17 Burst results for "Davis angela"

"davis angela" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

07:56 min | 3 months ago

"davis angela" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

"Of US continue to mourn the shocking thing of forty three year old Chadwick Boltzmann. On this past Friday Shagman Chadwick Bozeman, family released a statement saying it is with immeasurable grief that we confirmed the tragic loss the passing of Chadwick Boltzmann. Chadwick was diagnosed with Stage three colon cancer back in two thousand sixteen and battled with it. These last four years as it progressed to stage for the statement went on to say it was the honor of his career to bring king to Challah to life in Black Panther he died in his home surrounded by his wife and family they were by his side other historical and iconic roles at Chadwick played included James Brown whoa fantastic as James Brown Jackie Robinson. Outs and outstanding. Really good. Yeah. That's a good one two. We also know that Chadwick was a proud graduate of Howard University celebrities and athletes from Denzel Washington who actually paid for four Chadwick to go to school. He paid for I mean. At the behest of Felicia. Rashard. Yeah. And he didn't even know at the temple she was shot. He didn't even know at the time Chavalit. got a chance to thank him I. Think it was at the New York premiere of a Black Panther and he called him the dope is actor on the bland. He said that about his mentor Denzel and I mean Kevin Hart had nice things to say Samuel Jackson Viola Davis Angela Bassett who was in the. Played His mom in Black Panther Jamie Foxx a Ryan Kugler. WHO's the director of Black Panther, and of course Steve Harvey I mean everyone is just heartbroken over this talk about gone too soon Denzel Describe Chadwick as a gentle soul and he also said that when he was at the Premiere for Black Panther, he actually went to get his money get his money back. Yeah. You made a bunch dog. But you know he he he he was impactful. Way Too, short of a career, but to stuffy did was incredibly impactful. So sad man but it's just like, I mean we gotta get look man these colonoscopy. Important in our community there moving ages tapped me to go back and get another one. You know because I got nine probably seven years ago you need to get them every five I got eight hundred. No but I gotta go back now man. Look man these who sales. Yeah Man. Just. GotTa still top of. What a great deal but you see you're not impose a go get him check into you fifty. So he he didn't even got to the colonoscopy age, right. So by the time when they discovered, it was staged three. You know. So it's not like neglecting his health anything because they only recommend you go into you fifty but they said they will go to move the data but if he been up for for. More he probably had when he was thirty nine. Doing movies between going to get Chemo and. Brad Awesome Fighter a real superhero. Last night ABC honored Chadwick by airing the Black Panther commercial free, and then it was followed by ABC. News. Special Chadwick Boltzmann attribute for a king. A homeboy Columbia South Carolina. Right, that's right. All right. Steve Time for the latest on today's headlines Arjun Gentlemen Miss and trip. Thank you very much. Everybody Good Morning. A homicide investigation is underway in Portland Oregon after a man was shot and killed Saturday night during clashes between anti-racism protestors and a pro-trump pro police group victim not identified yet no arrests have been made however photos showed that the guy. was wearing a thin blue line patch on his shorts and a hat from local right wing group calling itself. Patriot prayer group that has been coming to Portland Oregon say to demonstrate and allegedly engage in violence forlan mayor. Ted Wheeler says, he's tired of the violence especially though the person he says is responsible for president trump. It's you who have created the heat in the division. It's you who have not found a way to say the names of black people killed by police officers even as people in law enforcement have and it's you who claimed the white supremacists are good people. You've tried to divide us more than any other figure in modern history, and now you want me to stop the violence the you helped create that was the mayor Portland Ted Wheeler meanwhile the streets of Kenosha Wisconsin where calm for a fifth straight night last night where protesters. Chanted Jayco Flake Jacob Blake the name of the young black man shot by a policeman seven times in the back paralyzed and still fighting for life president trump by the way promising to visit. Kenosha this week. However, the mayor there John and Tara. Mian tells NPR that any presidential visit is fine. But just not right now by the way, the local police chief is insisting that his officers did nothing wrong in being friendly to the seventeen year old white man who came to Kenosha And then allegedly shot three anti-racists protests. Two of them fatally Kyle Rittenhouse is charged with first degree intentional homicide congressional Democrats say they're outraged by the trump administration's decision not to provide face to face intelligence briefings to legislators about how foreign powers are trying to once again, subvert our democracy national head of Intelligence John Radcliffe says from now on, he'll only provide written reports Democrats say this is a violation of the administration's constitutional responsibility to keep the Congress inform intelligence officials already announced that Russia is already working to harm Jessica, his presidential bid finally and so sadly missed Jackie Robinson Mr Black Panther Mr James, Brown and others has left us too soon. Actor Chadwick Aaron Bozeman died. From Anderson South Carolina died Friday after losing a four year battle against colon cancer among his great roles get on up Marshall and black. Panther. King of all people I am King of Wauconda Chadwick Bozeman was forty three years old. Now back to the Steve Harvey Morning Show you're listening to. Harvey Morning Show. My name is Langston Carmen in Armagh black man who loves conspiracy theories. That's why I along with the beautiful oppressors at iheartradio and big money players have a brand new podcast called Mama told me where we've me and a special guest will explore all the twisted conspiracies that the white man keeping secret. So listen to my Mama told me available on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or anywhere else that pods are cast In nineteen, eighty, three diane downs, shot her three children killing one and severely injuring the others she showed up for her trial pregnant. Now, nearly forty years later that child Becky Babcock is on a journey to explore her connection with her mother's violent past listen to happy face present to face on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you find your favorite shows..

Chadwick Boltzmann Shagman Chadwick Bozeman Wauconda Chadwick Bozeman Steve Harvey Denzel Washington Portland James Brown Oregon US Jackie Robinson Ted Wheeler Kenosha ABC Jamie Foxx South Carolina Felicia Rashard Steve Time New York diane downs
"davis angela" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

