Audioburst Search

36 Burst results for "Davies"

Fresh "Davies" from Own It

Own It

00:35 sec | 15 hrs ago

Fresh "Davies" from Own It

"Lots of sunshine temperatures in the mid seventies overnight lows will be in the low fifties. Clear sky again tonight if you want to watch for that big moon Party. Cloudy then for Monday High 73 a bit cooler, 56 for low that as we go overnight into Tuesday Tuesday more clouds, those of Sun breaks around with a high of 66. That's the latest from the couple Weather center. Now back to ST Talk with your host, Chris Davies. Thanks so much for joining us. We're talking 10. 31 exchanges, and we left the last segment off. Uh, reverse..

Couple Weather Center Chris Davies
Spelman College class of 2020 finds ways to celebrate graduation despite coronavirus pandemic

Lenz on Business

00:24 sec | Last month

Spelman College class of 2020 finds ways to celebrate graduation despite coronavirus pandemic

"A virtual senior salute ceremony today for the five hundred graduating seniors at Spelman college Sharon Davies is the VP for academic academic affairs we are so proud of your accomplishments and we look forward to celebrating with you in person when safety around graduation class Davis is this year's class had to adjust in ways they never

Sharon Davies VP Davis
Online conspiracy theorist twist singer's COVID-19 death

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

Online conspiracy theorist twist singer's COVID-19 death

"Some social media users are claiming the Joe Davies death on March twenty ninth was due to lung cancer and that health and government officials are blaming it on covert nineteen to exaggerate the viruses threats Diffey had announced days before he had tested positive for the virus his wife tera says in a statement if he did not have long cancer and the conspiracy theories are false and hurtful the confusion appears to have come from an obituary for diffuse father also named Joe Diffie who died of cancer in twenty eighteen marches are a letter

Diffey Tera Joe Diffie Joe Davies
Online conspiracy theorist twist singer's COVID-19 death

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

Online conspiracy theorist twist singer's COVID-19 death

"Some social media users are claiming the Joe Davies death on March twenty ninth was due to lung cancer and that health and government officials are blaming it on covert nineteen to exaggerate the viruses threats Diffey had announced days before he had tested positive for the virus his wife tera says in a statement if he did not have long cancer and the conspiracy theories are false and hurtful the confusion appears to have come from an obituary for diffuse father also named Joe Diffie who died of cancer in twenty eighteen marches are a letter

Diffey Tera Joe Diffie Joe Davies
Online conspiracy theorist twist singer's COVID-19 death

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

Online conspiracy theorist twist singer's COVID-19 death

"Some social media users are claiming the Joe Davies death on March twenty ninth was due to lung cancer and that health and government officials are blaming it on covert nineteen to exaggerate the viruses threats Diffey had announced days before he had tested positive for the virus his wife tera says in a statement if he did not have long cancer and the conspiracy theories are false and hurtful the confusion appears to have come from an obituary for diffuse father also named Joe Diffie who died of cancer in twenty eighteen marches are a letter

Diffey Tera Joe Diffie Joe Davies
"davies" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

13:44 min | 2 months ago

"davies" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"I mean the fact that you didn't put yourself forward for the role of chief medical officer that you waited for someone to ask you the fact that your initial reaction was to be taken aback rather than be fantastic bat and the fact that you didn't take a challenge intellectual challenge of debate as an undermining of your ladyship pathology. How gendered do you see that? I mean at the Global Institute for Women's leadership we look at a lot of research about these things and to us in those sorts of things does saying the agenda dynamic based on the research but it had to use it. If you had been you know Bob instead of instead of Sally. Would you had your cat sit on the chief medical officer post ten years earlier? Would you put yourself forward? Would you say on just going to blitz this? I'm going to the base Savo? Would you feigned more offhand or dismissive? If people put account of you two you can guide so you and I know the research that a lot of women are waiting for a tap on the shoulder little princess. This wasn't about that my response was why would I want to do it because actually I had the world's best job I was running one and a quarter billion pounds worth of health research. I loved it and I wasn't sure I actually wanted to do the job. So that's quite different from how it's too much for me and so I had to think myself into. So do I want it? What is it and what what would I do with it? And then to watch other people circle and think about it actually in the end. I went to the Permanent Secretary of the department. Said I've been thinking about this and I have decided to apply because my present role repulsed. The CMO am. I don't respect any of the men who you are too short list. Says I will apply. I will keep the research portfolio. And if you don't appoint me that's fine but I will not report to the new. Cmo I will report directly to you so actually I played it quite. Powerfully was not a that I was waiting to be tapped. I thought through what could I do with it and I thought through who else would get it and how I wanted it and four women who are listening to this podcast and who are now shaking their head going. I could never do something like that. What would you say to them? Was there a little voice in the back of your head? Sighing war. Sally. Don't be so push shield and not gonna like you if you push like that because a lot of women have that voice in the back of their heads. Yes I think over the years. I've come through that so don't let me pretend that this is how I've I've always been quite challenging as talking about me as a young doctor. I've also had my fair share of worries and the Impostor Syndrome but I've learned I believe in the Peter Principle which is that a lot of people ended up appointed to the job born above the warm where they function best as managed everything. I've done so my question to myself is. When does the Peter Principle play out? Can I do the next level and the way you find out? It's by doing it and I probably can. So that's where I come to this fantastic now during your time as chief medical officer. Of course you'd have ended up with the one with the KHURANA virus. But you did during your tenure have to deal with the case response to the atoll rap break in West Africa and you said back then. You were very proud of the volunteers. The doctors the nurses the lab staff the government officials who went out and put themselves at risk to do an amazing job. Can you just talk us through what it was like to be at that time in such a responsible position when a ball breakout and as we know they season incredibly deadly disease. I mean we've all spent a lot of time talking about death rights from nineteen but a baller is truly Deadly disease absolutely well-treated. You might get thirty to forty percent deaths but always an outbreak sit. It starts much higher until you've built the right facilities and got the local staff knowing how to treat the patients and it's scary because it's not that