21 Burst results for "Deaf Community"

Twitter is finally thinking about accessibility first

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:04 min | 3 months ago

Twitter is finally thinking about accessibility first

"There's been a lot of talk this week. About new twitter features mostly disappearing tweets but twitter also announced tuesday that its planning boys. Only chat rooms called spaces where you talk instead of type earlier this summer. Twitter experimented with letting people send audio only tweets but didn't allow for captioning those tweets so they were inaccessible to the deaf community. Twitter that feature on pause and has now created two new teams one to make twitter a more accessible place to work and another to vet product ideas for accessibility and according to twitter. Accessibility has been quote top of mind when developing spaces delana brand is vice president and head of inclusion and diversity at twitter the process in the past has been very decentralized so each team that had some accountability for accessibility really was driving their own processes and decision making Typical example are accommodations on being handled by our policy standards in benefits teams or facilities request being handled by a real estate and workplace team etc. And what we realize is while there's always power and flexibility are decentralized approach has some gaps and then we can even be more effective by bringing the structure to it. There really. wasn't anyone looking across in the past and and trying to bring the silos together and that's exactly what we're we're going to remediate with this new organization. How much power will these teams have. Could they pump the brakes on a feature out. If it's not accessible. I mean that's that's where the power they approach is is right is for the folks that have the experience that have the expertise to absolutely call out where we have missed the mark or where we are at risk or where there are potential gaps in surface that to the leadership team We are making investments in putting these teams in place because we want them to be empowered to challenge appropriately a common theme whenever you talk about. The tech industry is that if the industry where more diverse and in this case more people with disabilities worked at twitter or any other company that their products would be better. Are there any steps that you've identified about trying to improve the diversity in hiring and accessibility of twitter as a company. Yeah it's it's a part of the focus on you call it out. I mean it you know you. You can short these gaps and remediate these issues when you have people who are experienced either in the accessibility space or themselves from the disabled community because they have the insight And have the lived experience to be able to To call these things out and so it is absolutely a priority focused literally now. Is we're building on these teams. There are several folks that we have been interviewing that come from the disability community or our resident experts in the space maybe leading some external organizations that we partnered within in the past to to gain insights if you will so we're pretty excited about the approach that we're taking again. Lots of room to grow and improve acknowledged that and are really excited to be digging ed. Twitter's delana brand. The company says automatic captions for audio and video are due out early next

Twitter Delana Brand
With 'Deaf U,' Nyle DiMarco Strives To Show 'There Is No One Right Way To Be Deaf'

All Things Considered

06:06 min | 5 months ago

With 'Deaf U,' Nyle DiMarco Strives To Show 'There Is No One Right Way To Be Deaf'

"On Michelle Martin. Let's go back to pre covert times for a minute. You're a college student, and you want to take a break from the grind by going out for a few drinks or maybe getting a mani pedi with your B F F. But the seats only allow you to sit next to each other rather than face each other. No big deal, right? Well, it kind of is, if you are deaf or hard of hearing, And if you use American Silang, which SL to communicate Where you use your hands and facial expressions are important. And those are just a few of the subtleties revealed to those outside of the deaf community in the new Netflix reality, Siri's deaf, you know. It follows a group of students that guided at University in Washington, D C, which is known as the on Ly University in the world, where students can live and learn in American sign, language and English. But students still have to navigate a world that isn't necessarily built for them. The creator of the series is Nyle DeMarco, the model actor and activist who won both America's next top model and dancing with the stars, the first death contestant to do so, and he is here with us now to tell us more. And through the miracle of technology. He and I are talking to each other. And you're going to hear the voice of his interpreter. Gray Van Pelt. Welcome. Thank you so much for joining us. Of course. It's my pleasure. Thanks so much for having me today. As I just noted, you've been on reality television kind of a star. You're a model dancer. Clearly an activist. How did the idea of making a show about your alma mater come to you? It's pretty interesting. It goes back to my own experience being on reality television. I always felt that the image that was kind of made of me on screen was very one dimensional was always asked specifically about my deafness about my identity's sorts of struggles, but never about the things that I liked or disliked or really anything that I would have offered more to who I wass. It was nothing really about The culture right? And the idea for this show really came with the realization that we could use this to reframe the deaf community and offering entrance into our world which is so rich in culture and so layered in diverse but one of the things that I noticed If you've seen any show about college life, then you're going to, you know, recognize the types the The athletes, the influencers, you know, I activists, But you also introduced us to another divide a guy a debt between the so called elite Capital D, deaf from well known deaf families. And then as you've described elsewhere, lower case D death, those who don't come from these well known death families. Why did you feel it was important to kind of highlight this other divide myself as somebody who views elites as a group. I see. It could be a positive thing in the preserving of sign language, our culture, You know, it's about passing down those legacies in those traditions that make our culture. So Reg. There certainly are lower case D people who might see elites as someone who's had an unfair advantage, right? Whether it's their educational background, their confidence, their identity, their language fluency coming into college debt for them often, you know, they face a challenge that They have to not only focus on getting a degree, but also focus on learning a new language and a new culture. But there are so many layers to that divide between elites and perhaps Laura Kees de definite, something that's really key for a community. It's very complicated, but it's a discussion that were starting to have one of the characters of football player named Rodney. Likes to think of himself a somewhere in the middle of this divide. He has cochlear implants so he can hear and he also signs and I want to play a clip. This's Rodney's father. Do you feel like you're in between? We're like caught in the middle. I a deft So I'm in a body community. And this is what he is saying to some degree. Is is that he gives himself a license to be a Yeah. Ronnie Rotten family is so incredible. He's one of my absolute favorite. On the show. And one thing that I really love about him is that he really, you know, showcases and embodies that there is no one right way to be deaf, right? He's already fluent in American sign language, and so he has access to both. He's able to function in a hearing world in a deaf world with SL in English versus Ah lot of other students who come in to Garland at with outside language. You know they're facing a struggle of looking to find a place to fit in. Ronnie's already got it figured out so you can see through the show. He's like, I'm good. It's one of the things I love about him. Well, one of the things that I really liked about this exchange, though it mirrors some conversations that I think we have about race in this country to Rodney's also African American, and he also Exists in the space of trying to figure out like, what does it mean to be that right now? What do I want to be the truth of me and who gets to decide that? I think at the core of it, you know, it comes from growing up specifically in a culture and having access to the language. You know, I do think that Romney is incredibly confident. And you know, he knows exactly where his intersectionality lies. I do want to mention that you've been forward facing death advocate part of Your work in this area met hiring death crew members and creatives. I want to highlight that because that's not something that you want would necessarily know watching the Siri's. But why was that important as someone who is deaf? You know, I know that if you really want unauthentic story, it has to happen behind the camera, you know, defies really captured the culture best and we actually made it a requirement that we had to hire deaf people. We wanted to ensure that at minimum, we had 30% of the deaf crew behind the scenes working and we ended up with 50%, which was incredible, and it's the first time it's ever been done in history. You know we're working. So that later we have a little Hollywood empire were able to develop our own TV shows in our movies and our content that really reflect of culture and an authentic experience. And this essentially was the start. I'm so thrilled about it. That was now DeMarco, creator of the New Netflix. Siri's deaf You It is available now. And just wanna mention that we've been hearing him through the voice of his interpreter, Nyle DiMarco. Thanks so much for talking to us. Course. This was such a pleasure. Thank you so much for having me.

