35 Burst results for "Davinci"

Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:31 min | 3 weeks ago

Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

"Well i of course. Our hosts quadruple board. Certified doctor of internal medicine pulmonary disease critical care and neuro critical care and still fighting on the frontlines over the war on. Covid my very good friend. Dr steven tae back. How you doing steve. I'm well thank you as you've heard joining us from johns hopkins medicine. Doctor kenneth pinta. He's the director of research for the james buchanan. Brady urological institute. He's the co director prostate cancer research program for the sidney kimmel cancer center. He's a professor of urology. He's a professor of oncology. he's a professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences. Welcome dr to. What do you do with all your spare time can. This is not meant to be a softball question. But it's going to sound that way. I'm trying to understand from your inside. Perspective. what is it about the environment you work in a johns hopkins that produces these kind of outcomes. These ratings and the international recognition part of it is tradition. Johns hopkins was founded as the first research university in the united states and we've always placed the tripartite mention of patient care education to students and research on equal footing. So that we're always seamlessly combining those and the other piece of tradition is johns hopkins hospital in the medical school itself. We defined american medicine at johns hopkins with william oastler. Starting out saying we're gonna do medicine differently. Use the term. Medical residents started at johns hopkins. Because ostler made. The doctors live in the hospital to be trained in. So that's where the term came from. You know we have this dome at the hospital. With with the wings of the building and medicine rounds what referred to the fact that they would go round and round the dome to the different wards. And you know we carry that sort of tradition with pride and people love to work there and we've always attracted really smart people who love madison in love taking care of people and really love combining that with the research that powers the next generation of medicines. Forward dr parton. Your department chair talked about. While other hospitals use reports for urological surgery hopkins actually makes their own. Robots isn't making davinci robot. No we use a commercial robots like everyone else but what we are doing is creating the next generation of robots to work with mri machines. We have danced in. Our department is making a special robot that does that. The hopkins whiting school of engineering is developing the next generation of robots to integrate imaging with robotic surgery. A lot of that is not just hardware. it's software we're living in a pretty high tech era. We've come a long way in medicine but still so many men die of prostate cancer. What are we messing up here in. We have to do to fix this. So you know in this time of covid and so many people dying of kobe. You know it's an infectious disease. We gotta do better and we tend to forget about these other illnesses that are plaguing the planet you know if you look around the world. Ten million people a year are dying of cancer in the us. Six hundred thousand people are dying of cancer. Thirty thousand men die of prostate cancer. Every year and cancer of all kinds including prostate cancer is curable if you find it in time because we can do surgery or radiation in jewelry you but unfortunately in about fifty thousand men per year we find the cancer too late. We find the cancer. After it is escape the prostate and metastatic cancer virtually of all kinds is incurable and prostate cancer. Unfortunately metastasized spreads to the bones as first sight and it causes a lot of problems for guys in the bones including pain and eventually kills them and we can talk about how that happens but essentially we fail because we don't cure people because we don't find the cancer in time. Let me ask you a question about that. Actually because i've been quoted by colleagues that if you're fifty years old you have a fifty percent chance that you actually have prostate cancer and at sixty sixty percent chance that you've probably already have prostate cancer and so on and so forth and it would beg the question. Would it not make sense to prophylactically. Remove the prostate. And then obviously the the major impediment to that is the major side effects. What does the thought process about that in. Where are we in terms technologically of mitigating the terrible side effects of impotence and incontinence. So i think there's two aspects to that question steve that we just need to touch on because the other thing you hear. All the time is that oh prostate cancer. You don't have to worry about it. You're going to die with it not from it. You know we do see that. Eighty percent man age eighty if you look in their prostates. If they've gotten killed by a car accident you'll see prostate cancer. So essentially prostate cancer exists in two forms one form. Is this indolent slow growing low grade cancer. That probably shouldn't even be called the cancer. But it still is in we find it by screening and and those are the guys that can be treated with active surveillance. We don't need to treat their cancers where a lot smarter about that now than we were even a few years ago. The other kind of cancer is the aggressive prostate cancer. That is not the kind you find on all types whereas the kind that's growing quickly that we have to get out before it spreads so prostate cancer is definitely has a hereditary component. If you have a father or an uncle who had prostate cancer your your risk of developing prostate cancer is double if you have to family members. It's quadruples you had three family members. You're gonna get it so it is familial. There are some genetic drivers. Like vr rca to that lead to a higher incidence of prostate cancer. And we definitely say if you've have family history us should start screening sooner.

Prostate Cancer Pulmonary Disease Dr Steven Tae Cancers Kenneth Pinta Brady Urological Institute Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center First Research University William Oastler Johns Hopkins Dr Parton Johns Hopkins Medicine James Buchanan Hopkins Whiting School Of Engi Johns Hopkins Hospital Ostler Metastatic Cancer Steve
The History of Lorenzo de' Medici

This Day in History Class

04:07 min | 2 months ago

The History of Lorenzo de' Medici

"Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm tracy v wilson and it's january first happy new year. Lorenzo de medici was born on the stay in fourteen forty nine. The medici family of florence was rich and powerful. They had come to florence sometime in the twelfth century although they had started out as just simple tuscan peasants but over a couple of hundred years they became incredibly wealthy and powerful by the middle of the fourteenth century. There were one of florence's leading families and they also had a reputation for being extremely adept at negotiating in the worlds of politics and money and this was through. Legitimate means as well as through things like bribery. Lorenzo domenici was described as the most medici of the medici. He was nicknamed lorenzo. The magnificent he's been described as the most powerful the most famous the most brilliant the most influential in the world of art thanks to his patronage and the most ruthless came to power in florence along with his brother in fourteen sixty nine after the death of their father and the two of them were ruling together and nine years later. There was a conspiracy to assassinate both of them and to take control of the republic of florence away from the medici. This was called the pazzi. Conspiracy the potsy and the medici were basically rival families within florence. One of the things that had led to this whole rivalry in the conspiracy was that the potsy family had taken over the financial affairs of the papacy and that was taking business away from the medici which the medici did not appreciate the ringleader in. This conspiracy was francesco. Potsy and he wasn't the patriarch of the pazzi family. But he was the one that was driving all of this. The fascination was finally set to take place during easter mass. in fourteen. seventy eight and lorenzo's brother giuliano was killed but lorenzo escaped afterward though. Lorenzo sought retro bution against olive his conspirators. There was a lot of hanging people throwing them out windows. A lot of dismemberments overall it was very gruesome and there were more than seventy executions of purported co-conspirators this whole incident though really shaped lorenzo's that his brother was dead so he was on his own in terms of his leadership at the republic and it had also gotten rid of a lot of actors and demonstrated the links that he would go to so after this whole conspiracy and the war that followed food. He had the support of a lot of the people of florence. He ruled almost as a monarch. Although lorenzo really liked to describe himself as just a highly respectable citizen anything special he and others in the family also acted as patrons to writers and artists and architects including people like botticelli and leonardo davinci among many others there was also of course michelangelo. Who was brought up partially in the medici household lorenzo domenici was also a collector of antiquities and of artwork. Basically what they were doing. They couldn't really afford to pay for the most extravagant biggest name artwork so they would find lesser known undiscovered talent of sort of cultivate them by their work for cheap. It's not however totally accurate to say that the medici family single paid for the renaissance. Sometimes they are described that way. Lorenzo was also a poet himself in addition to his patronage of other artists by the fourteen ninety s though lorenzo's health was declining the city of florence. Also becoming less and less enamored with the lifestyle that he had enabled and encouraged. This is a lifestyle that was just full of lavish festivals. in extravagance. He died at the age of only forty three. His son giovanni later became pope. Leo the tenth.

Lorenzo Tracy V Wilson Lorenzo De Medici Lorenzo Domenici Potsy Medici Giuliano Francesco Leonardo Davinci Florence Botticelli Michelangelo Giovanni
How Sports Trading Cards Went from Hobby to Asset Class

ESPN Daily

04:21 min | 2 months ago

How Sports Trading Cards Went from Hobby to Asset Class

"So dan. i want you to help. Explain exactly how wild this year has been for sports cards with an example and that example that sticks out to me and shocks me every time i consider it. Is this record setting. Mike trout card. Can you tell me a little bit about the card itself. So it's a it's a two thousand nine bowman chrome super factor dan. Hey ducky is a writer and researcher for espn and a card collector. Himself it's got autograph on a autograph on grated. Basically there are three companies professionals Authenticator beckett s g c they grade. How perfect on a scale of one to ten a. Carter's so this might trump card is a nine so it's pretty. It's pretty close to perfect but the autograph is greeted at ten. So it's really close to perfect card can awesome. It's a trap route card also on top of that. It's a one of one so there is only one of these in existence yet. It's so interesting because mike trout in public is like a semi anonymous celebrity like a lot of fans casual fans and sports. Even don't really know him. But this card this one of one card with the perfect autograph. What did actually go for went for nine. hundred million. A new record has been set for the most valuable baseball card in history. Somebody paid three point. Nine million dollars for this mike trout rookie card. I know that when joe maddon was confronted with the information that he had a player who's card solta that much giving like. How much does the mona lisa goes for. Wow i'm into art. That puts him right up there with the mona. lisa's self. For what what is anything by a davinci or wow that is. That's that's pretty. That's pretty phenomenal. And it's actually. It's like yeah. I mean that's disappear question. And what was the previous record holder in terms of the most valuable card that had ever been sold at auction. The previous holy grail. Was you know the the honus wagner keys who six said turn of the century the twentieth century like early nineteen hundreds heart on. It's such a lower behind it. That's not happening with mike trump there. There's no incredible backstory to have his card exists. It's it's modern. It's not easy to obtain but it's not it's not like tobacco card that was pulled from from production really what happened to wagner was once thought is that wagner didn't like that he was being used his likeness is being used to sell tobacco the kids so he objected a pulled the card from production and that was that the other less known school of thought is that wagner he wouldn't be compensated for his likeness so he objected because he wouldn't be paid and the facts the truth which is a i like this story better it would be the like the earliest flexing of brand autonomy. It is remarkable what you say though the difference between his honus wagner card which does like looking at it. I'm looking at it right now on my screen. It's like this historical american artifacts that reminds me of like a daguerreotype from like the civil war or something it looks important and ancient and the trout card. The fact that this object can be worth more than any other thing that came before in modern times and the guy who sold this. Mike trout card dan for this terrifyingly large amount is a man named ken golden. So tell me a little bit more about him. What's the business that guy runs. Golden is ken. Golden golden auctions diammonium. Sins loan out nike sneaker. How much does that they work can in your eyes to me. It's definitely a six-figure iconic piece it is the most famous pair of sneakers in the world. Then he remains arguably the most renowned auction house for remember billion sports

Mike Trout Authenticator Beckett DAN Ducky Wagner Mike Trump Joe Maddon Espn Carter Mona Lisa Baseball Lisa Ken Golden KEN Nike
"davinci" Discussed on Living Legacy Leadership