05:09 min | 4 months ago

"davis angela" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Again, Curtis Ellis is back. I appreciate you. Curtis for being here policy director with America First policies also served as the senior policy advisor on the 2016 President. Trump Pence campaign. Curtis. Good morning. Good morning. Great to be here. Thanks for having me back. Absolutely. So. I wanted to get your thoughts on Joe Biden these days and their direction with the Democratic Party and the VP potential where this all could land here. It seems to me the Joe Biden Maur and Mohr is kind of out of touch. She's out of sight a lot, obviously, and when he comes forward, it's a teleprompter or nothing, and I just can't imagine. Him on the debate stage, but we'll get to that in just a minute. Let's talk about where he may end up is a you know, in a situation where his V P is not his choice, but Shoved down his throat and he takes it in likes and has to run with it. So what do you think's going on the and see with Joe Biden right now? You really summed it up. Well, they're the VP choice is not going to be. His choice is going to be forced on him, just like his entire administration. Should the Lord help us, he'd be elected. He's not going to be running the show going to be run by the radicals in his party because that's who runs his party. Look, we heard Probably from his ideal vice presidential candidate, just on Friday. Came forward and I'm talking about Angela Davis, Angela Davis for those too young to remember a radical revolutionary communists from the 19 sixties. She served prison time for providing guns used to murder a judge in a courtroom shoot out and we're not talking about Somebody who I've got some interesting ideas here that I think should be debated. No, she was providing guns to people who were killing judges and doing jailbreaks as she studied Marxism in East Germany is not somebody who Experimented with ideologies away. People experiment with drugs in college or marijuana or something. No, she's hard core committed and what she said. This is the most interesting thing is, she said. She backs Joe Biden because he will be most easily pressured to do the bidding of the far left of people like her. So, she said out loud What everybody knows that he's going to be pushed around. He's not the When he was a senator. He was. He was a pro business, really Very pro corporation corporate business. Ah, Senator, And that's not who he is now now, and he was kind of moderate in a way and he was, you know, I voted for the crime bill that sent a lot of people to prison for a very long time. He flirted with segregationist. He tried Teo be the tough guy. No nonsense. Middle of the road guy. That's not him Now. Now he just wants He wants to be president. So bad he'll do anything to get there. And that means placating the crazies that run the Democratic Party now, so Yeah, Angela Davis, man. She is not on ly just a big activist back in the sixties, but, you know, she's a CZ. You mentioned a big Part of the Communist Party and was hugely involved that from late sixties the early nineties, and now she's a University of California Santa Cruz professor there. I guess she's been retired, but she's been in academia teaching this crazy non nonsense that she believes in you. Do you believe that she not only endorses him, but it will be a part of the picture with this, if, in fact he does get elected. Most will be whispering the scenes into the years of the people who will be talking to him. Look. Alexandria, Kaze O Cortez, Congress AOC all out Crazy congresswoman from New York. She's she called herself a socialist. She's heavily influenced by Angela Davis. She looks up to Angela Davis, the role model on a road. Go. Biden's energy, his green New Deal. Energy plan Climate plan Whatever you wanna call it, it's basically a plan for the government to take over the entire energy sector. Tell you what kind of fuel you can use. How much of it when basically allocating and rationing fuel on a national basis? This is communism Absolutely. Central Control economy if you control Energy. You control the lifeblood of the economy and courtesy of a do you have time to stay with us for one more segment. I've got to take a quick break to have time to stay with us for a quick second. All right. Very good State. Yeah, I want to talk more tea with you about Joe Biden's potential VP pick and who's actually calling the shots if he's the marionette puppet in all of this more, with Curtis Ellis coming up in three minutes, Alabama's morning news News Radio, 1055 W Get ready for diamonds directs largest.

Joe Biden Angela Davis Curtis Ellis Joe Biden Maur Democratic Party VP president Communist Party Very pro corporation East Germany senior policy advisor senator America marijuana director Mohr Teo President murder
"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:40 min | 5 months ago

"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"How we can do better by my shin wa R. who is or was I believe she still is the the publisher or the editor rather over truth out dot org this is from the interaction the very beginning of the book she's a word I can't say on the air I'll I'll replace it with the word damn damn damn damn damn damn I'm crying with my mother over the phone it's late evening December twenty fifth twenty twelve and Kayla my only sister and best friend has been arrested for the seventh time in the past six years she's in jail again and this time we're sort of hoping she'll stay there if she asks I tell mom I'm not bailing her out well you know we're not mom says her voice low and far away a wary echo of words uttered in months and years past year she's in there at least should be safe jail we agree maybe the only place they can save killer's life staving off her burning dependency on heroin either of a signal is just the regardless of whether Kayla stays clean while incarcerated sooner or later should be getting out do we know what she's in for I asked mom doesn't matter I think of Kayla coughed in listless being dragged through the doors of the cook county jail catching the eyes of women she's known before in court on the street in juvenile detention in jail in prison under one wonder whether part of her is relieved to be back later when I pick up the phone here robotic voice announce you have a collect call from the cook county jail press five to take the call I press the hang up button and get into bed my attitude toward kills incarceration was born out of desperation she overdosed three times within two months passing out on the street awakening and abandoned buildings across crowded hospitals repulse barely taking yeah my wish chafed against not only my love for her but also my politics my ideals my sense of justice and truth after all I run a social justice based news organization and have denounced the Colossus that is the prison industrial complex for as long as I can remember for nearly a decade I've corresponded with a number of people in prison as both interviewees and pen pals have learned much from them about the violence and hopelessness of our system I understand is the power structures that create prisons have been guided by the work of people like activist and scholar Angela Davis a straw a staunch prison abolitionist how could I reconcile my whole hearted opposition to the prison industrial complex with a desire to see my own sister locked up I look back on that time I can only comprehend a bike knowledge in the insidious persistent role of prison occupied in my mind it was closely connected the roller hockey pies in larger society incarceration serves as the default answer to many of the worst social problems plaguing this country because this solves the because it buries them by isolating and disappearing millions of Americans more than two point three million right now making us the most incarcerated country on the planet prison conveniently disappears deeply rooted issues that society rather those of power in society but rather not intend to risen writes Angela Davis Angela Davis performs a feat of magic is massive numbers of homeless hungry unemployed drug addicted illiterate and mentally ill people vanish behind its walls the social problems of extreme poverty homelessness hunger unemployment drug addiction illiteracy and mental illness you come more ignore a bold to but as Davis notes prisons do not disappear problems they disappear human beans and the Cajun and array sure of those human beings mostly people of color and poor people sure it's a cycle in which large groups of people are cut off from mainstream society and then I the freedoms opportunities civil dignity and basic needs that allow them a good life in many jails and prisons incarcerated people are tossed into a dank dungeon like solitary confinement cell when they are determined to have mis behave it's dubbed the whole isolated in dark it shuts out almost all communication with fellow prisoners in the outside guards control the terms of confinement and the channels of anybody which words can travel international the whole presents a stark symbol of the institution of prison in its entirety which function on the talents of disappearance isolationism and disposable lady the solution to our social problems the mechanism that's supposed to keep things together amounts destruction the disposal of vast numbers of human beings the breaking down of families in the shattering of communities prison is tearing society apart this country's most marginalized communities bear the overwhelming brunt of that devastation but ultimately we are all caught up in the destruction is the politics of isolation ruptures the human bonds that could otherwise all together a safer healthier and more just society the behemoth that encompasses the prison is called by many names bus man one all ones I think are those that convey the pervasiveness of its power when in fact the world outside as well as the people within aliran activist Beth Ritchie is the term prison nation describing it as quote a broad notion of using the arm of the law to control people especially people who are disadvantaged in come from disadvantaged communities about that control take the form of prisons jails surveillance policing detention probation ours restrictions on child child guardianship the militarization of schools and other strategies of isolation and disposal particularly deployed against poor communities of color especially black communities others of his presentation simply to demonstrate the system's of Aston's own infiltrates our culture and fuels our national politics often in invisible ways prison industrial complex P. I see is another key term racial pursing of the prison abolitionist group Chrisette critical resistance defines it and then she goes.

publisher
"davis angela" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:20 min | 6 months ago

