35 Burst results for "Davinci"

"davinci" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

05:40 min | 10 months ago

"davinci" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Is he doing something wrong or is that a known issue? Because that's all Greek to me. So yeah, that doesn't. I mean, normal workflow is that if you're going to use a laptop or even a computer for that matter, that's not the reference monitor that you want to use. You want to use an external monitor, which we make great tools to be able to do calibration for that as well as getting the HDMI or SDI output to hit those monitors. So normally that's the workflow that you would go with. And to be honest with you, if he went into our forum and type for suggestions on how you make that work, everybody will come out with how they all do it because everybody seems to do it a little bit differently. Years ago when we were losing this E old CRT monitors, people are asking, well what monitor should we buy with plasma or what should we buy? And I said, all I said was, if everybody bought the same monitor, then it would be easy because no matter how bad it was, at least it was all bad for the same direction. But that never really happened. So but there are calibration tools that we have built into our boxes that go to monitors. So yeah, there are definitely ways to do the calibration and to work with an external monitor and it's the best way to do it because that's what that's for. So that's how everybody usually works on there and there's the scopes in resolve. A lot of people work with two screens just for the user interface and then have another monitor for their final output. What would you say to folks that are wanting to get become experts resolve experts? What are some good resources for them to learn? Yeah, obviously, I can jump in YouTube and learn a ton of stuff there from really good educators that are putting out free content. But from the source, if someone says yeah, I want to become a professional resolve editor. I want to be good, you know, I want to know all the different modules from soup to nuts. What's a good starting point for that person? So on our site, we actually list some of the schools that teach. So if you go on our website in the resolve page, there's listings for companies that teach resolve. There's a few big ones that do, well, lately they've been all remote, but some of them are starting to do some in person training as well. And you'll find a lot of good resources there. There's definitely, as you mentioned, there is a lot of good free content out there. But for getting maybe individual training or on advanced training, there's definitely some great schools to teach resolve and have been for a number of years now. Great, great. Here's the last question from Victor Victor says I think this kind of goes to what you mentioned earlier about the M1 processor M1 processor support from Apple. Victor I'm paraphrasing, but essentially said, what am I going to get new when resolve has upgraded to M1 and I've upgraded my computer to M1 and magic things happening there or is it just speed enhancements? So it's speed enhancements, but that is a big deal because you're getting faster editing faster visual effects stuff. So doing the rendering of the face for face recognition and things like that working in real time. And I mean, just huge speed increases. And frankly, I'm waiting for my M1 laptop to show up so I can see for myself how much faster it is. I love it. So much stuff. All right, so future facing, you know, this is the area of the interview where you put on your tap dancing shoes. So what's your name in the hat, right? So what's next? You know, to the extent that you can reveal what's happening in the future. What can we look forward to? I think that what we really have been concentrating on is just tighter integration between all the tabs. We just released some things where working in one area say on the audio will appear exactly the same in fair light and things like that. So we'll have a lot of that. But we're always working on new features. We're always working on streamlining the process adding different functions, it's amazing. There was a I think it's a ten or 12 minute video on what was new in 17 .4. So we're trying to get as many new features in, but also the integration between it all. And then on top of that, the speed enhancements, which are a big deal for sure. Yeah, no, absolutely. Yeah, and I said, just speed enhancements, but really, right? That's the big deal that everyone's the holy grill that we've been searching for since the days of old, you know, in LEs in doing cool stuff on computers, it's always been about rendering and how long it takes to do this because that in a freelance mode that directly relates to income, right? So yeah, yeah, cool stuff. We'll leave it there. So if people want to go download this application and jump into it and play around with it, where should they point their browsers? So they need to go to blackmagic design dot com, all one word, and you can just click on resolve on the front page. Love it. Bob, chameleon, thank you for coming on give us your time today. This has been.

Victor Victor YouTube Victor Apple Bob
"davinci" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

07:22 min | 10 months ago

"davinci" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Da Vinci as you would expect. And so if you're going to edit blackmagic raw, you may as well stay in resolve, which is how a lot of people got started with it. And the pandemic accelerated a lot of the use of it. In addition to the younger generation is growing up with resolve. They buy a pocket camera, they start using it. You know, I know plenty of kids that go to colleges that are maybe teaching another NLE, but they're using resolve anyway. Just because it's free or it came with their camera or whatever, and they know how easy it is. And they also know how that they can send their BRP, which is davinci resolve project file to somebody else to finish the color and those kind of things. So the collaborations work in there. Now, the fairlight audio has really accelerated a lot of this too because there are facilities that were fair like customers prior to the acquisition that have moved to fairlight in resolve and then if they also have da Vinci color grading already in-house, then they're editing is probably going to start to pick up resolve just because of the efficiencies of that kind of workflow. You know, you don't make a change usually unless there's a real reason to. But this new integration between fairlight and the color and fusion visual effects and the editing has made people consider making that switch. And I think we're going to see an even greater acceleration of that. On top of that, all the new Mac hardware, these new M1 chips, davinci resolve has been specifically geared and done updates to resolve in order to make that faster than ever. So there's multiple speed increases with that new M1 chip that everyone's taking advantage of, including editing 8 K yeah. There's so much to talk about. One of the directions that I think hopefully we'll get to towards the end of this is future facing. I know obviously you can't talk about any anything that's secret or hasn't been released yet, but I wanted to chat about kind of the direction of where things might be going with mobile and how the company is looking at mobile based photographers. There's some other competitors on the market like LumaFusion that are doing mobile based editing. I'm wondering, does blackmagic design? Is that even on the radar? Before we get to that, though, I wanted to talk a little bit about just the color grading piece of it, or in other words, I know the kind of a lineage or the history of the software was color, right? And then it kind of spread out into all these other areas. Is it still that? And can resolve or let you as a person sitting inside the company can would you recommend resolved to people who aren't video first? I'm a podcaster and I'm looking at the audio features in there. Like, yeah, I could use that, but is it for me? Am I gonna lose anything? Should I really be using something, you know, different, more standard or is this fine for the kind of audio? Where do you sit? Where do you sit in terms of people that are coming in from a motion graphics first or audio first versus video first? Well, I think what's happened is that people have come in from all kinds of directions, right? But we have been very good about building tools or building additional tools to allow people to come in from other NLEs or whatever they were other softwares. So just in the color page alone, we have the color wheels like they used to have an Apple color. So and we have printer lights for the photography people. So we have built tools to do that. We also you can map your keyboard to emulate the software that you're coming from. In addition to that, not only do we have a lot of great videos on our website, but a lot of people put out a lot of different videos about resolve all the time that we have a forum. There's other forums. The ability to learn and to find out, I mean, I do it myself. Sometimes I'm in there and I'm like, oh, I forgot how to do that. How do I do that? Well, let me just Google that. Oh, there's the answer. It is an interesting dynamic. When I worked in Hollywood, back in the 90s, so a long time ago. 80s and 90s, I was there in a facility. You could barely get somebody that you worked with to teach you something different. Today, all you've got to do is type in, how do I use this? And it comes up. The sharing that goes on these days is amazing to me, but it's so much easier to move to another platform because it's that easy to just pick up what people are the translation. And most of the time, if you're coming from another software, you already have a lot of the basics down anyway. You're just trying to figure out how do we do that here? Or what is cool? Or how what's faster? And that's one of the things we've done. We've really increased the speed of the way people work. Now, at the end of the day, some people like if they're doing an individual project for themselves, they can get it done faster. If you're working with a client, what you can do is just give them more choices in the same amount of time. And that's really where that's where the collaboration really goes strongly in a supervised environment. But for people who are just trying to get their feet wet, the application has all of the great tool sets in all of the different mediums of post production with audio visual effects editing color grading so that you can really go back and forth. And the chances of you finding somebody else that's already using it is very strong in one of the disciplines or all of them. And the ability to find someone to work with you on a project where maybe you're doing the editing and you want someone to do the color grading or vice versa is very easy. And I think that you'll see as time goes on more and more people are using it and it just keeps growing and growing to a point where it's a whole I don't know. It's amazing to me because I think when I joined the company, there might have been 200 people in the world that knew how to run resolve. And today it's millions and millions and millions. Yeah, you know, you know what? Another question that pops up is the we discussed the freemium the free version of the adverse is the paid version and all that. So is it, what's the strategy there? So is the strategy that I'm sure there's some altruism in there, you know, helping people that can't necessarily afford really expensive software to actually get in and do stuff. But is the kind of backroom whiteboard strategy also let's get them hooked on what we do with this free version and then ultimately as their career progresses they'll upgrade and they'll buy an atom, they'll buy blackmagic cinema cameras and all that stuff because they're in the family, you know, and they already know how to use it. Is that kind of the strategy there? You know, so it's a cup of fold. So our founder grant petty is a guy who worked in post production. And he remembers it well when he would go to a trade show and the first question the sales guy would ask is, so where do you work? And then you would say what company you work for? Well, if that guy knew they didn't have a lot of money, he wouldn't talk to him. And he's like, well, what does it matter? What if I worked at the place across the street next week and they have a lot of money. So his idea is.