easy to catch. She can't catch it with spiritually wise like covert any bodily secretions and a lot of the early cases always spread through funerals and everything. Which means that. You're getting the heart of a community. How do you conduct your rights? The social fabric of those communities scary because it was going up exponentially. The number of doctors it died in Sierra Leone was horrendous. It's decimated their Health Service. Azziz covert in some countries like Italy and Spain and we are having doctors and this is dying here with co two so the questions were to understand the disease and luckily we had a lot of good Santus. Explain that to me. Understanding how best treated the present chief medical officer. My Success Chris Witty was actually the chief scientific advisor it defeat our aid agency so he and I worked in tandem with him thinking about Sierra Leone. The me thinking about the impact on Britain. And then you get to the clash between science and public pressure. One example was that the son says that to do entry. Screening based on high temperatures is not cost effective so we go to our emergency meetings chaired by the Prime Minister that called Cobra because it stands for Cabinet Office briefing rooms and say cost effective and the prime minister says. But I want to do it. Ashley. I then was able to tease out that the reason he wanted to was. He wanted to show the country and his electrode that he had done everything possible to protect them. I could see the advantage of catching people coming in from west Africa and saying these of the symptoms if they develop ring this number Public Health England. And this is what you do so that we were giving them something. I said. Well if you feel you need to do it to show. You're doing everything. The reason advantage. Are you prepared to pay the bill? And he said yes. I said fine. I have no problem with doing it. Interestingly this time on covert the scientists said it wasn't cost effective and our prime minister. Said all right. We wouldn't do it. I actually think that was the right decision here because so much everywhere that you either walk down and stop aeroplanes and traffic. Or you don't follow but you can't do it through entry screening and we know that now because of all these eysenck dramatic carriers but just teasing out what does say what needs doing. What politicians want an in the moment taking the decisions and flexing round that is quite tough and then talking to the nation about it doing all the media? I still remember after one broadcast my sister saying you look really grumpy and said I was trying to look serious. And she's because counts and she said well look jumpy and I think that was when they really started that and I'll go guidelines of course a lot of the press calling me. The chief nanny which is totally gendered was and that was quite difficult. You know usually I just ignored it or laughed about it. Though the walls of famous type where on the Today programme which is of course are very famous news programme on radio. Four every morning one of the interviewers Nick Robinson instead of waiting till the end of an interview then saying and chief nanny or something said some call you chief. Nanan so angry that he started like that turned around and said. I think you'll being gendered. I think that's unacceptable. I won't have it. There was a whole twitter storm in support of me and he was writing me. A note sexist. I would say you did it without thinking and it was my back against the wall. I challenge my fight back. I mean half frustrating was that I mean they are chief medical officer an incredibly serious job talking about issues that really matter will abol or end up in the United Kingdom deadly disease what is alcohol usage or the misuse of alcohol costing in terms of people's held some lives and people are critiquing like that. I mean how have frustrating is it. Well I did goals Kim Woody. Call a male. Cmo The chief. Man I said I would watch wants I retired. I have not yet seen in cool male successor chief. Nanny and I'm waiting for it because that would then mean it wasn't gendered and do you think fool women in the Medical Profession Women Hamada spa to a public role like that that saying that kind of treatment it puts them off. Or they just shrug and say well. I guess they'll be a bit of that but the job still worth. Do you have a sense of that? I think it does put women off. Because how do you learn to cope with it and you know I have learnt? I've been very well. Trained MEDIA WISE BY THE DEPARTMENT DOT COM staff of fabulous. And they would really everything I did. I was prepared as if it was a five hour exam. What are the elephant traps? How will I sound? How will it come over? And I've learned terrific amount. Thanks to that but if you haven't been through that so that you know okay. I can do this in any way. I am a fighter. It's quite worrying. Are they going to say things like that to me? What will I do? How will I say it so I think it does put off some of the ones who would turn out to be very good with some training and so we need to do more training and in an age like this watching as you get to do now than being in the middle of it so that having that sense of distance which can give you an ability to see it all I mean what do you think are some of the big problems in dealing with a pandemic like this and so much main? The scientific problems though feel free to speak about them. But I've got more on my mind this balance that you've talked about between political decision making in the expert advice and also the communications when people at home for countless hours they can scroll every tweet watch every facebook post and clearly end up with a lot of John King formation as well as hopefully get themselves onto some credible sources including more chief medical officers and other scientific experts. I so it is difficult. Unite both knew this. There's a desire for news. All ministers led by the Prime Minister. Doing five. Pm Conference News Conference every day and actually people around the country logging. In what's fascinating to me is you can see that. Some ministers a lousy at it talking down to us the public or bossy others are too nervous clearly not leaders and it really is sorting them out the door couple. I'm happy they're in their roles but others you think Ooh but the scientists my successor. The chief scientific advisor or deputies are there and being home and giving the advice so the communication is there. I think the media so far doing in Britain a very good job of being supportive but questioning a bit of challenge but most of them are taking the line of look. We can do the looking back later on. This is where we are. How are you GONNA go forwards and recognizing the needs the sense? We have a wonderful institution called the sounds media center. Run Your folks whether you know it but she finds experts to talk to journalists all the time about different things and she's been running conferences for the journalists with expert so that they get the background so when stories come up they know what's going on and when a story comes up she'll find them an expert to quote comment so I think we're getting very responsible reporting in general on looking all across the globe. Of course I looked to the states. Get a lot of interesting things and I really can't not take you up on that how you see the US in comparison with the UK or any other nations response. Well I'm glad we have an nature. I think he's my big. Take home message that care and testing. It's free appoint access because we know that poor people whether they are black and minority ethnic just our own or toxins..