Living Legacy Leadership

03:17 min | 5 months ago

"davinci" Discussed on Living Legacy Leadership

"So <Speech_Female> as I mentioned <Speech_Female> already <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Leonardo <Speech_Female> was actually a <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Very, handsome <Speech_Female> physical specimen <Speech_Telephony_Female> apparently, <Speech_Female> and a very strong <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> the stories <Speech_Female> were abounding that he <Speech_Female> could bend <Speech_Female> horseshoes with <Speech_Female> his bare hands. <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> Now <Speech_Female> whether that was true or not <Speech_Female> who knows maybe <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Female> he was a strong <Speech_Female> guy and <Speech_Female> well-balanced <Speech_Female> himself <Speech_Female> in <Speech_Female> his physique <Speech_Female> but also took really <Speech_Female> good care <Speech_Female> of his body health <Speech_Female> was very <Speech_Female> important <Speech_Female> to him. As I mentioned <Speech_Female> before he said, you need <Speech_Female> to be responsible <Speech_Female> for your <Speech_Female> own health <Speech_Female> not only <Speech_Female> physically in fact, he was <Speech_Female> a vegetarian <Speech_Female> which I didn't <Speech_Telephony_Female> know before <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Female> then also understood <Speech_Female> about the impact <Speech_Female> of your mood <Speech_Female> and your <Speech_Female> attitude on <Speech_Female> your physical <Speech_Female> wellbeing. <Speech_Female> So <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Corporales. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Ta. is <Speech_Female> where he <Speech_Female> would <Speech_Female> <hes> express <Speech_Female> physicality <Speech_Female> threw <Speech_Female> himself in his own <Speech_Female> body <Speech_Female> but also <hes> <Speech_Female> we know he <Speech_Female> appreciated the bodies <Speech_Female> of others around <Speech_Telephony_Female> him <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> I am sure <Speech_Female> he built that into <Speech_Female> a lot of his <Speech_Female> inventions <Speech_Female> as well <Silence> and then finally. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> The the seventh <Speech_Female> of the principles <Speech_Female> that Gallup <Speech_Female> has laid out <Speech_Female> as key <Speech_Female> to Leonardo's <Speech_Female> approach to <Speech_Female> thinking and learning and <Speech_Female> expressing his <Speech_Female> genius. <Speech_Female> was. <Speech_Female> Shown saone. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Name, which is connection. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> Now. <Speech_Female> There's a famous quote <Speech_Female> by Leonardo <Speech_Telephony_Female> that said that <Speech_Female> everything <Speech_Female> connects with <Speech_Female> everything else. <Silence> <Speech_Female> And this <Speech_Female> is all about systems <Speech_Female> thinking, <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Female> also the <Speech_Female> Internet connection <Speech_Female> of one thing <Speech_Female> to another. <Speech_Telephony_Female> So <Speech_Female> if you have <Speech_Female> a teenager <Speech_Female> for example <Speech_Female> or a staff <Speech_Telephony_Female> member who <Speech_Female> is lacking <Speech_Female> in. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Interest, in any <Speech_Female> topic or <Speech_Female> engagement in <Speech_Female> their schoolwork or <Speech_Female> their work projects <Speech_Female> or so on <Speech_Female> the the the <Speech_Female> trick is the <Speech_Female> key is <Speech_Female> to find something <Speech_Female> that connects <Speech_Female> the two. So when <Speech_Female> I was working a lot with <Speech_Female> young people <hes> <Speech_Female> particularly in England. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> they were struggling with <Speech_Female> mathematics. <Speech_Female> We would use the <Speech_Female> example of playing <Speech_Female> pool or billiards <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> talk about the angles <Speech_Female> of shooting the ball. <Speech_Female> Well, they understood that <Speech_Female> they could get <Speech_Female> it. They knew they had <Speech_Female> to turn the Q.. <Speech_Female> <hes> certain <Speech_Female> direction to hit <Speech_Female> the ball at a certain place <Speech_Female> to make sure it went <Speech_Female> into pocket <Speech_Telephony_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> and then we could <Speech_Female> turn. That back <Speech_Female> and and talk about <Speech_Female> vectors and <Speech_Female> angles, and <Speech_Female> so on <Speech_Female> the impact and consequences, <Speech_Female> and so <Speech_Telephony_Female> on of <hes> <Speech_Female> as as <Speech_Female> relates to mathematics. <Speech_Telephony_Female> So <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> that's not my area <Speech_Female> of expertise. So <Speech_Female> I found that <Speech_Female> interesting. So <Speech_Female> that's a good way <Speech_Female> to find ways to connect <Speech_Telephony_Female> <hes> <Speech_Female> that connect <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to something else, <Speech_Female> and that then <Speech_Female> will engender interest <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> engagement in <Speech_Female> any topic. <Silence> So. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Just to repeat <Speech_Female> the principles. <Speech_Female> That <Speech_Female> <hes> how to think <Speech_Female> like Leonardo Davinci <Speech_Female> according to Michael <Speech_Female> Gal by the book <Speech_Female> of the same name. <Speech_Female> Cuneo <Speech_Female> Sita curiosity <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> demonstra <Speech_Female> own a demonstration <Speech_Female> or hands on <Speech_Female> since that <Speech_Female> Sione, <Speech_Female> which is using all <Speech_Female>

Leonardo Davinci Cuneo England. Michael
"davinci" Discussed on Living Legacy Leadership

Living Legacy Leadership

04:45 min | 5 months ago

"davinci" Discussed on Living Legacy Leadership

"Around all around you to express your own brand of genius. So just to. Tell you again that the book how to think like Leonardo Da Vinci was written by a colleague of Mine Longtime Colleague I've known Michael Gelb for. Thirty thirty five years. We've waltzed around the country and multiple countries in the same circles working together for example, with Tony Buzen? WHO's the crater of mind mapping and in fact Gal was in England as a young upstart think early twenties or so think he was going to college is going to attending a course on the Alexander Technique which has to do with. Body Movement and Getting the most out of your physique and physiology. Anyway, he was in London for this. Many years ago now and he met up with Tony Beeson and In fact, they traded services so to speak so Tony Tony's taught Michael Mind Mapping and Michael. Talk. Tony Juggling. and. In fact, a little side story When Tony's book the Mind Mapping Book Reached Twenty Five Years those of US involved in the network and certain invited public were invited to Royal Albert. Hall. In London I was one of those my kids were all their husband was there and we. Made a Guinness Book of world, Records Record for the most people juggling at any one time and and same place. So we were doing this. At the Royal Albert Hall and I had been invited to juggle up on the stage, but I had to go down. To the floor because when I juggled I can't moving forward and they were afraid I would walk off the stage so. That was my little story about my being with Michael Gale Juggling Albert Hall in London Michael is also married now to the opera singer Deborah Domanski and He's also a practitioner of Kito and If you look Michael GELB DOT com, he has different interviews and programs and so on about. Creative thinking in general. But of course, Leonardo Da Vinci is his specialist. Subject. So Leonardo was born in fourteen, fifty two. So Couple of hundred? Years. Ago. and He of course is considered a polymath season artist although frankly you know what? He didn't actually paint that many pictures at least that if survived and and yet we know his work as some of the most famous art work in the world kind of interesting. From. A historical perspective he was pretty much known in his time. He has a he was patronized by a lot of the feudal lords and so on of the time and he moved around the Feudal Kingdoms in Italy at the time Florence. Milan Rome all these places as an inventor as someone who invented military weapons as an architect and urban designer. He designed canal systems he studied waves and wave action of water We know him for his drawing of Vitriol V and man, which is purports to show the perfect or divine proportions of human beings and how they interrelate to. Through things like the fifth series with a sacred geometry and so on we know he kept prolific notes in his notebooks with odd features like writing backwards. Some people say it was because he was dyslexic and we know that influence just learning styles and you're going to see here how some of his Principles of learning relate to the fact that he was dyslexic. But, whether that was the the sole reason he wrote that way isn't his books or there's also some speculation that actually. was trying to foil his competitors He didn't want them to be able to figure out things. He was still thinking through and working on and stealing his ideas and so he wrote in this dubious manner but it was a guy that is you'll see through the principles that we're GonNa talk about in a minute. Approached life quite differently than most of us he you know it..

Leonardo Da Vinci Tony Tony Michael Gelb Michael Royal Albert Hall London Tony Buzen Michael Mind Mapping Tony Beeson Tony Juggling. Michael Gale Leonardo US Royal Albert England Milan Rome Florence Deborah Domanski Italy
"davinci" Discussed on Living Legacy Leadership

Living Legacy Leadership

01:54 min | 5 months ago

"davinci" Discussed on Living Legacy Leadership

"Welcome to living legacy leadership where we explore, discover and share insights, tools and strategies for life well lived into elder hood. I'm your host Donna Kim Brand Author Speaker Legacy Strategy Coach, and creator of the concept living legacy where you choose to live life on your own terms while contributing to people, places and projects along your. Life, Journey. I believe that the life you live is the legacy you leave. Now the guests I bring to each week all address some unique aspect of learning leadership or legacy. This helps you raise your own game as a leader of business in life and also showcases some extraordinary people who exemplify living legacy leadership. At least once a month, I also offer a training session skill you and game change your thinking for your own application. So get your notebook ready or sharpen up your memory by tuning in your attention, and we'll dive right in. Well today folks is one of those game change your thinking days and we're gonNA be talking about how to be smart like Leonardo Da Vinci. I'm going to share with you the principles of learning used by Leonardo Davinci to be the polymath considered the number one genius in history according to most people. Accessing the insights and wisdom of my colleague Michael, Gallup who's author of the book how to think like Leonardo Davinci you too can take on Davinci's approach to observing and acting on life all.

Been Caught Stealing

Your Brain on Facts

04:40 min | 6 months ago

Been Caught Stealing

"Thankful faults jewelry and fine art. Maybe a casino carefully organized plans by people dressed in black turtlenecks with lots of cool gadgets close calls. What we remember as the daring heist of one of the world's most famous paintings. was really neither of those things. The heist wasn't particularly daring and the theft of Leonardo DAVINCI's Mona Lisa. Wasn't even noticed until well after it had happened. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. These days the Mona Lisa also called in Italy login Kanda and her famous enigmatic smile hang in a prominent place in the Louvre in Paris. It holds the Guinness World Record for the highest known insurance valuation in History at one, hundred, million dollars in nineteen, sixty two. So. That would be about eight hundred million dollars today. Over six million people go to see it each year. It's so popular that you can't even snap a quick Selfie of it without having a few dozen other strangers, hands, and cell phones in the frame. This popularity certainly wasn't the case when the painting was I hung in the Leuven eighteen o four or for the century subsequent. Neither was popular with critics when the artistic elite who often relegated it to the low end of DAVINCI's work it was basically just another painting. It was so unsocial in fact that it took the better part of twenty four hours before staff even noticed the painting was missing in Nineteen. Eleven. A handyman named Vincenzo Perrugia was working in the museum and he simply waited in a closet until after the museum had closed. Tuck to the painting under his smock walked on out. He was unwittingly aided by a plumber also working in the museum who unlocked a for Peruta when he found himself stuck inside. The police were called and they searched the museum. The only sign they found the Japan Kanda was frame laying on a staircase. Though police did find some twenty one other paintings in the museum. The curator's had previously reported missing. The. Search went citywide then national then international. Ships were searched before they left France or after arriving in their port of call. A reward of over half a million dollars in today's money was offered. The Mona Lisa's picture was printed in newspapers all over the world. It became a of Mona Lisa Mania. The theft of this single painting served a spawn multiple criminal enterprises. People on the wrong side of the law knew that those with more money than morals would want to buy. LEGITIM- Kanda. A pair of confidence men from Belgium hired a small army of forgers to make quality fakes, which they then sold to select around the globe. They made sure their buyers were unlikely to ever meet and rested soundly knowing that no one would let on that they had purchased the most famous stolen painting in the world. Though today, one of them would probably take a selfie with it. The huge reward and the number of fakes in circulation meant the police were inundated with leads. For two years they searched tirelessly. But Fruitlessly The sixty man strong force even interviewed, Peruta Twice. But decided, he couldn't be the criminal mastermind they were looking for. Not only did those two years not yield the Mona Lisa the police didn't even find the forgeries. The head of the Paris police retired in shame. Did, peruse, you get an enormous payday for the stolen painting. People were soon to learn that he didn't steal it for money. When ferruccio approached museum in Florence to sell them the painting, the museum's director called the police instead. After. His arrest Russia's stated. I worked in the Louvre making frames for paintings stolen from Italy by France every day I pass login Kanda and swore I would return it to its rightful home. He seemed convinced he would be heralded as a hero. This was sadly not the case but the Italian courts were sympathetic giving him only a year in prison for the world famous theft. These days legit Kanda sits behind more bulletproof

Mona Lisa Kanda Theft Mona Lisa Mania Leonardo Davinci Legitim- Kanda Louvre Paris France Italy Vincenzo Perrugia Peruta Russia Japan Belgium Florence Ferruccio Director
11 Trivia Questions on Hamilton

Trivia With Budds

03:23 min | 6 months ago

11 Trivia Questions on Hamilton

"Wants this quarantine. Is Lifted. We'll what happens and we'll see how much all of us can get out there and travel the world. I'm sure that they were all aching to just see something other than the inside of our garage or office or kitchens. So. Here's hoping for that. We're going to jump into these eleven questions on Paris and New York City right now here we go. It's Peres versus New York. Question number one according to the two thousand, twelve centers about how many people live in Paris is at one point five, million, two, point, five, million or five point five, million people number one, one, point, five, two, point five or five point five. Number two what nineteen sixty one, Audrey Hepburn film takes place in New York City number two, what nineteen sixty one audrey hepburn film takes place in New York City number two. Number. Three pairs is often called the city of light because of its role in the age of what number three pairs is often called the city of light because of its role in the age of what? Number four Captain Raymond Holt is a character you could find on what New York Sitcom number four Captain Raymond. Whole is a character. You can find on what New York Sitcom Number Four Number five museum is the setting for the intro of the Davinci code number. Five, what museum is the setting for the Intro of the Da Vinci Code. Number six what arena do the New York jets call home number six what arena do the New York jets call home? Number seven, this famous Irish writer has a tomb in Paris bears a sculpture of a person with wings named the writer number seven. A famous Irish writer has a tomb in Paris with sculpture of a person with wings name the writer. Number eight about how many acres is central park is at three, hundred, twenty, five, four, hundred, seventy, six, six, hundred, Sixty, eight, hundred, and forty acres number eight, those choices again, the acreage of Central Park three, twenty, five, four, seventy, six, sixty, or eight, forty. And number nine and frank. Sinatra's New York New York. He sings I want to wake up in a city that blank blank fill in those two blanks number nine and Frank Sinatra's New York. New York he sings I want to wake up and the city that blank blank. Number ten. What does the French word Mandi translate to English that's M. O. N. d. e. what does the French word Monda? Translate to in English. Andy Bonus for Peres versus New York for two points. There are six replicas of what landmark in Paris. There are six replicas of what landmark in Paris. Those are all your questions, repairs versus new city. We'll be right back in just a second with those us in France answers.

