker than we expected so far which the analyst is blaming on the price of the device. Additionally, coupled with that Jiang expecting the iphone ten are an iphone ten s production to come down slightly. But in comparison to what isn't clear as I say, given his pessimism where apple hardware is concerned. Those comments or not really surprising. The surprising bit was his prediction of poor, sir..

apple June Jiang Australian parliament UK Rosenblatt ars Technica Australia New Zealand US Shen Deakin university ours Technica lecturer Canada analyst fifty thousand dollars ten million dollars
"deakin university" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"deakin university" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast. Milken science fiction live on the future of six at Melva museum. Contemplating the future of six future where six pleasure pregnancy will probably get a little bit Weeda and a little bit wild. Thank you to new technologies and our brains guests philosopher, professor rob Sparrow from Monash University who does into the future where robots become carers and also our sexual partners bioethicist to av KENDALL from Deakin university. Well, she us for a future where the use of artificial wounds. So having babies outside our bodies could help achieve equality between the sexes. And we also have professor Bob warm with us tonight a behavioral and Volusia biologist. He's lab at Monash Uni investigates, the six lives of other animals and. How are infecting dramatically changed by what we do place? Give them a big welcome. Six pleasure reproduction as it every listener biologist, they're all kind of on the same spectrum really out. There's one in point exactly it's all about posse on your genes. So I guess the bodies basically lock support system for reproduction. It's a very very anti lighting y describing. Try and do better. Because you know, biology is kind of what he's about. But it's about so much more than there. Without pleasure. Six would be boring. The pleasure sought of things is actually really crucial in terms of facilitating that drive for reproduction. Right pleasure is just about alternately procreating. Back to the boring. Animal's type pleasure in six think. So I think human sex lives quite vanilla compared to a lot of the other animals that we actually study in the animal world, we have species that actually engage in sexual cannibalism where the female actually eat the mile during sex and the mouse completely complicit in all of this. Because by being eaten alive, he's actually contributing nutrients to he's future progeny, but then also by being eaten alive, he's prolonging the actual act of sex. And so he's able to transfer more sperm to females aches say he signs up for these great perfectly. Happy.

rob Sparrow professor Monash Uni Milken ABC Melva museum Monash University Deakin university Weeda Volusia Bob warm
"deakin university" Discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"deakin university" Discussed on All In The Mind

"Approximately three million straightens leave with depression or anxiety. These conditions can affect health. Thank you feel and cause you to question who is the real you, whether you're on or off medication? Dr tomorrow. Kayeli Brown is a bio ethicist at Deakin university, her interest in the sense of authenticity in relation to mental illness, motivated her to explore a range of women's experiences. She interviewed women with major depression and bipolar disorder. She expected to find a difference between the way the women felt about their prospects of getting bitter depending on the type of diagnosis. They had. Okay. Actually, what I found was not a distinction between the different diagnoses of depression, but a distinction between people who felt like most of their depressive episodes were triggered by something going on in their lives, and those who didn't. So the women who said that most of their episodes of depression were triggered by, say, a stressful life event or something else that had happened, they were more likely to feel that their depression could be overcome in the future. Whereas those who felt like they tended not to experience triggers for their depressions tended to feel like depression is likely to be chronic. So when I asked them why they said that, well, I feel like because it came out of the blue. I can't see any reason why it happened. So I don't feel like there's much I can do to control. Roll it, whereas those who felt black, their depressions were triggered, felt like there's a reason why it happened. And so it's possible to understand why depression is happening and potentially how to control it in the future. Because in the past depression with categorized into two types, they was indulgence depression, which came as a result of within and reactive depression, which was triggered by something that had happened in people's lives. It's no longer thought of in this way, but can you see that reflected in the results of your study? Well, this was the one of the things that I thought of when this finding was coming up. I thought exactly. Like you said, I, this starts to resemble this old categorization of depression. So even though there are some subtle differences between the way that. It used to be cut a garage, so they they used to use what they called objective life measures. So the person who is investigating the scientists would come up with, say a list of life events that they thought classified someone is having a major stressful life event. Whereas I just allowed the women themselves to say whether they felt their depression was triggered by something and some of them the things that they listed. My never have been considered on those objective life event measures if you will. But aside from those differences, I did think it does resemble these old categories so it might be worth revisiting that old distinction which has now been lost. It's categorized more on the symptoms and it's not taking into account how depression comes about let alone. Hell the individual feels that they're depressions come about..

depression Kayeli Brown Deakin university bipolar disorder
"deakin university" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"deakin university" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

"The term superfood and and really highlight genius food so wild salmon is definitely one of them you know it provides the building blocks to create healthy new brain cells we now know that the adult brain can grow brain cells up until death you stimulate neurogenesis when you exercise but you wanna make sure that when your brain is like okay let's you know let's get this new brain cell production into high gear you wanna be able to facilitate the most appropriate building blocks for that and wild salmon contains dha fat which is one of the most important structural components of the of the human brain i talk a lot about grassfed beef that's probably one about one of the more controversial tips in the book i don't think that the vegan diet is appropriate for optimal brain function and in fact i think that you know red meat when properly raised contains a number of really important nutrients that help facilitate brain energy metabolism that help can mitigate depression there was a great study out of deakin university in australia that found out of a thousand women those that did not consume the recommended three to four servings of red meat per week or twice as likely to suffer from a depressive disorder major depressive major depression or an anxiety disorder twice as likely and there were also at increased risk when they consumed more than that as well and i checked the study was not funded by the beef industry you know it's a it's a potent source of keratin lloyd's wish which can help the brain perform optimally vitamin b twelve obviously creating there's a special kind of fat found in kraft's fed red meat called cla which i think is probably very beneficial i talk a lot about avocados so do you guys avocado yeah i mean you posted avocado on instagram these days it's like instant twice as many likes we had vaulter longo on the.