Da Vinci Apple Hollywood Google grant petty
"davinci" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

05:27 min | 10 months ago

"davinci" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"To welcome back to another episode of this week in photo. I'm your host, Frederick Van Johnson. Today I have bob camellia on the hot seat. He's been on the show before, but he is director of sales operations over at blackmagic design. We're going to be diving in and having a man on the street, conversation about da Vinci resolve and where it sits in the industry. What's the differences between the free version and the paid version? Why you should be considering it? Is it too much? Is it too little? All these things we're going to dive into in this short interview. Bob, welcome to the show. Welcome back to the show, I guess, is a more appropriate. Well, thank you. And it's good to be back. That's for sure. Yeah, yeah, that's what a deep conversation. You guys are always up to cool stuff over there. You guys are always making cool hardware, cool software. I love the user interface of resolve and the all in one approach that you guys have taken with the UI UX of the app versus do your editing over here and then jump over here and do your sound stuff and then jump over here and do your motion graphics and all that. It's all kind of in a daisy chain. I wanted to dive into that. But before that, give us a brief introduction as to what your areas of responsibility are at blackmagic design and then we'll dive into result. Sure. So at blackmagic, I'm the director of sales operations, as you mentioned, and what that really means is that I supervise the team that does the product specialists and they work on the trade shows, which we are currently not doing. So we're doing a lot of virtual stuff. In addition to that, I do handle some of the sales liaison with our distributors and things like that. But I also am a spokesperson for the company, obviously. So I do a lot of interviews. So I used to travel a 120,000 miles a year and now I travel a 100,000 miles a day on Zoom. But it has been an interesting couple of years now, but I've been able to basically get out and talk to everybody about the product and show them products virtually as opposed to in person like we used to. Yeah, yeah, which is really good. It's bad, you know, that of course we want human contact and we want to go to trade shows and meet up with our friends and colleagues and all that. But you can't deny the efficiency of just doing it like this, right? And not having to rip a zipper hole in the ozone jumping on planes and so it's good and bad, right? There's always there's always pluses and minuses. Yeah, for sure. What we miss is the opportunity to have better interaction with a lot of customers when we do the shows. And also for them to see some of the larger products. Like a whole fair like console, like a 5 bay fare like console is kind of tough to look at a Zoom call and go, well, that seems like it would work. So we do look forward to getting back in person at some point, show off some of the hardware. But in terms of showing resolve and showing software, we've been able to do a lot of that virtually, and that really has expanded the use of the product. Now, the pandemic itself, I think, lend itself to people experimenting during some downtime to take a look at what resolve is all about. And it comes from a couple different places. It's either the colorist that people use use resolve and they think, well, if I edited in resolve, would that be easier, which the answer is yes. And then there's people that are playing in fair light that used to own the original fair lights that have ported over to fair light in resolve, so that Matt gets more people to work together. And then, you know, we also included the studio version in all of the cameras and other products that you kind of get a feel for the product just that way. Now, as you mentioned earlier, there's the studio version and the free version. And the free version is extremely robust. It is used by a lot of people because it's just easier to get started with that. And you can share and collaborate with people that use the studio version. I do that with my own daughter. She's 25 and she makes videos and she uses the free version and I have the paid version and we're able to share files back and forth and it really works well. Yeah, that's fantastic. And that's a good segue into where I want to go with this discussion is just the positioning and what's missing from the free version versus the paid version. Is it, you know, you know, most of us that have kind of come up in this whole software age, we understand the whole idea of freemium means, okay, you kind of get a little bit like you get a taste of what's in the actual version, but really want to plunk down the money for the actual version. If you want to get any real work done that doesn't have a water marker, it's not missing key export features or things like that. Can you set the stage for us there? Like brass knuckles, the free version, and just even rewinding back a little bit further for the folks that are watching this and they're like, yeah, I've heard of resolve. I've heard of blackmagic design, but what is what is resolved? Can you set the stage for what the app is compared to final cut pro premier and the other in LEs on the competitive landscape? Sure. So I go as far back to resolve as you can at blackmagic because I worked for da Vinci. So I came with the acquisition, which was a little over 12 years ago..

Frederick Van Johnson bob camellia da Vinci Bob Matt
"davinci" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"davinci" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

"Yeah i'm all right. no no. Don't worry i'm all right. Fortunately the nice guys broke my fall. Mona lisa is worth at least eight hundred and sixty million dollars. Eight hundred sixty million dollars. What's crazy about. It is that i could go into bed. Bath and beyond and get a puzzle for fifteen dollars and ninety five cents. That probably looks just as good as davinci shepherd. A little squiggly lines in between because the house always wins play long enough. You never changed the stakes. The house takes you unless when perfect hand comes along you bet and you bet big then you take the house. Oh and the nice guys on business.

Mona lisa davinci shepherd
5-Year-Old Girl Killed in Accidental Shooting in Ohio

The Boxer Show

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

5-Year-Old Girl Killed in Accidental Shooting in Ohio

"A five year old girl over the weekend in an accidental shootings, putting another spotlight on gun safety in the home. A B C six is Luanne Stoia talked to Robert Straws ball, commander of the Columbus Police Major Crimes Bureau about the situation. Police say people can pick up free gun locks at any Columbus fire station through a program initiated by City Council this month. No questions asked. So I implore you. I beg you. If you have a firearm and you don't have it secured in your house, and you have Children. Please. Go by and pick up one of these gun locks. In the most recent case, the girl was found with a gunshot wound to the head and a home along via DaVinci Driver on 10 A.m. Saturday morning. The child died at the hospital nowhere yet on charges in connection to the shooting.

Luanne Stoia Robert Straws Columbus Police Major Crimes B Columbus Fire Station City Council
3 Steps to Landing Your Next Online Fitness Coaching Client

Change Lives Make Money

02:26 min | 1 year ago

3 Steps to Landing Your Next Online Fitness Coaching Client

"Okay so three steps to landing. You're next on n. fitness coaching clients. Step-by-step with nothing held back. Oh yes right. These number one is to collect three of your best transformations and club three your best transformations and you wanna put these together side by side. Step number one. Write that down. Collect three of your best transformations now when you put them side by side what you guys want to do. Is you want to make sure that there before. And after so before it goes on the left after goes in the right. Because when we're reading a book we read a book left to right all right. So when you guys to collect three of your best transformations and put them up left to right so before and after left to right the reason you're gonna use three is what we're going to do with these transformations is we are actually going to use those and we are going to put them on our stories as well. So we're gonna write a post about one of them were also going to use these transformations and we're going to put them on our stories as well. Okay so step number one is collect three of your best transformations you're gonna put them side by side step number two is you're going to write a post about one of your best clients so take one of those transformations that you collected and what we're gonna do is we're going to write a post about one of those clients. That's what we're gonna do so you're going to write a post and it's gonna say and the post. This is very important for you. Guys that are renewed on my coaching. And you're to marketing. In general the key to a successful post is you guys need to make sure that the headline has specific results because if the headline doesn't have specific results that the client got ben. It's not going to be attractive to ideal clients are coming in and so you wanna make your headline specific results. An example of specific results a headline would be my client. Sarah lost thirty pounds and six inches in twelve weeks. You can even do my client. Sarah lost thirty pounds and twelve weeks but specific results aren't so you're gonna write a post about this client doing specific results now for you guys. That might not know writing. Or if you're in the tinky. Coaching academy you can literally go into the units and you can grab any one of the testimonial templates. So i've given you guys three testimonial templates social templates that you guys can use davinci academy going to the units. It's in unit one and you can literally download the testimonial opposed framework. And i want you to use that framework also gonna run through that. Really quickly and his podcast. I'm going to do a summary so the first thing you want to do. Write a headline with specific results. So sarah lost thirty pounds in twelve weeks. Then you wanna talk about the pain that she was in with the excess weight. So you know. Sarah was really struggling to find extra energy to play player their kids when she got off work. She was always tired. He was burning out and choose thirty pounds for went when she first reach out to me. You wanna talk with the paint and you wanna talk about the struggles that she had because of the way because excess weight. She found it hard to like. Won't social gatherings. She was finding it hard to climb up the stairs. She's finding it hard to do day to day activities and she wasn't happy with with where she was at so specific results than you wanna talk about the pain. Then you wanna talk about the struggle. Then you want to talk about what you did to solve that problem

Sarah Davinci Academy BEN
Exploring Sobriety Rooms in Clubhouse - With Justin Lamb

Goodbye to Alcohol

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Exploring Sobriety Rooms in Clubhouse - With Justin Lamb

"I'm just lamb. I live in michigan in the united states. I am a podcast. Host of the podcast called friend request. And i also play guitar and saying pursued that for a number of years and my day job that i don't really talk about often as Is an asset accounting super boring. I actually don't like talking about it at all. But it pays the bills while i can do all my other hobbies like the podcast and interviews like this and things like that. Oh that's really interesting. So you wanted these creative people that is actually good with numbers as well because normally thought the one on the other you know. I have a weird theory on that. Because i had to take. I'm going to school to become a therapist right now to waited forever. I got three associate's degrees. Well piney way way through community college. Now i'm going to go to an actual university and get a masters in counseling. Because of that. I had to take a math class recently. And i'm thirty eight years old so i was sitting there with a bunch of you know. Eighteen nineteen year olds taking this math class. And during that time i never touched my guitar. my theory is that it was exercising. The one side of my brain so the other side just wasn't really fascinating. Nineteen who was a leonardo davinci was famous for having for doing both of those things. I'll be next. Don't worry about it right there next to just stay. We've stumbled across each other in the recovery space. haven't we so Tokens is trivial. Y'all substance abuse issues and how that happened and how you started using and and when you stopped you know. I didn't touch anything until the end of high school. I wasn't one of those people that started drinking. You know twelve thirteen. Fourteen years old

Michigan Leonardo Davinci United States
Venus Missions: All the Burning Questions NASA Hopes to Answer

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

02:01 min | 1 year ago

Venus Missions: All the Burning Questions NASA Hopes to Answer

"The long the newseum drought is over. Here's planetary society editor. Ray pauleta ray. Welcome back and thank you for this. June ninth article double venus missions all the burning questions nasa hopes to answer no pun intended. I'm sure double it's now triple right. Tell us about this new announcement from the european space agency. Yes so we're actually getting not one not two but three missions to venus which is to be super exciting. The third mission is actually called envision. Yes say just announced. Recently that they're going to be sending their own spacecraft to venus which is just incredible. I mean it's been thirty years since nasa has sent spacecraft venus. The last one. I believe was magellan. So it's kind of wild that everything is just turning up venus. It's about time thirty one years since that. Lots of magellan. It's just absolutely crazy that we had to wait this long. We hope to have the principal. Investigators for both of the nasa missions. On pretty soon maybe we can get the vision Equivalent of a pi as well. There are a lot of questions that we hope. These missions are going to help us to answer. Even if they don't provide full answers you cover a lot of them in this article. One of them we go back to that drought. I mentioned at the top of this segment. Water there's all the speculation about did venus. Was it a much wetter place. Billions of years ago like mars. Is this going to help us with that. Yeah it's really incredible. I mean when you think of something like venus. It's hard to imagine that there is anything ever even just resembling an ocean on the planet right but was actually a good chance that hey there might have been a watery past so i think that with davinci plus the spacecraft is actually going to drop a sphere through venus's atmosphere and measure some of those noble gases that could be there and that seems to be a big clue in finding out whether or not venus ever had an ocean. And

Ray Pauleta Ray Nasa European Space Agency Magellan
Haptic Intelligence With Katherine J. Kuchenbecker

The TWIML AI Podcast

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Haptic Intelligence With Katherine J. Kuchenbecker

"I'm really looking forward to digging into our conversation and your work. Which is at the intersection of robotics and machine learning. And i'd love to have you start us off with a little bit of background. How did you come to work in the field. Yeah i grew up in california. Actually although my name looks german. And i live in germany. I'm actually american. And i was raised by a research psychologist. My mom who said now retired professor and a surgeon and i was always fascinated by how things work and i wanted to create technology. Head helped people. I also did a lot of art. And i like riding ahead. Many many different interest and i was an athlete and athletics that led me to study at stanford university which was also enough to home but far enough away and i studied mechanical engineering. I really enjoyed understanding physics than how all had also design and build things produce functionality in the world and i was always drawn more towards like smart systems with sensors and actuators. Programming actually delayed taking programming class. Because i'd heard so difficult on the other athletes libel player. They all said oh. You know the programming class so hard. I loved it beyond words. And then i just i took more computer science punching i decided to stay for master's degree and i worked actually in as a teaching assistant a machine shop for two years helping students learn design and manufacturing like welding and casting bronze and milling aluminum and making parts sticking the shop late at night and i really fell in love with working with younger pupil helping them design and create things and i also took this amazing metrics class. There like realized. I wanted to become a professor and i that i needed a phd. And i needed a phd adviser. So i looked around and found a new professor. Was his first fish student. his name's Niemeier and he was one of the first engineers at intuitive surgical a robotic surgery company. That most of you probably know make davinci robot and we got along soup. Well was also volleyball player. And yeah the mechanical engineering computer science electrical intersection. It's really robotics Turning to do something useful whether that's in health or in consumer products or at work on so many different things now.