Nyle Demarco Rodney Siri Netflix Ronnie Rotten Michelle Martin Washington Van Pelt Ly University Nyle Dimarco Laura Kees America Football Garland Romney Hollywood
"deaf community" Discussed on The Lucky Few

The Lucky Few

05:16 min | 5 months ago

"deaf community" Discussed on The Lucky Few

"Way people in the deaf Community do not want to be called hearing impaired because what we're saying is that this is the impairment and and from what I understand most people within the deaf Community would say no, there's not something wrong with me. This is who I am I'm deaf. It's not because there's a dog Pyramid to like what I ought to be but right deafness is my identity. So right call me deaf. It's a source of Pride. It's a source of Pride. It's saying yes, this is an odd scripter. This is my identity. This is my culture. This is who I am and if you when you try to separate that it's actually more harmful for me than empowering for how long for me right. We're starting to really break free from titles that Bond us negatively impact and finding pride and Power in in individuals and I feel like even in the workplace disability that I was thinking that I was mentioning earlier that there is so much to shed as far as that being bad or wrong grammar like wage. It just says so interesting how much we carry that was the social norm. And how in past time there was so much shame in any anything that was quote-unquote wrong in a person in how that gets passed down. And even if you think you're not a person that feels that way you still have work to do cuz it's 8 inch still there and like this knowledge is so important that we're still learning how to empower every person on this planet, you know, right? Yeah, and I think that that let's bring it back to differently-abled which is the phrase that we used so often on this podcast and I'm like, what is it that is not empowering you guys about saying differently-abled as opposed to saying disabled. Way you feel like this is a problem for those who are listening in our like I don't get this you guys. What are you saying? I liked what you read to us Heather off about superhero powers, like compared almost to like superhuman strength..

deaf Community differently-abled
"deaf community" Discussed on The Lucky Few

The Lucky Few

03:27 min | 5 months ago

"deaf community" Discussed on The Lucky Few

"Top of the morning. So if if language is always changing. We're especially in a cultural moment where things can change all the time because of the internet like no wonder, you know, if you if your hairs are up and you're like, what is this changing? I just want to like give that information that things language is always changing and we as Learners being open to changing the way we speak about race. If we need to be back in the changing way we speak about where people come from or you know, how they want to refer to themselves. It's just so important in all aspects of life that we are listening and speaking in a way that values people. Yeah. I raised my hand everyone dead. I think too with a springing up this topic and the little talking we did before we recorded you Heather speaking about it just brought up to me how easy it is to Clump the disabilities Community as a whole but even within the disabilities Community, it's just so many people are their own Community. Yes, like the deaf Community how we're talking about a person with Down Syndrome as opposed to an autistic person. Like there is it is kind of a shame and not a shame. I think like I said, you said we weren't going to shame anybody but it is a bummer. All of a sudden have an aha moment, but I'm like, oh great. I just completely grouped a people group, you know and like and it's not intentional. All but we live so much in a box just to understand things so we bought these things up for understanding and I'm excited that we're going to unbox that bring awareness and I love education. I love educating myself, especially with social things and I feel like what a great opportunity for us to have this conversation more than telling anybody something new. It's a conversation for a changed world view and never been hurt and open mind an invitation. I think about how we speak scoot over wage makes them which may I don't really think that out. So I I feel like I changed the bulb that Heather passed it over. She asked us about first-person language. So let's let's talk about that. What how do you guys think about first-person language? I agree with it now. Although I agree with it in the proper context to which I want it to be successful, you know, so as a mom, I feel like okay another thing as an advocate and being a mom Advocate you can't help but place your own feelings on it, too. So I want my daughter to be seen for who she is, you know, so she's a girl first she's sunflower first then she was dancing him..

Heather deaf Community disabilities Community
"deaf community" Discussed on The Lucky Few

The Lucky Few

03:26 min | 5 months ago

"deaf community" Discussed on The Lucky Few

"Top of the morning. So if if language is always changing. We're especially in a cultural moment where things can change all the time because of the internet like no wonder, you know, if you if your hairs are up and you're like, what is this changing? I just want to like give that information that things language is always changing and we as Learners being open to changing the way we speak about race. If we need to be back in the changing the way we speak about where people come from or you know, how they want to refer to themselves. It's just so important in all aspects of life that we are listening and speaking in a way that values people. Yeah. I raised my hand everyone dead. I think too with a springing up this topic and the little talking we did before we recorded you Heather speaking about it just brought up to me how easy it is to Clump the disabilities Community as a whole but even within the disabilities Community, it's just so many people are their own Community. Yes, like the deaf Community how we're talking about a person with Down Syndrome as opposed to an autistic person. Like there is it is kind of a a shame and not a shame. I think like I said, you said we weren't going to shame anybody but it is a bummer. All of a sudden have an aha moment, but I'm like, oh great. I just completely grouped a people group, you know and like and it's not intentional. All but we live so much in a box just to understand things so we bought these things up for understanding and I'm excited that we're going to unbox that bring awareness and I love education. I love educating myself, especially with social things and I feel like what a great opportunity for us to have this conversation more than telling anybody something new. It's a conversation for a changed world view and never been hurt and open mind an invitation. I think about how we speak scoot over wage makes them which may I don't really think that out. So I I feel like I changed the bulb that Heather passed it over. She asked us about first-person language. So let's let's talk about that. What how do you guys think about first-person language? I agree with it now. Although I agree with it in the proper context to which I want it to be successful, you know, so as a mom, I feel like okay another thing as an advocate and being a mom Advocate you can't help but place your own feelings on it, too. So I want my daughter to be seen for who she is, you know, so she's a girl first she's sunflower first then she was dancing him..