"davis angela" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Public radio and public radio stations around the country this is America are we ready the national calling about racism violence and our future together tonight we are opening the phones for an urgent conversation about the outrage that has erupted into streets all over the country and about the racism and racial inequality that has been made clear in the course of call the nineteenth on calories we started the America are we ready series of national conversations many months ago some of your some of the earlier segments as we started to cover the democratic primary season back then there were many candidates vying to run against president trump this fall now there's only one back then we were not yet wearing masks or even talking about a global pandemic today we are back then we were concerned about racism in America yes but tonight that concern is much more front and center and so here we are with protests going on all over the country and it is time to talk about it we are also joined again this hour by Minnesota public radio host Angela Davis Angela welcome back thank you for having me tonight these have been unequivocally difficult months for just about everybody we should say any more than one hundred thousand people have died from covered nineteen and the toll still mounting every day some forty million people are out of work it is June first it's a fact that's not lost on a lot of people who are wondering how they are going to pay this month's rent are this month's mortgage people are going hungry hurricane season is coming and likely heat waves it's just a lot in a minute all of that George Floyd and Brianna Taylor have joined more than a thousand people who have been shot and killed by police in the past year that's according to The Washington Post police shooting tracker in each and every one of these areas of acute crisis that I've just checked through black Americans are far over representative so these past months have offered a stark lesson in just how much racism and inequality continue to shape our lives in the United States and throughout this hour we are going to take your calls to talk about that and more importantly about how you and me and all the rest of us can actually deal with that fact so give us a call my phone number is eight four four seven four five talk that's eight four four seven four five eight two five five have the events of the past few months change your thinking about racism or racial inequality in anyway or better yet have the change what you're doing or willing to do about racism or to bring about racial justice whatever your racial identity how are you personally prepared to confront these challenges give us a call at eight four four seven four five talk that's eight four four seven four five eight two five five or tweet at us use the hashtag America are we ready America are we ready is our hash tag and joining us in this conversation is doctor Gail Christopher's is the executive director of the national collaborative for health equity and she's drawn some acclaim in public health circles in particular for her work on developing truth and reconciliation prophecies for what she's calling racial feelings I have spoken to Dr Christopher previously about this work on my other show the United States of anxiety and Dr Christopher I'm just so happy you could join us again tonight oh it's my pleasure thank you for having me you are firstly a public health person as I've said and so I'm just curious you talk about racism in terms of feeling like it's a disease or condition that's a vocative framework what why do you talk about it that way what I don't talk about racism as a disease per se I talk about racism as a believe system that causes us to be sick the entire society it is a belief system that devalues human beings as we have seen so starkly and whether it's the lethal manifestation and through police violence or the disproportionate exposure and subsequent path ology and death from cold with nineteen or just the everyday chronic cumulative effects of the stress of living with perceived assault and diminished value that cumulative effect weakens our systems our community our every system we have in our body and it makes us more vulnerable so I don't think that racism is the path ology per se it is the belief system that makes us more vulnerable to path ology and to sickness and premature death does that make sense it does it does it end you talk about healing it and and and I guess that's the part that really strikes me is that that's something that can be sealed right we have to you know the mind and the body are intimately connected and I happen to be of the of the I guess mindset that our beliefs are the most powerful force in our own lives and they certainly have an impact upon others and so when I talk about healing I'm really talking about getting rid of the permission to devalue ourselves and other human be ing I'm talking about and I'm a Star Trek fan so I'll say it you know we have to jettison this antiquated coldly there's no grounding for it in science in any way this idea of a taxonomy of the human family we we can put some people at the top basically white males and everybody else in descending order of value and a lot of I think people under estimate what racism means you know they think it's it's a prejudice or or it's an unfair treatment it's so much more than that it is an embedded way of feeding in our society rooted in this belief system and it took to its extreme it it it's wrapped up in the perception that that which is perceived as the other and less stand is a store at to the viability and the health of of people and so and in law enforcement and the military you know they're trying to eliminate the threat and so this this excessive use of force and this extreme vulnerability the people face because they have been perceived as a threat and must be eliminated it's all wrapped up in this history you know so well guide this history of of this racial hierarchy and so I when I say he'll we have to get rid of that and we have to replace it with a genuine understanding of our interconnectedness and interdependence really says extended human family so how do we get there is the question the kind of put on the table at the beginning of this and we're gonna take a call now from Nashville billion Nashville who maybe has one part of the way at least in his experience Billy around America are we ready hi there hi thank you for taking my call I'll be brief I'm not I am a long time marketing and while I'm a black male black female and I spent a long time being militant and don't get a lot of attention and get you a lot of our focus on the issue but recently in the past two years a lot of my spaces that are working are I believe acadamy occupational peeler our work with a lot of white people and what I found is that I do need to get more don't you when I listen and then just have conversations so it's not that I'm counting one two white fragility buffering I got to actually give money to the black visions collective which I'm sure you're familiar with in Minnesota the clear organization committed to dismantling systems of oppression and violence and I got him to do that by talking and listening so I I see what wrong but you talk about their ideas about race to how his whiteness because what we really think about what and how their social lives in the fall construction right when you get white people talking about whiteness and they can break it down damn I'm been able to get people to connect the dots I'd rather go I think it's fascinating that we are trying to get you on police brutality I wouldn't know why I think if you kill an unarmed black person individual talents policy we take your pension the pension going the way that continues to go into a fund that pays the great the king family when the city is that the pay out hundreds of millions of dollars in lawsuits your pension gets to go into that if you kill an unarmed black person no tolerance that's what I think needs to happen thank you so much Dr Christopher what are you thinking as you listen to belly I'm sorry I didn't quite hear you I'm sorry I was just asking I was talking to you Dr Christopher and I'm just curious okay great hundred percent what I agree that there has to be consequences consequences for these actions you know when I talk about the healing work which is and which involves the listening and the relationship building that is important but it's not you know instead of action and consequences and policy changes and expectations I think that was a brilliant suggestion that their pensions are gone but then that should happen because they're no longer police officers and their you know locked up or or or prosecuted for for murder so but I agree and his main point though about the heat police found that listening is how he gets people to act or to move he makes more progress we don't have certain skills we must have if we're gonna move forward together as a society if we're going to really overcome racism listening the ability to listen to deeply listen is one of those skills we also have to have a capacity for empathy and understanding and perspective taking and we don't know we're not taught those in in academia were not taught those as we grow up we learn those skills and practice them in order to be good at them and that's what the racial healing work is about it requires inter acting in interfacing as his story said with people who are different from us cells M. and having a an environment that is compassionate enough to to create the listening opportunities and the sharing opportunities and that's what begins to break down your preconceived notions and barriers and we expand our circles of engagement we will scan all see the absurdity of the experiences of racism we have a minute before we have to go to a break George in fort Greene Brooklyn this call is the report from the protest George give us your best minute hi I'm I've been approaching every day and I have already gone home for the day but now they came to my doorstep as straight as the end of my street so I came out and there's a peaceful perfectly peaceful rally and there's just an army of police and again and again this is what I see every day the police are so aggressive there's so many of them there so frightening and there's not really a fan but there.