Stanford University Athletics Germany California Niemeier Volleyball
"davinci" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"davinci" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"And that's the shut for now space-time is available every monday wednesday and friday through apple. Podcasts is a stitcher google podcasts. It casts spotify cast amazon music dot com soundcloud youtube. Your favorite podcast download provider and from space time with stewart gary dot com space times also broadcast through the national science foundation on science owned radio and on both iheart radio and tune in radio. And you can help to support our show by visiting the space time store for a range of promotional merchandising goodies or by becoming a space time patron which gives you access the triple episode commercial free versions of the show as well as lots of burners audio content which doesn't go away access to exclusive book group and other awards just go to space time with stewart gary dot com for full details. And if you want more space time please check out our blog where you'll find all the stuff we couldn't fit in the show as well as heaps of images new stories loads videos and things on the web. I find interesting or amusing. Just go to space time with stewart. Gary dot com la dot com. That's all one word. And that's tumbler. Without the you can. Also follow us. Through at stewart gary on twitter at.

"davinci" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"davinci" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Seem to flick out in dairy time. There's a whole whole range of different projects. I can barely touch minnesota into the elected concerned about. Styling had completely always start them as well. You cannot question. I'm asking every strong. The more airtime dec- she gets the better. The more Elon musk hopefully. We'll sit up and take notice together. Wish that There is other programs dialing case. The pets The nice notable one at the moment but he's not the only one one thousand seven hundred. Satellites wranglings phenomenal project and its iron ride. It's incredible but i for astronomy. It's an incredible challenge and has significant negative impact. In fact i think nasa picture of the diet show age the famous orion abiola taking. And because you need to take exposures to get both sensitive images you can see. The trials left bar the satellites but absolutely mob in ways that are trying to do any kind of sensitive measurements at the sky. It's challenge at radio wavelengths as well so the optical image as a very very negative impact radio links for satellite constellations Using those radio frequencies to communicate with us and it causes massive massive problems for us for example the primary band up yes kept telescope obsessing at around but boogie has almost half of the frequencies around that central range wipe down but i thought like it is a constant challenge. Obviously federal outside delivering valuable resources for humanity and. That's something that we want to be able to continue to and to see being developed But it would also be nice to be able to continue to do the science that we wanted to to understand the universe and placing it and finding some happy medium to allow coexist is going to be critically important. That's emmy prosaically. Scientists professor andrew hopkins from the macquarie university in sydney. And this space time still to come. Nasa's mars ingenuity helicopter experiences an inflight failure and an aniela solar eclipse take place on june tenth. Oh adamo stood calm on space time..

andrew hopkins sydney one thousand macquarie university adamo minnesota Nasa one both sensitive images seven hundred aniela solar half of the june tenth
"davinci" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"davinci" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"You need was also taken at a different frequency. Different radio frequency slowly high frequency than was used in the pope's ovation combination of the information at those different frequencies adds additional value in the way that we can understand the properties of the radio is being mission. Say it's a. It's a particularly interesting and valuable patrick's scar We're actually planning to extend the region scarring around which that original s calculation was taken when we begin next stage of quotations in just a couple of weeks time in fact probably as well as covering number of other actions of the extra galactic in this kind of stand a little bit more about the performance of the telescope before we begin the mindset. I operations what's the end of the early next year. I understand. there's been some getting used to the way. The telescope operates looking at that particular part of the sky. Because you're you're not looking at very diffuse areas. You're looking at a very very busy environment. Looking like yes exactly and always being challenge for radio deferments say produced very fidelity images when you have very complex and brought on a range of different physical scales so one of the challenges that we've been looking through with kathy's to understand how we can ensure that the telescopes performance when observing these very complex parts of the skype gives us the best possible images. And we're still not quite there yet although. We think that we're doing a lot better than we were able to. Even with that died out. But there's still some way to go. I think and Of the goal of that next round of pilot observing. That i just mentioned we'll be to understand exactly the kinds of processing. We need to do to improve the fidelity of the images as a result. This is a particularly challenging area to radio astronomy. It's it's an area that has required a lotta daily sophisticated computational development and it's something that is applicable only to us but to the rest of the generation has is for the sky and ultimately to the itself. Say while we're doing some interesting and exciting in its own ryan. We're also really painting life. The next generation telescope just going to be absolutely fantastic the fence and what four thousand radio sources of interest and he surprises. They not not one of the things. That is really exciting about astronomy. That every time you get amazing set of new exciting data on the numbers of sosa's that we identified in particular pets with a scorpio. Observation is about the number that we expected. Many of them are being detected for the first time although we could make predictions for the numbers. This is the first time that i've seen and Of course when you see things for the first time you in the universe and so it really is helping to open a window on the properties of the galaxy's saying through the milky way beyond the milky way as well as the object within the milky way itself couple of the event horizon telescope more accurately event horizon interferometer grabbed.

patrick skype kathy first time early next year four thousand radio weeks one pope
"davinci" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"davinci" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"The strain square kilometer. Array pathfinder ask how to develop the most detailed map yet of a portion of the galactic nine of the milky way the findings reported in the monthly notices. The roy lester. Nama society measured almost four thousand compact radio sources many of which were unclassified as well as regions of hydrogen with staff formations. Taking place the galactic planes always been one of the essential objectives for astronomers as it's the part of the galaxy were earned solar system resides and it contains billions of stars as well as dustin gas clouds and presumably dark matter. The project was part of the stiller continuum originating from radio physics in our galaxy or scorpio survey which itself is part of emu the evolutionary map of the universe program projects been difficult because of the huge amount of emissions emanating from so many different sources in this very busy part of the sky making it challenging to obtain out of fat free images and effectively reducing the quality of the final images which in turn makes data analysis more challenging adding to the difficulty at the time the observations were carried out as cap wasn't yet fully operational with any fifteen of its thirty. Six twelve made a parabolic dish. Antennas deployed still at allow the radio telescope into barometer to image area of the sky covering about forty square degrees. Astronomers was still able to study many sources once referred to his radio quiet and they discovered numerous extended unclassified sources lying to a class of galactic bubbles constituting and you sample for identifying supernova remnants located in the murchison region of outback wisdom ustralia. Some eight hundred kilometers north of perth as cap is one of the technology. Demonstrators set up as part of the leading to the giants quick kilometer array project which is building the world's largest radio telescope spanning australia and south africa. The newest cabs of vacations of the galactic plane will allow astronomers to explore a whole new series of astrophysical processes which could lead to the discovery of a new class of object the unprecedented sensitivity angular resolution of these and future immu observations is allowing astronomers study galactic structure and stellar evolution in fact greater detail than ever before and the project doesn't just cover the southern hemisphere it extends into the northern hemisphere is world covering some seventy five percent of the sky at frequencies of around one gigahertz. Amy project lead scientists professor andrew hopkins macquarie university says the data taken during the early stage of as cap commissioning demonstrates the informers extreme sensitivity to extended radio emissions allowing that of important structures in the milky way and providing new insights into the formation and evolution of its stars. Amy is an ambitious project. We anticipated being able to use the new as kept telescope as it was designed stages over ten years ago now to be able to map the entire up and hennessy to dips and solutions that had previously been able to be made a few square degrees scarring. So we expected him you. When fully complete in bats years from now to be providing the best.

australia andrew hopkins south africa eight hundred kilometers billions of stars fifteen Six twelve seventy five percent about forty square degrees macquarie university thirty one gigahertz over ten years ago roy lester four thousand compact radio so one of southern hemisphere northern hemisphere one essential objectives
"davinci" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

The Maria Liberati Show

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"davinci" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

"Thanks for listening to the maria. Liberati show. This is maria liberati. I'd also like to thank my producer. Britain roselle my production intern. Alexandra troy my guess for this episode. Tomorrow vishay and dennis bird and also thank my listeners for listening and joining me on this month of april celebrating leonardo davinci and hope to see you at my tuscan picnic. Mother's day event on. Saturday may eighth again. It's a live event and a zoom event. So it's a hybrid event. You can join us. If you're in the area the live event will be at the game and design and remodeling center in harleysville pennsylvania. It's three fifty five main street you'll be given the address and directions everything when you register the live event. The registration is limited. We can only accept about ten to fifteen guest. this zoom event is a virtual event. And you can be anywhere in the world and attend that event and all attendees will get a recipe card. So please join us again. You can register. On november february dot com maria liberati dot com or on facebook events. You can also find me on twitter. At maria liberati with a capital m. on facebook at chefs maria liberati on instagram at maria liberati and let's see linked in at 'em liberati and you can also find me on my website at maria liberati dot com and my blog is they are also and You can also find more recipes and more of my culinary memoir stories in my book series the basic art of italian cooking. You know the series did win an international award which i'm so proud of the gorman world cookbook awards in two thousand ten and this series is the basic art of italian cooking the basic art of italian cooking holidays and special occasions and the basic art of italian cooking davinci style. Which is the book that will be giving away in the next few days to those of you not everyone. But you've piano it in a in a Drawing to If you've shared or like the episodes or if you hashtag marie liberati show with a photo that you share creating one of the recipes that i gave during the month of april you'll be entered in a drawing to Win a giveaway of the book. So please join in and good luck. Hope you win a Hoop you win a copy of the book but of course if not you can get your copy. online anywhere. books are sold until next month and next month is the month of may and will be celebrating. 'cause you know that's National i think it's national sealy ac on so we'll be doing some gluten free recipes and also it's national kitchen remodeling month in may so we will be having some kitchen designers on so you can get some tips also on designing your kitchen or maybe some upgrades you might wanna do as well and of course we'll have lots of food topics more recipes more food until next time. This is maria liberati. Peace love and pasta..

twitter vishay leonardo davinci dennis Mother's day Tomorrow instagram Alexandra Saturday may eighth harleysville pennsylvania facebook april maria next month maria liberati dot com em liberati Britain fifteen guest may this month of april
"davinci" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

The Maria Liberati Show

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"davinci" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

"For cini.