New York City Paris New York New York Sitcom Frank Sinatra Writer Audrey Hepburn Peres Central Park Captain Raymond Holt France Captain Raymond Andy Bonus M. O. N.
Leonardo!

The Past and the Curious

04:40 min | 6 months ago

Leonardo!

"To. The Renaissance, Oh Italy, how you have suffered through the darkness of the Middle Ages, and now here we are standing on the cusp of a new era where we will turn our minds to nature. Humans, and the world striving to understand how it all works, congratulations to us all. We've made it. This speech is not even remotely real though it was very well delivered. Thank you very much money, but it is easy to mistake this sentiment as something that people at the time might have actually felt. Most likely no one at the time realized that a new era, the renaissance had begun in the year fourteen hundred it's not like a giant switch flipped flooding the so called dark, ages with the bright light of the renaissance like US folks were just living their lives day to day. Most people will probably never even realized that the world was changing in such tremendous ways. It took historians to do that our story centers around Italy which in the early eighteen hundreds became the center of the renaissant. which radiated to the world the term renaissance refers to a time period that brought a new focus on philosophy and the arts sciences, understanding of the world and the mathematics behind it, and also a humans place in it. All like all other times it was also a period filled with wars and conflict because you know people right but it was a period of great advancement and achievement. Some of the greatest the world has ever known. The most famous and probably most important figure from this time and place was a left handed polymath who is unmarried and socially mismatched parents didn't even pay for him to be educated. Luckily for him and for the rest of us, he was really smart and he worked hard to keep getting smarter. No one could argue about his genius, His name was Leonardo Da Vinci. As. A young boy without the means for an Education Leonardo took advantage of the apprentice system in Italy, his natural ability with art and strong grasp of geometry and math, which she somehow learned without ever actually going to school earned him a spot as an apprentice to an artist in Florence named Ferruccio. Broke Yo is a leading painter and sculptor an his workshop near the Arno River Leonardo rose from sweeping the floors and mixing paints to working side by side with his master. It was not uncommon for an apprentice to handle much of the actual painting in a workshop and Leonardo was no different much of the painted onto canvases signed by Rubio was actually put there by Leonardo in fourteen seventy two at only twenty years of age Davinci officially became a master himself. This meant he could accept commissions for his own work which he did this how you made money. But he also found patronage or support from powerful political leaders. He moved to Milan to work under the Duke of Milan a man named sports. He originally got sports as attention by making him a lute from a horse go and silver. Which is pretty Nedal for being honest. This horse had instrument must have worked because sports decided to pay him a bunch of money. For Seventeen years in Milan, he made statues designed architectural features, created models and drawings. The even painted the masterpiece the last supper on the wall of the Monastery of Santa Maria. Della GRADS E. In addition to all of this, he was learning about the anatomy of living creatures, including people. Of course, do this he had to dissect cadavers or dead bodies? And to get these, he had to dig them up when no one was looking. Just pretty gross, but people learned a lot from his willingness to get his hands dirty. Honestly he was kind of a Rockstar people wanted to hire him for everything and he honestly left a lot of jobs unfinished because more. We're always coming his way. But when he did finish something, people would rush to see it and flocks like we might do for a concert or a Broadway show today. As. If this wasn't enough he was also designing some of the most incredible technology. The world has ever seen. Remember he was a polymath an expert at many thanks. Most of his designs were never actually built like a helicopter and a tank, a diving suit and a super mega gigantic crossbow. These just existed as detailed drawings in his many notebooks filled with a never ending flow of ideas.

Italy Davinci Arno River Leonardo Milan Leonardo Da Vinci United States Monastery Of Santa Maria Florence Rockstar Rubio Ferruccio
Meggan Watterson | Christs First Apostle and Her Gospel of Love

Hay House Meditations

05:54 min | 8 months ago

Meggan Watterson | Christs First Apostle and Her Gospel of Love

"Hi Megan, welcome to the House Meditations podcast. Thank you, thank you for having me. Yeah. I'm really excited to to speak to you about. Of Topics today that includes your meditation and condemned practices. the life of Mary Magdalene in Christ. Women in early Christianity, and as you write in your book the Christianity we haven't yet tried. We haven't tried yet, yes. I think it might be instructive for our listeners for us to situate our conversation. By talking about the person of Mary Magdalene so, can you tell us who Mary Magwar mangled was? What was her relationship to Christ? Well, I love to start that conversation with. A clarification, which is that Mary Magdalene was not a prostitute. 'cause most people. That's how they have come across our. That's how they've been told about her is that she is the penitent prostitute, the woman who sinned much and was forgiven much So this. was a story of fictitious story created about her around the sixth century it within the Catholic tradition and the Catholic Church has actually. wrote a formal apology in the nineteen seventies and have corrected that misunderstanding of her and then Pope Francis recently rehabilitation sort of rehabilitate. That's the word he rehabilitated her. And she is now officially the apostle to the apostles, and that to me is very significant, not because there is anything ever. It's not that there's anything innately derogatory about sex in the body or you know. Anything having to do with that it the reason why to me it's so significant and important is because it begins to us closer to the truth of who she really was. Which which is the person Christ resurrected to? Right, she was his witness. She was there at the Tomb, not by accident not. Happen to just be in the right place at the right time if we include her Gospel among the other gospels that were co defied in the fourth century, if we if we reintroduce her gospel as just as significant just as worthy of taxed and scripture it. It speaks to Christianity, that included her included her in authority clued included her partnership with Christ, and that's really how I would describe and define them regardless of whether you ever go the sort of Davinci code rabbit hole of Were they married and. Did they have a physical relationship. They have a physical relationship. Physical Child You. We don't even need to go there at this point right now. It's so significant to identify and what we can know. empirically is that they were companions. They were partners and we know that from the. We know that even just from the New Testament exactly that we add these other Gospel, so can you help so for those of us? Who aren't scholars of the Bible or theologians? Can you help situate us? Okay? We have the the new. Testament that actually speaks about Mary Magdalene. Just spoke about that. She was present at at the resurrection, and she was the first person who Christ spoke to right after. They have that. We have that like an that. When I was raised Catholic that was the story was a prostitute who he was speaking to that what I was told. These whole other said of writings of Gospels that were around. There wasn't a codified Christianity after Christ right there were. Complaint Forms of writing. Right. Can you help us understand that? Yeah, I get really excited, sorry. When we talk about this early form of Christianity before it was could have at. It wasn't cofide until the fourth century. So that's important to understand so there are hundreds of years where there's a Christianity that's being practiced that so radical and threatening to the Roman Empire and the idea of. Existence being ranked according to a hierarchy so educated Roman born men are at the top, and then it. There's all different layers in positions of power but women. Prostitutes slaves would be down there at the bottom meaning, having no rights, and not having a sense of. Being able to have autonomy and voice and power themselves so Mary Magdalene would. Be Way down there at the bottom, not because she was a prostitute because she was a woman, women didn't have any rights or own property so. This form this early form of Christianity. If we re introduced scripture like the Gospel of Mary Magdalene like the Gospel of Philip, which names Mary as Kreis companion. The Greek word is Kono's, and that word can be translated as partner, beloved or companion, so the gospel of Philip names. Miriam of Magdala Mary Magdalene as the companion of Christ

Mary Magdalene Magdala Mary Magdalene Mary Magwar Megan Mary Catholic Church Philip Miriam Roman Empire Pope Francis Partner Kono
Lavender, Love and Pasta! twitter

The Maria Liberati Show

01:46 min | 9 months ago

Lavender, Love and Pasta! twitter

"The deck of his cobblestone home with family the. The Sun is out over the horizon covered in white fluffy clouds, yet it's rays shine through and Brighton the entire day. It's bright as a baby. Blue Sky Meshes with the scenery in perfect harmony, towering mountains, filled with green trees, and other vegetation stand tall in the distance with pride at the farm, a light breeze sways these purple plants back, and forth to and fro with ease, creating a symphony of nature, true and pure echoing through the countryside. Lovely scent of these violent shoot plans travels with the wind. The traveling fragrance seems to spread a feeling of calm and love. This is a moment sure to last forever in the minds of all present. What is this lovely herb? If. You guess lavender than you're correct. LAVENDER is one of the most widely recognized plants and herbs. The world known for its stunning appearance breath taking sent. It has gained a loyal following of admirers throughout time in Shakespeare's winter's tale. He writes hot lavender men's. Marjoram, the marigold that goes to bed with the sun, and with him rises weeping. These are flowers of middle summer, and I think they're given to men of middle aged lavender, Israeli plant with an influence on cuisine, medicine, the Arts Romance and culture. With better topic for this segment. Leonardo DAVINCI's own recipe for making a fragrance is to make

Leonardo Davinci Brighton Arts Romance
What's the Most Expensive Book in the World?

BrainStuff

03:51 min | 10 months ago

What's the Most Expensive Book in the World?

"These days with printing and digital technologies being. What they are books can be very affordable. But when you get into collector territory prices can be astounding. Today's question is what is the most expensive book in the World Abraham Stuff? It's me person Sagar. Sometimes I like to imagine that long after I'm dead. A wealthy philanthropist is going to buy my diary for millions of dollars in lend it to museums across the planet. Then everyone would finally know the answer to today's question. What is the most expensive book in the world? Something by William Shakespeare the Neck Renamo con twilight new moon. Well it all depends on if the book is printed or if it's handwritten if we're talking books that have had multiple copies printed and the answer is the Bay Psalm. Book which sold for more than fourteen million dollars in November of two thousand thirteen it was originally printed by Puritans in Cambridge Massachusetts in sixteen forty seeking religious freedom. These settlers wanted their own translation of the Old Testament. Today there are only eleven copies remaining and it is considered the first book printed in America but if we include one of a kind handwritten texts than the Bay Psalm. Book isn't even worth half the value of the most expensive book ever sold. That title goes to Leonardo DAVINCI'S CODEX Leicester which sold for thirty point. Eight million dollars in nineteen ninety four to a little known computer programmer by the name of Bill Gates. Adjust that amount for inflation and today the Codex is almost worth fifty million dollars. In fact. That's forty nine million. Five Hundred Twenty eight thousand five hundred. Sixty one dollars and forty cents. If you WANNA be technical it's an unbound seventy two page notebook filled with Davinci's drawings and thoughts mainly about how to move water yet. The most expensive book in the world is basically a plumbing manual more on that in a minute. A lot of DAVINCI's writing was lost to history. Almost half of it. In fact so the Codex. Leicester is mainly important because it's a single collection of his focused ideas. The Codex is written like many of Davinci's works in something called mirror hand. All the letters are reversed and it's written from right to left so the only way you can read it when it's held up to a mirror and you probably need a fluency in antiquated Italian as well. So it's a book about water that's written backwards to be fair. That's oversimplifying things a bit. It's primarily about how astronomy and geology relate to water. Considering the functionality of tides eddies and dams really Davinci was trying to figure out how to harness the power of moving water he demonstrates how pressure increases with theft in a fluid and the Codex examines configurations of siphons and differently shaped pipes. He's particularly interested in the fluid mechanics of how water moves around obstacles. This manuscript was first purchased in seventeen. Seventeen by a guy named Thomas Coke who later became the earl of Leicester Hence the title Codex Leicester But in one thousand nine hundred eighty an art collector named Armand Hammer bought it changing. Its name to the more bad ass Codex Hammer. This only lasted fourteen years. Though intil gates bought it and changed back then he made it into a screensaver for windows. Ninety five actually gate seems genuinely inspired by Davinci's example of pushing themselves to find more knowledge. He's even loaned the book to a number of museums years so it be viewed and studied by the public. So that's the most expensive book