medical officer Prime Minister Sally Sierra Leone scientific advisor Britain Bob Global Institute for Women West Africa Chris Witty Permanent Secretary twitter US Medical Profession Women Hamad Italy UK Ashley Nanny facebook
"davies" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

14:35 min | 2 months ago

"davies" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"My guest today is dying Sally Davies. Who until October last year was the chief medical officer for England the my senior government advisor on health matters? She was the first and only woman to ever hold this raw. She's also a member of the World Health Organization Executive Board and now serves as master of Trinity College at the University. Kind Bridge Sally. Until recent weeks many people would not have thought much about the chief medical officer. Now we find ourselves hanging off their every word and I met a way we are in the world. Can you describe the role of the chief medical officer what it was like to hold that job? Well it was an incredible honor and to bear flagbearer. I think as a woman actually does put more pressure on. You definitely meant that. I was called the Chief. Nanny of the nation which was sexist. But what we have to do is think hard about the public's health and most of the time for me in Britain that was not about the NHL services. It was more about the preventive health health improvement and health protection. And so of course. Lamentin is came onto that. I was the one that with the backup of scientists had to advise government. When we have the NAVA joke poisonings in two thousand nine ten. I was not there for the first wave of the flu. Pandemic I was actually running research the chest but I was there for the third wave when we had even more deaths and drank back from holidays by ministers for a bowler in West Africa to talk about what needed doing where we responding effectively and to talk to the public. Some people call the roll. The nation's doctor so it's complex because it moves around and I'm a hematologist a specialist in sickle. So and then. I became a researcher so I have a broad background but I'm rather pleased that my successor is an infectious disease specialist so he has called the president horrors of covert and he is expert. And can you imagine what the Chief Medical Officer in the U. K? Or INDEED OTHER CHIEF. Medical officers around the world are going through now. Can you give us an insight into what would it be like well? It's very pressured because what you're trying to do is stay on top of the signs on one side. What should we be doing the services on what's going on and the limitations because no one is prepared for something as bad as this and then the pressures which come from ministers because they clearly want sorting out and they want to show they're in control the media which again is pushing and raking over every little thing and the public demands? Put that beside your own desire to get it right and to save lives and it's a very pressured role you refer them to people not saying something like this coming. Did you ever imagine that the world would be where we are today? Well we did a lot of practice. As did you in Australia of pandemic planning but it was always a flu. So that tastes in respiratory born virus and we thought that would standards in good stead. I think it's shown that we didn't practice everything we didn't think through the testing well enough and the other things. We clearly didn't have ready but would anyone have ready. It's a question of how much clamming can you do and we did a lot and we some really good planning song quite proud of what we did but then how fleet of foot can you be when it happens and how anticipate can you be as you watch it develop and what's giving you hope at the moment on one thing that certainly in world war odd claims the scientific and medical communities coming together and focusing on the research and vaccine other things that are going to make a profound difference at all of that. What scaping you spirits up? Well the first thing is of coal some actual nature that we historically have epidemics and pandemics and survival of the fittest as nations and society. We come through. Interestingly here. I am sat in Trinity College and the where the plagues in the mid sixty and hundreds. Which aren't she because we close down as we have done now. Pasta spy but newt of gravity fame is famed for having. Actually it's not quite correct story having discovered gravity during one of the plagues. I think the way people are coming together whether it's about the sun some working together on treatments vaccinations whether it's in the service stories of heroism of nurses doctors on the front line but also the volunteering the support from people in the community for the vulnerable taking medicines. Taking food and everything. So it's how society is coming together and working together whether it's on Sundance or to support others. Isn't that wonderful? The way it's happening and I am loving the means and the little videos and everything on facetime what SAF and zoom I mean are now doing masses of things by zoom. We were cooking supper with our daughter on zoo last night. She was cooking hers in the House. And we were cooking up unfortunately onsumer. You can't lane in enticed they can't particularly better. I'm GonNa take you back now to your ties when you grew up and when you first start to think that you might want to be doctor because I'm sure one of the things that struck people as we've watched the coverage of the pandemic is had. Jane ended idiots most of the experts most of the politicians or their podiums breed. I telling us what's going to happen next all men so as a girl growing up. What made you decide you so I wanna be a doctor. Well actually. I'm an auditory because I didn't know what to do. I got to the age of sixty nine had quite decent exam results. I was better biology. Have I remember my mother saying you? Good biology you quite like people that you do mince father who was a medic. No one else in the family so I talked to him and it seemed a good idea so I went off to do it and actually after the first couple of years and it's on record I found it quite brutalizing. I think in the way that the doctor's now will find it. The people were. We had Russian health system particularly at that time in the mid seventies where I can remember. Oh young woman. For instance. Not being allowed renal dialysis because there was a choice between patients. And she didn't win. Am I thought this was so unfair? And how many things were handled. I was so brutalized I actually gave up for four years and then giving up discovered I had of the -cation and I think what our young doctors are going through. The moment on the front line is very similar. Not Enough ventilators. Who Do you choose seeing? People die in circumstances where you can't hold their hand and their families can't be there I think they're experiencing some of that brutalizing and harrowing things that I saw in the early and mid seventies and I fear many of them will say after it's over. I can't do this. I hope like me I went off. Married diplomat went Madrid as a diplomat's wife. I wasn't the good diplomat's wife but I realized I wanted to do meant and then came back really energize and I hope that if they do give up then come back energized. When they've found themselves again. Do you think we'd be a bit better now at supporting the main to health and well being of air frontline doctors enosis as they go through something like this would they be more understanding about how spirit crushing making. Those choices are literally between who lives in dollars. I think we're more understanding but talking to our younger daughter WHO's a first year doctrine. The front line they are so stretched so rushed that the extra services aren't available so it is a question of kindness in a team and supporting the team. I had that too. It wasn't enough for me. I would rather a gentle soul that stage. I don't know I think we're going to have to do an awful lot of catching up later on and when you look back on those days I mean. Brutalizing is a very strong word. Was that really perspective about the system. Did you think that they was agenda? Element and win offered in your life that if I said to yourself. Jay is something different that happens because I'm a woman. Oh the walls gendered element the was in medical school. I think thirteen women at the year of one hundred ten. I mean looking back very inappropriate thing so when we did surface anatomy I was made to stand on a stool while they drew on my legs where the muscles were. I mean you know and I thought that was normal that stage but you wouldn't allow that now getting back to starting on the walls. The word very few women. The nurses were not used to women. Doctors remember the system. My first ward saying well. You think I'm here to ally was no. I don't and she said you're here to make mighty and it was actually quite difficult environment and I was definitely Baltimore. The pecking order. But I came from a fairly sparky academic background and my father who was a theologian taught me that. I should ask and challenge. In order to get the right answer I mean at the age of six challenging bishops. How do you know God exists and things so? Perhaps I was better prepared. The many women would be in that. I was prepared to challenge and push back but it wasn't easy. Am I do think it was a agenda sexist environment and can you give us an example of one moment of pushing back of challenging? Do Love the image of you as a sixty road. You know at Sunday lunch challenging bishop but in the context of Medical Education or medical practice. Well I mean just silly things like I remember. I did something on one of my early wall drown. Something consultant said. Miss Davis I said in front of the patient and the whole team. I appreciate you think have got this wrong and I'm really sorry but I know that when you're happy with me you call me Sally when you content you call me. Dr Davis Miss Davis not acceptable. And he said Oh. I didn't realize I did that. Said you into the men interesting. It didn't again. Oh so go to resort. Yes I wouldn't be invited to everything because the boys were going for a beer sitcoms. I can't stand beer and I didn't like pubs because of the smoking them so I didn't mind in one sentence but on the other side. We all know that a lot of medical networking used to take place in the pub over a beer so I was being excluded though I think the funniest was my hematologist professor who I was very fumbled. But he would do this long ward round on one morning of the week and at a certain point he would walk into the gents and continued discussing the patients and my friend Anais. She she and I would stand outside. Arms crossed thinking. What are they saying about patients? We're looking off. And I got so fed up I took to propping. Open the door with my foot and continuing the conversation with the professor while he was in the Jen's that stopped it. That's a fantastic. He meach to now. You've said about being a woman that you think your gender means that you bring anything special to the role for example role as chief medical officer beyond the willingness to take a more collaborative approach and perhaps a relative lack of a guy. What did you mean by that? A lot of men who achieve these great offices set out to I mean I do meet young. Men Are not met a young woman. Actually who say to me? I want to be a chief. Medical officer said well. Perhaps you should not only enjoy the journey but recognize that. It's an issue of timing. Who else is around? And you may not make. But they're invested in the office. I wasn't it was only about a year before the post came up when my predecessor said to me sally you'd be a good. Cmo Why didn't you apply? When I go in about a year. And I said why would I want it? We had this very funny discussion. So it wasn't. I was invested in the office or had an EGO. In fact I don't my father and mother as I said. We're academics and they brought me up to believe that you should have a really good debate. Does matter of it's an argument but the debate. Get to the best answer. So I brought this very academic research background in and in fact what my team said was I would get to a conclusion quite quickly. But if they had a better argument I would shift and I was always debating thinking aloud and everything and that isn't an ego driven way of doing it so it was a different style. It was very I set out to make evidence my U. S. P. and to be collaborative and debating and then if a decision needed taking I would take it. So that was kind of different approach. Much more academic approach and just unpacking some of that..

Chief Medical Officer Medical officer Sally Davies flu Trinity College professor World Health Organization Exec NHL Lamentin England Britain Australia Miss Davis advisor West Africa Dr Davis Miss Davis researcher Brutalizing
Miami - Florida police chief placed on leave after alleged comment about deputy who died of coronavirus

WIOD Programming

00:17 sec | 3 months ago

Miami - Florida police chief placed on leave after alleged comment about deputy who died of coronavirus

"Davies police chief chief is is out out on on leave leave the the Florida Florida state state law law fraternal fraternal order order of of police police as as chief chief Dale Dale angle angle retaliated retaliated against against employees employees who who raise raise safety safety concerns concerns about about the the corona corona virus virus in in the the department department angle is also accused of saying their Broward county deputy killed by covert nineteen got it because he was gay

Davies Florida Dale Dale Broward County
The Best Marketing Strategy Anyone Can Use - The Candid Cashflow Podcast | Internet Marketing | Marketing Strategy

The Candid Cashflow Podcast

08:34 min | 3 months ago

The Best Marketing Strategy Anyone Can Use - The Candid Cashflow Podcast | Internet Marketing | Marketing Strategy