Make Your Food A Masterpiece Inspired by DaVinci

The Maria Liberati Show

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Make Your Food A Masterpiece Inspired by DaVinci

"Wanted to share some tips on making your food masterpiece food presentation tips that were inspired by da vinci. Leonardo da vinci is well known for using a scientific i to develop his artistic style. He observed that objects three dimensional and used his observations of late and dr to paint vivid and realistic. Portrait's and landscapes is a concept called kado scored. Oh it seems obvious to us now. But it was revolutionary in leonardo's time he also observed how objects details and colors change when they fade away into the distance education ni called sfuzzi motto and use this tool to his advantage to create a sense of great death. Sue motto is also known as leonardo smoke for how he made mountains and other distant landscape features blue and smokey while this is not as conclusive or rather to the culinary arts as other aspects of his style. It's still worth noting. Other notable features of his art are the cross hatching that slants to the left caused by his left handedness. This is also the reason that he wrote backwards to reduce smudging. He used many left handed and tools and adapted tools in his work. So presentation is a huge part of what makes food so delicious by using leonardo davinci's art style. You can make unique and pleasing arrangements of food that our instagram worthy. Pay attention to the way late will change the way your food looks. For example. pancakes look great. When eaten by a window rather than beneath an overhead light the angle of the light makes the sarah shine and brings out the texture of the pancakes in fact using natural light whenever possible. Make meals more enjoyable pay attention. Also to hand dominance there are subtle differences between how right handed and left handed. People eat arranging the plate. Accordingly can make meals more enjoyable for

Leonardo Davinci Kado Leonardo
"davinci" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

The Maria Liberati Show

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"davinci" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

"Wanted to share some tips on making your food masterpiece food presentation tips that were inspired by da vinci. Leonardo da vinci is well known for using a scientific i to develop his artistic style. He observed that objects three dimensional and used his observations of late and dr to paint vivid and realistic. Portrait's and landscapes is a concept called kado scored. Oh it seems obvious to us now. But it was revolutionary in leonardo's time he also observed how objects details and colors change when they fade away into the distance education ni called sfuzzi motto and use this tool to his advantage to create a sense of great death. Sue motto is also known as leonardo smoke for how he made mountains and other distant landscape features blue and smokey while this is not as conclusive or rather to the culinary arts as other aspects of his style. It's still worth noting. Other notable features of his art are the cross hatching that slants to the left caused by his left handedness. This is also the reason that he wrote backwards to reduce smudging. He used many left handed and tools and adapted tools in his work. So presentation is a huge part of what makes food so delicious by using leonardo davinci's art style. You can make unique and pleasing arrangements of food that our instagram worthy. Pay attention to the way late will change the way your food looks. For example. pancakes look great. When eaten by a window rather than beneath an overhead light the angle of the light makes the sarah shine and brings out the texture of the pancakes in fact using natural light whenever possible. Make meals more enjoyable pay attention. Also to hand dominance there are subtle differences between how right handed and left handed. People eat arranging the plate. Accordingly can make meals more enjoyable for

leonardo davinci tomorrow april lonely palette maria bird the dennis
"davinci" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

The Maria Liberati Show

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"davinci" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

"Thanks for listening to the maria liberati show where food meets our travel and life. This is maria labor audie. And i'm signing off. But before i do i wanted to remind you. Please join us for the tuscan picnic. Cook along for mother's day. It's a an event that we're having on may eighth. I'm doing this. There are two versions of the event. If you're in the philadelphia area you can join us. Live if you register time because there's only a small amount of registered so we can allow we'll be having it at Gaming design is a show room kitchen in harleysville pennsylvania. There's only a small number of register and they can do the live event. But i would love to see you there. And if you're not in the area you can zoom in. I'd love to see by zoom so zoom into the event. The live event is saturday. May eighth from one to three. Pm you can register for this. On event rate dot com or maria liberati dot com. So please join us. I'd love to see at this tuscan cook along mother's day event. Please join me. And also don't forget if you create this episodes recipe reba lead to ghana or the recipe from last week. Which i think we did a charlotte mellon as a Hashtag take a picture of your recipe. Hashtag the maria liberati show. Share it on social media. Share the show like this show and you'll be entered in a drawing for an autographed copy of my book the basic art of italian cooking. Davinci style and you can find the basic art of italian cooking. Davinci style along with the other books in the series the basic art of italian cooking and the basic art of italian cooking holidays and special occasions at maria liberati dot com at art of living prima media dot com which is the publisher on amazon kindle. And almost anywhere. You can find books online. You can find the books there. There's also the basic art of cooking series. Which is actually a smaller. I call them bursts of books. So they're short books on specific topics we have the basic art of coffee. The basic art of cocktails the basic art of pizza the basic art of pasta the basic art of creating a tuscan wedding the basic art of experiencing venice those books. You can also find my maria. Liberati dot com art of living premium media dot com and anywhere. You can find books online. The basic of italian cooking is a culinary memoir series where i share recipes and stories about my life in italy. I did study the culinary arts there and my experiences they are. The basic art series does have some little stories in them But there sure books so please enjoy the books. They're they're they are in. You can get a copy. But as i said again forget share. Today's episode like my show share my show and you'll be entered in a drawing to win the basic art of italian cooking davinci style. I'd also like to thank for helping to make this a great episode my producer. Brian roussell i have to thank michelle cox. Who is my guest of for this week's episode award-winning author. Michelle cox and by production intern. Alexandra troy all for helping us. Make this a great episode and until next time. Oh you can also find me on twitter at maria liberati with a capital and the on facebook chef. Maria liberati on instagram. At maria liberati on lincoln and liberty and on pinterest. Also you can find me at all those places and of course you can find me on my blog at maria liberati dot com and my website. Maria liberati dot com until next week. Peace love and pasta..

Brian roussell May eighth michelle cox saturday italy may eighth mother's day last week Alexandra philadelphia facebook twitter Michelle cox Davinci maria liberati Today next week instagram kindle this week
"davinci" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

The Maria Liberati Show

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"davinci" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

"In everything davinci on leader this month as well. And don't forget. I m giving away autographed copies of my book. The basic art of italian cooking davinci style. Which is all about special towns and places that leonardo davinci lived in in italy. One was in france and recipes that are traditional in those particular towns and cities and also all of the chapters. Tell you with special projects that he did in those towns and again if you wanna win an autographed copy of my book like this show Take a photo of the recipes that we do.

italy france leonardo davinci davinci this month One italian
"davinci" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

The Maria Liberati Show

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"davinci" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

"Also.

"davinci" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"davinci" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"To get those votes in for your favorite NBA players. As all Star voting will conclude tonight and 11 59 Eastern Standard time and all votes count twice on This final day. With Anthony Davis out with a calf injury. The Lakers have inserted Cal Koosman into the starting lineup for tonight's game against the Timberwolves and Tiger Woods is set to host the PGA Tour is Genesis Invitational at the Riviera Country Club beginning on Thursday, But he will not be playing. I'm JD half ring. Yeah. From the Southern California Toyota dealers Traffic center. We make it easy. We have a crash on the 60 and industry and this one is along the West found side just before Crossroads Parkway, the left ladies flanks. They're going to be there a while longer and traffic is slow moving away from Hacienda Boulevard, Anaheim Hills still pretty stacked on the 91 eastbound from where Canyon to Green River. More delays in Corona Heavy from surface Club all the way to Main Street, and we're also checking out that drive in mid city 10 eastbound loading up it, Robertson taking you ahead all the way to the five in Boyle Heights. Sponsored by state of brothers K A pie in the sky helps get you there faster. I'm Angel Martinez Visit Stater Brothers Markets website and never miss a deal on groceries while you're there, Check out their weekly ad and sign up for digital deals for even more great savings throughout the store. Stater Brothers markets Never miss a deal. Hey, is Dr Wendy Walsh, have your quarantine sweat pants made you gain a little weight over Cove it Well, now it is time West Medical is proud to be the only outpatient bariatric surgery center in the country, too. Offer. The Divinci X. The DaVinci ex robotic surgical system allows for hyper precision making weight loss surgery safer with faster recovery and better results, and it's covered by most Peopie O insurance. Call 1 800 West Med or Visit West medical dot com Feel incredible because I called 100 West Medical Spectra Mobile is the fastest growing mobile provider in the nation. It's easy to see why millions have chosen a better way to mobile with Spectra Mobile. There are no contracts and no added fees. Even nationwide. Five G's.