Leonardo Davinci Leicester Armand Hammer Sagar Bill Gates Cambridge Massachusetts William Shakespeare America Thomas Coke Theft
An Excerpt from the book Youve Got This: The Life Changing Power of Trusting Yourself by Margie Warrell

Optimal Living Daily

05:48 min | 11 months ago

An Excerpt from the book Youve Got This: The Life Changing Power of Trusting Yourself by Margie Warrell

"An excerpt from the book. You've got this the life changing power trusting yourself by Margie. Worrell growing up on a small dairy farm in rural Australia. I learned early. That courage trump's confidence as I mustered up my courage learning to ride my first horse as he towered over me or at least felt that way that a couple of years later had trained the brave all over again as I mastered my second horse. A Wild Brumby. We won in a raffle. Who went from zero to one hundred miles per hour in five seconds flat? My lifelong lesson growth in comfort can't ride the same horse of course if you've ever wished he were confidence you're not alone. The biggest hurdle we ever have to face fairly stories. We spin ourselves about not having what it takes to achieve what we want mired in misgivings. Many people tiptoed timidly through much of their lives arriving safely. Life's end with a large gap between the life. They did live the life they could have lived if only they act themselves more and doubted themselves less. Of course we're all wired for caution cognitively bias to overestimate the risks. Underestimate ourselves man. Focus more on. What scares us like being rejected or exposed as a fraud than on. What inspires us? Little wonder one of the regrets of the dying is that they lived to safe and risks to little which begs the question. Is it confidence. We really need to forge meaningful careers and driving our lives or is it courage to take action amid or doubt fears and misgivings Bill Marriott. The legendary hotelier. Who took the business? His father had started as a nine seat root beer stand and turn it into the world's largest hotel empire believes it's the ladder during a fireside chat for Marriott headquarters. I asked him what he learned about building confidence. He threw his head back and laughed. I've learnt that don't have as much as people think I have. He chuckled ye confidence by doing and learning and making mistakes and fixing. Your mistakes is true. Confidence is inbuilt through. Knowing you can't fail is built through risking failure daring to act with very confidence. We wish we had and trusting ourselves that even if we fall short we'll figure it out and be okay. Martin Seligman a leader in the field of positive. Psychology said that positive self image by itself doesn't produce anything in cannot be sustained without action in other words. You can't think yourself confident rather a Soliman road quote a sustainable sense of security in oneself arises from positive and productive behavior and quote. Ask anyone who's ever done anything worthwhile. And they'll tell you that it wasn't confidence in their invincibility that fueled their endeavors rather their desire to do something trump. They're feared they'd fall short in their attempt or my case as an aspiring equestrian fall of my oars which by the way I did many times ensured their mission exceeded their fear compelling them break ranks from comfort. Time and time again sometimes. It was semi confident actions. Sometimes it was not in the gut knees shaking nervous action but always action as prime minister of New Zealand. Jason Arden said quote. If you sit and wait to feel like you're the most confident person in the room. You were probably going to be left by yourself and quote so too. It is for all of us. We cannot build the confidence. We like sitting safely on our couch. Waiting for a thunderbolt of unstoppable self-belief to strike us from above does not say confidence doesn't have its merits. However with the exception of cereal narcissists confidence waxes and wanes. Waiting until you feel confident you cannot fall short before you take a brave leap toward your bold. His aspirations in your work relationships and life Camino long long wait far more useful to focus their energy on cultivating courage or training. The brave as I did each time saddled up after a fall all those years ago after all. Courage is not dependent on being completely self-assured that you'll hit a bullseye. Every time rather as about daring to do something despite your misgivings or lack of mastery as research has repeatedly found people build confidence by adopting a growth mindset and wish they give themselves permission to get better as they go along first allows you first draft then a slightly less lousy second. Dina half decent third draft. No one writes bestseller first time. They put pen to paper. So if you've been waiting until you're one hundred percent confident you know exactly what you are doing or of achieved. Davinci like mastery before you set out. Consider the hidden tax of letting your doubts. Call the shots on your career on your relationships. On the value or adding or failing to add for others on ever unleashing your full brilliance on the world cheating behaviors proceeds changing self perception rather than dwelling on all the reasons why not to take action. Shift your focus onto your future desired outcome and then take some action any action toward it doesn't matter how small or insignificant your action is. It just matters that you reclaim the power you've previously given your doubts in fears then notice how you feel nervous. Perhaps but definitely more empowered because he realized that the ground beneath you didn't open up and actually it wasn't so bad after all and then tomorrow repeat and continue every day thereafter until whatever one scared you no longer does at which point. It'll be time to raise your size again by deliberating. Refocusing your attention onto what it is that you do want. It creates a subtle shifting your psychological state than by taking action toward it. You subconsciously affirmed for yourself your commitment to achieving it courage confidence life rewards action only by daring to defy your. Taos and act with the confidence. You wish you had. Can you ever realize how little reason you ever had to doubt yourself?

Bill Marriott Marriott Margie Australia Worrell Martin Seligman Fraud Prime Minister Jason Arden New Zealand Dina
Microsure MUSA Robot Used for First Time on Real Patients

Automated

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Microsure MUSA Robot Used for First Time on Real Patients

"This past week. Mussa or M. U. S. a surgical robot built by Dutch robotics. Company was used in the first in human robotics Assisted microsurgery so music and operate on vessels under a millimeter from point to two point. Eight millimeters in diameter so. This is compared to the most successful surgery robot the DAVINCI system which came out already twenty years ago but even the Da Vinci can only. I put an air quotes only operate down to one millimeter. But what's the benefit of this though? So the patients have faster healing and it also removes any non deliberate hand movement made by the surgeon which clearly would improve the success chance of the operation itself

Da Vinci Mussa M. U.
Martin Senn (Davinci Virtual) - Creating an Airbnb for offices

Wall Street Oasis

07:21 min | 1 year ago

Martin Senn (Davinci Virtual) - Creating an Airbnb for offices

"Martin. Welcome to the PODCAST oil. Good afternoon. Alex how are you doing today? I'm great I'm in La Urine Salt Lake. You're the COO. Of DAVINCI virtual super cool technology company kind of changing the way people work. But we'll get into all of that here shortly. Love to hear about who? You are how you got what you do now you know. You're you're an entrepreneur. Now were you were. You always an entrepreneur. Like how'd you get to this place in life? I mean my later fifties now. So it's been quite a quite a stretch but Today out of my office window. I'm looking at some snow covered peaks and Here in Utah but quite frankly that has a lot to do with my upbringing as well. I was born to Swiss parents in California. No snow covered peaks there but When I was about two years old we move back to Europe to Switzerland and spent my entire childhood and education in the tiny country of Switzerland. I grew up in a cow. Tom Literally six hundred and fifty people living their cows. Going up down the mountain every morning and night But then I Finished my studies at the University of Iraq and At the end of my program We actually had an opportunity to Work anywhere in the world For Global Business Program. Get additional credits. As I was a dual citizen with the United States I was able very easily to come back here and actually complete. My era ended up in Los Angeles where you are right now. Alex and I spent one year outside of Marina del Rey with a large travel wholesale company. thought I will be here for about a year. Go back to Switzerland do but good Swiss do which is pick a career for life work till they're sixty five get the Golden Watch and enjoy obviously. Didn't turn out that way I grew quite fond of the American way of life. But also the American dream and the American opportunity as I Finished my year in a had an opportunity to grow to work for two more years with a travel wholesale group that had offices in Colorado Hawaii in a couple of other areas I worked with him for the next couple years and started building call centers and call centre software for them. I really enjoy to that particular line of work but In in the early nineties we had an opportunity to acquire a competitor here in park city. Utah and At that point chose to take that position and moved here I thought it was going to be here for another year or two. Obviously now. It's been almost thirty so Things have worked out differently but You know I found you and I think I found my place not just From a personal perspective but also from a fresh perspective. Marin it's a it's a cool story kind of how you've go these different places and you say oh. I'll try this out there for a year and then you kind of just really kind of your very much open to you. Know seeing if you like it if you don't like it what's good about. It was bad about it and that's so unique I think. Can you hear from a country in Europe? Far Far Away experimenting. What you like what you don't like. What do you think is inside of you that you know allows you to just have like such an open? Mind as you're as you're going through this well a felt like part of the reason why I chose to leave Switzerland in the first place and goalwards internationally. Right was a felt. Probably confined wanted to expand my horizons. I wanted to see more of the world but also learn more in the business world and I think that's what drove me Kind of to become my guests a little bit of a traveling workman anyhow in the first place. I think the second piece of it is you know you find yourself Still without normally family responsibilities or large responsibilities try out different lines of work may be starting experimenting with certain things and I think one of the big differences here in the states whereas Switzerland this entrepreneurism and small businesses. Very much alive right. It's very much driven. There's literally millions of companies Back home things are big more traditional of ignore established and quite frankly small businesses still outside of the macro economist may be still Something that's not that much. Never did I really enjoyed it. Obviously that's why I'm here and You know I migrated from the travel industry down into coming mysteries worked extra for a very large telecom group here in Salt Lake City a for almost a decade and exited nine hundred ninety nine Because I was frustrated with The Red Tape. Maybe the lack of ability to affect change technology etc. And I wanted to regroup at that. Point was actually quite a pivotal day in in my professional career so I went back out on my own. I started my own consulting firm and actually that's how my business partner and Bill Nick in two thousand five and it was kind of almost an odyssey and a match of talent and Bishen. And that's when I truly felt we had something special and I wanted to get involved with that. Yeah it's it's interesting. How you talk about kind of your upbringing of thinking about you're always go work for a big company need. Just do that for your entire life. Get the gold watch retire but then it's what the cool part of your journey is is that you had an this open mindset to go see experiment see what. Martin was really put on this earth to do and you have this entrepreneurial spirit inside of you and so yeah you did the the corporate route and like many people. You saw yeah. I don't like all this red tape. Bureaucracy let's go. I can do this better out of my own all-star consulting and then we'll we'll see where it takes me. Yeah and you know it comes with With a joy and with pain obviously Alex you know that as well You know If you want to be an entrepreneur If you like building things from the ground up it obviously comes with without the safety blankets in a lot of cases right so you gotta have a risk tolerance. I think you've got to have the desire to really drive You know The notion of never quit the notion of being responsible for all it's really part of that journey and but I also feel that it is the most rewarding way to work if you have the ability to to truly do what you like can enjoy and push forward and grow something special. I think that's the most rewarding thing you can professionally aside from obviously you know Establishing a family and have a good family live and grow kids

Switzerland Alex Utah Europe La Urine Salt Lake COO Martin. University Of Iraq Los Angeles United States California Salt Lake City Martin TOM Marina Del Rey Marin Colorado Hawaii
You Don't Have to Give Up Important Things to Get Important Things Done by Michael Mehlberg of Modern da Vinci

Optimal Living Daily

02:46 min | 1 year ago

You Don't Have to Give Up Important Things to Get Important Things Done by Michael Mehlberg of Modern da Vinci

"You don't have to give up important things to get important things done by Michael. Mellberg of modern DAVINCI DOT net. It seems to be the productivity flavor of the month. The NOT TO DO LIST. Have you heard of it? The basic idea is this instead of listing. The things you need to do make a list of things. You should not do things that are preventing you from accomplishing your goals. Things like checking facebook responding to emails first thing in the morning watching TV or avoiding video games for few days. Mitt seems to work. He replaced time. Otherwise spent watching video games with real honest to goodness productive work but after denying yourself this basic need and yes playing video. Games is a basic human. Need you forget why that article you read on not to do. This was so inspiring. You build up a backlog of unplayed games that is so compelling. You dropped his new productivity trick and played fortnight until your thumbs are raw. Now the bandages ripped off. You're doing exactly what you said. You would not do loving it yet hating herself at the same time you're not to do. This is setting you up for failure. We all have vices. Were human it comes with the territory but denying these vices outright. Quitting them cold Turkey is setting us up for failure. Research shows that the best way to break a habit is to be mindful of it not quit cold Turkey. Mindfulness healthy recognize the cravings patterns and behaviors which ultimately helps you realize. These behaviors aren't helpful force. Self Control on the other hand only works when you're not stressed tired. In those circumstances the part of your brain that regulates self-control essentially shuts off so any efforts to quit. What you're doing are ineffective though you intend to stop wasting time on activities that distract you from your most important tasks in reality. You're only getting a momentary boost of productivity what's worse you're reinforcing a mindset of is okay to fail my goals when they're too hard dat is not good purpose. Driven action sets you up for. Success is not that we should get a grip on our vices. If you spend all day playing video games and get nothing done. That's a problem if you spend all day in your inbox responding to other people's problems. You're not accomplishing your own objectives. And THAT NEEDS TO CHANGE ASAP. But you must ask yourself. What is the purpose behind? My actions is ignoring my email inbox for a day. Something I need to do is something I can afford to do. Is this something that I can do on a recurring basis without destroying my ability to achieve my goals for the year. The Not to do list may be all the rage but it's fraught with danger without a clear purpose for every item that goes on this list. You'll find yourself ignoring it or worse. Binging on the very things you add to it my say. Throw the not to do list out

Turkey Mitt Facebook Michael Self Control
Who Was First on Earth?