"Today. I've got the best marketing strategy. That in my opinion that that I think anyone can use for pretty much anything. And I'll be using it actually throughout this episode. You stick around here for any amount of time and you're GONNA find out that. I'm pretty picky about marketing like I want methods. That are fresh. Aren't GonNa waste my time that are ethical and are gonNA give value to my clients and customers so you know I find certain tactics to just be old tired. Need to be retired and I. I talked about that. In episode twenty three the candidate cashflow podcast actually in the wheel linked to that also in the show notes. If you want to check it out it kind of went a little more in depth And I talked in that episode about what I call the unique approach which is not basically following a bunch of people and just kinda parenting and rehashing whatever they do instead of doing that. A unique approach is kind of developing your own ideas and your own products and ways that you market those products so if you wanNA check that out it'll there'll be a link in the show notes some of those old marketing methods that I'm talking about things like webinars. I think that's probably my number one number one that I hate. I'll never forget the first one that I attended the guy. He was fifteen minutes late and then when he showed up he pursued a drone on for an hour and a half about nothing. I finally gave up and went to bed because I hadn't learned a single thing at that point in every Webinar that I've ever attended was the exact same. It was a lot of hype a lot of blabbering a lot of selling with no real substance. It was pretty much You know a couple hours of some guy talking probably in front of a white board telling me something he could have told me in five minutes and then try to sell me. Whatever it was he was trying to sell me know so you made ten thousand dollars last month. That's great. I'm still not buying your one thousand dollar product. Anyone can find ten suckers per month if they do enough webinars. It's just not the type of business model that I'm personally going for any time. You see a Webinar. Then you know the main mo of that. Webinar is to sell you. Probably a big ticket item. I also I'm not a fan of people that just turn out product after product after product. I'm currently trying to build my business around content and information products and some of those things we're going to be for sale. It's just the nature of the beast but the thing is is there are these guys and they that their entire business model is to turn out products and run a big launch on a platform like warrior plus or Jv Zoo. That's their entire business model like they're they. Launch launch is their meal ticket. And I'M NOT SAYING THAT. The products are quality because some of them really are. There's a guy Stewart Turnball he puts out some really good products and Kin Boatmen He. He does a puzzle book software. His stuff's really good. So there's a few people out there. George Cat Sudas wordpress plug ins a few of the people that that choose to mark that way have really good products but the problem here is. There is an unbelievable amount of crap that you have to wait through to find the good stuff most of the products that I've gotten via one of those things you know. It's like a long chain of piggybacked products and ot woes or one time offers and you know. I've seen some of them as many as six to eight additional. You have to opt out of just to get the final product that you bought. It's ridiculous I you know up. Sales are thing. Eight upsells on one product is is ridiculous especially when the the the sales don't even relate to the product itself so I I'm just I'm done with that stuff. It's not the type of business model that I want is not the type of business model that I recommend for people that I consult with teach advise Blah so another one is you know the crappy email is now look. I started writing to my email list daily in November of this past year. And that's something that I thought that I would never in my life do is right in email every day or you know because I didn't really want to receive an email every day. You know I believe in email marketing but some guys just take it to an insane level. I write my emails every day and I tried to provide something useful and observation a tool advice on something I try to provide an you know a new idea. Whatever you know Brendan macy's one of the worst. If you hang around the war you're plus or Davies Zoo or any of that stuff for long enough. You gotTa Youtube Channel. You'RE GONNA run into that guy. He's one of the worst. I would not doubt his products. Help young people learn the ropes to an extent but is approach to get bucks is? It's just not my style or the kind of content that I enjoy consuming so list that just tout correct crap products. That's another thing like on my list. I don't I do not hardly sell anything. If I release something I either give it away for free or it's pretty cheap. Like I think the most expensive thing that I've touted to my list so far was twenty seven dollars. I just I don't do a lot of selling. I know I know people. You know the money's in list and all this stuff just not my style. I'M NOT GONNA run over to click bank and find seventeen products that are going to pay me well and start. Hakkinen to my list because it seems like the thing to do to make me some money. I'm going to find the legit way to make money the one that provides value and once I figure it out. That's what I'm going to be teaching. Everybody I'm not doing this. Just one crappy product after another. I just I can't which brings me to the rehashed methods so it's true there have been many combinations of the same methods to make money online build a website promote a product build a list. Rents repeat it's not rocket which is the reason that I'm actually in the beginning stages of developing a system that people can jump into completely free of charge and learn these basic things. So they're not buying these rehashed products. I would say ninety nine percent of the products that I bought were just rehashed methods seriously. Every affiliate marketing product is the same. You choose a niche you creator find a product to promote around that niche. You build a website around the product you create an opt in to capture email addresses you give away a free e book as an incentive for people to opt into your email list and then you write articles about your niche you create content for other blogs videos guests post you comment on blogs forums websites in your niche ad nauseam at infinity emits almost too difficult to get an email addresses anymore because the entire Internet is jaded. These methods are simply wore out. If you WANNA get rid of me to say Webinar or one time offer and I'm gone

Jv Zoo Stewart Turnball George Cat Sudas Infinity Davies Zoo Brendan Macy
Gordon Elliott's charge finished second behind Easysland

The Final Furlong Podcast

06:04 min | 3 months ago

Gordon Elliott's charge finished second behind Easysland

"Johnny Henderson Grand Annual Challenge. Cup goes the way of that Man Gordon Ilias and Davy Russell Chosen Mate with Gordon finishing second with eclair. Fhu and then we had a massive raise for Joseph. O'brien he said that this has been the plan on the podcast that they were hoping for better performance and boy did they get it and well-backed as well thirty. Three's Joseph said that on the show after a handicap special. He was cut to twenty s and he was the chosen really. Well backed Jess but they were steaming into into from eleven tens on the day he was a bigger price earlier than sixteen beforehand. This money but chosen mate was well back to really the market phoned the right horses. All MOANING CHOSEN. Mayton us in them. Were horses that that that the other everyone tracking they were getting a lot a lot of attention. I know that in the morning you could have got nine to one. Third Chosen May and by the time the races off he was just just below five to one us and then was just below ten to one himself and another exceptional handicap performance for Gordon Elliott chosen. May He looks absolutely get up for this race. It was again another one that had been running incredibly well behind voices and this was a very very good victory. I think granite eighteen. Who BEEN LONGTIME ANTI POST FAVOURITE FOR PAUL? Nicholls wasn't quite. I don't know again. It was a bad day for political team. None of his horses really Brown. Well this on the best of all of them but they they kind of changed his tactics a bit and he was rather little bit more is positioned up with the pace more than and being being held up and he was always going well but it wasn't going to be the him but again. The Irish is showing dominance in handicaps and a brilliant victory for I think it was a I think. A big syndicate chose mate was at the northern racing partnership and and Yeah tallied upper a great great wheat for Gordon Elliott. Who the day on the morning. I think he had six wins and he was on six wins six seconds and three thirds and Willie Marlins was on three wins. Five seconds and five thirds somehow managed. Lose where he was one point six to be talked trainer. I don't know but amazing. Really really mullins cheers and better. Yeah another another top. Handicap spoke ordinary. I'll tell you how he lost seekers. Great White Shark third bosses. Oscar was unlucky not to get closer. But I'm delighted finish fifth because that went plays mony and he would've got it had it not been for parole qualifier horrible full. Oh Gordon but dramatic stuff and I do remember. It was like old school tv where Nick is handed a piece of paper. It was like something from watching like old school. Reruns of nineteen seventeen news broadcasts. Thanks thanks very much with that update because they were locked together as you said it was. It was amazing why Bez was held up in the rear great field. I have no idea because that doesn't suit him at all. But Hey Sean Joe is trying something different. Jodi mcgarvy keeping the ride Gordon wins again. Jane another huge success for for him. Presumably the approach from the British handicapper. Next year will be every Gordon handicapper. It goes up twenty pounds brilliant right by Davy Russell I had cut their scars in my selections and I wasn't all not comfortable watching the race. I was wondering were we going is as good as Davies. Body language suggested we were and he made couple of mistakes on the mound never panicked he ultimately put me at ease watching him I always once know you have debut Rossler Barry or you know Richard Johnson on your soy. Been you're instantly. Put at ease and no offense to Shana Keith or JJ seven but been of growing up watching the on the big day and he sold rarely gets it wrong. And this was a tactic. Good Brilliance from him I think most Ryan is part of the syndicate and they got great satisfaction from day. Celebrations would have been huge. I'd say the government the closing down and as a great seal being held up. Aki Job better than he usually does so. He didn't travel with fluency that he has done. When he raises from the front put he jumped a lot better than he can Paloma blue biggest parliament for me. I am not making any more excuses for the horse I think he has an implement ability but he wins someday and I won't be on Off and then it of bridesmaid isn't he? He's run second to their Eastbourne couple times in grade ones and now he's been third at Jutland hearings massive race again. Joseph O'Brien but ultimately that is David Ostlund chosen may stolen show horses connections and he's giving them some great days but you're right he's a bridesmaid. And Hey look we did. All right we did find in terms of our handicaps. I'll happily take place. Thank you very much on a bonkers week and the bunkers week would end with a twenty five so one Wynonna First Cheltenham Festival. Success for Paul Weber. Would Philip Hobbs. Who's we could have been saved and a brilliant ride from Ben Jones. As well ultimately a short head stops them from getting a victory in behind on mcinerney giving. Willie mullins great white shark a fantastic ride And Gordon Elliott's the bosses Oscar running a stormer. I thought I stayed on really really strongly in the Martin.