Anthony Davis Angel Martinez Hacienda Boulevard Thursday Timberwolves Green River Wendy Walsh Boyle Heights West Med Cal Koosman Crossroads Parkway Lakers PGA Tour tonight Corona Heavy Stater Brothers markets Peopie O Riviera Country Club Southern California West Medical
Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:31 min | 1 year ago

Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

"Well i of course. Our hosts quadruple board. Certified doctor of internal medicine pulmonary disease critical care and neuro critical care and still fighting on the frontlines over the war on. Covid my very good friend. Dr steven tae back. How you doing steve. I'm well thank you as you've heard joining us from johns hopkins medicine. Doctor kenneth pinta. He's the director of research for the james buchanan. Brady urological institute. He's the co director prostate cancer research program for the sidney kimmel cancer center. He's a professor of urology. He's a professor of oncology. he's a professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences. Welcome dr to. What do you do with all your spare time can. This is not meant to be a softball question. But it's going to sound that way. I'm trying to understand from your inside. Perspective. what is it about the environment you work in a johns hopkins that produces these kind of outcomes. These ratings and the international recognition part of it is tradition. Johns hopkins was founded as the first research university in the united states and we've always placed the tripartite mention of patient care education to students and research on equal footing. So that we're always seamlessly combining those and the other piece of tradition is johns hopkins hospital in the medical school itself. We defined american medicine at johns hopkins with william oastler. Starting out saying we're gonna do medicine differently. Use the term. Medical residents started at johns hopkins. Because ostler made. The doctors live in the hospital to be trained in. So that's where the term came from. You know we have this dome at the hospital. With with the wings of the building and medicine rounds what referred to the fact that they would go round and round the dome to the different wards. And you know we carry that sort of tradition with pride and people love to work there and we've always attracted really smart people who love madison in love taking care of people and really love combining that with the research that powers the next generation of medicines. Forward dr parton. Your department chair talked about. While other hospitals use reports for urological surgery hopkins actually makes their own. Robots isn't making davinci robot. No we use a commercial robots like everyone else but what we are doing is creating the next generation of robots to work with mri machines. We have danced in. Our department is making a special robot that does that. The hopkins whiting school of engineering is developing the next generation of robots to integrate imaging with robotic surgery. A lot of that is not just hardware. it's software we're living in a pretty high tech era. We've come a long way in medicine but still so many men die of prostate cancer. What are we messing up here in. We have to do to fix this. So you know in this time of covid and so many people dying of kobe. You know it's an infectious disease. We gotta do better and we tend to forget about these other illnesses that are plaguing the planet you know if you look around the world. Ten million people a year are dying of cancer in the us. Six hundred thousand people are dying of cancer. Thirty thousand men die of prostate cancer. Every year and cancer of all kinds including prostate cancer is curable if you find it in time because we can do surgery or radiation in jewelry you but unfortunately in about fifty thousand men per year we find the cancer too late. We find the cancer. After it is escape the prostate and metastatic cancer virtually of all kinds is incurable and prostate cancer. Unfortunately metastasized spreads to the bones as first sight and it causes a lot of problems for guys in the bones including pain and eventually kills them and we can talk about how that happens but essentially we fail because we don't cure people because we don't find the cancer in time. Let me ask you a question about that. Actually because i've been quoted by colleagues that if you're fifty years old you have a fifty percent chance that you actually have prostate cancer and at sixty sixty percent chance that you've probably already have prostate cancer and so on and so forth and it would beg the question. Would it not make sense to prophylactically. Remove the prostate. And then obviously the the major impediment to that is the major side effects. What does the thought process about that in. Where are we in terms technologically of mitigating the terrible side effects of impotence and incontinence. So i think there's two aspects to that question steve that we just need to touch on because the other thing you hear. All the time is that oh prostate cancer. You don't have to worry about it. You're going to die with it not from it. You know we do see that. Eighty percent man age eighty if you look in their prostates. If they've gotten killed by a car accident you'll see prostate cancer. So essentially prostate cancer exists in two forms one form. Is this indolent slow growing low grade cancer. That probably shouldn't even be called the cancer. But it still is in we find it by screening and and those are the guys that can be treated with active surveillance. We don't need to treat their cancers where a lot smarter about that now than we were even a few years ago. The other kind of cancer is the aggressive prostate cancer. That is not the kind you find on all types whereas the kind that's growing quickly that we have to get out before it spreads so prostate cancer is definitely has a hereditary component. If you have a father or an uncle who had prostate cancer your your risk of developing prostate cancer is double if you have to family members. It's quadruples you had three family members. You're gonna get it so it is familial. There are some genetic drivers. Like vr rca to that lead to a higher incidence of prostate cancer. And we definitely say if you've have family history us should start screening sooner.

Prostate Cancer Pulmonary Disease Dr Steven Tae Cancers Kenneth Pinta Brady Urological Institute Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center First Research University William Oastler Johns Hopkins Dr Parton Johns Hopkins Medicine James Buchanan Hopkins Whiting School Of Engi Johns Hopkins Hospital Ostler Metastatic Cancer Steve
"davinci" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"davinci" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Robert Cohn exult very guarantee Southland weather from Ko Phi. Partly cloudy tomorrow highs in the sixties to around 70. This report brought to you by 1 800 the law too. We have a crash on the four or five in Westchester. This'll. One is along the South bound side, just past Howard Hughes Parkway, blocking the car pool and the left lane Watch for delays. Backing up away from the 10. Let's head out to Santa Fe Springs. We've got Mike O'Brien KF eye in the sky. Sponsored by injury. Attorney Superwoman super lawyer dot com. This problem been going on all afternoon here. The south outside of the five approaching car Benita. That's a big rig fire being extinguished, dealt with in the two right lanes fires long out, but there's a big mess here. It is bumper to bumper right into Norwalk and essentially behind that he got that normal. Slowing out of commerce now also looks like the eastbound side of the tent on the brakes there from just before the four or five out of Santa Monica. On it off into downtown Los Angeles from there and then again on the brakes there from the 10 eastbound pretty much from city terrorists on and off throughout Bonnie, but much better on that strategy. Injured in an accident. There's a superwoman super lawyer dot com. Mike O'Brien KF eye in the sky. This update is sponsored by Stress balls, de stressing gummies KF eye in the sky Hopes get you there faster. I'm Angel Martinez stressed out. Try stress balls, de stressing gummies, eat a couple and you'll feel like keep taking stress balls, gummies and eventually, your world feels like become a stress ball er with stress balls, gummy supplements His doctor Wendy Walsh, have your quarantine sweat pants made you gain a little weight over Cove it well, now it is time West Medical is proud to be the only outpatient geriatrics. Surgery center in the country to offer the Divinci acts. The DaVinci ex robotic surgical system allows for hyper precision making weight loss surgery safer with faster recovery and better results, and it's covered by most Peopie O insurance. Call 1 800 West Med or Visit West medical dot com Feel incredible because I called 1 800 West Medical Sell your luxury items with the real real, the most trusted marketplace for authenticated consignment with access to the real reels. Millions of Luxury shoppers. Your items, sell fast and earn up.

Mike O'Brien Robert Cohn Ko Phi Santa Fe Springs Howard Hughes Parkway Santa Monica Angel Martinez West Medical Wendy Walsh Southland Norwalk Benita Westchester Los Angeles DaVinci Attorney Bonnie
"davinci" Discussed on Real Estate Coaching Radio

Real Estate Coaching Radio

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"davinci" Discussed on Real Estate Coaching Radio

"Land where he was going to build this big ass house and he sees no argument and do it. And then joe. Said jos like josie older than us and he goes by a little bit and jogos. Why why are you selling. And then you remember the alonside because it was occupying space in his head that he could otherwise use on some more interesting projects which makes a lot of sense. Yeah and i think there's a lot of things in life that you can look at that. Say you know why. Why is that taking up so much space. When i could use it on maybe something. That's more important to me or more important than a contribution to the world sense. Well service more interesting. Things like that. But i i thought that was an interesting interview with joe because who thinks like that radio on moscow okay but but other people think like that because he talked about it and set that example. But that's the point though that's the that's the. He was consciously making decision realizing that he doesn't wanna use his bandwith report toward the creation of this house because he said he actually said here's elon. Musk great are modern day. What did they always say talion. Every time you're on a crossing creative modern day davinci right so if he goes italian. That's what they call them davinci which left he hasn't said in essence says but he was saying. I don't want to spend the time investing thinking about in this house. Don't have this house in my mind because it's going to distract me for making rockets and getting mars. That's basically what he says big thinking. Oh my god. I mean think about that. It's just so funny to think he's the mosque's the richest man in the world. He's going to be the first world's first trillionaire possibly. Why couldn't you have hired people to have those thoughts for them. Why couldn't you have hired two scenario of architects. Because is not the way the human brain works here. I remember he was saying he would wake up thinking about the house and then he you know at the same time it would be on the floor of tesla trying to figure out some way to solve a production. Problem did go to sleep that night and he just sort of was introspective in rose realizing that that was just consuming too much mental horsepower. Right and i think that's fascinating so when i'm around these younger people i see i remember frankly when you and i are going through that it really was such an utter and complete waste of time i know and furthermore i don't think it was even necessary. There was nothing real positive that came from having pass through. That sort of you know. There wasn't not that i can remember. Well you so you're a female. This is different to you rate. i i have to. Maybe be more introspective about it. Obviously you wanna have a nice nest for your family. That's that's a big thing. And definitely i think women are more motivated by that safety and security aspect and by the neighborhood matters you know and that's still matters to us of course But i think you'd go through different phases of that for sure and you know people also can be competitive with each other and you know..

joe jos josie davinci moscow tesla
The History of Lorenzo de' Medici

This Day in History Class

04:07 min | 1 year ago

The History of Lorenzo de' Medici

"Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm tracy v wilson and it's january first happy new year. Lorenzo de medici was born on the stay in fourteen forty nine. The medici family of florence was rich and powerful. They had come to florence sometime in the twelfth century although they had started out as just simple tuscan peasants but over a couple of hundred years they became incredibly wealthy and powerful by the middle of the fourteenth century. There were one of florence's leading families and they also had a reputation for being extremely adept at negotiating in the worlds of politics and money and this was through. Legitimate means as well as through things like bribery. Lorenzo domenici was described as the most medici of the medici. He was nicknamed lorenzo. The magnificent he's been described as the most powerful the most famous the most brilliant the most influential in the world of art thanks to his patronage and the most ruthless came to power in florence along with his brother in fourteen sixty nine after the death of their father and the two of them were ruling together and nine years later. There was a conspiracy to assassinate both of them and to take control of the republic of florence away from the medici. This was called the pazzi. Conspiracy the potsy and the medici were basically rival families within florence. One of the things that had led to this whole rivalry in the conspiracy was that the potsy family had taken over the financial affairs of the papacy and that was taking business away from the medici which the medici did not appreciate the ringleader in. This conspiracy was francesco. Potsy and he wasn't the patriarch of the pazzi family. But he was the one that was driving all of this. The fascination was finally set to take place during easter mass. in fourteen. seventy eight and lorenzo's brother giuliano was killed but lorenzo escaped afterward though. Lorenzo sought retro bution against olive his conspirators. There was a lot of hanging people throwing them out windows. A lot of dismemberments overall it was very gruesome and there were more than seventy executions of purported co-conspirators this whole incident though really shaped lorenzo's that his brother was dead so he was on his own in terms of his leadership at the republic and it had also gotten rid of a lot of actors and demonstrated the links that he would go to so after this whole conspiracy and the war that followed food. He had the support of a lot of the people of florence. He ruled almost as a monarch. Although lorenzo really liked to describe himself as just a highly respectable citizen anything special he and others in the family also acted as patrons to writers and artists and architects including people like botticelli and leonardo davinci among many others there was also of course michelangelo. Who was brought up partially in the medici household lorenzo domenici was also a collector of antiquities and of artwork. Basically what they were doing. They couldn't really afford to pay for the most extravagant biggest name artwork so they would find lesser known undiscovered talent of sort of cultivate them by their work for cheap. It's not however totally accurate to say that the medici family single paid for the renaissance. Sometimes they are described that way. Lorenzo was also a poet himself in addition to his patronage of other artists by the fourteen ninety s though lorenzo's health was declining the city of florence. Also becoming less and less enamored with the lifestyle that he had enabled and encouraged. This is a lifestyle that was just full of lavish festivals. in extravagance. He died at the age of only forty three. His son giovanni later became pope. Leo the tenth.