Heather deaf Community disabilities Community
"deaf community" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:52 min | 5 months ago

"deaf community" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Which is Just, great. Well thank you to the deaf community because they would not have survived the pandemic without facetime. Right. A seriously. Now before isn't you back into your day? I always had folks shot out a queer. Oh, which is person place or thing that made you feel like you can be who you are today we use shout out. Who Am I? A good one. Interesting Question Oh you're putting me in the spot. Let's see. It's funny because you know having to choose one I mean. I talked so much about how you know there. There's no representation of deputies in Hollywood but. And having to look up to it's funny that the focus of this question is more on someone who would be hearing I would have to say micro would probably be somebody who's not quite well known but a very good friend of mine within the Deaf Community who has incredible and inspires me his name is Tate like me he came out much later And you know that was one of my first realizations that maybe I wasn't straight. He had kind of paved the way for me to understand that I could be something more than just that I always felt that they were really sort of exclusive in that I have to pick one but date really helped me discover that and kind of stretch the the that I was living in. And I I mean, he's not all that well known, but I'd say. It's the top. People do their family members or yeah I mean we need more representation obviously yeah. Of course. I think sometimes it like you're saying, it doesn't have to be. The Most impactful to the most people just has to be the most impactful to you and that can be that can be a lot that can be that can be your buddy. That that she does her its proximity. Sometimes. Definitely. And I would say my other Quito, probably would be Chela man, who's a really good friend of mine I'm if you've if you've heard of I I, just I love him. So Much I. Love Everything that he is I'm how he embraces himself and the layers has identity. And so many times I I look at that and I think, wow, i. really you know the language that he had an eighteen years old to really. Be Able to approach in a way that. The media could see I mean was really incredible. So young tight and Challah. Yeah well, it's. Super Cool person to encounter just through the way I've encountered him like just the Internet. And I will..

Tate Deaf Community facetime Quito Hollywood
"deaf community" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

05:01 min | 5 months ago

"deaf community" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"I mean, these are interesting questions. And and it's in it's not always obvious what the right answer should be. I mean, sometimes you like well, of course, it should be the same but shut it or are we expecting it to be the same? I don't know how long I know I would but does everyone. Yeah that that's a fair statement. Okay. So we Broadway to log you guys have a very generous with your time today. I do want to talk just as we close out about to voice damage. That was like one of the reasons why I had both of you on because you started this this podcast and YouTube channel two boys Deb's to to developers. You guys have heard them talking today just sort of chap about what's going on in the voice deaf Community what challenges are running across I thought it was just like really interesting and maybe a long-overdue type of thing. So why don't you tell the listener is about that a little bit and how they can find out more. Yeah. So actually I have met Ellen at voice Summit and then again at project voice at the beginning of this year and we had a dog Conversations but they have been fairly small. It really wasn't until voice Lynch came around and this, you know this idea of of getting together there and and Thursday we go co-host with some other people The Voice lunch that that we have on Fridays in the us, but we had kind of toyed with the idea a little bit about hey, we should get together and talk about this stuff. And finally we came when they did and it's just been a joy to to we pick a topic and then we just start and we don't really plan anything ahead of time and we tend to talk a lot and often claimed. It doesn't really enjoy enjoy the conversation that and the experience that each of us have what these voice platforms. I don't think it's a surprise to either of us that you commented that this one is running longer than thought because almost all of our sessions run longer than we thought but I think it's because we saw that nobody, you know, I think both of us like talking about voice in general and lots of people are talking about Thursday. In general both, you know had a market for it and how to use it and where it's going and the future so forth, but we didn't see anybody talking about, you know on a day-to-day basis. How do we create a skin and an action and get it out there? How do we do this?.

YouTube deaf Community Deb Ellen us Lynch
"deaf community" Discussed on Strength To Be Human --Literary Podcast, Hosted by Mark Antony Rossi

Strength To Be Human --Literary Podcast, Hosted by Mark Antony Rossi

04:46 min | 5 months ago

"deaf community" Discussed on Strength To Be Human --Literary Podcast, Hosted by Mark Antony Rossi

"I wouldn't trust people to say I'm ugly and shoot me poor. Makes no sense a lot of work, isn't it? Yeah, that's why identity is so much important in so many different things. I remember hearing one time and I actually was able to talk to a couple of years later somebody that was deaf and I remember when the the calculator airplanes came out implants came out and then of more advanced hearing aids now where the deaf Community got extremely upset. They were like all this is going to ruin our way of life and all this is going to be this and it's going to be that people who actually writing the boycott the Company's trying to actually people to put laws to stop this and blah blah. Again, I'm not deaf but I know somebody was deaf and that would have been my mom and one year and remember her having two lines learn sign language until she was able to get a hearing aid. That way we can actually pay for that would work enough for her to help her because you know, she had live a little bit of a light at the work at the nurse by pretending the things like reading lips and other things like that cuz the other ear can we catch so much money. She just lost it one day. She got a fever from being ill and mixing our she lost most of her hearing and I remember that Years later talking to her before, you know, she slipped into dementia and just became somebody else. I remember her laughing saying cry I would I would I love to have had that stuff. I mean it would be great. Oh, wow. I don't know what these people are talking about. It doesn't make any sense. Why would you want to be deaf, you know, and I explained to her I said listen. They have a formed identity of deafness and then identity they have formed the language. They informed almost like it's Deaf culture. They had like death shows and death music things and I mean really all kinds of death stuff literally.

deaf Community fever
"deaf community" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:50 min | 5 months ago