America
"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Today were reading locked down lock why prison doesn't work and how we can do better by my shin wa are who is or was I believe she still is the the publisher or the editor rather over Truthout dot org this is from the interaction the very beginning of the book she's a word I can't say on the air I'll I'll replace it with the word damn damn damn damn damn damn I'm crying with my mother over the phone it's late evening December twenty fifth twenty twelve and Kayla my only sister and best friend has been arrested for the seventh time in the past six years she's in jail again and this time we're sort of hoping she'll stay there if she asks I tell mom I'm not bailing her out well you know we're not mom says her voice low and far away a wary echo of words uttered in months and years past it she's in there at least should be safe jail we agree maybe the only place they can save killers life staving off her burning dependency on heroin either of a signal is just the regardless whether Kayla stays clean while incarcerated sooner or later should be getting out do we know she's in for I asked mom as a matter I think of Kayla coughed and listless being dragged through the doors of the cook county jail catching the eyes of women she's known before in court on the street in juvenile detention in jail and prison wonder one wonder whether part of her is relieved to be back later when I pick up the phone here robotic voice announced you have a collect call from the cook county jail press five to take the call I press the hang up button and get into bed my attitude toward kills incarceration was born out of desperation she overdosed three times within two months passing out on the street awakening in abandoned buildings or crop Crowder hospitals or pulse barely taking yeah my wish chafed against not only my love for her but also my politics my ideals my sense of justice and truth after all I run a social justice based news organization and have denounced the Colossus that is the prison industrial complex for as long as I can remember for nearly a decade I've corresponded with a number of people in prison as both interview isn't pen pals I have learned much from them about the violence and hopelessness of our system my understand is the power structures that create prisons and guided by the work of people like activists and scholar Angela Davis a straw a staunch prison abolitionist how can I reconcile my whole hearted opposition to the prison industrial complex with a desire to see my own sister locked up I look back on that time I can only comprehend a bike knowledge in the insidious persistent role the prison occupied in my mind it was closely connected the role it occupies a larger society car serrations serves as the default answer to many of the worst social problems like in this country this solves the because it buries them by isolating and disappearing millions of Americans more than two point three million right now making us the most incarcerated country on the planet prison conveniently disappears deeply rooted issues that society rather those of power in society but rather not intend to prison rights Angelus Davis Angela Davis performs a feat of magic as massive numbers of homeless hungry unemployed drug addicted illiterate and mentally ill people vanish behind its walls the social problems of extreme poverty homelessness hunger under unemployment drug addiction illiteracy and mental illness become more ignore a ball to but as Davis notes prisons do not disappear problems they disappear human being and the Cajun and erasure of those human beings mostly people of color and poor people sure it's a cycle in which large groups of people are cut off from mainstream society and then I the freedoms opportunities civil dignity and basic needs that allow them a good life in many jails and prisons incarcerated people are tossed into a dank dungeon like solitary confinement cell when they are determined to have misbehaved it's dubbed the whole isolated in dark it shuts out almost all communication with fellow prisoners in the outside guards control in terms of confinement and the channels of any by which words can travel inter now the whole presents a stark symbol of the institution of prison in its entirety which function on the tenants of disappearance isolationism and dispose ability the solution to our social problems the mechanism that's supposed to keep things together amounts destruction the disposal of vast numbers of human beings the breaking down of families in the shattering of communities prison is tearing society apart this country's most marginalized communities where the overwhelming brunt of that devastation but ultimately we are all caught up in the destruction is the politics of isolation ruptures the human bonds that could otherwise all together a safer healthier and more just society the behemoth that encompasses the prison is called by many names boss man Juan all ones I think are those that convey the pervasiveness of its power when in fact the world outside as well as the people within scholar and activist Beth Richie is the term prison nation describing it as quote a broad notion of using the arm of the law to control people especially people who are disadvantaged in come from disadvantaged communities quote that control take the form of prisons jails surveillance policing detention probation ours restrictions on child child guardianship the militarization of schools and other strategies of isolation and disposal particularly deployed against poor communities of color especially black communities others of his presentation simply to demonstrate the systems of Aspin's own infiltrates our culture and fuels our national politics often invisible ways prison industrial complex P. I see is another key term racial pursing of the prison abolitionist group chrisley critical resistance he finds it and then she.

twenty fifth two months six years
"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:51 min | 2 years ago

"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Martin university book club today. We're reading lock down locked out. Why prison doesn't work and how we can do better by Maya Hsien warr who is or was I believe she's still is the publisher or the editor rather over truth out dot org. This is from the introduction. The very beginning of the book. She's the word I can't say on the air. I'll replace it with the word damn damn damn damn damn damn. I'm crying with my mother over the phone. It's laid evening, December twenty fifth twenty twelve and Kayla. My only sister and best friend has been arrested for the seventh. I'm in the past six years, she's in jail again this time, we're of hoping she'll stay there. If she asks tell mom, I'm not bailing her out. Well, you know, we're not mom says her voice low and far away. A weary echo of words uttered in months and years past if she's in there at least you'll be safe jail. We agree. Maybe the only place that can save Kayla's life staving off her burning dependency on heroin either of us acknowledges, the regardless of whether is stays clean while incarcerated sooner or later, she'll be getting out. Do we know what she's in for? I asked mom doesn't matter. I think of Kayla coughed and listless being dragged through the doors of the Cook County jail catching the eyes of women. She's known before in court on the street in juvenile detention in jail in prison wonder, one wonder whether a part of her is relieved to be back later when I pick up the phone and hear a robotic voice announce you have a collect call from the Cook County jail press five to take the call. I pressed the hang up button and get into bed. My attitude toward Kayla's incarceration was worn out of desperation overdose. Three times within two months passing out on the street awakening in abandoned buildings or crowded crowded, hospitals or pulse, barely ticking. Yet, my wish chafed against not only my love for her. But also, my politics my ideals, my sense of Justice and truth after all, I run a social Justice based news organization and have denounced the colossus that is the prison industrial complex for as long as I can remember. Nearly a decade corresponded with a number of people in prison. As both interviewees in pen pals have learned much from them about the violence and hopelessness of our system by understanding of the power structures that create prisons Evan guided by the work of people like activists and scholar. Angela Davis a straw, a staunch risen abolitionist. How could I reconcile my wholehearted opposition to the prison industrial complex with a desire to see my own sister locked up I look back on that time. I can only comprehend it by acknowledging the insidious persistent role of prison occupied in my mind. It was closely connected to the role at occupies in larger society. Incarceration serves as the default answer to many of the worst social problems plaguing this country, not because it solves them because buries them by isolating and disappearing millions of Americans more than two point three million right now making us the most incarcerated country on the planet prison, conveniently disappears deeply rooted issues that society rather those power in society would rather not attend to prison rights Angeles Davis. Angela Davis reforms feet of magic as massive numbers of homeless hungry unemployed drug addicted illiterate and mentally ill people vanished behind its walls. The social problems of extreme poverty, homelessness hunger. Unemployment drug addiction. Illiteracy and mental illness. Become more ignore too. But as Davis notes, prisons, do not disappear problems. They disappear human beings, and the caging and a ratio of those human beings, mostly people of color and poor people repatriates a cycle in which large groups of people are cut off from mainstream society and denied the freedoms opportunities civil dignity and basic needs that allow them a good life in many jails and prisons incarcerated people are tossed into a dank dungeon like solitary confinement cell when they are determined to have misbehaved, it's dubbed the whole isolated in dark. It shuts out almost all communication with fellow prisoners in the outside guards control, the terms of confinement, and the channels if anybody which words can travel in and out the whole presents a stark symbol of the institution of prison in its entirety which function on the tenants of disappearance, isolationism and disposability the solution to our social problems the mechanism that's supposed to keep things together amounts destruction. The disposal of vast numbers of human beings. The breaking down of families in the shattering of communities prison is tearing society apart this country's most marginalized communities bear, the overwhelming brunt of that devastation, but ultimately, we are all caught up in the destruction is the politics of isolation ruptures, human bonds that could otherwise old together, a safer, healthier and more just society behemoth that encompasses the prison is called by many names, most meaningful one for ones I think are those that convey, the pervasiveness of its power the way it infects the world outside as well as the people within scholar and activist. Beth Ritchie is is the term prison nation describing it as quote, a broad notion of using the arm of the law to control people, especially people who are disadvantaged in come from disadvantaged communities that control take the form of prisons jails surveillance policing detention probation, arse restrictions on Charl child guardianship the militarization. Of schools and other strategies of isolation and disposal, particularly deployed against poor communities of color, especially black communities. Others of us prison nation simply to demonstrate the systems vastly. Oh, an infiltrates our culture and fuels. Our national politics often in invisible ways prison industrial complex PSE is another key term, Rachel hurting of the prison abolitionist group. Chris critical resistance defines it and she goes on through this extrordinary book locked down locked out by my..