Gordon Elliott Man Gordon Ilias Joseph O'brien Willie Mullins Davy Russell Paul Weber Oscar Johnny Henderson Jess FHU Willie Marlins Philip Hobbs CUP Eastbourne Nicholls Mcinerney Cheltenham Festival BEZ Ben Jones Shana Keith
Russell T Davies On Balancing Politics, Tech and a Multi-Year Family Saga in ‘Years and Years’

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:45 min | 4 months ago

Russell T Davies On Balancing Politics, Tech and a Multi-Year Family Saga in ‘Years and Years’

"The BBC HBO show years and Years Combines the politics economy and tech twenty nineteen and imagine how it all might evolve over the next fifteen years. Emma Thompson is in it. As a celebrity British politician with autocratic leanings but mainly the show follows a family as they deal with the world changing around them. Russell t Davis created and wrote years and years. He's also worked on the show doctor who torchwood and created queer as folk. He said the tech in years and years is like life. It's complicated just to show good and bad. I think some of the saddest moments. It's you have a world war on television and the little five six year old kids just staring into their phones playing their games. So yes there's bad stuff but let's talk about and yet there's very very good stuff. I tell you what to do when I made the choice to said to this around a family that came from one of the good sites of current tech which is very simply the. What's up group? I'm one of three kids two sisters. They've got two kids. Each were Nice family will like each of the wicked on but up until a couple of years ago. My nieces grow up to three years ago. I would've text them twice. Happy Birthday. Merry Christmas now. Oh my God. I went out the other night and I came back to the WHATSAPP group to fifty three messages on the group because because someone at cooked lasagna with butternut squash so yes. There's good stuff if you choose good ride the badge and they could right. You've got to get both because in the end. It's the technology it's it's the people. Well it's great because some of the tech feels really immediate like a headband. That projects a holographic sort of snapchat filter for your face that everyone can see in the physical world. It's futuristic but it's also completely realistic. Yes yes I think it was invented tomorrow. We'd all go and buy one. I mean I find this fascinating. I mean everyone my age. Everyone sends each others photos of themselves looking like a dunk. It will not count rash of instagram. Filters like what dog are you or what Keiko you. I'm certainly a Battenberg. I love those filters and I'm fascinated by the way we love those filters and so the moment someone events a filter you can see in the real world not just on your phone dot com. I will be new for my palace on the moon. Do you have conflicting feelings about tack or is it like so many things where it just reflects? The real world has interesting. I think it's both I think I have to be entertaining but entertain doesn't mean being glib or dust. I think I'm getting older. I think my stuff is full of warnings. Now to be honest it's funny. I'm now in the middle of an eddy of my next drama. Which is we'd each be. Oh Max over there which is about the AIDS crisis of the nineteen eighty s and leaked just watched an idea of an episode warning about viruses and we step out above. Does this virus on the loose? You can't them those lessons from History Indus- strangers no what a world. I was telling people that I'm taking a little bit of comfort in darker timeline but there is something comforting about the passage of time right like you fast forward in these episodes and increasingly terrible things happen but also people are still living their normal lives. Talk to me about that sense of perspective. Yes that's right. I mean it's it was quite hard. Showed a salad sleep with its concept of moving forward in time every episode moves forward a year but actually I sat there and saying doubt dry being questioned by fifty seven times set. That didn't know what else moves forward a year every episode Downton Abbey and so did upstairs downstairs many years ago. It's actually not former drummer. Have invented a sippy by this jobs. Going to the future by a year every absurd that had people scared but in terms of trauma tens of how the characters are getting on lobs. Who who's going out with? Who WHO's cross with? Who who loves to to take yearly jumps in that? It's a very simple dramatic device so I knew that would work. I had the confidence of those. Those full beds to say This'll work and and that sort of creep into the story. Which is that would winner. In in societies when dictators arise all where huge changes are made and and West Society swing from left to right or right to left. It doesn't happen overnight. That's why I wanted. What ends up fifteen year span on the show is social these things slowly creeping up on you and you're more concerned with having tea or for your love or have a good divorce. That's actually the stuff the meat and drink of your life while the biggest shadows falling on new unseen so a needed that stretch to show small picture of people living in a bigger picture

Emma Thompson BBC Russell T Davis Battenberg Downton Abbey Aids Whatsapp West Society
"davies" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