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:35 min | 1 year ago

Who Was First on Earth?

"Today are mysterious past the first the people on Earth. Where did they come from? Leonardo Davinci. Tesla is dying these three in one hundred others over the centuries all with ideas. You were ahead of their time. Where did these ideas come from? Metal Staples at held Mexico's Ancient Pyramids together yet. Local indigenous business people had no knowledge of metallurgy. The NASCA wells relied on air pressure to bring water up from underground rivers and the unexplained tunnels on on the two thousand five hundred mile. Inca road that are carved through solid stone. How did that happen? How were these deeds? Possible where to disadvantage. What's knowledge come from could survivors of a long extinct species of Homo Sapiens have somehow passed on the tiniest spark of knowledge through DNA? What a silly question indeed based on science I guess not so silly before you dismiss this premise? Completely let's take a look at the evolution universe. Science would agree that the planet earth is about four point five billion years old to put that number two perspective consider that a billion is a thousand million and a million is a thousand thousands for no less than a century. It has been believed that the earliest earth was covered with the see of vocally magma however evidence of this of the rocks have either eroded with time or stay down underground inaccessible enter Zircon crystals. Not the man made versions but tiny crystals pulled from the Jack Hills of central Australia. The oldest of which have revealed that during the first five hundred million years so the planet earth was not covered with the see of magma indeed that it was cold enough for the formations of continents were above sea level. What is revolutionary is these ancient crystals have revealed that early earth and some aspects? Wasn't that different from today. These science-based facts are less than a decade old. That already gaining aning the respect of mainstream science in one four point one billion year old crystal carbon was found suggesting that life existed justed on earth. Three hundred million years earlier than scientists previously thought. Twenty years ago this would have been heretical. This carbon resembles modern carbon. Though this all adds up to the conclusion that early Earth was more hospitable to life than science thought and begs the question could could the environment of early Earth supported. Humans could earth's I people have crawled out of an ancient ocean. The primordial soup so to speak and evolved over the next two hundred thousand years if we run with that rough figure man and is developed brain may have been walking walking around over a billion years ago not two hundred thousand. But where's the evidence of a civilization that all the answer is. Where's I the evidence of anything? Over one billion years old science degree so there have been five periods of mass extinction. Four hundred forty four million years ago. When eighty six percent of all species became extinct? Three hundred seventy five million years ago. When seventy five percent of all species became extinct and in two hundred million years ago with the loss of eighty percent and finally sixty six million years ago when seventy six percent fell to extinction keep keep in mind that the tortoise of the Galapagos has evolved over twelve million years each of the known periods of mass extinction did not eliminate all all the species and some fossils remain science agrees that there certainly could have been far earlier periods of mass extinction and extinction say over a billion years ago? One that would leave. No fossils. Time would take care of that. If Homo sapiens were among the victims uh-huh of an early earth extinction. Of course there would be no fossils. But what are the carbon found in Australia's ancient zircon crystals and what of the advanced knowledge displayed by South America's earliest indigenous people. Where did they come from? Your guess is as good as mine and only time time will tell

Australia Leonardo Davinci Tesla Mexico Jack Hills Galapagos South America
3D Printing at CES 2020

3D Printing Today

04:26 min | 1 year ago

3D Printing at CES 2020

"I did not go to see this year and I'm Kinda glad I didn't go to see as this year because we look at what's been written about what showed up at the twenty twenty three D.. Printing doesn't seem to be much. They're pretty slim pickens pretty slim. The first thing that at least in the article from Three D. Printing Industry. They Kinda I talk. Talk about the Davinci color the five day then. She's continually to push this notion of a color. Three d printer using inkjet technology. In which color is is while it's laying down the layer and it does work fairly well. I mean it's not bad it works. It's not it's not the highest quality color you get. It's kind of everything I've seen seems kind of bleed e eighty Kinda Fady you you put the color of the base. PLA which you have to use. There's it's kind of off white gray and that kind of changes and washes the colors that are being placed upon it but still bill. It's better than what you're going to get with. A multicolor multi multi filament color such as the pal the MU or tool changer right. It's going to be much much much much more detail on an f. d. m. for an f. the machine however I finally finally got to hear some I feed back on actually using these machines are are acquaintance. Joe Larsen who posted on our forms if you want want to hear in detail exactly what he wrote. Go on our three D. Printing Tips Three D. printing tips and tricks for him and look for Five D. printer thread. It's still up there. And Joe on the a fourth post wrote about his experiences and actually using the Davinci color printer things and he never has told us this before. Oh interesting so he's he's not very happy. He's not very happy with his experiences and it seems that every time he tries tries to use it some chip on the thing blows out now the chip. I think he's talking about is a chip on the SPOOL. Okay because the spools are shipped that was always the DAVINCI model for All their printers were were very inexpensive but then using Using proprietary trying. Trying to lock you at reprioritize filament. He complains that he buys a set of inks that are all brand new showing ninety nine percent full and then suddenly they show zero zero. Yeah plane and the the biggest problem is is that what he tries to contact. DAVINCI takes months to get fixed. Lau Amihai now now. He believes in their their methodology for color printing. And I think I do too. I think it's a a good approach to adding color to edit my the for some applications yeah not not not I mean how many applications really need hi Rez color in annual. I know but it's it's like toys and Hobby But you know it. It looks like it may not be worth while no As far as storing during the ink cartridges. It's going to be the same complication that as two d printing go dry thousand. Wear out quickly. It gets expensive very very very fast. They were supposed to send me one when it first came out and A guy exchange half a dozen emails with somebody at the at the company APP. Nothing ever never happened. But so yeah so if you're like you know rubbing your hands and they want to get that it's going to be like everything else. Take it with a grain of salt. You might be very reduce appointed right quickly and look at the look at the quality of the color you get on the on the prince because I found the of the quality of color. Kinda Canada's appointing. Yeah well it's kind of like if you take a regular peel print and color with like a Sharpie You get this kind of bleed lead affect yes. And and that's just the nature of of Pierre. Lay the layers just kind of wick. The the color and it looks at least from the samples. Apple's I've seen like it. Does that on this printer as well. The only way around that I know is to is to shoot it with primer and then it then it you know you can beautifully l.. Color it But this sprinters not they're just going directly onto the Palais. So there's GonNa be some

Joe Larsen Lau Amihai Davinci Apple Canada Pierre
Quibi spending more than a billion wading into streaming wars. Luring subscribers will be key.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

09:41 min | 1 year ago

Quibi spending more than a billion wading into streaming wars. Luring subscribers will be key.

"QUBE was founded by former Disney Disney executive producer. Jeffrey Katzenberg Meg. Whitman is CEO. They gave a big presentation about the service last week at sea. Yes in yes Las Vegas. They've raised more than a billion dollars and signed up a lot of big name. Talent to create all new shows and movies but no video will be longer than ten minutes. At a time. I spoke to what minutes and she told me queries. Secret sauce is all new technology. I asked her to tell me how it works. Well the first thing is you know. People people are watching a video on on their mobile phone today but it's an uneven experience. Sometimes if you're holding the phone portrait it's a little postage stamp size than u-turn horizontally. It's got big black line. Some content is only available. Portrait sums only available in landscaping said for our use case on the go. Viewing we have to be able to have seamless portrait to landscape rotation with full screen video. And we figured out that it had to really be what we call script to screen innovation because the creators have to film a little bit differently. They have have to look at a shot and they have to say how will that shot looking portrait. How look landscape and then we make two edits of the movie? You Could Watch the movie and portrait or the whole movie and landscape but the gyroscope interscope in your phone knows which way you're holding the phone so we can show you the right editor of the movie and so we thought all right. We'll have the edit of the portrait the editor the landscape and we were going to run both in the background on your phone except for them. We figured out it would eat way too much bandwith and way too much battery life Susan. Okay got any other ideas us on how we can do this. And ultimately it came down to a kind of compression technology that when you are watching in portrait your landscape version is compressed and this is never been done before we have patents on it and that's why the experience is so seemless an so engrossing and then we shot obviously to the aspect ratio of the phone. Is there price pressure. Now I feel like Disney is putting a lot of pressure on a lot of services and you're launching at five dollars a month with ads eight dollars a month without. Yeah I'M GONNA have to come down. I don't know you know it's four ninety nine a month with ads seven ninety nine a month without ads we think that You know member we're going after millennial audience you know eighteen to forty four. We think that most will pick the ad-supported version because it's very light add load. It's only a two and a half minutes per hour of watching which is much less than prime time. TV which is seventeen and a half minutes of advertising for every hour that you watch and so for ninety nine we think is a good value for this premium content on their mobile phone and for those people who really don't want advertising. We felt like we should offer an ad free version Russian at seven ninety nine. Yeah so then. D expect that most of the revenue will be generated by the subscription We think that that will be obviously the base case. And we'll see how this works out. I think the majority will be subscription revenue But we'll see what made you sort of land on this idea of ten minutes for a long time in video radio. It was two minutes and then Youtube went to ten minutes for mid roll purposes. Is it for mid roll purposes. Like how did you sort of land on the part of this judgment but at the data that we used is it turns out that the average session length for the population worldwide except for China is actually six minutes so think about it to be spent five hours hours a day on your phone. You're picking up that phone a lot of different times and the average session six minutes. It's a little bit longer in China. So he said six minutes. So you know maybe our goodies. Abe's we call our content. Qubit should be between five and a maximum of ten. Can I watch on TV. You at launch. He will be able to chrome cast like you'll built casts is to your TV but we at launch will not have a unique apple TV or chrome. Google TV APP PER SE. Because really we think this is mobile. Only and when you think back to this portrait to landscape seamless full screen video. Think about it part of the joy of this. Is You get on the bus holding your phone portrait. Then you watch you know On the bus and horizontal then get off and you go back to portrait most people's. TV's are not going to go back and forth and So we think this is sort of an interesting thing new way to view and is uniquely suited to the mobile phone and then what about the content race. I mean that can be you know. I've been in content longtime. Yes it can be a little bit of money pit. Yes and you know and there's no built in library necessarily archive that you're working from. How do you win that battle? Yeah well you're right. There is no we will be the first streaming services that launches without a library. Because think about it. You can't take sixty minute television show and just chop it up into You know six ten minutes segments is all has to be shot for turnstile which is new and has to be written if it's a movie and chapters that has to be written in a chapter optimized version so it's all new which we think is actually exciting and fun but we have to make a lot of content. Because you can't come to see two or three things you have to field there's a world of richness and a lot of genres and you know we have quite a unique content strategy and so we have Maybe invested did significantly in content. And this is all about finding the great stories Attaching the great actors and actresses to it and getting them excited sighted about doing something entirely new so we will launch with In the first year. One hundred and seventy-five original shows every day we will will produce commission from our partners Three hours of new fresh content every single day which is thirty five five percent more than a network does in prime time so there's a lot of fresh daily new content on the on the APP which I think will keep people. We'll keep coming back for that. At least that's what we hope I mean I am listening to this as a person who does the daily show. And I'm thinking either your geniuses or you're crazy well here's the thing remember. We don't make any content ourselves. You make your own content for that I do. We have to pay for it. But we are leveraging leveraging the expertise of our craters studios were leveraging for our daily essentials where we curate news and sports and weather and lifestyle. We're we're leveraging the infrastructure of our excellent partners right and And so that makes a bit easier but but we have a budget. And we've we've planned for that and and you know we think that will Be The budget for the first year. Talk to me a little bit about the content. So do you anticipate that people will make short versions of things that they may be. Five years later turned into. Oh a longer project longer project. Let me give you an analogy in another medium that you will totally get Do you remember the Davinci Code. Yep The DAVINCI code is four hundred sixty four pages just one hundred and five chapters. Every chapter in the Davinci code is five pages because eighteen years ago. Dan Brown said people are not reading for forty five minutes now. They're probably not even reading for thirty and he said if you've got five minutes I want you to read one chapter got ten minutes. I want you to read two chapters but the thing I do not want you to do is stop in the middle of a chapter but nothing was lesser about the Davinci code other the length of its chapter so we like to say our movies. Nothing's lesser about the movies other than the chapter is the way we deliver them and then we have You know as I described our daily the essentials which we hope will create the daily consumption habit. We're going to curate. You know. Twenty five daily shows every single day From talk shows to horoscope go to news to whether to sports excetera and then The other kind of content we have is this unscripted episodic and documentary three shows and a perfect example. There is Chrissy. Teigen is doing a show her favourite show as it turns out of judge. Judy so she came to us and said I want to do Christie's Court and the tagline is no claim is too small and dumb and each claim will be ten minutes or eight minutes and And she's super excited about it and you by the way you can. You can't in our movies you've got to watch them. The episodes in particular order. But Christie's court you could watch in any order because they're not related to each other episodic so you really have like snack bowl and binge. Yes kind of covered exactly. Yeah okay why are you here. Yeah I mean considering your background ground what drew you to this. Yeah well I've been friends with Jeffrey. For thirty years. We worked at the Walt Disney Company together back in the day and then When I was at Ebay I sat sat on his DreamWorks Animation Board? So Jeffrey and I've been friends for a long time. And when he heard I was stepping down from HP after six and a half years. I told the board I would say five years. He called me and he said would you ever consider coming down and being the CEO of Qube. I said well I don't know I've gotta you know so. He came up and had dinner and at the end of dinner. Three hour dinner. I said this is a really good idea. It's a really good idea because what I look for in new consumer tech businesses. Is I look for other trends right. Trends are absolutely right is the market large. The market's gigantic back. And is there you know. Are you changing consumer behavior or are you just taking people to a premium level and is there a sustainable ainable what I call a sustainable competitive advantage. Meaning if we're successful and everyone else comes in how. How do we continue to win? And how how is that is that through the intellectual property. Well there's actually Largely through our relationships with our studios It is first mover advantage for sure and we have to learn how to how to create create this platform. And we've had to teach craters how to do it so we think we have A lot of barriers to entry because we will be out first by a pretty wide margin