Lorenzo Tracy V Wilson Lorenzo De Medici Lorenzo Domenici Potsy Medici Giuliano Francesco Leonardo Davinci Florence Botticelli Michelangelo Giovanni
How Sports Trading Cards Went from Hobby to Asset Class

ESPN Daily

04:21 min | 1 year ago

How Sports Trading Cards Went from Hobby to Asset Class

"So dan. i want you to help. Explain exactly how wild this year has been for sports cards with an example and that example that sticks out to me and shocks me every time i consider it. Is this record setting. Mike trout card. Can you tell me a little bit about the card itself. So it's a it's a two thousand nine bowman chrome super factor dan. Hey ducky is a writer and researcher for espn and a card collector. Himself it's got autograph on a autograph on grated. Basically there are three companies professionals Authenticator beckett s g c they grade. How perfect on a scale of one to ten a. Carter's so this might trump card is a nine so it's pretty. It's pretty close to perfect but the autograph is greeted at ten. So it's really close to perfect card can awesome. It's a trap route card also on top of that. It's a one of one so there is only one of these in existence yet. It's so interesting because mike trout in public is like a semi anonymous celebrity like a lot of fans casual fans and sports. Even don't really know him. But this card this one of one card with the perfect autograph. What did actually go for went for nine. hundred million. A new record has been set for the most valuable baseball card in history. Somebody paid three point. Nine million dollars for this mike trout rookie card. I know that when joe maddon was confronted with the information that he had a player who's card solta that much giving like. How much does the mona lisa goes for. Wow i'm into art. That puts him right up there with the mona. lisa's self. For what what is anything by a davinci or wow that is. That's that's pretty. That's pretty phenomenal. And it's actually. It's like yeah. I mean that's disappear question. And what was the previous record holder in terms of the most valuable card that had ever been sold at auction. The previous holy grail. Was you know the the honus wagner keys who six said turn of the century the twentieth century like early nineteen hundreds heart on. It's such a lower behind it. That's not happening with mike trump there. There's no incredible backstory to have his card exists. It's it's modern. It's not easy to obtain but it's not it's not like tobacco card that was pulled from from production really what happened to wagner was once thought is that wagner didn't like that he was being used his likeness is being used to sell tobacco the kids so he objected a pulled the card from production and that was that the other less known school of thought is that wagner he wouldn't be compensated for his likeness so he objected because he wouldn't be paid and the facts the truth which is a i like this story better it would be the like the earliest flexing of brand autonomy. It is remarkable what you say though the difference between his honus wagner card which does like looking at it. I'm looking at it right now on my screen. It's like this historical american artifacts that reminds me of like a daguerreotype from like the civil war or something it looks important and ancient and the trout card. The fact that this object can be worth more than any other thing that came before in modern times and the guy who sold this. Mike trout card dan for this terrifyingly large amount is a man named ken golden. So tell me a little bit more about him. What's the business that guy runs. Golden is ken. Golden golden auctions diammonium. Sins loan out nike sneaker. How much does that they work can in your eyes to me. It's definitely a six-figure iconic piece it is the most famous pair of sneakers in the world. Then he remains arguably the most renowned auction house for remember billion sports

Mike Trout Authenticator Beckett DAN Ducky Wagner Mike Trump Joe Maddon Espn Carter Mona Lisa Baseball Lisa Ken Golden KEN Nike
Been Caught Stealing

Your Brain on Facts

04:40 min | 2 years ago

Been Caught Stealing

"Thankful faults jewelry and fine art. Maybe a casino carefully organized plans by people dressed in black turtlenecks with lots of cool gadgets close calls. What we remember as the daring heist of one of the world's most famous paintings. was really neither of those things. The heist wasn't particularly daring and the theft of Leonardo DAVINCI's Mona Lisa. Wasn't even noticed until well after it had happened. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. These days the Mona Lisa also called in Italy login Kanda and her famous enigmatic smile hang in a prominent place in the Louvre in Paris. It holds the Guinness World Record for the highest known insurance valuation in History at one, hundred, million dollars in nineteen, sixty two. So. That would be about eight hundred million dollars today. Over six million people go to see it each year. It's so popular that you can't even snap a quick Selfie of it without having a few dozen other strangers, hands, and cell phones in the frame. This popularity certainly wasn't the case when the painting was I hung in the Leuven eighteen o four or for the century subsequent. Neither was popular with critics when the artistic elite who often relegated it to the low end of DAVINCI's work it was basically just another painting. It was so unsocial in fact that it took the better part of twenty four hours before staff even noticed the painting was missing in Nineteen. Eleven. A handyman named Vincenzo Perrugia was working in the museum and he simply waited in a closet until after the museum had closed. Tuck to the painting under his smock walked on out. He was unwittingly aided by a plumber also working in the museum who unlocked a for Peruta when he found himself stuck inside. The police were called and they searched the museum. The only sign they found the Japan Kanda was frame laying on a staircase. Though police did find some twenty one other paintings in the museum. The curator's had previously reported missing. The. Search went citywide then national then international. Ships were searched before they left France or after arriving in their port of call. A reward of over half a million dollars in today's money was offered. The Mona Lisa's picture was printed in newspapers all over the world. It became a of Mona Lisa Mania. The theft of this single painting served a spawn multiple criminal enterprises. People on the wrong side of the law knew that those with more money than morals would want to buy. LEGITIM- Kanda. A pair of confidence men from Belgium hired a small army of forgers to make quality fakes, which they then sold to select around the globe. They made sure their buyers were unlikely to ever meet and rested soundly knowing that no one would let on that they had purchased the most famous stolen painting in the world. Though today, one of them would probably take a selfie with it. The huge reward and the number of fakes in circulation meant the police were inundated with leads. For two years they searched tirelessly. But Fruitlessly The sixty man strong force even interviewed, Peruta Twice. But decided, he couldn't be the criminal mastermind they were looking for. Not only did those two years not yield the Mona Lisa the police didn't even find the forgeries. The head of the Paris police retired in shame. Did, peruse, you get an enormous payday for the stolen painting. People were soon to learn that he didn't steal it for money. When ferruccio approached museum in Florence to sell them the painting, the museum's director called the police instead. After. His arrest Russia's stated. I worked in the Louvre making frames for paintings stolen from Italy by France every day I pass login Kanda and swore I would return it to its rightful home. He seemed convinced he would be heralded as a hero. This was sadly not the case but the Italian courts were sympathetic giving him only a year in prison for the world famous theft. These days legit Kanda sits behind more bulletproof

Mona Lisa Kanda Theft Mona Lisa Mania Leonardo Davinci Legitim- Kanda Louvre Paris France Italy Vincenzo Perrugia Peruta Russia Japan Belgium Florence Ferruccio Director
11 Trivia Questions on Hamilton

Trivia With Budds

03:23 min | 2 years ago

11 Trivia Questions on Hamilton

"Wants this quarantine. Is Lifted. We'll what happens and we'll see how much all of us can get out there and travel the world. I'm sure that they were all aching to just see something other than the inside of our garage or office or kitchens. So. Here's hoping for that. We're going to jump into these eleven questions on Paris and New York City right now here we go. It's Peres versus New York. Question number one according to the two thousand, twelve centers about how many people live in Paris is at one point five, million, two, point, five, million or five point five, million people number one, one, point, five, two, point five or five point five. Number two what nineteen sixty one, Audrey Hepburn film takes place in New York City number two, what nineteen sixty one audrey hepburn film takes place in New York City number two. Number. Three pairs is often called the city of light because of its role in the age of what number three pairs is often called the city of light because of its role in the age of what? Number four Captain Raymond Holt is a character you could find on what New York Sitcom number four Captain Raymond. Whole is a character. You can find on what New York Sitcom Number Four Number five museum is the setting for the intro of the Davinci code number. Five, what museum is the setting for the Intro of the Da Vinci Code. Number six what arena do the New York jets call home number six what arena do the New York jets call home? Number seven, this famous Irish writer has a tomb in Paris bears a sculpture of a person with wings named the writer number seven. A famous Irish writer has a tomb in Paris with sculpture of a person with wings name the writer. Number eight about how many acres is central park is at three, hundred, twenty, five, four, hundred, seventy, six, six, hundred, Sixty, eight, hundred, and forty acres number eight, those choices again, the acreage of Central Park three, twenty, five, four, seventy, six, sixty, or eight, forty. And number nine and frank. Sinatra's New York New York. He sings I want to wake up in a city that blank blank fill in those two blanks number nine and Frank Sinatra's New York. New York he sings I want to wake up and the city that blank blank. Number ten. What does the French word Mandi translate to English that's M. O. N. d. e. what does the French word Monda? Translate to in English. Andy Bonus for Peres versus New York for two points. There are six replicas of what landmark in Paris. There are six replicas of what landmark in Paris. Those are all your questions, repairs versus new city. We'll be right back in just a second with those us in France answers.

New York City Paris New York New York Sitcom Frank Sinatra Writer Audrey Hepburn Peres Central Park Captain Raymond Holt France Captain Raymond Andy Bonus M. O. N.
Leonardo!

The Past and the Curious

04:40 min | 2 years ago

Leonardo!