Kayla Angela Davis Cook County Martin university Maya Hsien warr Angeles Davis Beth Ritchie Davis heroin publisher us Evan Rachel Chris editor twenty fifth two months six years
"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:59 min | 2 years ago

"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Publisher or the editor rather over truth out dot org. This is from the introduction. The very beginning of the book. She's the word I can't say on the air. I'll replace it with the word damn damn damn damn damn damn. I'm crying with my mother over the phone. It's late evening, December twenty fifth twenty twelve and Kayla. My only sister and best friend has been arrested for the seventh. I'm in the past six years she's in jail again. And this time we're sorta hoping she'll stay there. If she asks tell mom, I'm not bailing her out. Well, you know, we're not mom says her voice low and far away weary echo words uttered in months and years past if she's in there at least you'll be safe jail. We agree. Maybe the only place that can save Kayla's life staving off her burning dependency on heroin either of us acknowledges, the regardless of whether kill stays clean while incarcerated sooner or later, she'll be getting out. Do we know what she's in for? I asked mom doesn't matter. I of Kayla cuffed and listless being dragged through the doors of the Cook County jail catching the eyes of women. She's known before in court on the street and juvenile detention in jail in prison wonder one wonder whether a part of her is relieved to be back later when I pick up the phone and here, a robotic voice announce you have a collect call from the Cook County jail press five to take the call press, the hang up button and get into bed. My attitude toward Kayla's incarceration was worn out of desperation, she'd overdose three times within two months passing out on the street awakening in abandoned buildings crowded, hospitals, or pulse. Barely ticking. Yet, my wish chafed against not only my love for her. But also, my politics my ideals, my sense of Justice and truth after all, I run a social Justice based news organization and have denounced the colossus that is the prison industrial complex for as long as I can remember. For nearly a decade corresponded with a number of people in prison. As both interviewees and pen pals have learned much from them about the violence and hopelessness of our system. My understanding is that the power structures that create prisons Evan guided by the work of people like activist and scholar. Angela Davis a straw, a staunch abolitionist. Could I reconcile my wholehearted opposition to the prison industrial complex with a desire to see my own sister locked up, and I look back on that time. I can only comprehend it by acknowledging the insidious persistent role the prison occupied in my mind. It was closely connected. The role it occupies in larger society incarceration serves as the default. Answer to many of the worst social problems plaguing this country because it solves them, but because of berries them by isolating and disappearing millions of Americans more than two point three million right now making us the most incarcerated country on the planet prison, conveniently disappears deeply rooted issues that society rather those power in society would rather not attend to prison rights Angeles Davis. Angela Davis reforms a feat of magic is massive numbers of homeless hungry unemployed drug-addicted illiterate and mentally ill people vanish behind its walls the social problems of extreme poverty, homelessness hunger. Unemployment drug addiction. Illiteracy and mental illness. Become more ignore too. But as Davis notes, prisons, do not disappear problems. They disappear human beings and the Cajun and a ratio of those human beings, mostly people of color and poor people repeat the cycle in which large groups of people are cut off from mainstream society and denied the freedoms opportunities civil dignity and basic needs that allow them a good life in many jails and prisons incarcerated people are tossed into a dank dungeon like solitary confinement cell when they are determined to have misbehaved, it's dubbed the whole isolated in dark. It shuts out almost all communication with fellow prisoners in the outside guards control, the terms of confinement, and the channels if anybody which words can travel in and out the whole presents a stark symbol of the institution of prison in its entirety which function on the tenants of disappearance, isolationism and disposability the solution to our social problems the mechanism. That's supposed to keep things together about destruction. The disposal of vast numbers of human beings. The breaking down of families in the shattering of communities. Krizan is tearing society apart this country's most marginalized communities bear, the overwhelming brunt of that devastation, but ultimately, we are all caught up in the destruction is the politics of isolation ruptures, the human bonds that could otherwise altogether a safer, healthier and more just society behemoth that encompasses the prison is called by many names, most meaningful one full ones, I think are those that convey, the pervasiveness of its power weight infects the world outside as well as the people within scholar, and activist Beth Ritchie's is the term prison nation describing your desk quote. A broad notion of using the arm of the law to control people, especially people who are disadvantaged income come from disadvantaged communities, and quote that control take the form of prisons jails surveillance police detention probation, arse restrictions on Charl child. Guardianship the militarization. Nation of schools and other strategies of isolation and disposal. Articularly deployed against poor communities of color, especially black communities. Others of us prison nation simply to demonstrate the systems. Oh, an infiltrates our culture and fuels. Our national politics often in invisible ways prison industrial complex PSE is another key term racial housing of the prison abolitionist group. Chris critical resistance defines it and she goes on through this extrordinary book locked down locked out by Maya. Amac Tom urban here with you. I you know, I listened.