Quibi spending more than a billion wading into streaming wars. Luring subscribers will be key.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

09:41 min | 1 year ago

Quibi spending more than a billion wading into streaming wars. Luring subscribers will be key.

"QUBE was founded by former Disney Disney executive producer. Jeffrey Katzenberg Meg. Whitman is CEO. They gave a big presentation about the service last week at sea. Yes in yes Las Vegas. They've raised more than a billion dollars and signed up a lot of big name. Talent to create all new shows and movies but no video will be longer than ten minutes. At a time. I spoke to what minutes and she told me queries. Secret sauce is all new technology. I asked her to tell me how it works. Well the first thing is you know. People people are watching a video on on their mobile phone today but it's an uneven experience. Sometimes if you're holding the phone portrait it's a little postage stamp size than u-turn horizontally. It's got big black line. Some content is only available. Portrait sums only available in landscaping said for our use case on the go. Viewing we have to be able to have seamless portrait to landscape rotation with full screen video. And we figured out that it had to really be what we call script to screen innovation because the creators have to film a little bit differently. They have have to look at a shot and they have to say how will that shot looking portrait. How look landscape and then we make two edits of the movie? You Could Watch the movie and portrait or the whole movie and landscape but the gyroscope interscope in your phone knows which way you're holding the phone so we can show you the right editor of the movie and so we thought all right. We'll have the edit of the portrait the editor the landscape and we were going to run both in the background on your phone except for them. We figured out it would eat way too much bandwith and way too much battery life Susan. Okay got any other ideas us on how we can do this. And ultimately it came down to a kind of compression technology that when you are watching in portrait your landscape version is compressed and this is never been done before we have patents on it and that's why the experience is so seemless an so engrossing and then we shot obviously to the aspect ratio of the phone. Is there price pressure. Now I feel like Disney is putting a lot of pressure on a lot of services and you're launching at five dollars a month with ads eight dollars a month without. Yeah I'M GONNA have to come down. I don't know you know it's four ninety nine a month with ads seven ninety nine a month without ads we think that You know member we're going after millennial audience you know eighteen to forty four. We think that most will pick the ad-supported version because it's very light add load. It's only a two and a half minutes per hour of watching which is much less than prime time. TV which is seventeen and a half minutes of advertising for every hour that you watch and so for ninety nine we think is a good value for this premium content on their mobile phone and for those people who really don't want advertising. We felt like we should offer an ad free version Russian at seven ninety nine. Yeah so then. D expect that most of the revenue will be generated by the subscription We think that that will be obviously the base case. And we'll see how this works out. I think the majority will be subscription revenue But we'll see what made you sort of land on this idea of ten minutes for a long time in video radio. It was two minutes and then Youtube went to ten minutes for mid roll purposes. Is it for mid roll purposes. Like how did you sort of land on the part of this judgment but at the data that we used is it turns out that the average session length for the population worldwide except for China is actually six minutes so think about it to be spent five hours hours a day on your phone. You're picking up that phone a lot of different times and the average session six minutes. It's a little bit longer in China. So he said six minutes. So you know maybe our goodies. Abe's we call our content. Qubit should be between five and a maximum of ten. Can I watch on TV. You at launch. He will be able to chrome cast like you'll built casts is to your TV but we at launch will not have a unique apple TV or chrome. Google TV APP PER SE. Because really we think this is mobile. Only and when you think back to this portrait to landscape seamless full screen video. Think about it part of the joy of this. Is You get on the bus holding your phone portrait. Then you watch you know On the bus and horizontal then get off and you go back to portrait most people's. TV's are not going to go back and forth and So we think this is sort of an interesting thing new way to view and is uniquely suited to the mobile phone and then what about the content race. I mean that can be you know. I've been in content longtime. Yes it can be a little bit of money pit. Yes and you know and there's no built in library necessarily archive that you're working from. How do you win that battle? Yeah well you're right. There is no we will be the first streaming services that launches without a library. Because think about it. You can't take sixty minute television show and just chop it up into You know six ten minutes segments is all has to be shot for turnstile which is new and has to be written if it's a movie and chapters that has to be written in a chapter optimized version so it's all new which we think is actually exciting and fun but we have to make a lot of content. Because you can't come to see two or three things you have to field there's a world of richness and a lot of genres and you know we have quite a unique content strategy and so we have Maybe invested did significantly in content. And this is all about finding the great stories Attaching the great actors and actresses to it and getting them excited sighted about doing something entirely new so we will launch with In the first year. One hundred and seventy-five original shows every day we will will produce commission from our partners Three hours of new fresh content every single day which is thirty five five percent more than a network does in prime time so there's a lot of fresh daily new content on the on the APP which I think will keep people. We'll keep coming back for that. At least that's what we hope I mean I am listening to this as a person who does the daily show. And I'm thinking either your geniuses or you're crazy well here's the thing remember. We don't make any content ourselves. You make your own content for that I do. We have to pay for it. But we are leveraging leveraging the expertise of our craters studios were leveraging for our daily essentials where we curate news and sports and weather and lifestyle. We're we're leveraging the infrastructure of our excellent partners right and And so that makes a bit easier but but we have a budget. And we've we've planned for that and and you know we think that will Be The budget for the first year. Talk to me a little bit about the content. So do you anticipate that people will make short versions of things that they may be. Five years later turned into. Oh a longer project longer project. Let me give you an analogy in another medium that you will totally get Do you remember the Davinci Code. Yep The DAVINCI code is four hundred sixty four pages just one hundred and five chapters. Every chapter in the Davinci code is five pages because eighteen years ago. Dan Brown said people are not reading for forty five minutes now. They're probably not even reading for thirty and he said if you've got five minutes I want you to read one chapter got ten minutes. I want you to read two chapters but the thing I do not want you to do is stop in the middle of a chapter but nothing was lesser about the Davinci code other the length of its chapter so we like to say our movies. Nothing's lesser about the movies other than the chapter is the way we deliver them and then we have You know as I described our daily the essentials which we hope will create the daily consumption habit. We're going to curate. You know. Twenty five daily shows every single day From talk shows to horoscope go to news to whether to sports excetera and then The other kind of content we have is this unscripted episodic and documentary three shows and a perfect example. There is Chrissy. Teigen is doing a show her favourite show as it turns out of judge. Judy so she came to us and said I want to do Christie's Court and the tagline is no claim is too small and dumb and each claim will be ten minutes or eight minutes and And she's super excited about it and you by the way you can. You can't in our movies you've got to watch them. The episodes in particular order. But Christie's court you could watch in any order because they're not related to each other episodic so you really have like snack bowl and binge. Yes kind of covered exactly. Yeah okay why are you here. Yeah I mean considering your background ground what drew you to this. Yeah well I've been friends with Jeffrey. For thirty years. We worked at the Walt Disney Company together back in the day and then When I was at Ebay I sat sat on his DreamWorks Animation Board? So Jeffrey and I've been friends for a long time. And when he heard I was stepping down from HP after six and a half years. I told the board I would say five years. He called me and he said would you ever consider coming down and being the CEO of Qube. I said well I don't know I've gotta you know so. He came up and had dinner and at the end of dinner. Three hour dinner. I said this is a really good idea. It's a really good idea because what I look for in new consumer tech businesses. Is I look for other trends right. Trends are absolutely right is the market large. The market's gigantic back. And is there you know. Are you changing consumer behavior or are you just taking people to a premium level and is there a sustainable ainable what I call a sustainable competitive advantage. Meaning if we're successful and everyone else comes in how. How do we continue to win? And how how is that is that through the intellectual property. Well there's actually Largely through our relationships with our studios It is first mover advantage for sure and we have to learn how to how to create create this platform. And we've had to teach craters how to do it so we think we have A lot of barriers to entry because we will be out first by a pretty wide margin

Jeffrey Katzenberg Meg Walt Disney Company Qube CEO Christie China Disney Disney Editor Las Vegas Whitman Interscope Youtube Google Apple Executive Producer Dan Brown Qubit ABE
Famed Auction House Sothebys Sold for $3.7 Billion

Business Wars Daily

04:55 min | 1 year ago

Famed Auction House Sothebys Sold for $3.7 Billion

"The business wars daily is brought to you by Staples work is changing, but Staples is changing right along with it. The new Staples delivers solutions to help your team be more connected productive, and inspired. Learn more at Staples dot com slash change. From wondering, I'm David Brown and this business wars daily on this Monday, June twenty fourth. Sotheby's the famed auction house just closed its biggest sale ever. It sold itself to French Isreaeli businessman Patrick, dry for three point seven billion dollars dry. He is a telecom and cable industry tycoon. He founded European cable company. I'll tease in two thousand one and has a reputation for building a global business empire through acquisitions and aggressive cost-cutting. But the Wall Street Journal has already reassured art lovers to mention Sotheby's employee's the dry. He won't bring that cutthroat strategy to his newest acquisition rather, he's buying the auction house for art's sake. The journal says and art lover himself draw. He owns works by Picasso Matisse and Chagall and. His long admired the auction company, which was founded in London in seventeen forty four at least now draw he plans to hold onto Sotheby's for the long term and help it grow the first step. He intends to take these private ending. It's thirty one year stint on the new York Stock Exchange. The idea is that going private will help Sotheby's compete with its arch-rival Christie's Christie's is a private company also owned by a French businessman, the two companies often scrap over lucrative consignment deals to sell multi million dollar artworks in collectibles to seal those deals auction houses often discount their commissions, but as a privately, held business Christie's had more latitude to shave its commissions and make big deals than Sotheby's did since Sotheby's had to report those details to shareholders that latitude makes a difference over the last year. Both Christie's and Sotheby's have done well, booed by a healthy economy. But in absolute terms, Christie's fared better than Sotheby's by more than a half of a billion dollars. Christie's is seen as the winner in the art collection duopoly in part because it has captured some gasp worthy deals in 2017 it sold a rediscovered Leonardo Davinci painting for a record price of four hundred fifty million dollars. And last year it sold the art collection of Peggy and David Rockefeller for a record price as well. Eight hundred thirty five million dollars under draw. He's ownership Sotheby's should prove to be a more aggressive rival, and that won't just be an in-person auctions, but online as well. The company intends to expand on a strategy that already started boosting its digital sales are collectors still politely raised their hands at live auctions to bid on old masters, but more and more often younger art buyers are bidding online, Sotheby's soul, two hundred twenty million dollars worth. Of art online last year up twenty four percent from twenty seventeen the Wall Street Journal reported, it's too soon to know whether taking Southeby's private, and pushing online sales will help Sotheby's surged past Christie's or not. But one thing is clear Patrick draw. He is already proved himself to be artful at growing companies now. We'll see whether he'll be successful at painting, a new future for Southeby's. From wondering this is business daily if you like our show, sure would appreciate a review and a rating on your favorite podcast app. I've David Brown, and we'll be back with you tomorrow. Business wars. Daily is brought to you by Staples. The world of work is changing faster than ever before a week ago open floor plans were in. Now, they're out the pace of our evolving work lives can feel overwhelming. But Staples can help not the old stables, but a new Staples that delivers solutions to help your team be more connected productive, and inspired work may be constantly changing. But Staples is changing right along with it to support you. Learn more at Staples dot com slash change.