"To. The Renaissance, Oh Italy, how you have suffered through the darkness of the Middle Ages, and now here we are standing on the cusp of a new era where we will turn our minds to nature. Humans, and the world striving to understand how it all works, congratulations to us all. We've made it. This speech is not even remotely real though it was very well delivered. Thank you very much money, but it is easy to mistake this sentiment as something that people at the time might have actually felt. Most likely no one at the time realized that a new era, the renaissance had begun in the year fourteen hundred it's not like a giant switch flipped flooding the so called dark, ages with the bright light of the renaissance like US folks were just living their lives day to day. Most people will probably never even realized that the world was changing in such tremendous ways. It took historians to do that our story centers around Italy which in the early eighteen hundreds became the center of the renaissant. which radiated to the world the term renaissance refers to a time period that brought a new focus on philosophy and the arts sciences, understanding of the world and the mathematics behind it, and also a humans place in it. All like all other times it was also a period filled with wars and conflict because you know people right but it was a period of great advancement and achievement. Some of the greatest the world has ever known. The most famous and probably most important figure from this time and place was a left handed polymath who is unmarried and socially mismatched parents didn't even pay for him to be educated. Luckily for him and for the rest of us, he was really smart and he worked hard to keep getting smarter. No one could argue about his genius, His name was Leonardo Da Vinci. As. A young boy without the means for an Education Leonardo took advantage of the apprentice system in Italy, his natural ability with art and strong grasp of geometry and math, which she somehow learned without ever actually going to school earned him a spot as an apprentice to an artist in Florence named Ferruccio. Broke Yo is a leading painter and sculptor an his workshop near the Arno River Leonardo rose from sweeping the floors and mixing paints to working side by side with his master. It was not uncommon for an apprentice to handle much of the actual painting in a workshop and Leonardo was no different much of the painted onto canvases signed by Rubio was actually put there by Leonardo in fourteen seventy two at only twenty years of age Davinci officially became a master himself. This meant he could accept commissions for his own work which he did this how you made money. But he also found patronage or support from powerful political leaders. He moved to Milan to work under the Duke of Milan a man named sports. He originally got sports as attention by making him a lute from a horse go and silver. Which is pretty Nedal for being honest. This horse had instrument must have worked because sports decided to pay him a bunch of money. For Seventeen years in Milan, he made statues designed architectural features, created models and drawings. The even painted the masterpiece the last supper on the wall of the Monastery of Santa Maria. Della GRADS E. In addition to all of this, he was learning about the anatomy of living creatures, including people. Of course, do this he had to dissect cadavers or dead bodies? And to get these, he had to dig them up when no one was looking. Just pretty gross, but people learned a lot from his willingness to get his hands dirty. Honestly he was kind of a Rockstar people wanted to hire him for everything and he honestly left a lot of jobs unfinished because more. We're always coming his way. But when he did finish something, people would rush to see it and flocks like we might do for a concert or a Broadway show today. As. If this wasn't enough he was also designing some of the most incredible technology. The world has ever seen. Remember he was a polymath an expert at many thanks. Most of his designs were never actually built like a helicopter and a tank, a diving suit and a super mega gigantic crossbow. These just existed as detailed drawings in his many notebooks filled with a never ending flow of ideas.

Italy Davinci Arno River Leonardo Milan Leonardo Da Vinci United States Monastery Of Santa Maria Florence Rockstar Rubio Ferruccio
Meggan Watterson | Christs First Apostle and Her Gospel of Love

Hay House Meditations

05:54 min | 2 years ago

Meggan Watterson | Christs First Apostle and Her Gospel of Love

"Hi Megan, welcome to the House Meditations podcast. Thank you, thank you for having me. Yeah. I'm really excited to to speak to you about. Of Topics today that includes your meditation and condemned practices. the life of Mary Magdalene in Christ. Women in early Christianity, and as you write in your book the Christianity we haven't yet tried. We haven't tried yet, yes. I think it might be instructive for our listeners for us to situate our conversation. By talking about the person of Mary Magdalene so, can you tell us who Mary Magwar mangled was? What was her relationship to Christ? Well, I love to start that conversation with. A clarification, which is that Mary Magdalene was not a prostitute. 'cause most people. That's how they have come across our. That's how they've been told about her is that she is the penitent prostitute, the woman who sinned much and was forgiven much So this. was a story of fictitious story created about her around the sixth century it within the Catholic tradition and the Catholic Church has actually. wrote a formal apology in the nineteen seventies and have corrected that misunderstanding of her and then Pope Francis recently rehabilitation sort of rehabilitate. That's the word he rehabilitated her. And she is now officially the apostle to the apostles, and that to me is very significant, not because there is anything ever. It's not that there's anything innately derogatory about sex in the body or you know. Anything having to do with that it the reason why to me it's so significant and important is because it begins to us closer to the truth of who she really was. Which which is the person Christ resurrected to? Right, she was his witness. She was there at the Tomb, not by accident not. Happen to just be in the right place at the right time if we include her Gospel among the other gospels that were co defied in the fourth century, if we if we reintroduce her gospel as just as significant just as worthy of taxed and scripture it. It speaks to Christianity, that included her included her in authority clued included her partnership with Christ, and that's really how I would describe and define them regardless of whether you ever go the sort of Davinci code rabbit hole of Were they married and. Did they have a physical relationship. They have a physical relationship. Physical Child You. We don't even need to go there at this point right now. It's so significant to identify and what we can know. empirically is that they were companions. They were partners and we know that from the. We know that even just from the New Testament exactly that we add these other Gospel, so can you help so for those of us? Who aren't scholars of the Bible or theologians? Can you help situate us? Okay? We have the the new. Testament that actually speaks about Mary Magdalene. Just spoke about that. She was present at at the resurrection, and she was the first person who Christ spoke to right after. They have that. We have that like an that. When I was raised Catholic that was the story was a prostitute who he was speaking to that what I was told. These whole other said of writings of Gospels that were around. There wasn't a codified Christianity after Christ right there were. Complaint Forms of writing. Right. Can you help us understand that? Yeah, I get really excited, sorry. When we talk about this early form of Christianity before it was could have at. It wasn't cofide until the fourth century. So that's important to understand so there are hundreds of years where there's a Christianity that's being practiced that so radical and threatening to the Roman Empire and the idea of. Existence being ranked according to a hierarchy so educated Roman born men are at the top, and then it. There's all different layers in positions of power but women. Prostitutes slaves would be down there at the bottom meaning, having no rights, and not having a sense of. Being able to have autonomy and voice and power themselves so Mary Magdalene would. Be Way down there at the bottom, not because she was a prostitute because she was a woman, women didn't have any rights or own property so. This form this early form of Christianity. If we re introduced scripture like the Gospel of Mary Magdalene like the Gospel of Philip, which names Mary as Kreis companion. The Greek word is Kono's, and that word can be translated as partner, beloved or companion, so the gospel of Philip names. Miriam of Magdala Mary Magdalene as the companion of Christ

Mary Magdalene Magdala Mary Magdalene Mary Magwar Megan Mary Catholic Church Philip Miriam Roman Empire Pope Francis Partner Kono
Lavender, Love and Pasta! twitter

The Maria Liberati Show

01:46 min | 2 years ago

Lavender, Love and Pasta! twitter

"The deck of his cobblestone home with family the. The Sun is out over the horizon covered in white fluffy clouds, yet it's rays shine through and Brighton the entire day. It's bright as a baby. Blue Sky Meshes with the scenery in perfect harmony, towering mountains, filled with green trees, and other vegetation stand tall in the distance with pride at the farm, a light breeze sways these purple plants back, and forth to and fro with ease, creating a symphony of nature, true and pure echoing through the countryside. Lovely scent of these violent shoot plans travels with the wind. The traveling fragrance seems to spread a feeling of calm and love. This is a moment sure to last forever in the minds of all present. What is this lovely herb? If. You guess lavender than you're correct. LAVENDER is one of the most widely recognized plants and herbs. The world known for its stunning appearance breath taking sent. It has gained a loyal following of admirers throughout time in Shakespeare's winter's tale. He writes hot lavender men's. Marjoram, the marigold that goes to bed with the sun, and with him rises weeping. These are flowers of middle summer, and I think they're given to men of middle aged lavender, Israeli plant with an influence on cuisine, medicine, the Arts Romance and culture. With better topic for this segment. Leonardo DAVINCI's own recipe for making a fragrance is to make

Leonardo Davinci Brighton Arts Romance
What's the Most Expensive Book in the World?

BrainStuff

03:51 min | 2 years ago

What's the Most Expensive Book in the World?

"These days with printing and digital technologies being. What they are books can be very affordable. But when you get into collector territory prices can be astounding. Today's question is what is the most expensive book in the World Abraham Stuff? It's me person Sagar. Sometimes I like to imagine that long after I'm dead. A wealthy philanthropist is going to buy my diary for millions of dollars in lend it to museums across the planet. Then everyone would finally know the answer to today's question. What is the most expensive book in the world? Something by William Shakespeare the Neck Renamo con twilight new moon. Well it all depends on if the book is printed or if it's handwritten if we're talking books that have had multiple copies printed and the answer is the Bay Psalm. Book which sold for more than fourteen million dollars in November of two thousand thirteen it was originally printed by Puritans in Cambridge Massachusetts in sixteen forty seeking religious freedom. These settlers wanted their own translation of the Old Testament. Today there are only eleven copies remaining and it is considered the first book printed in America but if we include one of a kind handwritten texts than the Bay Psalm. Book isn't even worth half the value of the most expensive book ever sold. That title goes to Leonardo DAVINCI'S CODEX Leicester which sold for thirty point. Eight million dollars in nineteen ninety four to a little known computer programmer by the name of Bill Gates. Adjust that amount for inflation and today the Codex is almost worth fifty million dollars. In fact. That's forty nine million. Five Hundred Twenty eight thousand five hundred. Sixty one dollars and forty cents. If you WANNA be technical it's an unbound seventy two page notebook filled with Davinci's drawings and thoughts mainly about how to move water yet. The most expensive book in the world is basically a plumbing manual more on that in a minute. A lot of DAVINCI's writing was lost to history. Almost half of it. In fact so the Codex. Leicester is mainly important because it's a single collection of his focused ideas. The Codex is written like many of Davinci's works in something called mirror hand. All the letters are reversed and it's written from right to left so the only way you can read it when it's held up to a mirror and you probably need a fluency in antiquated Italian as well. So it's a book about water that's written backwards to be fair. That's oversimplifying things a bit. It's primarily about how astronomy and geology relate to water. Considering the functionality of tides eddies and dams really Davinci was trying to figure out how to harness the power of moving water he demonstrates how pressure increases with theft in a fluid and the Codex examines configurations of siphons and differently shaped pipes. He's particularly interested in the fluid mechanics of how water moves around obstacles. This manuscript was first purchased in seventeen. Seventeen by a guy named Thomas Coke who later became the earl of Leicester Hence the title Codex Leicester But in one thousand nine hundred eighty an art collector named Armand Hammer bought it changing. Its name to the more bad ass Codex Hammer. This only lasted fourteen years. Though intil gates bought it and changed back then he made it into a screensaver for windows. Ninety five actually gate seems genuinely inspired by Davinci's example of pushing themselves to find more knowledge. He's even loaned the book to a number of museums years so it be viewed and studied by the public. So that's the most expensive book

Leonardo Davinci Leicester Armand Hammer Sagar Bill Gates Cambridge Massachusetts William Shakespeare America Thomas Coke Theft
An Excerpt from the book Youve Got This: The Life Changing Power of Trusting Yourself by Margie Warrell