"deaf community" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sharing money with one card in the count, customers can open an account at one finance dot com slash NPR. It's here and now dozens of fires continue to burn up and down the West Coast fire crews getting a handle on some of them, but many will be burning for a long time. Let's touch base for just a couple minutes with K PCC's Jacob Margolis in Southern California. Jacob, give us an overview of the whole state. Yeah, even though some of the coverage of fires in the West has died down, we're still very much on fire. Right now. We've got 22 large fires in California 18,000 firefighters are working pretty much nonstop and a lot of been going non stop since about July. Some of the biggest fires or most notable ones, are the August complex up in Mendocino. It's at 837,000 acres by far the biggest fire on record only 34% contained Then we've got the creek fire that's torn through Sierra National Forest. That is still going. It is only 27% contained in here in Southern California. We've got the bobcat fire that is over 100,000 acres with largest in L, a county history and is not contained it all. It's threatening multiple counties and burning homes. It's very, very sad. Tough. Well, how about a requalify? Is that any better? It's improved, in part, at least in Eladio wind flow, but other people in other parts of the country or suffering or in our areas or suffering. And we should be very concerned about the health impacts from some researchers at Stanford that they're seeing an increase in the number of asthma cases coming in as well as strokes at Stanford Hospital, though That data needs to be ferreted out of it. But yes, the whole whole nation is being impacted by our smoke. Right now, we'll just briefly some of California's worst fires come later in the fall to get a sense of what's to come. It's going to be hot. We're waiting for Santa Ana winds, which are 60, plus mile per hour winds that could push fires across l A all the way to the ocean. That is our traditional wildfire season. So You know, fingers crossed. KPCC Science reported. Jacob Margolis. Thank you. Thank you. Okay. Two Cove in 19. Are you doing the right thing and wearing masks, But maybe missing smiles. We may have a solution. First wearing masks and social distancing is the best way to curb Cove in 19 right now, despite President Trump, downplaying masks and holding packed rallies where few people wear them. His top health officials were all over the Sunday morning shows pleading with people. To wear a mask. So good for you if you're wearing one, But, yes, we miss smiles, Which is why it was so disorienting to see a little girl round the corner in the store the other day, grinning at me like crazy through her cloth mask. What It's what's known as a clear panel mask. A number of companies are now making them the online company Rafi Nova, based in Needham, Massachusetts, which sold handbags and accessories till Cove in 19. Calls. There's the smile mask. We're going pictures that here now that or you have to see this. Marisa Goldstein is co founder of Rafi Nova. Hi, Marissa. Hi there, and also with her. Olivia Gampel, a licensed speech and language pathologist who helped design the smile mask. Olivia. Welcome to you as well. Thank you so much. And Morris, if you could just start by describing the mask again will have pictured here now dot Sure. So The Rafi Nova Smile mask is made with three layers of cotton fabric, and it has a panel that's made with B p a free recycled plastic. It can have adjustable ear loops or a tie behind one size for adults and one size for kids. And so the plastic is the part that goes over the mouth. Is there a seal a solid steel between the plastic and the material? There is a solid seal on the mask. This is a non medical mask, but it's been tested by several universities. And it is a safe and effective mask. Well, we want to know. The doctors say that the smile masks can be s safe as regular cloth Mass. Dr David Aronoff at Vanderbilt. Says that if properly constructed, they might be Yoon safer. Because durable, you know, synthetic materials like plastics can provide, you know a strong barrier to drop with dispersal. It's interesting we can thinking we wanted to do a story on how the heart of hearing in the death were faring during the pandemic, because, of course, many need to read lips, and we understand that was your inspiration as well. Marissa. That's correct. I'm someone who's always smiling and I would joke around and say like, Hey, guys, I'm not really smiling right now. But you would never noticed because I have this mask on and then Olivia, who's a speech language pathologist. She brought up the need for those that are deaf and hard of hearing that they're not able Tio participate in the conversation while wearing masks, so speech sounds or dampened by both the masks, fabric and by distance, which makes it really difficult to communicate effectively during this time of social distance. And as well. Many members of the Devin hard of hearing communities rely on lip reading to aid in their understanding of a conversation. Those who wear hearing AIDS, especially behind the ear, hearing AIDS or cochlear implants. They have a lot of difficulty wearing traditional masks that have ear loops, because when you start to pull off an ear, Lupin may take your hearing aid off with it. And so we designed the smile mask to have to tie behind straps that will accommodate for these hearing AIDS and cochlear implants, and the reception has been extremely positive. From both members of the deaf community to teacher's speech, pathologist Ideologists, You know, members of all different, you know, working fields. We created a special teacher package on our Web site a few months ago, and it just caught on like wildfire in in probably a two week period. We made 200 to 300 prototypes that we were just constantly Fixing and changing on DH making better and better. And so we really condensed this this prototyping timeframe which would normally be several months into just a few weeks because we knew that we had to get this product out into the market. Okay, So now we move from the beginnings of the your smile mask to you know where it is now, not just the deaf community, but I saw it on a little girl. It turns out her whole school has ordered them. Olivia. Tell us more about that. As someone who specializes in speech. You know, Children who are learning about emotions may have difficulty recognizing these emotions through facial expressions and tone of voice. When teachers or peers are wearing masks. I can also speak to this from, you know, a speech perspective where Children were learning phonics and speech sounds they required like this visual representation of tongue and lips, placement language. Comprehension relies not just on the words that we say but how we say it. Children look at our eyes are lit movements and cheeks all aid in this comprehension well, and you know adults. I mean, some people are loving the masks because there's a certain mystery to it. You were much less make up, you know, And it's become kind of a fashion statement in some quarters, but people are missing the smile. And I did a little research on the Duchamp smile named after the scientists William Benjamin Amon Duchamp. I'm sorry from murdering that, but he was a neurologist who studied this idea that this huge smile that just spreads across your face. And not only lifts the corners of your mouth but also affects your orbit. Claris July the muscles around your eyes. We really need to see that big smile and by the way, we should point out you know, the deaf in their own communities might each one to have these masks, But it's equally important for their colleagues to have the masks because that's Who they're trying to communicate with. Absolutely. These masks aren't just for the actual members of the deaf and hard of hearing communities, but they're for everybody around them as well. It's really important if you're at a grocery store, you never know if you'll encounter somebody who relies solely on lip reading to communicate. Mersa one quick question. So those of us wearing our masks that have glasses are fogging up our glasses all the time. What do you do about the breath on the plastic? That's a great question, so there will be some fogging. We've partnered with a company out of Indiana. We have an anti fog solution and you just apply a few drops onto the mask before using it and you wipe it. It reduces fog and condensation from forming on the mask like a ski goggles again. We'll have the pictures at here now dot org's. It's got a certain flair of its own as well. It kind.

Olivia Gampel Jacob Margolis AIDS California Rafi Nova Smile Southern California West William Benjamin Amon Duchamp West Coast Sierra National Forest Mendocino Rafi Nova Santa Ana Stanford Stanford Hospital curb Cove Indiana KPCC Science Marissa
"deaf community" Discussed on Back From The Future Podcast

Back From The Future Podcast

04:36 min | 7 months ago

"deaf community" Discussed on Back From The Future Podcast

"That's the best part and I'm not trying to sound like I haven't figured out but I believe thoroughly that everybody could win with having this technology out there and I just need somebody to come come to. Me and it will expose that. Well, I just want to thank you for coming on the and I'm sure he feels the same way. Yeah. This is lots of Fun Kyle I do wish you the best and we would love to have you back on the show you know with your progress of Fridrik sounds awesome but I could just see it now I can see this actual project. Working Yeah. Yeah. Totally want to see this happened. Yes I appreciate that so much. It's been a riot talking to you guys feel free to reach out anytime if you would have liked to go into if you're listenership whatever like to have me go deeper into a certain topic, whatever that may be I would love to really help people. That's that's really what it comes down to is I just want to help people be able to get into this industry. So that way not only do the companies at the people that they need, but the people can hire the stills and you will to get into this because there's a lot of money in it and I'd like. To. See people go from having these low awful paying jobs to having the freedom enjoy of being able to create something just by being able to speak to machines. So I appreciate you guys taking the time to bring me on and I'm so grateful for everybody in the Deaf Community for everything you've done for me and thank you so much to anybody who's taking the time to listen I appreciate you I. Wish Everybody the Absolute Best, and let's try to make code something that's transformative instead of so destructive where can people find you? We've mentioned you're linked in are you on any other social media platforms or do you have an email you would like to share with everyone You can reach out to me personally through linked in..