13:36 min | 4 months ago

"davies" Discussed on EconTalk

"True rainforest which is as if if you haven't been there as as you imagined from a foam and it's completely dark very loud very watts. Many many layers of canopy teeming with life loud in what? What's what's he does Other animal just just kind of for an economist. He spent fifteen years in central bank and offices libraries concerning stock. I'll talk about. The roots is in that area. The the Tree Ritz. Yeah it's just it's under a bunch of leaves. There's talk about that just one Darrien House. A couple of quite poisonous. Snakes one's called deferred allowance. And it would actually kill you if it bites and they just when you're hiking tree rainforests after a while the roots of trees just very very much like snakes and it just becomes. It seems I'm sure more treasures than it is. The the points is that these teak plantations which is absolutely everywhere. I agree frankly to despise the teak and I met deep in the jungle historically had been responsible for the preservation and he said the environment is now ICU. A now we have the killer. Problem of teak teak is not an indigenous species. I point it's from Southeast Asia. Not from not from Central America. The the result the reason fatigue is the results of subsidy system. The Panamanians realized that too much of the rainforest was getting cut down so they set up this system of of subsidies for people that would replant but as the environmentalist assets me. A plantation is not a forest. It just happens. That teak is hugely valuable antique. Not Truly how. Some properties as a very a take tree has very very large leaves much bigger than a dinner plate like a big serving plate. They are very thick and that waxy untruths own good fatigue. Darwinian evolution is developed the fact that these leaves contain an asset which kills Bugs the eight them. The points is that when the leaves fall to the floor that floor because they're so big has had no light source at all. That's completely unlike natural trees whether taller the tree the smaller leaves to let light down. There's been no light on the floor to and then went to teach leave falls to the to the first floor. Alas out this asset That's a that's a natural process but it means when you walk into a teak plantation. The the the ground is if somebody has poured gasoline and torched it there is no life and so what has happened is primary rainforests. I'm has been this problem of the failure of the Commons cut. The property rights system has failed and people who traded. That would two way and then suddenly says economists okay. We've got this great idea. Let's subsidy put in a subsidy that's also L. targeted on a completely unsuitable tree which actually does damage to the the Boston. The wildlife below at is now completely the Norman Panama. It's kind of devastating catalogue of economic mistakes. But the teak plantation. Is it stand alone or is it in the middle of the rain. Is it on the edge of the rainforest is it does it? Is it just a bad failed substitute or is it also hurting the rainforest itself because it leaks into the night? I it doesn't leak in but it's where the rainforest should used to be and I would say arguably a I'm not one hundred percent sure but as the lake was described to me I think it would be better off just leaving the fields fallow allowing local bushes and trees to grow rather than having to take so the teak now They and there are some amazing aerial photos of Darren from the sixties and the eighties. And you can just see the rainforest retreating a now while the rainforest once was that was teak and in a sense it does the damage. Because weather teak that will never be new rainforest. Grief that other that Cornucopia of other life and organic stuff exactly. So what's that mean for the people who live there so it sounds like they're doing okay? I mean it's a tragedy for the rainforest obviously and some biodiversity is the the people who are. Let's backtrack the people who are the indigenous people? There they've got this property right in the ability to harvest a limited amount of pounds of tons of whatever of wood. So they're they're selling mouse. They could have made it illegal to sell them yet but they did or they did. They can't enforce it those people. Are they doing okay? The people live there. Is that a vibrant economy in terms of be. These are incredibly remote communities right. It's t t even get to these people you have to write the end of the Panamanian highway not a lot of powdered milk then a drive about another three hours on tracks. And then you take a canoe for about six hours so these are near indigenous peoples and they use the money to to let you know the the trade involved in. It's it's it's a very simple on culturally. When young couple gets married they build them in your house and they have now have access to Morton built building materials. Concrete blocks Corrugated on roofing and so and also outboard motors and say an exchange of a few trees for those things is one they want to take part and the the problem frankly and you can see it from these. As I mentioned is just sustainability you can see the land they live in ebbing away So yeah it's it's not a law is not a long term viable option. And if you compare for example the ability that Panama's had competitive for example Costa Rica in creating eco-tourism. It's far far lower. That would be much more sustainable way of of making revenue from than natural environment. While protecting it you in that canoe for six hours is a fun now. Why because it's fun to being a Canadian for an hour but for six house is fun. And how long did you spend in Darien Couple of weeks and Darren. Yeah what your quarters like I. Courts is the night that I stayed in the furthest away. Embarrassed village was the least sleep. I've had in my in my life so I I went to see the chief and he took me down to this thatched roof building which was his old building. Kind of present for that to me. I was very grateful. To Sleep. There and I eat sleep in in hammocks and you advised to pull my Homolka of my face and I thought why is this for and then as an adult movie i. This is an easy one. I go ahead. Yeah House Night. Foul literally as night fell the first bar. I was GONNA say Bats Van Law about the first bats and it was not small landed on the Mesh couple of inches away from my face and I thought about and I would say that the thing that I lived in this thatched roof was basically a batts nest and maybe that happened every thirty seconds. The next eight thousand till dawn came so it was just just slept fitfully that night. Guess that's interested. You bring you bring a present to pay. I guess I did differently. I didn't I didn't think I did bring gets lots and lots of the places visited in the Burke I did give gifts I mean obviously I didn't I never you'd never pay upfront for for interviews. But why why there was something like a community hall or something like that and some of these villages and they wanted a donation for the end. I did that kind of thing. I think nice boy like you're doing a place like that seriously. I D- were there moments in writing this book deep that you grossly sounds like there were moments when you underestimated what. You're going to go through to pull this off Is this part of the fun. I wouldn't call it fun daren. Darren was an incredible experience Some was I never slept in a Hammock with seriously not fun I. I don't do that but I felt very determined to get to these people and try and tell their economic story to try and give that the narcis which I have done in the book to just two places. The one we mentioned was in the camp where there was this question of Islamic state dot felt like this a bit kind of scary And there was one moment. Actually In Darren while I was tracking and there was some evidence of kind of either power paramilitaries or freedom fighters being in the area and I thought this is. This is getting too too close to the line Uncertain so I backed off. But in general and third one was there a couple of days in Kinshasa. You'RE GONNA come to that next which were which were a little bit. Harry you might. Yeah the it was daring. Now if I remember correctly where there's no real perimeter as no real security. There's no police. There's no they're they're vulnerable to outsiders who won't hurt them they did. Yeah most outsiders interested in. It's far away but you talk about you mentioned early. The emigrants trekking through. Think you tell the story of the guides who would pay to take people through there and then Blackmail them her abandon them and that they came across dead bodies of of people got lost. Could get back. Yeah absolutely the the. There's a large number of illegal immigrants in the Darren gap something I'd read kind of couple of paces about but it makes it sound like it's kind of small phenomenon. I saw them in every village and town that I went to people from Nepal people from Punjab people from Senegal Marine. And the reason they do it is because it's so dangerous if you manage to track from the Colombian side where she got to By flying into an airport somewhere in South America if you manage to get to that side and then track through the authorities folly tree because that's the sort of fundamental reason people do it and then once they're through into Panama they can find some truck and the Panamerican Highway starts there and goes goes on our as far north as you want a guy of course. There are loads of borders. You have to cross. But Darren is like a six-day track through the rain forest. And and that's what was going on there and the problem to go back that they face To go back to Australia and also get to go back to a big question of this book is you know. Can we rely on markets to always bring up thousand example of where if ever there was a market a trade that could occur between the young Colombian guys? That have no real source of income. Excuse me but do neither way through. And the Punjab Nepalese guys. That have a large amount of money hidden on the idea of the way through the program being. There's no reputation Delaney C. Each other ones and often what happens is people get taken in robbed and then left to find a way out and yeah I. I didn't see any myself. But many of the groups had tried to trek through reported having seen that bodies along the way. But you mentioned shows and I wanted to make sure we talked about that as chapter in the book on Kazan I it's amazing. How many economic episodes or or or resonated with me for from this offbeat conversation. We're having I just thought I want a minute ago and I've forgotten it now but A long time ago early days of ECON talk. I interviewed Responded to mosquito A few times actually but something he said. I've never forgotten I think about it a lot and that was a remark he made about king leopold so king. Leopold was the head of Belgium and He owned the Congo personally. Personally and versus point. I forgot how it came up at risk point was..

Darren Panama Tree Ritz Darrien House Southeast Asia king leopold ECON Norman Panama Punjab Nepalese Central America Kinshasa South America Boston Kazan Congo Australia Harry Costa Rica Belgium
"davies" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