Kayla Angela Davis Cook County us Publisher Angeles Davis Davis heroin Nation of schools Evan editor Tom urban Chris Charl Krizan Beth Ritchie twenty fifth two months six years
"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

06:13 min | 2 years ago

"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Marvin university book club today. We're reading lock down locked out. Why prison doesn't work and how we can do better by Maya Hsien warr who is or was I believe she's still is the the publisher the editor rather over truth out dot org. This is from the introduction. The very beginning of the book. She's the word I can't say on the air. I'll replace it with the word damn damn damn damn damn damn. I'm crying with my mother over the phone. It's late evening, December twenty fifth twenty twelve and Kayla. My only sister and best friend has been arrested for the seventh time in the past six years. She's in jail again this time, we're sorta hoping she'll stay there. If she asks, I tell mom, I'm not bailing her out. Well, you know, we're not mom says her voice low and far away weary echo of words, uttered in months and years past if she's in there at least you'll be safe jail. We agree. Maybe the only place that can save Kayla's life staving off her burning dependency on heroin either of us acknowledges, the regardless of whether Kayla stays clean while incarcerated sooner or later should be getting out. Do we know what she's in for? I asked mom doesn't matter. I think of Kayla coughed and listless being dragged through the doors of the Cook County jail catching the eyes of women. She's known before in court on the street and juvenile detention in jail in prison wonder one wonder whether a part of her is relieved to be back later when I pick up the phone and here robotic voice announce you have a collect call from the Cook County jail press five to take the call pressed the hang up button and get into bed. I attitude toward Kayla's incarceration was worn out of desperation overdose. Three times within two months passing out on the street awakening in abandoned buildings crowded, hospitals, or pulse. Barely ticking. Yeah. My wish chafed against not only my love for her. But also, my politics my ideals, my sense of Justice and truth after all, I run a social Justice based news organization and have denounced the colossus that is the prison industrial complex for as long as I can remember. For nearly a decade of corresponded with a number of people in prison. As both interviewees and pen pals have learned much from them about the violence and hopelessness of our system by understandings of the power structures that create prisons Evan guided by the work of people like activist and scholar. Angela Davis a straw, a staunch risen abolitionist. How could I reconcile my wholehearted opposition to the prison industrial complex with a desire to see my own sister locked up I look back on that time, I can only comprehend by acknowledging the insidious persistent role the prison occupied in my mind. It was closely connected to the role it occupies in larger society. Incarceration serves as the default. Answer to many of the worst social problems plaguing this country, not because it solves them because of berries them isolating and disappearing millions of Americans more than two point three million right now making us the most incarcerated country on the planet prison, conveniently disappears deeply rooted issues that society rather those power in society would rather not attend to. Prison rights Angeles Davis. Angela Davis reforms a feat of magic as massive numbers of homeless hungry unemployed drug addicted illiterate and mentally ill people vanished behind its walls. The social problems of extreme poverty, homelessness hunger. Unemployment drug addiction, illiteracy and mental illness. Become more ignore too. But as Davis notes, prisons, do not disappear problems. They disappear human beings and the caging and erasure of those human beings, mostly people of color and four people perpetuates a cycle in which large groups of people are cut off from mainstream society and denied the freedoms opportunities civil dignity and basic needs that allow them a good life in many jails and prisons incarcerated people are into a dank dungeon like solitary confinement cell when they are determined to have misbehaved, it's dubbed the whole isolated in dark. It shuts out almost all communication with fellow prisoners in the outside guards control, the terms of confinement, and the channels if anybody which words can travel in and out the whole presents a stark symbol of the institution of prison in its entirety which function on the tenants of disappearance, isolationism and disposability the solution to our social problems the mechanism. That's supposed to keep things together about. Destruction the disposal of vast numbers of human beings. The breaking down of families in the shattering of communities prison is tearing society apart this country's most marginalized communities bear, the overwhelming brunt of that devastation, but ultimately, we are all caught up in the destruction is the politics of isolation ruptures, the human bonds that could otherwise old together, a safer, healthier and more just society behemoth that encompasses the prison is called by many names, most meaningful one full ones, I think are those that convey, the pervasiveness of its power the way it infects the world outside as well as the people within scholar and activist. Beth Ritchie is is the term prison nation describing it as quote, a broad notion of using the arm of the law to control people, especially people who are disadvantaged and come from disadvantaged communities, quote that control take the form of prisons jails surveillance policing detention probation, Arshi restrictions on Charl child guardianship. The militarization of schools and other strategies of isolation and disposal. Articulately deployed against poor communities of color, especially black communities. Others of us prison nation simply to demonstrate the systems of Ashton's. Oh, an infiltrates our culture and fuels. Our national politics often in invisible ways prison industrial complex PSE is another key term, Rachel hurting of the prison abolitionist group. Chris critical resistance defines it, and then she goes on through this extrordinary locked down locked out by Maya. Defending America from the weapons of.

Kayla Angela Davis Cook County Maya Hsien warr Marvin university Angeles Davis Davis publisher heroin America Evan us Rachel Ashton Chris editor Beth Ritchie twenty fifth two months
"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:44 min | 2 years ago

"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Locked out why prison doesn't work, and how we can, do better by, Maya Hsien war who is or was. I believe he's still is the publisher, or the editor rather over truth out dot org This, is, from the introduction. The very beginning of the book she's the word I can't say on the air or replace it, with the word dam, dam dam dam dam dam I'm crying with my. Mother over the, phone it's, late, evening December twenty fifth twenty twelve and Kayla my. Only sister and best friend has been arrested for the seventh time in the past six years she's in jail again and this time we're sorta hoping she'll stay there if she asks I tell, mom I'm not bailing her out Well you. Know we're not mom says her voice low and far away a weary echo of words, uttered, in, months, and, years. Past if she's in there at least she'll. Be safe jail, we agree. Maybe, the, only place that. Can save Kayla's life staving off her burning dependency on heroin either of us acknowledges the regardless of, whether stays clean while, incarcerated sooner or later should be getting out do. We know what, she's in for, I asked mom doesn't matter I think Kayla coughed and listless. Being dragged through the doors of the Cook County jail. Catching the eyes of women she's known before in court on the street and juvenile detention, in jail in prison. I wonder one. Wonder whether a part of her is relieved to be, back later when I, pick up, the phone and hear a robotic. Voice announce, you have a collect call from the Cook County jail press five to take the call I pressed the hang up button and get into bed. My, attitude toward, Kayla's incarceration was worn out of desperation she'd overdose three times within two months passing out on the street awakening in. Abandoned buildings crowded hospitals or pulse barely ticking yet my. Wish chafed against not only my love for her but also my politics my ideals my sense of. Justice and truth after all I run a social Justice based news organization and have denounced the colossus that. Is the prison industrial complex for as? Long as, I can remember For nearly a decade I've corresponded with a number of people in prison As both interviewees and pen pals have learned much from them about the violence and hopelessness of our system by understands the power structures that, create prisons Evan guided, by the work of, people like activist and scholar Angela Davis, a straw a staunch risen abolitionist reconcile my wholehearted opposition to the. Prison industrial complex with a desire. To see my own sister locked up I look back on. That time I can only comprehend. It by acknowledging the insidious persistent role. The prison occupied in my. Mind it was closely connected to the role it occupies in larger society incarceration serves as, the default answer to many, of the worst social problems plaguing this country not because it solves them but because of, berries them by isolating and disappearing millions of Americans more than two point three. Million right now making us the most. Incarcerated country on the planet prison conveniently disappears deeply rooted issues that society rather. Those power in society would rather not attend to Prison rights Angeles Davis Angela Davis reforms feet of magic is, massive numbers of homeless hungry unemployed drug-addicted illiterate and mentally ill people vanished behind. Its walls the social problems of extreme. Poverty homelessness hunger unemployment drug addiction illiteracy and mental illness Become more ignore too but as Davis notes prisons do not, disappear problems they disappear human beings and the caging and erasure of those human, beings mostly people, of color and poor people repatriates a cycle in which. Large groups of people are cut off, from mainstream society and denied the freedoms. Opportunities civil dignity and basic needs that allow them a good life in many jails and prisons incarcerated people are into a dank dungeon like solitary confinement cell when they are determined to have misbehaved it's dubbed the whole isolated in dark it shuts, out almost all communication with fellow prisoners in the outside guards control the terms of confinement. And the channels if anybody which words can travel in and, out the, whole presents a stark symbol of the institution of prison in its, entirety, which function on the tenants of disappearance isolationism and disposability. The solution to our social problems, the, mechanism, that's, supposed to, keep, things together about Destruction the disposal of vast. Numbers of human beings the breaking down of families in the shattering of communities prison is tearing society apart this country's most marginalized communities bear the overwhelming, brunt of that devastation but ultimately we are all caught up in the destruction, is the politics, of isolation ruptures the human bonds that could otherwise old. Together a safer healthier and more just, society behemoth that encompasses the prison is. Called by many names most meaningful one full ones I think are those that convey the pervasiveness of its power away it infects, the world outside as well as the people within scholar and activist Beth Ritchie uses the term prison nation describing your, desk quote a broad notion of using the arm of the law to control people especially. People who are disadvantaged income come from disadvantaged communities That control take the form of, prisons jails surveillance policing detention probation arse restrictions Charl child guardianship, the militarization of schools and other strategies of isolation and disposal articulately deployed against poor. Communities of color especially black communities others of us prison nation simply to demonstrate the systems fastness. Oh an infiltrates our culture and fuels our national politics often in invisible ways. Prison industrial complex PSE is another key, term Rachel hurting, of, the prison abolitionist group Chris critical resistance defines it and then she goes, on through this.