Deaf Community Fridrik
"deaf community" Discussed on GSMC SciFi Podcast

GSMC SciFi Podcast

08:04 min | 9 months ago

"deaf community" Discussed on GSMC SciFi Podcast

"Combat moves for the break. We were talking about the concept of brother against brother. Allusions to the civil war both the American type and the marvel type, which is also American in its own way I suppose, and then the Bible verses that are related to the sword of Truth and. Putting brother against brother, which is really what this episode seems to be about in my personal opinion. There's a truth that has been presented to everyone, and that is that this EPA genetic change is something that's natural. It's already in. Human DNA is natural in the most literal sense of that word and nurture has impacted nature. And so this is viewed as a disease by some people that it needs to be exterminated or just removed from the body, so that they become regular humans again and for others who are living with this. It's not really an illness to them. And that reminds me somewhat of folks in the Deaf Community or folks who are living with different types of dwarfism. Some folks think that they should be working on trying to hear if they're deaf. They think that deaf folks should get cochlear implants or get hearing aids and a lot of hearing. People do not understand why folks in the deaf community might shun that why they might not want to be in the hearing community, but indeed many deaf individuals do not, and when we talk about the deaf community, we talk about deftness with a capital, D. because it is their community, so that does mean something different. And one of my friends is an ASL interpreter. And she has also spoken recently to me about how cove in nineteen is disproportionately impacting people who are in the deaf and hard of hearing community, because with all these masks, they can't read folks lips, and they also are not able to see some of the cues that go along with ASL. For the hearing community for those of us who aren't really familiar with ASL a lot of us think of it as primarily being hand and move ments, but there are very many facial expressions that also accompany the different signs for different words and the different things, so if you're out there, and you're wanting to make these face shields, the space masks for folks. Maybe consider making the kind that have the plastic shielding around the mouth that is translucent or transparent, so that folks in the deaf and hard of hearing communities can also understand what you're saying. I can only imagine how jarring may be to not be able to suddenly understand why anyone around you is saying in something that is truly about apocalyptic right now much as it is apocalyptic in V wars, so keep that in mind, and if you are making those masks, or you're purchasing one for yourself, even if you do not personally know anyone in the deaf or hard of hearing community I really encourage you to think about getting those. Those types of masks just to really be considerate of others around us after all. That's also the point of the masks. So while we're out there being considered about spreading germs, we might as well also be considerate about how we are communicating with the world around us, including those who are not necessarily just like us. We are only as safe or protected as the most vulnerable among us and I think that's important to keep in mind. Similarly in Communities Lake the dwarfism community. There are people out there who have different lives than we do, and it's not necessarily considered to be disability. Just as many folks in the deaf community do not consider deftness to be a disability. Their community is much like the hearing community, but it also has some really wonderful cultural differences. It's not about just being different from the hearing community. Its own community in and of itself, and it's valuable in its own right as is the dwarfism community, some types of deafness, just like dwarfism are genetic in their basis. So this is just some human variation that is encoded in our DNA. And, very similarly weaken view this type of vampirism in this specific instance of the wars as not being something unnatural. It's not disability. It's not an illness from where the people who are experiencing it stand and I think that's one of the largest values of Scifi. SCIFI provides allegories for understanding different communities or context in the world around us through representation in ways that might be more stark or so by making it vampirism, it takes some of the wind out of the sales of folks who might get their chests. A little puffed up with outrage win. You are saying that something like this is not a disability or an illness, but they're very many people out there in the world who undergo similar types of issues, not in that they are sucking the blood out of other people just that at the. The very base level, they have genetic or EPA genetic components that are different from people who don't have those genetic components or don't have those genes expressed, and just because you or jeans or expressing one way does not mean that the gene expression that is happening around you and other individuals is necessarily a disability or an illness, and that's really another strong point that I. Get out of this episode so. That's the big difference here is that it's almost offensive in a way that luther is viewing this as an illness to Michael, so Michael is kind of figuring out that this is who he is as a person, and after the initial onset of transitioning into vampirism, once those EPA genetic changes have already taken place he doesn't. To have as severe bloodlust, he's not having the headaches and stuff anymore, and he seems to have mastery over these super senses. So for him, this is becoming a normal way of life. Humans can adapt to anything that they can become accustomed to, and that is what is happening with Michael and the other vampires that have been exposed to these pre ons, and who's EPA. Genetic changes have responded.

Deaf Community EPA Michael Communities Lake luther
Activist and YouTuber Chella Man

Nancy

02:58 min | 1 year ago

Activist and YouTuber Chella Man

"Going to talk to someone who sort of like lives their life in front of an online community. Chela man is a model and actor an activist for the deaf community and the chance community and also just a hugely popular Youtube Vlogger. Yeah his channel has two hundred and fifty thousand youtube subscribers and I think the thing that we both love about his videos is that they're so like personal and honest. He share stories about everything from his relationship to his transition to like everyday stuff from his life. Yeah he just so much in like I just have to mention. He's only twenty one years twenty one. Yeah Yeah I have to say. We definitely like gave him a hard time about how he's done so much at such a young age. I get that a lot. Yeah why why is it? Just feels like you've done so many things like you're doing art you're like acting. Um Ah in the only move to New York like three years ago. Yes Yum until it you grew up in Pennsylvania right I did sadly well can ask what was it like Krupp there. Oh well it was tough. It was a small town in the middle of nowhere basically like very white suburbia Trump land right before the election trump actually came highschool to speak which. I was there for as a junior in high school outside protesting all day. Obviously wow it was really hard you know the culture was. I watched all these kids that I grew up with walked past me on not look at me outside and just walk into the building support him. What was that day like? There's just a lot of emotions most of all. I just felt so fjord from whether that was like fueled by sadness. If fueled by anger I will just go back to that day a member. Why need to do what I do? One of your Youtube Videos. That became hugely popular for you early on. Was You documenting your experience on testosterone. My name is Charles Man and my voice one day on T. Hi My name is Charles. And this is my voice. One Week on. Either name is a man and dismay boys twenty-six to my name is Charles And this is my one year to. How do you think about telling your story online and like how did you begin that process? Honestly I began that process like any other teenager just now and then sharing snippets of getting caught fear etc but after a while I wanted to document transition because I found other trans people online and because of them I was able to make certain connections within my own identity and he wanted to be that for people especially deaf inquiry people of Color. Social media is my way of being able to say what I wanted to say. Cemented in