13:45 min | 4 months ago

"davies" Discussed on EconTalk

"With cash. That could be spending lots of places out in the modern world not not do at the present on the surface. Just a debit card. That's I can use it Walmart I assume. Cvs ALL ALL KNIVES. The the the the cod That I'm talking about there too. Cards one is the one that you why you pay the money and you which charges the other card so in this example charges loads and this example. Let's say you are on the outside and you have got a debit card which has zero balance like I. I don't know why I'm somewhere else somewhere else in the in in the United States and I go to CVs or whatever and buy a one of these charge cards scrape the norms of the back and there are forty. String forty numbers. Those called the dots. I then go in and visit a relative or but I got lost. Let's let's pack up. There's there's two kinds of cards here. The first cards called is the Green Dot card. That's like a credit card right. Yes and I can spend it in lots of places. Yeah and it's just one brown though. If a discard the is accepted in many retail stores. Correct the challenges once. Let's say someone to back up your example but I want to give you this card So I give you this card and it's got one hundred dollars on it and I said Richard Happy Birthday. Here's one hundred dollars. A good time used to go around town you go to Walmart you go to a cvs you go to a bar you spend the money. That's on the card. Now it's down to zero. Now what do you do to throw it away exactly? So then the second card comes back and so you're whoever is wants to give you. This money wants to give you this. Money goes into the store. Let's say with five hundred bucks. That's me that's the largest amount. Hans over the five hundred bucks to the retail reseller and gets back in exchange. This card called money. Pack and not is worth one hundred dollars in debt card is not for buying with that card is just for loading loading loading your green dot debit card. Exactly you scrape scrape the little shiny silver lottery exactly off the back and you got these fourteen numbers on those numbers. Now if you were teen digit numbers yet Yeah one long number with fourteen digits that those fourteen digits which are appalled adults are themselves worth five hundred bucks for whoever receives them notes on their card and they can just be read out savor of phone or memorized or written down on a little piece of paper and say the way it works is once somebody has access. Today's there's numbers they can give them either via meeting Some other mechanism talking some on the phone to a family member in a prison and that family member can give those numbers in exchange to another prisoner that by exchanging five hundred dollars worth of value there. Alaska gave the other prisoner. Who then transmits them to the outside and the other person's card is then charged with that value moated loaded importantly the people on the outside never meet. They never linked bank accounts. They don't use pay power one another. This is now. Id there's nothing's traceable. It's it's laundered perfectly. The idea is that there should be some ID. But those large-scale reporting since since I did this and since the books have been various stories of this. It's very easy to get around the idea requirements. They easy too easy to skip around. But my presumption is Let Sam your uncle. Sorry to push imprison Richard Richard Jared Angola You get a weekly. Maybe you get some access to a phone while you're there. Legally I assume through the rules and and I give you go out. I'm in. I'm in free society. You're in prison. I go out I by money. Pack a scrape the numbers off the back. And I read them off to you or I send them to in a coded in a letter in code. Now you have a string of fourteen digits that you can tell anyone. And if they have the green dot card they have buying power correctly so arch. You're gonNA tell that to the guard in exchange for the smuggled Mojo there is there are report lots of reports of You know I didn't mean any calls. He said they're doing that. But then there's there's quite wide scout reporting of problems with God's Atangana bringing bringing stuff in yes so but but in your example before you as the prisoner told somebody else on the outside the the fifteen digit number fourteen digit number. What would why would what transaction would that be lubricating? It could be the fact that I could beer The the person paying could be the relatively innocence and concerned family member of a prisoner. Let's say who is addicted to Major. Okay so I WANNA get an. I'm just feel sorry for them and I want to get them some buying power. But I certainly don't want to risk bringing Joe in one of the other prisoners may have contacts on the outside a family member who is prepared to take that risk because they're involved in that trade so this is a totally untraceable totally liquid form of buying power for anybody. It's real money. Yeah it's an amazing and there are now since I since I discovered and and I had this light bulb moments when one of these prisoners said we have this docked currency. I've been looking into it a bit. And there are other examples and other concerns now about being used in money laundering cross-border trade and so on digest prisoners. And it's exactly as points of Agana goes right back to that financial innovation of dealing king. The person that pays for the for this money. Pack and the person that needs to spend and the ability to just send those digits across the states across borders wherever and it sends it sends buying power. It's it's a very modern form of currency it fits perfectly with those those conditions. That mango sat out. You know it's durable is it. It's equivalent to dollar essentially. It's amazing now in my interview. David Scar back to talk about his book. Prison gangs one of the most depressing fascinating aspects of that which is probably related to what we're talking about is that Prisoners get killed who don't abide by the rules in certain settings in his case he was looking at gang members who didn't do what they were expected to do or violated. The norms of the prison offended different gang. And they'd get killed and I'd say it said today but I said how you kill somebody in a prison. There must be video cameras everywhere and his point was the at least in California. There are places the video cameras. Don't reach the prisoner. Corners PRESUMABLY PRISONERS. Noar. Those are more or less where they can have encounters like this where people are going to fight to the death. horribly And that the prison itself in his case kind of likes that because it allows the prisoners to enforce certain norms that lead to stability every once in a while it leads to violence but that violence damps down the other violence. That would happen if that weren't there so I wonder if in this case you'd kind of imagine that the guards would kind of like the opportunity to smuggle And would close their eyes to certain things coming into the prison. It would allow them to blackmail prisoners. It would allow them to sell to prisoners. So my presumption is that the guards and even possibly the administration is aware that some of this is going on but it keeps things somewhat sedate relative to what they might otherwise be. Yeah I mean I'm not sure is the answer to that question. I think that's all they having having spoken with longtime prisoners there. There's a big difference between this first economy. We discussed these. I would call them completely natural human wanst to want to look your best. When you're meeting your family member. And so on. And those trades thaw lubricated by mackerel or granules of coffee on noodles and I would say certainly Dotson economy which should should bail out to To flourish because you people have these demands. They have the ability to cut one there and they're making one another better off the When you start getting involved with very addictive drugs you actually run up right. You run up against that thing that I that I referred back to that everybody that works in prison systems mentioned to me which is safety insecurity because people are addicted they can then be persuaded to do very damaging things one of them in particular is. That's one of the ways to settle a debt. Sometimes in prison is to carry out an act of violence on behalf of the person you and if you're addicted to a drug you might do that and so for that reason. I think other than God's people who are themselves actually involved in criminality. Nobody working in the prison systems wants to have people actively addicted to things that leads to some sharp demands that you end up with the violence fair now. Good Point I one of my favorite movies And I'm sure many listeners have seen it as the Shawshank redemption which is a story of prison. Life it's kind of weird it's up. I would say it's you could describe it either as a comic book of Fairytale but it's about prison so it's not exactly a normal fairytale but it has a certain a larger than life surreal aspect to it in the storytelling and one of the tragedies of that That movie is that the people who do finally get out after long time in the prison Struggle to adapt to what should be Nirvana Heaven. This wonderful freedom. It's just GONNA be Great. You're in this horrible. Hell Hall. Had you couldn't buy what you wanted except to these credibly complicated means you're surrounded by the same people every day. A lot of wanted to hurt you. The work is miserable and yet when get outside Their loss so talk about what you learned about what happened and go. There's a seventy two plus thing you write about and and some of the thoughts about prisoners. Who who have a chance to be free yet. There's a there's a fantastic organization called the first seventy two plus is based in in New Orleans and they help Prisoners in the in the first seventy two hours of release because they found that this is one of the riskiest and most daunting time for prisoners. As one of the guys baked he'd been inside for. I think forty years said to me and he kind of made it as Jake. He said coming he said coming out. It was like I was in an episode of the jetsons Just in that statement sort of made a double job because you know the jetsons itself by twenty years old and he just felt bewildered by the technology. The environment you know how to behave and there is. This is way beyond the thing that I studied which is very specific was the emergence of currencies in prisons. But you do see in New Orleans when you go to a place like that the true economic and social cost of all this. Which is the the guys that come out if they are successful these treaties? I seventy two hours. They are full of ideas and potential. And they now have entrepreneurs hub at this this this place the first seventy two where they have a credit union help each other raise money for the for. The businesses are assessing up. And just the the real sort of punch in the gut ruled that in many of these guys are sort of thirty eight or something well in the thirties. And they've lost in fifteen years or something on the in the inside and I think what's poignant and you write about every beautifully is that There things inside the person that that they become accustomed to and going to the outside load those that infrastructure of the orderliness of it There's a wonderful documentary out now about a president but but I'll love. It's about a prison College Credit Program and the prisoners in this. It's taking college courses inside the prison with other prisoners but the instructors from outside from the college and they find out the they described studying and doing their homework. Their papers from like eleven. Pm till three or four. In the morning.