Kayla dam dam dam Cook County Angela Davis Maya Hsien publisher Beth Ritchie Davis heroin us editor Angeles Davis Evan Rachel Chris twenty fifth two months six years
"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Club today we're reading lock down locked out why. Prison doesn't, work and. How we can do better. By Maya. Hsien warr who is or, was I believe she's still is the publisher or the editor rather over, truth out dot org This, is from the. Introduction the very beginning of the book she's a word I can't say on the air I'll replace, it with the word. Damn damn damn damn damn I'm crying with my. Mother over the, phone it's, late, evening December twenty fifth twenty twelve and Kayla my only. Sister and best friend has been arrested for the seventh time in the past six years she's in jail again and this time we're sorta hoping she'll stay there if she asks I tell, mom I'm not bailing her out Well you know. We're not mom. Says her voice low and far. Away a weary echo words uttered. In, months, and, years, past. If she's in there at least you'll be. Safe jail we, agree maybe. The, only, place that can. Save Kayla's life staving off her burning dependency on heroin either of us acknowledges the regardless of whether, is stays clean while. Incarcerated sooner or later she'll be getting out do. We know what, she's in for, I asked mom doesn't matter I think of Kayla cuffed and listless. Being dragged through the. Doors of the Cook County jail. Catching the eyes of women she's known before in court on the street and juvenile detention in jail, in prison I wonder. One wonder whether a part of her is relieved to be back later, when I pick up, the phone and hear a robotic voice. Announce you, have a collect call from the Cook County jail press five to take the call I pressed the hang up button and get into bed. I, attitude toward, Kayla's incarceration was born out of desperation she'd overdose three times within two months passing out on the street awakening. Into abandoned buildings or crowded crowded hospitals or pulse barely. Ticking yet. My wish chafed against not only my love for her but also my politics my ideals. Sense of Justice and truth after all I run a social Justice based news organization and denounced the colossus that. Is the prison industrial complex for as? Long as, I can remember For nearly a decade of corresponded with a number of people in prison As both interviewees and pen pals. Have learned much from them about the violence and hopelessness of our system I understand is to the power structures that, create prisons Evan guided, by the work of people like activists and scholar Angela Davis a straw a staunch risen abolitionist How could I reconcile. My wholehearted opposition to the. Prison industrial complex with a desire to see my own sister locked up I look back, on that time I can only comprehend it by acknowledging the insidious persistent role the prison occupied in my mind it was closely connected to the role it occupies in larger society incarceration. Serves as the default answer to many. Of the worst social problems plaguing this country not because it solves them because, buries them by. Isolating and disappearing millions of Americans more than two point, three million right, now making us the most incarcerated country on the. Planet prison conveniently disappears deeply rooted, issues, that, society rather those power in society would rather not attend to prison rights Angeles Davis Angela Davis reforms a feat of magic. Is massive numbers of homeless hungry unemployed drug addicted illiterate and mentally ill people vanished behind its walls the social problems, of extreme, poverty homelessness, hunger unemployment drug.

Kayla Cook County Angela Davis Hsien warr Angeles Davis heroin Evan publisher editor twenty fifth two months six years
"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"In jail we agree maybe the only place that can save kayla's life staving off her burning dependency on heroin either of us acknowledges the regardless of whether killer stays clean while incarcerated sooner or later should be getting out do we know what she's in for i asked mom doesn't matter i think of kayla coughed and listless being dragged through the doors of the cook county jail catching the eyes of women she's known before in court on the street and juvenile detention in jail in prison wonder one wonder whether a part of her is relieved to be back later when i pick up the phone and hear a robotic voice announce you have a collect call from the cook county jail press five to take the call i pressed the hang up button and get into bed my attitude toward kayla's incarceration was worn out of desperation she'd overdose three times within two months passing out on the street awakening in abandoned buildings or crop crowded hospitals or pulse barely ticking yet my wish chafed against not only my love for her but also my politics my ideals my sense of justice and truth after all i run a social justice based news organization and have denounced the colossus that is the prison industrial complex for as long as i can remember for nearly a decade i've corresponded with a number of people in prison as both interviewees and pen pals have learned much from them about the violence and hopelessness of our system by understandings of the power structures that create prisons evan guided by the work of people like activist and scholar angela davis a straw a staunch risen abolitionist out could i reconcile my wholehearted opposition to the prison industrial complex with a desire to see my own sister locked up i look back on that time i can only comprehend it by acknowledging the insidious persistent role that prison occupied in my mind it was closely connected to the role it occupies in larger society incarceration serves as the default answer to many of the worst social problems plaguing this country not because it solves them because buries them by isolating and disappearing millions of americans more than two point three million right now making us the most incarcerated country on the planet prison conveniently disappears deeply rooted issues that society rather those power in society would rather not attend to prison rights angeles davis angela davis reforms a feat of magic massive numbers of homeless hungry unemployed drug addicted illiterate and mentally ill people vanished behind its walls the social problems of extreme poverty homelessness hunger unemployment drug.