Youtube Charles And Charles Man New York Testosterone Charles Krupp Pennsylvania
Sign Languages Display Distinct Ancestries

60-Second Science

02:43 min | 1 year ago

Sign Languages Display Distinct Ancestries

"More than one hundred forty sign languages. These are used today primarily by deaf communities around the world like spoken languages each sign language has its own grammar vocabulary and other special official features for example American sign language and British sign. Language are mutually unintelligible. In fact American sign language has more in common common with French sign language largely because French. Educators were instrumental in helping get deaf schools established in the United States during the nineteenth century. But while the lineages in development of spoken languages are well studied to haven't been a lot of large scale comparisons of sign languages the University of Texas Austin Linguist Justin Power. He and his colleagues aim to address that information gap. In order to study the question of sign language solution we I assembled a database of manual alphabets from dozens of different sign. Languages around the world so a manual alphabet is sort of a subsystem system within a sign language that is used to represent a written language so there's a hand shaped corresponds to each letter powers team chose to study manual alphabets because a record of them exists going back. To the late sixteenth century in Europe to uncover relationships between the alphabets the researchers use the same methods the US to trace relationships between different species based on their DNA. The methods grouped sign languages in this study into five main European lineages and those were Austrian origin British origin French origin Spanish and Swedish power says manual alphabets from Austria. France and Spain could be traced back to one handed manual alphabets from sixteenth and Seventeenth Century Spain. But each of those lineages evolved independently Hendley of each other and the British lineage which uses a two handed manual alphabet eventually made it to Australia New Zealand and India the study we also confirmed the French origins of American sign language and those of other countries including Mexico Brazil and the Netherlands. Surprisingly the Austrian strean manual alphabet influenced sign languages as far away as Russia. But wow this lineage has largely died out remnants of it live on Icelandic excite language. Today the study is in the journal Royal Society Open Science Power Says Future Research comparing the vocabularies of different sign. Languages could provide even more clues about how they've changed over time understanding how languages evolve would tell us a lot about the way that language in general evolves.

Justin Power United States Seventeenth Century Spain University Of Texas Austin Royal Society Open Science Official Europe Hendley Austria France Spain Russia Mexico Brazil Australia New Zealand Netherlands India
"deaf community" Discussed on An Arm and a Leg

An Arm and a Leg

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"deaf community" Discussed on An Arm and a Leg

"Who suddenly hated? Stephanie's bill the Deaf Community as Stephanie describes it the Deaf Community in Texas says happened to be involved in another legislative fight at the same time and the other one was super contentious briefly. There's an idea that deafness is an identity. There's culture to be part of hearing AIDS cochlear. Implants you could say they're taking something away and in the other fight deaf people with this perspective. We're fighting with among others the cochlear implant association so deaf people in that fight. See that Stephanie's bill involved tack like hearing AIDS and implants in some way and suspicion. Stephanie and the other moms worked hard to get up to speed and make nice and clear things up there like honest our bill does not mean anybody has has to get hearing aids or implants that if you want them insurance can't say no but when that first Senate committee here rolls around. It's still not clear that everybody's he's comfortable and then day before the hearing Stephanie. Her family all swimming hole in Austin. It's the middle of the afternoon and Stephanie is in her swimsuit you get this. Notre from wonderful allies works the speech center. Iris gets therapy. Is this woman. Emails me from the center. Hello Stephanie Hello Stephanie Exclamation mation where she's like could be a problem Texas Association of the Daf just posted a call to action to attend the hearing. Asked everyone to sign up to testify testify against Stephanie's Bill and in the fighter on that other bill the deaf community has turned people out in force so it raises questions about what kind of opponents might show up the next day deaf people people from the business community just government mandates Stephanie's ally has an hi dear like how about the bill sponsor guest to talk I at any of these hearings maybe Senator Colquhoun I could address any potential opposition right up top. And here's some things you could say. I forward this in my bathing suit. At the swimming hole to the senator's chief Assaf Chief of staff writes back this email him at three fifty one he bryce. You've got four of six. Sorry can you clarify. I'm not exactly clear what you're asking and Stephanie's like sorry. Exclamation mark is writing back and forth sixteen tries to clarify hope. This makes more sense. Emma guy does not right back and so the next day. It's time for the hearing. We had no idea like. We had no word from her. We didn't know if she'd gotten this message. What her plan was and they didn't know who's going to be there from the deaf community? How pissed off might they be? So they're sitting there with their allies is. He's t shirts that Mike Design. Oh by the time. Stephanie gets telling me this part story Mike has just come back from putting the baby Tabet. Never how how anxious. Because they didn't get back back to us about it and so she sits down. She gives his testimony about how much it means to her personally. Actually I've seen the tape and Senator Cohorts starts with dry recitation. You might expect what the bill's going to do serves and then I will tell you on a personal note members And I'm so proud today to have my who was one of my favorite and the struggle that we went through the blessing that she has been to our family she says her niece and the niece's daughter who was also porn deck. We'll speak later. The daughter Got Coakley implants when she was just a year a year old. She speaks as well as we do. And is the most incredible thing I've ever seen so so emotional. I'm so proud tale. Oh my God not a dry eye. Every up every senator was crying member. It's legit intense but it was like that tactic of like get her niece to get get up and also represent the deaf community slam dunk three pointer. It was the whole issue. I mean slaved three point and the deaf community no show of force. This one deaf person speaks against the bill and the bill passes the committee unanimously. It passes the calendar committee it passes the State Senate and the governor signs it and it becomes law. Aw thought it was a pretty good story by the time it's done. Iris is begging her mom to come to bedtime. Okay I'M GONNA come in five minutes. Okay I promise you pinky swear five minutes one Oy Alexis at the time for five minutes. Yeah we talk longer than that because we need to talk about what all this means you know. This is just one battle Seattle in a huge fight. Great big picture. I mean. Last year Stephanie's Family Spent More than twenty thousand bucks on healthcare. All in and that is not counting the new you hearing aid Irish needed and the Special Bluetooth part which is extra though. It's her teacher where Mike in Class. Just for Iris. After insurance that stuff is still like ten thousand bucks except Stephanie found another grant from the elks and got paid for. This is why this is why I wanted to pass the bill. Because I'm like I am savvy and I'm scrappy and like my kids not GonNa fuck in need anything but that is not normal. That is not a normal response because because people are fucking busy or they have like seventeen jobs and like mouths to feed and like people like nobody has time for this or the energy or whatever and I don't know just I'm I'm a fighter I'm just I have a fight of a fight in my soul and it's interesting because I am like super fucking negative and cynical you know. My disposition is like very like I said glass-half-empty Kinda Girl I. I don't know like I must have some sort of hope positively or something in my body because I do feel like activism as possible and people can make change and you did it with a lot of help we did it. Yeah but you decided to. Yeah yeah yeah with tiny like I was like I was like. Oh Oh there's a hearing aid industry was or an appearance and videos like this. Was You my friend. Jeremy did it for car But you know you did this and it's possible like this is the question of what does it take. This is a lot is what he does but it also is interesting being how we think of I think giant streets into the economy instead of industries. How impossible up against them but like there you just did it without really didn't have a network TV show? I didn't even really have like a substantial following. I don't I think time hadn't published book yet. Now he's podcasts. You're now you're just your normal lady. Yeah you can you can like it takes takes a little bit of like craziness I think and it takes like the reason for us like the reason was very strong our kids and other ills get other people's kids in Texas. Yes fucking Damn Straight Outta my the fifty thousand..