Sotheby Christie Staples Staples Dot Patrick Wall Street Journal David Brown Picasso Matisse Southeby French Isreaeli European Cable Company Leonardo Davinci David Rockefeller London Latitude York Peggy Chagall
"davinci" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"davinci" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Orrin Davinci of NYU Langone health conducted the trials that led to the first FDA approved cannabis medication a drug for epilepsy. Has the use of medical marijuana and the legislation of it got in the head of the science. Absolutely centrally politicians have voted that there should be illegal medical therapy. And we don't have data from rigorous scientific studies to define what the safety. Is it significant that Dr Davinci a pioneer in medical cannabis? Use is concerned. He says we need more specific advice on how to use it in a safe away as possible, and that includes being able to tell patients how long to wait before driving and figuring out ways of reliably determining what role it may be playing in motor vehicle accidents. Dr John lapook CBS news New York on Tuesday. Facing liquidation bankrupt, Sears agreed to consider a revised takeover bid from billionaire chairman Edward Lampert. The one hundred twenty six year old department store now a shell of its former self a king of US retail reports. Correspondent Tony dokoupil. Shares. It was the original everything retailer delivering the world to your doorstep. Why do I shop? Dear. Easy for me. I can pick a tennis balls children's clothing torque wrenches. But after navigating the shift to department stores and malls, Sears stopped innovating, according to former Sears executive more Cohen now director of the retail studies program at Columbia business school, the company has been on a death spiral for well. Over a decade. It's not the only company that has failed to change with the times from two thousand twelve through twenty seventeen s e commerce sales nearly doubled. And in the last two years at least two hundred million square feet of retail space closed, including dozens of stores from JC Penney. Macy's toys R us and K mart which merged with Sears in two thousand five this table and chairs and the China cabinet came from Sears. Bobby Jones told CBS Sunday morning. He worked at Sears for thirty five years enjoying wages and benefits that many of today's retail workers can only dream of. Prestige to say, yes. While the decline of Sears. Maybe historic says CBS news financial contributor, Mellody Hobson. It does not mean the death of retail. You have lots of retailers that are thriving out there, and you have some like Amazon that are building brick and mortar stores like whole foods, which they acquired butchered any of today's retail giants failed to adapt Hobson says they to risk falling. We'll have to be able to play in lots of lanes online with brick and mortar you have to have good products that the customer wants and stay competitive Tonita, Kabul. Reporting the world's richest couple splits up, the world's newest most eligible bachelor is a multi-billionaire Amazon basin and his wife MacKenzie have issued a statement announcing that after twenty five years they're getting divorced. They feel incredibly lucky to have found each other. And they're deeply grateful for every one of the years. They were married they say, they do it all over again. And both see wonderful futures ahead as. Parents friends, partners ventures and adventures Deborah Rodriguez. CBS news in unstoppable man on a mission dryers, he might Charlie bliss. Just can't stop working workaholics aren't that unusual? But this one is one hundred and one years old how many times would you say you've retired over the years? I lost count last June. The chemical engineer became what's believed to be the oldest American ever awarded a patent for a system. He says could be a big step in saving the world from climate change is to keep carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. And you think you've found a way to a cost effective way to his elaborate plan is designed to capture carbon dioxide emissions from power plants that burn fossil fuels like coal and oil preventing them from entering the atmosphere where they are a major cause of global warming. We have quite a bit to talk about now bliss and business partner. Charles Moseley, whose a mere eighty one are known as the thermodynamics duo lead makes me feel like a youngster. They even have a startup company to market their idea and they're working on six more patents. I think the real secret is to keep busy up here. And you're going to continue doing this work for a while. I have a work program right now. The continuing busy for two years when he'll be one hundred and three and still working to save the world. CBS news, Springfield, Virginia. Finally this weekend pay off for a penny pincher, and they say a penny isn't worth anything anymore. How about one worth a coupla hundred thousand dollars.

Sears CBS Orrin Davinci Amazon medical cannabis Bobby Jones Mellody Hobson FDA marijuana cannabis Edward Lampert JC Penney Charles Moseley US Tony dokoupil Dr John lapook tennis
"davinci" Discussed on This Is Success

This Is Success

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"davinci" Discussed on This Is Success

"So when I read the Davinci code and thought I think this is this is exactly what I set out to do if it had failed. I would have to sue. Nobody shares my taste. So therefore it's impossible for me to be writer. I'll go do something else. So what happened? When did you realize that the divinity code was a success? It was it was about six months before it came out, the preorder were so high from Barnes and noble is back in the days of borders and Barnes and noble and all the independent booksellers. It was a much different market. There was an enormous buzz among booksellers same. We as booksellers love this novel. We know we can hand sell it to everybody walks in the door and serandon has kept calling saying, wow, you know, they just they doubled the order they triple the order, they quadruple their order, and they actually put me on book tour four months before the book came out. And they said we want you to go meet all the booksellers. I said understand they said they love your book. They just want to know, you're not a jerk. Just go have dinner with and I met all the ios and all the independent booksellers. And it was a lot of fun. That was in the days when we had sold books to readers. So how did you process the success in the first week of that book going on sale? It was just insane. It was like a phenomenon and instant phenomenon just use a person who'd been starting out as musician struggling as a writer before this piece. And then this happens. How do you even process that I it was difficult? I I was very very grateful. Of course, you you kind of think every day you're gonna wake up and find out. It was all a dream. You pinch yourself at saying. Okay. This is actually happening. Yes. I'm this is what's happening. This is how many books we sold today. I guess I'm going to go beyond the following TV shows. I the book has sold around the world at some level. You just sort of laugh and say, well, how lucky him I it applies pressure. Of course, because you have such a big readership. And you wanna make sure that what you create is worthy of their time and makes them happy. And nobody ever feels like you know, what he had some success. And now he's not even trying I actually end up trying harder. Now that I have. Had some success. Why did the Davinci code do? So. Well, what was it that connected with so many people? Yeah. When some of it was luck. It was timing. It was unplanned timing. When I started that book, I just wanted to write a book about religion. I grew up in a very religious household. I'd always struggled with the battle between science and religion. I'd had some experiences that that had led me away from the church, and I wanted to write an alternative story of Jesus. What would it mean for Christianity? If Jesus were not literally the son of God, if you were mortal profit, we're Philip. Well, that's okay question. Ask you know..

writer Davinci Philip Barnes four months six months
"davinci" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"davinci" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"That's a pay. What did you do? What did you write? Oh, my God. No, I said. I'm planning. Celebrity golf event in New Hampshire, and I wait to the fifteenth hole to ask Dan Brown, what he does for a living. It goes all I write books. Have I read any. I don't know the Davinci code. Oh boy. At the time. You didn't know it was Dan Brown saying, no, you just thought it was a guy named Dan. I'm the celebrity in the group. I think I am. You know? So you have to ask questions, so, hey, what do you do Skippy hey, Dan, what do you do for a living small, talk in the yes to get through there around. Yeah, because you want it to be done where they go. You know, Dan, Patrick was in a really nice guy asked me about what I do for a living. So I go on fifteenth. I'm on the t box at fifteen sedan. What do you do for a living. Right? Bullock's. Oh, if I read any, no, the Davinci code. We tear off. I'm on my phone in like seven seconds, and I'm saying to my what I some playing golf with Dan Brown. Who wrote the Davinci code. Yeah. Yeah. And then she goes. So you're not the celebrity in your group? I go. No, not he is Dan Brown's, the celebrity. You're not even the biggest dad grow. No. No, yeah. Davinci code. He he ruled with Harlan cobaine the that famous author at one more Judd appetite. You know, his college roommate was Sandler yet. Okay. To go back to the Trump gimme a his real quick as of two thousand nine. The Davinci code had sold eighty million copies. That's it. Eighty mill, the big show Seventy-nine. Yeah. Yeah. My book we sold like seventy nine and a half million less than two Davinci code. Take him by you guys had eighty two million. We had something like that. I give me a hint on this. I'll give it to one more time to USC roommates. One goes on to be Super Bowl MVP the other AL MVP. First name of one is the last name of the other. So wouldn't be a quarterback. Nope. Okay. So yeah, polling. I think I have it. Fred, Lynn, Lynn, Swann? Yep. Well, that's juicy. That's good. And that I firm- they were roommates and they did win. Those awards will Fred was MVP and seventy five and and Swannee was probably MVP in seventy five where they both MVP's the same year that Super Bowl and BP in American League MVP I'll check that. I have. I ever throw it out my I have one classic similar. I'll give you one more to go. All right. In one thousand nine hundred seventy seven. There were three major rookie of the years in the three major sports, basketball, football, and baseball. All had the same initials. Can you name those three men a d..

Dan Brown MVP Davinci Sandler Bullock Fred AL New Hampshire Harlan cobaine Swannee golf Trump USC Judd baseball football Patrick Lynn Swann
"davinci" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"davinci" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Of it he did make detailed sketches of the mechanisms that he likely used in its construction and he left some notes as well and in two thousand nine renato baretto a master builder of tommaso use those sketches and davinci's notes and he actually recreated the lion it's really really interesting to watch you can find video of it online and will link to some of it you know it's kind of sobering to watch this sample of robotics that's based on early fifteen hundreds ingenuity because it's still a pretty impressive piece today to see this it almost looks like a giant toy it's life size but it's you know carved so it doesn't look like a real lion but it just it moves along and it kind of has wheels in its feet and it rolls as its legs move along the floor and it tilts its head side to side and it's kind of mind blowing to me to think that that was designed hundreds of years ago yes this episode of steph you missed in history glances brought to you by spiff i wait getting your oil changes much as i do to pain the gotta make time for it but spooky came to me here at work it was amazing i didn't have to get up from my desk and yet my oil changed and my car was washed in wax and spacey uses mobile one advanced synthetic oil which lasts twice as long as traditional oil so i get my oil changed less now spacey was super convenient they were really professional the whole thing was very easy they texted me every step of the way and they bring their own power and water to do the services on this super cool manso they can vacuum everything up they take it with them when they go it's entirely ecofriendly there's nothing left behind an i really encourage you to give them a try checkout spey on demand car care at gets biffi dot com or you can download the spiffing amp which is what are us and it was great because i got messages right through at an pictures of my car being worked on us.

davinci steph renato baretto
"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Miltiades offered to sketch his master and davinci agreed as a result melts he became responsible for one of the few depictions of davinci in existence it is clear from the reverend depiction that melt sea held his friend in high esteem during this time melting also encouraged davinci to focus his energy over the next three years unsteady in his disciplines and writing but in typical davinci fashion the man decided to make his growing frustration and disappointment at being relatively ignored in rome the nucleus of his writing perhaps this period reminded vinci of his childhood as a bastard when he struggled for attention amongst as many brothers and sisters not something one wants to be reminded of known and that is why when king francis the first invited to vinci to france and fifteen sixteen the ageing artist did not hesitate be completed st john the baptist and left behind his home country for the last time to become first painter architect an engineer to the king in his service to france francis the first davinci drafted the plans for the palace and gardens of rumour anton otherwise known as the queen mother's residence all while battling a case of malaria perhaps it was his vanity or perhaps it was his tenacity to prove himself again but davinci would let me their old age nor sickness impede his work in france he did not have much spare time to paint but he did design a mechanical lion figure with the capability to walk an open its chest to display a bouquet of lilies he was also able to compile some of his most prolific treatises and write a series called visions of the end of the world the work speaks greatly to the growing pessimism he displayed his old age.