deakin university australia lloyd vaulter longo
"deakin university" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"deakin university" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"That she citizen of this country and as a muslim i strongly condemn this action which i believe is an act purely by terrorists i can only pray that in future the police and other units will act responsibly after this event professor greg barton is chair of global islamic politics at deakin university in australia and has just spent time in indonesia dan damon asked him how much influence islamic state has their in indonesia islam estate is a very significant influence if san in terms of absolute numbers we've had perhaps as many as a thousand people go to iraq and syria in its name the numbers are not quite clear and perhaps half that number have already returned but in the context of a nation of two hundred and seven even in people and two hundred twenty five million muslims the largest muslim population in the world in a single nation it's remarkable how little penetration it's might nets good news that so i think proof to the fact that mccready imperfect though it is is what he and indonesia the traditional expressions of islam a strong and people have very confident sense of their identity so i think we need to frame it and put in that context you've just returned a few hours ago from indonesia what is it about the ideology which you know as as i'm sure you do that it's easy to find muslim clerics will utterly discount what islam estate teaches nonetheless it has traction with some people including these two families why is that.

greg barton deakin university australia dan damon indonesia islam estate syria indonesia professor iraq mccready
"deakin university" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"deakin university" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"That she citizen of this country and as a muslim i strongly condemn this action which i believe is an act purely by terrorists i can only pray that in future the police and other units will act responsibly after this event professor greg barton is chair of global islamic politics at deakin university in australia and has just spent time in indonesia dan damon asked him how much influence islamic state has their in indonesia islam estate is a very significant influence if san in terms of absolute numbers we've had perhaps as many as a thousand people go to iraq and syria in its name the numbers are not quite clear and perhaps half that number have already returned but in the context of a nation of two hundred and seven even in people and two hundred twenty five million muslims the largest muslim population in the world in a single nation it's remarkable how little penetration it's might nets good news that so i think proof to the fact that mccready imperfect though it is is what he and indonesia the traditional expressions of islam a strong and people have very confident sense of their identity so i think we need to frame it and put in that context you've just returned a few hours ago from indonesia what is it about the ideology which you know as as i'm sure you do that it's easy to find muslim clerics will utterly discount what islam estate teaches nonetheless it has traction with some people including these two families why is that.

greg barton deakin university australia dan damon indonesia islam estate syria indonesia professor iraq mccready
"deakin university" Discussed on The Food Chain

The Food Chain

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"deakin university" Discussed on The Food Chain

"The reason why you can't promote lots of the typical wolflike this has to do with attrition and health claims you can't claim something on a particular wolf that's different from any other wolf gordon post ma most mandatory for the cash and involves the addition of iron folic acid nisin riboflavin and sign and to wheat rice and maize but in some countries as a legal requirement to fortify milk cerealbased products fats and oils the other type of feed fortification is falling tree meaning it's at the discretion of the food manufacturer to at nutrients from a governmentapproved list for some this can be problematic marc lawrence is professor in public health nutrition at deakin university in australia fifty years ago they were few countries around the world where you would get more than a handful of products that have been 44 to atlanta voluntary doses this just been a proliferation of voluntary fortification in terms of the number of nutrients that obeying added to foods as well as a range of foods that are being added in cimoli the rolette of mandatory fortification has gone up tremendously it's just been incredibly exposure of the world's population to nutrients through for the croatian interventions so we've seen fate fortification rise along with the rise of processed fate it's a great irony isn't it that will purportedly the fortifications is occurring to the health benefits engineered it's displacing nutritious hope hoots from from the diet it seems to be a little bit of a mixed blessing putting it mildly and to double problem when the vehicle for carrying the fortification mafia breakfast cereal truly high in sugar assault or whatever.

marc lawrence professor deakin university assault wolf gordon public health australia atlanta fifty years milk
"deakin university" Discussed on Short and Curly

Short and Curly

02:01 min | 5 years ago

"deakin university" Discussed on Short and Curly

"Basically we just got to a point web computer games and special effects were well really really good so i thought i'd test out just how good they could be by building a machine that can take you into a completely different world but how come everything tasted and smelled and felt so real well that plug in the back of your head lets me tapped directly into your brain lou liz my head but wasn't a tricky creating a full computer world like the one i've been living in wrote year but like i said i'm a pretty amazing scientist and i had some great help one of my chief advises was virtual reality expert banharn from deakin university and he helped me realize the technology to make and experience machine wasn't just science fiction i think he will the other choose entering the experience who she would be one that's sahni by the breach and and food junk the new when we most need know i think it's an exciting proposition to me i won't new experience things that a fun to not have to do things we're doing our work working to enjoys as to win we might get there are not and so would you jump in which you unplugged from the real world and plug into virtual worlds if immense leaving behind everything here in the real world to into that virtual worlds wallets attempting proposition kauai think leaving my family and friends to difficult i say a number of problems with going into the experience for shane the first these who's going to run the real world who's going to make sure that the physical may phase cleaned looked after and the second he's is interacting with an autonomous computer generated.

scientist deakin university shane virtual reality