Stephanie senator Deaf Community Senate Iris Texas Mike Design AIDS Senator Colquhoun Emma guy Austin Seattle Jeremy Coakley Oy Alexis Texas Association of Chief of staff
"deaf community" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"deaf community" Discussed on WTVN

"Help the deaf community or victims of a domestic violence situation. Dispatcher is we'll be able to ask specific questions via text message. ABC six is Alexis Moberg says is designed to help those that are unable to speak or those in a dangerous situation that can't talk with the partial government shutdown hitting day, thirty three questions persist over next week state of the union address ABC senior White House. Correspondent Cecilia Vega. Says there's a game of chicken with Capitol Hill going on Republicans want to force speaker Pelosi to official. Early disinvite President Trump from delivering that speech now in the event that happens the White House is now we're told by sources prepared to different versions of a speech. One would be the traditional speech that he delivers before congress. The other would allow us essentially the president to go somewhere else and deliver this speech on the same night outside of Washington likely at a rally or something like that house speaker Nancy Pelosi last week asking the president to postpone the speech until the government reopens federal funding for food assistance programs runs out in March Ohioans who rely on snap benefits may face an uncertain future. In the coming weeks as the partial federal government shutdown continues, we have food banks and and different pantries. They rely on getting food distributed. If they may not be able to get because of the shutdown state. Representative Paula Hex. Hudson says federal food assistance freeze what impact nearly two million Ohio in struggle with hunger, including more than a half a million children. And we have so many people. That are working multiple jobs trying to make ends meet but also having to rely upon government benefits, actually snap. She is calling on people to call their representatives in Washington..

president White House Nancy Pelosi ABC Washington Cecilia Vega Paula Hex Alexis Moberg congress Ohio Representative Hudson official
"deaf community" Discussed on Babes and Babies

Babes and Babies

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"deaf community" Discussed on Babes and Babies

"You haven't seen a star is born. He's that when he was younger. What's the old music thing with the big Trump at looking thing that the music comes out of? Oh, yeah. Put his head on the record Trump. No. Like, the the music recorder that you got it got it got it. He put in there and blurred the music as loud as he could when he was a kid, and then he suffered hearing loss, it's about when you take kids concerts, and you see parents putting. Yeah. Headphones on their kids noise canceling it's because right because then the hearing loss it can cause I'm pretty sure I have hearing loss in my right ear, and I have a distinct memory sitting on my neighbor's porch. I was probably seven years old, and we were lighting firecrackers and throwing them and I didn't throw mine in Tainan. Exploded right next to my ear. And I just remember it was like raining and ice. My gosh. That's exactly what happened to my grandfather. And he lost his hearing and one of his ear allow I I think. think Crimea, just partial but not full. Well, he lost like most of it. Yeah. That is so crazy. Well, I mean good things. So we have Christy. Keane coming on with us today. And she knows a lot more about this than we do. And she is an advocate. For spreading awareness for hearing loss. So I'm super excited that she's going to be talking with us. Yeah. I think it's just great because anybody's out there who is out there advocating just erotic ating any kind of stigmas, and I feel like sometimes the debt the deaf community can fill a little isolated. So I think it's so great that she's such. What would you say, I guess just just an advocate for her daughter? And for the deaf community. I think she's amazing. Yes, let's get around. All right. So we're so excited to introduce you to Christine Caine. Her Instagram pages. Awesome. And I love the slogan that you have on there. It says spreading positively in hearing loss awareness, light confetti. Yes. I know it's it's funny because I've always done things on social media, Instagram and constantly. I was like why am I here? Like, why are people following me? Or what's the point? And then Charlie was born. Yes. Like, this is why all everything universes kind of molded this to be what it is. And now, I have a platform to share it. So it's pretty awesome. It's it's good to spread it out there. So that when Charlie goes to school people are kind of like, oh, yeah. You know? Yeah. Can we just talk for a second about the S? That is the beauty industry for women right now. I'm in my thirties. My skin is aging, and I seriously have no idea. What to do I go the department store? Everything is so expensive go to the drugstore. I'm not sure if that's going to work like where.

Christy Instagram Christine Caine Charlie Tainan Crimea Keane seven years
"deaf community" Discussed on Bad Science

Bad Science

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"deaf community" Discussed on Bad Science

"Like, it's like if you it's like if you told somebody to like change their race because there was something wrong with it. It's like me less Jewish with a brain surgery. And that'd be great. But it's it's it really it really does seem like people are like I've embraced deafness as a part of my identity and to a race that would be to a race. Like kind of who I am. And to say that it's like that understand. But it seems like it's also stopping science the right? The American deaf community is. Is is reflected in American. Deaf culture, utilizes American sign language has their own history values heroes and has been assaulted before. And has ones was marginalized in the late eighteen hundreds when there was a division in the how we should Kate children with hearing loss with deafness, whether we should be using sign language and allow them to use it sort of a natural system of communication that was available to them or to force individuals with deafness to to speak. So there was this divide from at that point in time. So there's a historic. Historic reluctance on part of the deaf community sort of accept things that will make them hearing because they don't believe that they're that they're impaired. But has that you know, or they don't see that there's a deficit because they can communicate and well historically deaf community marries within the deaf community and here in southern California because of the National Center on deafness Akao state Northridge, there's an inordinately large deaf community out here is that was that just at the beginning. When all this was introduced or is it still present today? What's still present today? But as as things have changed to again modifications and advances Coakley implant being one of them as a threat to the deaf community. I think it's been challenging for the deaf community to sort of proceed with with the technological changes as it may. They may see this as an erosion of their culture. Sure, the others just just one other sort of historical point, the there were laws passed in many states, fundamentally based on the work of Alexander Graham Bell who you may know as the inventor of the telephone himself married to a deaf person and was a deaf educator as part of his career at the turn of the of the twentieth century. There was a social darwinist eugenics movement all throughout America and Alexander Graham, Bell when when around the country, encouraging state legislatures to pass laws to prevent death. Individuals for marrying other deaf individuals. And the the other extension of that. There was laws that sort of not necessarily real relative to the death would persons with with mental deficits to have forced sterilizations of women. So that they couldn't reproduce children laws. The sterilization laws were on the books in California until about ten years ago..