Miltiades st john engineer anton malaria france rome francis the queen davinci three years
"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

"However when davinci arrived charles dome was the governor of the region felt secure enough with his rain to spend large sums on additions and modifications to his estate in fact don blah's wanted to vinci to sculpt a large equestrian statue for the tomb on his italian property not unlike the one that davinci had begun to craft for swore to all those years ago there was only one problem davinci was still employed by the cigna in florence for his work in the palazzo vecchio and they were impatiently waiting for him to finish the battle of andreotti he bought dumbbell was was eager to have davinci for his own project and so he wrote to the seniority ah begging for them to allow davinci to travel to milan i can't imagine that went well especially due to davinci is abandonment of the battle of and yet he surprisingly the group agreed davinci was quickly getting a reputation for not completing his commission's but the artist would always answered the call of a bigger more reputable challenge around fifteen o5 he began travelling more frequently to milan only returning to florence for brief visits and it was around this time in his life when davinci would meet one of his best friends most faithful pupils and possibly the object of his affection frencesco melt sea francesc goes father drawl amal melts sea was the head of a noble family of milan and had also been a military general under this forza family during the vinci tenure with them.

florence palazzo vecchio milan charles dome don blah davinci amal forza
"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

"The mona lisa gives us excellent insight into davinci personality not only was it a testament to how deep his passion for nature ran it also spoke to his respect for fashion onto vinci was known for preferring to wear the color pink to give his skin optimal glow and his commitment to hook coach your showed in the mona lisa in one of the treatises he kept during this time he wrote that art should never depict the fashion of the time as it opens current generations up to mocking by its descendance in his portrait of lady joe condo leonardo chose to protect the tight fitted fashions of the time from future ridicule by dressing the subject in loose plainly coloured robes as opposed to the traditional style of colorful more formfitting attire the painting was so well received that it would forever cement vinci's reputation as one of florence is greatest artists still the mona lisa was one of the last paintings to vinci completed in florence but before we travel with the vinci back to milan and beyond it's time for a quick word from our sponsors in fifteen no six davinci was fifty four years old he now had a significant following of apprentices and admirers but the polymath was never went to settle soon life in florence presented no more challenges for davinci and he quickly grew bored milan seemed like the perfect escape in an ironic twist the french you at once push to vinci out of milan were now asking for him to return the french had been in and out of control in naples venice and milan since fourteen 94.

mona lisa florence milan naples venice fifty four years
"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

"But during those three years he was also seeing a special lady on the sign a special lady whose subtle smile has become known around the globe it yet the mona lisa it's arguably davinci is most mysterious painting many people believe it is a selfportrait of davinci himself dressed in women's clothing sigmund freud argued that the painting was a depiction of katharina leonardo's mother while others believe it is of a local courtesan known as mona lisa gerrard deeming historical records indicate however the davinci was commission to do a portrait of lee said deljo condo the wife of a wealthy silk merchant in fifteen oath three this leads most historians to agree that the mona lisa is likely lady jane's kandal to further prove this belief and the talion research team has been carbondating and studying would they believed to be the remains of the noblewoman their goal is to connector genetically took currently living members of the gia condo family and do a facial analysis to compare their faces to that of the mona lisa whoever she may be the mona lisa change the way portrait's were done forever davinci is use of a halflength portrait of the subject gave the painting a more intimate feel you'd of inches attention to the background detail was also a relatively new concept in portrait's instead of painting the sitter in front of a tapestry or other rather bland background davinci chose to depict an incredible scene of nature behind mona lisa.

katharina leonardo mona lisa gerrard lee mona lisa jane deljo three years
"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

"When davinci caught word that a body had just been buried you would sneak into the graveyard after dark and dig it up he would then sneak the corpse back to his workshop for dissection and study was extremely illegal and would have landed the vinci and some seriously hot water with the church but it was a risky was willing to take in the pursuit of scientific advancement during his anatomical research davinci also became extremely interested in the skeletal system of birds and the physics behind flight he studied the anatomy of several species of birds and use the current in the local river to simulate air flow to draft one of the first sketches of a flying machine also known as an orniphoptera the machines wings would be operated by a person peddling or rotating a hand crank one wonders how he never seemed to be in short supply of dead birds maybe it's best not to know some things or whatever his methods davinci study of birds led to many of his most advanced inventions over the course of his studies davinci would be inspired to sketch ideas for some of the earliest forms of helicopters parachutes and submarines it is not recorded if davinci ever built or tested any of his designs but modern engineers have concluded that many of them would not have worked however in 2000 skydiver adrian nicholas successfully completed a jump using a parachute modelled from one of davinci designs impressive even though davinci didn't have the tools are materials necessary to see many of the other designs come to life.

adrian nicholas davinci
"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Chaser is saw an alliance with the vinci as the most advantageous move for his military career and by fifteen o too he had hired vinci as his personal military inventor and engineer for the next ten months davinci travelled across the region improving military fortifications and meeting with chase our as important commanders to discuss areas of weakness however davinci was never purely a military man in his downtime he would practice the art of suck paid data or knowing to see in order to improve the human ism in his paintings davinci eagerly delved into the study of human anatomy he took is the true the unmanned drawing which he had completed back in fourteen ninety and expanded upon it by conducting two sections of both humans and animals the vinci was extremely passionate about anatomy and who is responsible for some of the first recorded drawings of the cardiovascular and muscular systems and more his hope was that his work would greatly impact medical advancements and they did but not as quickly as davinci hoped these highly advanced journals were lost until the mid twentiethcentury they were discovered in a library in madrid on february thirteen nineteen sixty seven and have been studied by medical engineering students around the world since one of the journal's included a sketch for a crude robot that was essentially a suit of armor designed to be manipulated using a series of police in two thousand two a scientist named mark ross heim built a prototype of the robot using davinci is original design when it worked it proved that davinci had an extensive understanding of the interconnectivity of joints and how they affected human movement and of inches robot design was later used as inspiration for the first surgical robots doctors now use in many major surgeries or the other sketches found in the same notebook help medical researchers develop artificial limbs synthetic organs and contact lenses most of davinci is research was conducted on cadavers and because there was nobody volunteering their bodies for science in his time many of davinci subjects were obtained illegally.

vinci davinci scientist mark ross heim engineer madrid ten months
"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

"But davinci is legacy is so much bigger than the last supper laws right we're just getting started with the sports a family out of power and milan davinci saw no reason to return there from venice where he and the other sports as were seeking refuge instead he chose to travel from venice to florence and 1500 where he was welcome back with great zeal many notable citizens and florence had heard about davinci is last supper and tried to commission him for portrait's and other works when they received word he had returned but much to their dismay davinci was more focused on his scientific and mathematical studies during this time he believes studying these subjects made him a stronger artist andy focused on his inventions during his time with a sports as davinci had already invented several impressive warm machines such as a gargantuan crossbow one of the world's first tanks and the battle cherry at that had blades mounted on the sides however the battle cherry it was the only invention that he followed through with building and it was a massive success armies shuddered at the site of the chariot knowing it would likely take out many soldiers on top of that the chariot earned vinci a reputation as a gifted engineer it was that invention that also introduced a vinci to chase or a borja chase array was a wellknown member of the house of borja perhaps one of the most ambitious and conniving noble families in italy at the time on the board sia's were kind of like a real world version of the land of stress from game of thrones they place members of their family in strategic positions of power and betrayed those who got in their way.

venice florence engineer the house borja sia milan davinci andy italy
"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

"With ludovico held captive by the french davinci and the remaining sports as fled to venice davinci was disappointed to leave the sports as but he looked back on his period in milan with pride in fact some of davinci is most notable works were painted during this period of his life including the last supper and just years before his dynasties demise ludovico sforza commissioned vinci to create the last supper as the centerpiece for the family mausoleum after he began in fourteen 95 it took davinci three years to complete the work but once he was done it seemed everyone wanted a copy of the painting leonardo was finally getting the artistic fame he desired the last supper was special to davinci because it was the perfect combination of his two greatest passions math and art though the mural may seem relatively simple to the untrained eye it is actually a carefully crafted masterpiece when painting the last supper davinci used the rule of thirds an artist concept that divides an image into a three by three proportional grid research suggests that the human eye is naturally drawn to where the lines of each portion intersect and davinci use these intersections as the locations for major areas of tension in his work most are critics make a point to differentiate between how com jesus is at the center of the painting while judas peter and john on the left and thomas james and fill up on the right are anything but in davinci displayed is true genius and took the rule of thirds to another level by grouping the disciples each of whom was painstakingly depicted in threes wants no wonder the mural was an instant hit when it was unveiled in fourteen ninety eight even though it was technically an unfinished peace even to this day.

milan ludovico sforza family mausoleum thomas james venice davinci judas peter john three years
"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Time for today's recommendation if you're looking for another great podcast and you're interested in that paranormal lost civilizations time slips ufos or even crypto so allah than you have got to listen to expanded perspectives it's not a par cast podcast but they do have topnotch audio and entertaining storytelling the hosts kyle encamped take an openminded approach to a different strange event every week and from time to time they have authors and researchers guest on this podcast to expand their perspective so far they've had andrew collins nick redfern linda godfrey and many many others if you're interested in fringe topics and enjoy a good story in a laidback format checkout expanded perspectives there's a new episode out every monday to listen just go to i tuned tune in pods day or your favorite podcast directory and search for expanded perspectives or visit their website expanded perspectives dot com to start listening now check it out you won't regret it mm uh over the course of several anxietyridden days the vinci and his companions awaited their fate little the davinci know his friends in high places were hard at work to get him released some of these friends included lorenzo medici and other members of the powerful medici family their solid arguments bribes in threats to wouldbe testify ours worked no witnesses came forward to testify at his trial and the charges were dropped despite having escaped at guilty sentence and an execution the allegations greatly embarrassed vinci though he was fond of receiving attention for his art he preferred to keep his personal life out of the public eye and he was eager to leave the gossip that had followed him around florence since his trial and fourteen seventy six he did just that in fourteen 82 young leonardo left for milan to finally answer the summons of the sports a family.

lorenzo medici vinci florence leonardo milan kyle andrew collins nick redfern linda godfrey
"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"davinci" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Perfecting his sculpting and painting skills until and fourteen 72 at just twenty years old davinci is proficiency and dedication earned him admittance to florence's guild of saint luke as an apprentice artist quite the accomplishment for such a young man deed his membership to the guild allowed to vinci to collaborate with some of florence greatest artists and craft workers of the time but there was a rule that apprentice members of the guild could not take commissions on their own instead they must partner with the master member therefore davinci was still far from becoming the man history would remember and though the young artist had been focused on his own career for two years you still very close with his teacher votto opio the tokyo even reached out to leonardo for help completing his painting titled baptism of christ just like when yoda use the hallucination and the day go by cave as a final test for lukin star wars vitriol video believed that if davinci could put the finishing touches on the baptism of christ he would be ready to take on commissions of his own and the other members of the guild would advance his membership even though he had only been an apprentice for two years a 1550 book titled lives of the most excellent painters sculptors an architect's states that bedrock yo was so impressed with the vinci is talent that he retired from painting altogether the student became the master it was definitely the beginning of davinci is long career but it was also the spark that ignited his ego rumors of davinci artistic gifts spread fast making popular with powerful families like the met a choice throughout florence it wasn't long before he received his first independent commission from the scope peto monastery in florence and in fourteen 82 he began the adoration of the maj yet davinci never finish this painting the first of many unfinished works as he was called to serve the sports as the ruling family and milan he walked away from his first commission that easily it wasn't actually that uncommon for renaissance artist to leave work unfinished it was a risk that buyers took.

florence saint luke tokyo peto monastery vinci partner votto two years twenty years