kayla heroin cook county angela davis two months
"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"But also my politics my ideals my sense of justice and truth after all i run a social justice based news organization and have denounced the colossus that is the prison industrial complex for as long as i can remember for nearly a decade corresponded with a number of people in prison as both interviewees and pen pals have learned much from them about the violence and hopelessness of our system my understanding of the power structures that create prisons evan guided by the work of people like activist and scholar angela davis straw a staunch abolitionist could i reconcile my wholehearted opposition to the prison industrial complex with a desire to see my own sister locked up i look back on that time i can only comprehend it by acknowledging the insidious persistent role of prison occupied in my mind it was closely connected to the role that occupies in larger society incarceration serves as the default answer to many of the worst social problems plaguing this country not because it solves them but because buries them by isolating and disappearing millions of americans more than two point three million right now making us the most incarcerated country on the planet prison conveniently disappears deeply rooted issues that society rather those power in society would rather not attend to prison rights angeles davis angela davis performs a feat of magic as massive numbers of homeless hungry unemployed drug addicted illiterate and mentally ill people vanish behind its walls the social problems of extreme poverty homelessness hunger unemployment drug.

angela davis
"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Truth after all i run a social justice based news organization and have denounced the colossus that is the prison industrial complex for as long as i can remember nearly a decade i've corresponded with a number of people in prison as both interviewees and pen pals have learned much from them about the violence and hopelessness of our system by understandings of the power structures that create prisons evan guided by the work of people like activist and scholar angela davis a straw a staunch risen abolitionist out could i reconcile my wholehearted opposition to the prison industrial complex with a desire to see my own sister locked up i look back on that time i can only comprehend it by acknowledging the insidious persistent role of prison occupied in my mind it was closely connected to the role it occupies in larger society incarceration serves as the default answer to many of the worst social problems plaguing this country not because it solves them because buries them by isolating and disappearing millions of americans more than two point three million right now making us the most incarcerated country on the planet prison conveniently disappears deeply rooted issues that society rather those power in society would rather not attend to prison rights angeles davis angela davis performs a feat of magic as massive numbers of homeless hungry unemployed drugaddicted illiterate and mentally ill people vanished behind its walls the social problems of extreme poverty homelessness hunger unemployment drug addiction illiteracy.

angela davis
"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Truth after all i run a social justice based news organization and have denounced the colossus that is the prison industrial complex for as long as i can remember for nearly a decade corresponded with a number of people in prison as both interviewees in pen pals have learned much from them about the violence and hopelessness of our system by understanding the power structures that create prisons evan guided by the work of people like activists and scholar angela davis a straw a staunch risen abolitionist could reconcile my wholehearted opposition to the prison industrial complex with a desire to see my own sister locked up i look back on that time i can only comprehend it by acknowledging the insidious persistent role of prison occupied in my mind it was closely connected to the role it occupies in larger society incarceration serves as the default answer to many of the worst social problems plaguing this country not because the solve them because of berries them by isolating and disappearing millions of americans more than two point three million right now making us the most incarcerated country on the planet prison conveniently disappears deeply rooted issues that society rather those power in society would rather not attend to prison rights angeles davis angela davis reforms a feat of magic as massive numbers of homeless hungry unemployed drug addicted illiterate and mentally ill people vanished behind its walls the social problems of extreme poverty homelessness hunger unemployment drug addiction illiteracy.

angela davis
"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"My politics my ideals my sense of justice and truth after all i run a social justice based news organization and have denounced the colossus that is the prison industrial complex for as long as i can remember for nearly a decade of corresponded with a number of people in prison as both interviewees in pen pals have learned much from them about the violence and hopelessness of our system by understand he said the power structures that create prisons have been guided by the work of people like activists and scholar angela davis a straw a staunch prison abolitionist how could i reconcile my wholehearted opposition to the prison industrial complex with the desire to see my own sister locked up i look back on that time i can only comprehended by acknowledging the insidious persistent role the prison occupied in my mind it was closely connected to the role it occupies in larger society incarceration serves as the default answer to many of the worst social problems plaguing this country not because it solves them because of berries them by isolating and disappearing millions of americans more than two point three million right now making us the most incarcerated country on the planet prison conveniently disappears deeply rooted issues that society or rather those of power in society but rather not attend to prison rights angeles davis angela davis reforms a feet of magic is massive numbers of homeless hungry unemployed drugaddicted illiterate and mentally ill people vanish behind its walls the social problems of extreme poverty homelessness hunger honor unemployment drug addiction illiteracy.

social justice angela davis
"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"I think of kayla coughed and listless being dragged through the doors of the cook county jail catching the eyes of women she's known before in court on the street in juvenile detention in jail in prison wonder one wonder whether part of her is relieved to be back later when i pick up the phone and hear robotic voice announce you have a collect call from the cook county jail press five to take the call i pressed the hang a button and get into bed by attitude toward kayla's incarceration was born out of desperation cheat overdoes threetimes within two months passing out on the street awakening and abandoned buildings are crowd crowder hospitals or pulse barely taking yet my wish chafed against not only my love for her but also my politics my ideals my sense of justice and truth after all i run a social justice based news organization and have denounced the colossus that is the prison industrial complex for as long as i can remember for nearly a decade at corresponded with a number of people in prison as both interviewees in pen pals have learned much from them about the violence and hopelessness of our system i understand he said the power structures that create prisons have been guided by the work of people like activists and scholar angela davis a straw a staunch risen abolitionist how can i reconcile my wholehearted opposition to the prison industrial complex with the desire to see my own sister locked up i look back on that time i can only comprehended by acknowledging the insidious persistent role the prison occupied in my mind it was closely connected to the role it occupies in larger society incarceration serves as the default answer to many of the worst social problems plaguing this country not because it solves them but because of berries them by isolating and disappearing millions of americans more than two point three million right now making us the most incarcerated country on the planet prison conveniently disappears deeply rooted issues that society or rather those of power in society but rather not intend to prison rights angeles davis angela davis reforms a feet of magic is massive numbers of homeless hungry unemployed drugaddicted illiterate and mentally ill people vanish behind its walls social problems of extreme poverty homelessness hunger honor unemployment drug addiction illiteracy.

kayla social justice cook county angela davis two months
"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"davis angela" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Of justice and truth after all i run a social justice based news organization and have denounced the colossus that is the prison industrial complex for as long as i can remember for nearly a decade of corresponded with a number of people in prison as both interviewees in pen pals have learned much from them about the violence and hopelessness of our system by understand of the power structures that create prisons have been guided by the work of people like activists and scholar angela davis a straw a staunch prison abolitionist how can i reconcile my wholehearted opposition to the prison industrial complex with the desire to see my own sister locked up i look back on that time i can only comprehended by acknowledging the insidious persistent role the prison occupied in my mind it was closely connected with the role it occupies in larger society incarceration serves as the default answer to many of the worst social problems plaguing this country not because it solves them because of berries them by isolating and disappearing millions of americans more than two point three million right now making us the most incarcerated country on the planet prison conveniently disappears deeply rooted issues that society or rather those of power in society but rather not attend to prison rights angeles davis angela davis reforms a feet of magic is massive numbers of homeless hungry unemployed drugaddicted illiterate and mentally ill people vanish behind its walls the social problems of extreme poverty homelessness hunger a unemployment drug addiction illiteracy.

social justice angela davis