Optimal Living Daily

05:48 min | 2 years ago

An Excerpt from the book Youve Got This: The Life Changing Power of Trusting Yourself by Margie Warrell

"An excerpt from the book. You've got this the life changing power trusting yourself by Margie. Worrell growing up on a small dairy farm in rural Australia. I learned early. That courage trump's confidence as I mustered up my courage learning to ride my first horse as he towered over me or at least felt that way that a couple of years later had trained the brave all over again as I mastered my second horse. A Wild Brumby. We won in a raffle. Who went from zero to one hundred miles per hour in five seconds flat? My lifelong lesson growth in comfort can't ride the same horse of course if you've ever wished he were confidence you're not alone. The biggest hurdle we ever have to face fairly stories. We spin ourselves about not having what it takes to achieve what we want mired in misgivings. Many people tiptoed timidly through much of their lives arriving safely. Life's end with a large gap between the life. They did live the life they could have lived if only they act themselves more and doubted themselves less. Of course we're all wired for caution cognitively bias to overestimate the risks. Underestimate ourselves man. Focus more on. What scares us like being rejected or exposed as a fraud than on. What inspires us? Little wonder one of the regrets of the dying is that they lived to safe and risks to little which begs the question. Is it confidence. We really need to forge meaningful careers and driving our lives or is it courage to take action amid or doubt fears and misgivings Bill Marriott. The legendary hotelier. Who took the business? His father had started as a nine seat root beer stand and turn it into the world's largest hotel empire believes it's the ladder during a fireside chat for Marriott headquarters. I asked him what he learned about building confidence. He threw his head back and laughed. I've learnt that don't have as much as people think I have. He chuckled ye confidence by doing and learning and making mistakes and fixing. Your mistakes is true. Confidence is inbuilt through. Knowing you can't fail is built through risking failure daring to act with very confidence. We wish we had and trusting ourselves that even if we fall short we'll figure it out and be okay. Martin Seligman a leader in the field of positive. Psychology said that positive self image by itself doesn't produce anything in cannot be sustained without action in other words. You can't think yourself confident rather a Soliman road quote a sustainable sense of security in oneself arises from positive and productive behavior and quote. Ask anyone who's ever done anything worthwhile. And they'll tell you that it wasn't confidence in their invincibility that fueled their endeavors rather their desire to do something trump. They're feared they'd fall short in their attempt or my case as an aspiring equestrian fall of my oars which by the way I did many times ensured their mission exceeded their fear compelling them break ranks from comfort. Time and time again sometimes. It was semi confident actions. Sometimes it was not in the gut knees shaking nervous action but always action as prime minister of New Zealand. Jason Arden said quote. If you sit and wait to feel like you're the most confident person in the room. You were probably going to be left by yourself and quote so too. It is for all of us. We cannot build the confidence. We like sitting safely on our couch. Waiting for a thunderbolt of unstoppable self-belief to strike us from above does not say confidence doesn't have its merits. However with the exception of cereal narcissists confidence waxes and wanes. Waiting until you feel confident you cannot fall short before you take a brave leap toward your bold. His aspirations in your work relationships and life Camino long long wait far more useful to focus their energy on cultivating courage or training. The brave as I did each time saddled up after a fall all those years ago after all. Courage is not dependent on being completely self-assured that you'll hit a bullseye. Every time rather as about daring to do something despite your misgivings or lack of mastery as research has repeatedly found people build confidence by adopting a growth mindset and wish they give themselves permission to get better as they go along first allows you first draft then a slightly less lousy second. Dina half decent third draft. No one writes bestseller first time. They put pen to paper. So if you've been waiting until you're one hundred percent confident you know exactly what you are doing or of achieved. Davinci like mastery before you set out. Consider the hidden tax of letting your doubts. Call the shots on your career on your relationships. On the value or adding or failing to add for others on ever unleashing your full brilliance on the world cheating behaviors proceeds changing self perception rather than dwelling on all the reasons why not to take action. Shift your focus onto your future desired outcome and then take some action any action toward it doesn't matter how small or insignificant your action is. It just matters that you reclaim the power you've previously given your doubts in fears then notice how you feel nervous. Perhaps but definitely more empowered because he realized that the ground beneath you didn't open up and actually it wasn't so bad after all and then tomorrow repeat and continue every day thereafter until whatever one scared you no longer does at which point. It'll be time to raise your size again by deliberating. Refocusing your attention onto what it is that you do want. It creates a subtle shifting your psychological state than by taking action toward it. You subconsciously affirmed for yourself your commitment to achieving it courage confidence life rewards action only by daring to defy your. Taos and act with the confidence. You wish you had. Can you ever realize how little reason you ever had to doubt yourself?

Bill Marriott Marriott Margie Australia Worrell Martin Seligman Fraud Prime Minister Jason Arden New Zealand Dina
Microsure MUSA Robot Used for First Time on Real Patients

Automated

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

Microsure MUSA Robot Used for First Time on Real Patients

"This past week. Mussa or M. U. S. a surgical robot built by Dutch robotics. Company was used in the first in human robotics Assisted microsurgery so music and operate on vessels under a millimeter from point to two point. Eight millimeters in diameter so. This is compared to the most successful surgery robot the DAVINCI system which came out already twenty years ago but even the Da Vinci can only. I put an air quotes only operate down to one millimeter. But what's the benefit of this though? So the patients have faster healing and it also removes any non deliberate hand movement made by the surgeon which clearly would improve the success chance of the operation itself

Da Vinci Mussa M. U.
Martin Senn (Davinci Virtual) - Creating an Airbnb for offices

Wall Street Oasis

07:21 min | 2 years ago

Martin Senn (Davinci Virtual) - Creating an Airbnb for offices

"Martin. Welcome to the PODCAST oil. Good afternoon. Alex how are you doing today? I'm great I'm in La Urine Salt Lake. You're the COO. Of DAVINCI virtual super cool technology company kind of changing the way people work. But we'll get into all of that here shortly. Love to hear about who? You are how you got what you do now you know. You're you're an entrepreneur. Now were you were. You always an entrepreneur. Like how'd you get to this place in life? I mean my later fifties now. So it's been quite a quite a stretch but Today out of my office window. I'm looking at some snow covered peaks and Here in Utah but quite frankly that has a lot to do with my upbringing as well. I was born to Swiss parents in California. No snow covered peaks there but When I was about two years old we move back to Europe to Switzerland and spent my entire childhood and education in the tiny country of Switzerland. I grew up in a cow. Tom Literally six hundred and fifty people living their cows. Going up down the mountain every morning and night But then I Finished my studies at the University of Iraq and At the end of my program We actually had an opportunity to Work anywhere in the world For Global Business Program. Get additional credits. As I was a dual citizen with the United States I was able very easily to come back here and actually complete. My era ended up in Los Angeles where you are right now. Alex and I spent one year outside of Marina del Rey with a large travel wholesale company. thought I will be here for about a year. Go back to Switzerland do but good Swiss do which is pick a career for life work till they're sixty five get the Golden Watch and enjoy obviously. Didn't turn out that way I grew quite fond of the American way of life. But also the American dream and the American opportunity as I Finished my year in a had an opportunity to grow to work for two more years with a travel wholesale group that had offices in Colorado Hawaii in a couple of other areas I worked with him for the next couple years and started building call centers and call centre software for them. I really enjoy to that particular line of work but In in the early nineties we had an opportunity to acquire a competitor here in park city. Utah and At that point chose to take that position and moved here I thought it was going to be here for another year or two. Obviously now. It's been almost thirty so Things have worked out differently but You know I found you and I think I found my place not just From a personal perspective but also from a fresh perspective. Marin it's a it's a cool story kind of how you've go these different places and you say oh. I'll try this out there for a year and then you kind of just really kind of your very much open to you. Know seeing if you like it if you don't like it what's good about. It was bad about it and that's so unique I think. Can you hear from a country in Europe? Far Far Away experimenting. What you like what you don't like. What do you think is inside of you that you know allows you to just have like such an open? Mind as you're as you're going through this well a felt like part of the reason why I chose to leave Switzerland in the first place and goalwards internationally. Right was a felt. Probably confined wanted to expand my horizons. I wanted to see more of the world but also learn more in the business world and I think that's what drove me Kind of to become my guests a little bit of a traveling workman anyhow in the first place. I think the second piece of it is you know you find yourself Still without normally family responsibilities or large responsibilities try out different lines of work may be starting experimenting with certain things and I think one of the big differences here in the states whereas Switzerland this entrepreneurism and small businesses. Very much alive right. It's very much driven. There's literally millions of companies Back home things are big more traditional of ignore established and quite frankly small businesses still outside of the macro economist may be still Something that's not that much. Never did I really enjoyed it. Obviously that's why I'm here and You know I migrated from the travel industry down into coming mysteries worked extra for a very large telecom group here in Salt Lake City a for almost a decade and exited nine hundred ninety nine Because I was frustrated with The Red Tape. Maybe the lack of ability to affect change technology etc. And I wanted to regroup at that. Point was actually quite a pivotal day in in my professional career so I went back out on my own. I started my own consulting firm and actually that's how my business partner and Bill Nick in two thousand five and it was kind of almost an odyssey and a match of talent and Bishen. And that's when I truly felt we had something special and I wanted to get involved with that. Yeah it's it's interesting. How you talk about kind of your upbringing of thinking about you're always go work for a big company need. Just do that for your entire life. Get the gold watch retire but then it's what the cool part of your journey is is that you had an this open mindset to go see experiment see what. Martin was really put on this earth to do and you have this entrepreneurial spirit inside of you and so yeah you did the the corporate route and like many people. You saw yeah. I don't like all this red tape. Bureaucracy let's go. I can do this better out of my own all-star consulting and then we'll we'll see where it takes me. Yeah and you know it comes with With a joy and with pain obviously Alex you know that as well You know If you want to be an entrepreneur If you like building things from the ground up it obviously comes with without the safety blankets in a lot of cases right so you gotta have a risk tolerance. I think you've got to have the desire to really drive You know The notion of never quit the notion of being responsible for all it's really part of that journey and but I also feel that it is the most rewarding way to work if you have the ability to to truly do what you like can enjoy and push forward and grow something special. I think that's the most rewarding thing you can professionally aside from obviously you know Establishing a family and have a good family live and grow kids

Switzerland Alex Utah Europe La Urine Salt Lake COO Martin. University Of Iraq Los Angeles United States California Salt Lake City Martin TOM Marina Del Rey Marin Colorado Hawaii