Alexander Graham Bell California Alexander Graham Coakley Kate National Center America ten years
"deaf community" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"deaf community" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Me servicing the deaf community Is you, know when you're it's a it's a whole other language I get that but to. Be able to service folks, this way and have them have an experience It like this I think is really potent I I will tell. You as I was reading the. Story actually got a little choked, up this, store is in Washington, DC and all the employees. Will be fluent, in American sign language and I think that's pretty cool but the the part that That really touched. Me, was that apparently and I'm looking at a post somebody posted on Instagram there have been moments were baristas have taken things into their own hands and learn sign language for particular customers. Not just touched me there was. One particular barista in Virginia Who learned to sign, specifically to help a particular deaf patriot would come in. And frequent the store, and she wrote a note said I've been learning ASL American sign language just so you. Can have the same. Experience as everyone else I just thought That is really cool and. I think more and more you'll, see this type of thing and actually there is a place in Malaysia I think it started this. That had a Location a store that had people that signed in the store but I just think going. That extra, mile for people like. This is, what we should be reading more and more about rather. Than some of the. Heinous stuff that we hear about every every single day I mean. You hear Amy king I mean you hear. Nothing but heavy duty news all the time Because that's what she does for a living she's filtering all. This garbage, for us all right. Burger King, provides free cheeseburgers for life for a terminally ill dog Anything You have a. Pet I. Do I have a cat at this.

Burger King Virginia Washington Malaysia DC
"deaf community" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"deaf community" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"The first one was performed seventy eight i think it was written seventy six got it so i don't know i didn't go back to those original reviews or or contemplacion's about what the play was about and the characters but like your character for instance some people have kind of taken the character to task like an ill and as bright is a it is sort of that classic breakdown sometimes that happens in a relationship where an often for the man towards the woman in thinking they know best and thinking they are manned splaine you're certainly is apropos in this in this case this must teach you a little bit about communication and reflect on your own relationships and family and friends at cetera so the like any really good play the the things that are important about it shift over time so when it first came out the the revolutionary act of the play was that it was giving representation not just to a deaf woman but to the deaf community and showing politically how that community had been sort of shoved off to the side right and brought them into like a mainstream conversation so that conversation has changed for the deaf community technology has changed the modes of communication and they have moved beyond the argument that that argument inside of the play but the issue of communication between people remains will remain forever and ever we didn't solve in many ways we've gone backwards so so that which is not so if it was a if the play was a political act in nineteen eighty it's a it is a universal love story now right that space where a man in a woman with all of the best intentions and the desire and the love still can't actually see each other right cake they can't bridge that final gap between the two of them and yeah i mean he is the james lead character is ultimately i think a decent but flawed in that very noble way that man's planning is the perfect term for it right like he is a guy who is heart so much in the right place but he has one blindness that that stops him from being able to actually be the good man that he could be right did you feel like you know where you were at in your career you needed something like this like this was a kick in the butt.

contemplacion james
"deaf community" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

Happy Sad Confused

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"deaf community" Discussed on Happy Sad Confused

"Powerhouse woman that she is but non actor to broadway debut in the single most important role inside of the deaf community and and the the balls frankly to take that on and not just do it but knock it out i mean she is a phenomenon and it it is one of those nights of the theater that like leaves drain in the best possible way probably both for the cast and for the people in the audience right and it was you know i i'd seen the film years ago and then marlee matlin won the oscar for it and of course william hurt was amazing in it but so i knew the story but moving in so many different ways certainly that moment you spoke spoke of was very moving also moving like i realize i was sitting in the audience that there were many people in the audience and you're performing for that community and you're probably become a strains friend of that community in the journey and it must be so emotional and surreal to aknowledge that and feel that and to see that at the end of the show to see it at the end of the show but also it's an incredibly that portion of it is incredibly humbling so to be a full grown man with my own language and to suddenly be stripped down to being preverbal like the the journey from not one word to being able to perform for two hours has been incredibly intense and the the the grace and the patients that that lorne and all of our cast members and the deaf community has they've come to hit have have shown me as like you're on a journey right now in journey's going to be difficult but to be able to invite a community that i have existed around but never in through my entire life and to have that that place of connection has just a tremendous joy every night have been reading up like people talking about the play and it's always fascinating look at a play in a in a new time right like the twenty eighteen versus whenever it was them early eighties seventy.

oscar william lorne marlee matlin two hours
"deaf community" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"deaf community" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Concepts right like when you are texting if you're collecting capital letter reds last that long ago and so if you're saying something that's very uh you know like a lot of snow or you can import a lot of emphasis in your face a lot of snow so the governor's saying stay off the roads not do that they'll go stay off the roads i can hang i you know the the faces going to say the author of this is a very powerful statement right but the interpret it is going to listen to a whole sentence for the interpreter is backed up so you can watch the hands and face and match it too whether speaking 'cause he or she is going to listen to a whole sentence and then put it in two or three uh uh two or three different um uh phases so easily gonna say two or three concepts because you don't have to do a and and the and and you don't have to do all this a brief form who has secured his short has griefahn right so this is a short in the english but it's not translated word for word so like i say instead of i went to the store you say store went that's it and i know he's done studies that show that there are some concepts because of a lack of understanding of this whole thing that don't get across to the to the deaf community because they're not being translated properly um and i remember hearing about that specifically when it comes to uh to aids in each in aids prevention there's an article a couple of years ago i read about the deaf community was was not being serviced properly because they weren't being told the details and what not say heavily doubled down to read to to reach out to these people at the shoam of specifically what they met because it was that that short him was through something about the knee and that was missing the point or something like that oh yeah oh garfield gushing interpret exactly in endeavoring interpret um you know we've you just give a concept you don't give evidence very interesting that's the so if the guy was wearing allblack yep and he was very animated i think he's trying to show you most of the governor was very specific issues being very vociferous in terms of you'll stay home don't go anywhere perfect truck emphasis said would take you would do in.

aids prevention garfield