Walmart New Orleans United States Richard Richard Jared Angola Alaska California Hans president Sam Agana David Scar Joe Hell Hall Dotson Jake
Red River, Davies, to play in Eastern Dakota Conference Championship

What's On Your Mind - Encore

00:55 sec | 4 months ago

Red River, Davies, to play in Eastern Dakota Conference Championship

"Final Red River advances to tomorrow night's EDC championship game it'll be a Red River taking on Davies tomorrow here at six fifteen and then at seven forty five will be the boys championship game that will be Cheyenne and Davies going out at tomorrow night in the boy's EDC title game and so Chamblee will move into the consolation bracket now they will have to win a game tomorrow afternoon at four fifteen here at the shack Shamli and west Fargo will play the winner goes to state loser has our season come to an end of the earlier state play in game has Cheyenne taking on doubles lake at two thirty and so we've got a a heck of a busy day here tomorrow we'll have games started breakfast at NDSU tonight as they start the consolation play early tomorrow the state qualifier games boys go early then the girls and then you've got the championship game coming up tomorrow night

Red River Davies Chamblee Cheyenne Ndsu Final Red River Doubles Lake
Fashion at the Oscars, an Interview with Author Bronwyn Cosgrave

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:21 min | 5 months ago

Fashion at the Oscars, an Interview with Author Bronwyn Cosgrave

"Here to talk about the Academy Awards wisher just this past. Sunday right casts. Yes now I get to talk about all things red carpet I mean. This is arguably the Oscars arguably the most highly anticipated of all red carpets throughout the year. So you know we're here to talk about the Academy Awards and the Academy. Awards is the annual event of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences which is an organization established by among others American Phil Magnet Louis. B. Mayer who was co founder of the Metro Goldwyn Mayer Studios and it was founded in nineteen twenty seven and the academy originally had about thirty six members and that included quote unquote. Hollywood royalty like Douglas Fairbanks and his wife at the time. Mary Pickford and the Academy was really focused on promoting the Hollywood film industry at a time when it was not yet. The nationally internationally celebrated epicenter film production that it is today so the Academy Awards. Ceremony was instrumental in helping establish. The Hollywood film industry's reputation by celebrating. Its achievements across five branches so giving awards to producers actors directors writers and technicians and the First Academy Awards was held in Nineteen Twenty nine and unlike today it was not a broadcast event but was rather a ticketed private dinner that was attended by two hundred and seventy invited guests and this was held at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel in L. A. Dismay will mark ninety one years since the Academy Awards debuted on May Sixteenth. Nineteen twenty nine and things. Well you could say that they've changed just a tad today. The Academy's membership has blossomed from thirty six members to somewhere close to a thousand and from its original five branches. It now has seventeen. Over twenty million people across the US tune into the Oscars each year and has really become one of the most highly anticipated televised award shows of the season and millions of us tune in just for the pre show. I would argue and we do that because we WanNa see our beloved movie. Stars walk the red carpet and why can only be described as high style? I mean so. Central is celebrity dress to the Oscars that the pre show is televised live so that viewers like April and I am Oliver Address. Listeners can get up close views of their favorite celebrities attires before they even take their seats so talk show hosts interviews stars about what they wear while others give a play by play in studio and you know on various platforms across the Internet. I know I shared all of my favorites on instagram. And the revelry all things Oscars fashion does not end here of course in the days and weeks that follow as in every year a ceremony and special edition magazines will be printed that are dedicated to this red carpet fashion and of course the Internet will be aflame with talk of the best and worst dressed. Cast we've come a long way from that very first private dinner in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine and this has sparked our curiosity about just winded. The Oscars become as much about fashion as film and I started to research this topic and kind of dive right in but it was not long after. I began Researching that I came across. Bronwyn Cost Grace Fabulous book made for each other fashion the Academy Awards and of course I reached out to her and I am pleased to say she is joining us here. Today Bronwyn welcomed addressed Bronwyn. It is such a pleasure to have you here today. Welcome dressed thank you cassidy. I'm a huge fan of dressed. So it's lovely to be with you. Thank you so much and I have to say that we're here today. Because you wrote this fabulous book and I'm sure you've done a lot of interviews about red carpet fashion because of it your made for each other fashion and the Academy Awards. It's such an incredible book. You have this Great Inc. A primary source materials quotes newspaper clippings. And then there use these vivid descriptions to bring these nights and events to light and I just want to read a little bit from what you wrote about for the First Academy Awards which not aired because this is pre television but may thirtieth nineteen twenty nine for instance you write. A corruption erupted on the stretch of Hollywood Boulevard. Outside the Roosevelt Hotel just before eight PM at two hundred and seventy film industry. Silent screen notable slipped from a convoy of luxury automobiles and into its cavernous event. Space the blossom room. The Academy's prominent guests included Mary. Pickford NORMA SHEARER engine starlets Marion Davies and Joan Crawford. Lean and tanned. These actress lovely looked as delicious as their sugars. Spun Party Vapor a Waxed Candy Replica a Cedric Gibbons Golden Academy Award Trophy. So it's really these details that transport the reader back in time to that moment. So thank you. You must have had a wonderful time researching and writing. This book will thank you. I actually did not have a wonderful because I understand that because you know it's really it's really kind of you to notice the intricacy that actually went in to the writing of this book. The book took me three years and every single day of that was almost every single. Damn it was really one solid year of writing to the homestretch but for about two years. I scoured honestly. The world for information about what women wore the Oscars and my book really is about women and what they went through to get dressed and the great thing is that I did discover you. Know the bulk of that material in Los Angeles at the Margaret Herrick Library which is an academy library and a lot of it had never really been looked at and I'm also went to visit the great designers I went to the Dior Archive and John. Galliano actually called the archive and said you know. Help Bronwyn with what she what. She needs whatever she needs. Giorgio Armani also took it really seriously and help me. His team really helped me. I was very very fortunate. There's a great trust. One of my favorite dresses in the book is what we shall. Yo War when she was nominated for Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon and that dress was created from millions of Swarovski Crystal in Hong Kong by a very gifted designer named Barney. Chang and I what I actually noticed in the process of researching this book and why it took so long was that I kind of discovered a paper trail of identifying dresses and actually looking at the designer a designer attached to address in a caption say and looking at that dress in thinking that does not look like the work of say Howard greer who was one of the early costume designers and not all of the names turned up in in indexes for example addresses. So I really had to look hard and not believe what I saw imprint and that is something that I really noticed with fashion. History is that there will be a sort of myth associated with something. Say A design. Then it's not always the case and you really need to read between the lines and and go back to the primary source material and then to contextualized that all you know and put it in right into this story. This really captivating story. Yeah it's not an easy feat but you did it beautifully. Thank you but oh the one thing I will say about. That is that the book does also revolve around a celebration every year. So that really anchored the book the actual ceremony. Where you know. That was Super Fun. I watched every Oscar ceremony. That had been telecast. That was the first thing that I did so every Oscar ceremony that had been televised. Say I think it was like Nineteen Fifty. Four certainly the mid fifties onwards and really got to work with that material. Which was the fun stuff? Actually

Academy Awards Academy Academy Of Motion Picture Arts First Academy Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel Bronwyn Hollywood Cedric Gibbons Golden Academy Mary Pickford Douglas Fairbanks Metro Goldwyn Mayer Studios B. Mayer United States Phil Magnet Louis Co Founder Giorgio Armani Great Inc Norma Shearer Oscar Hong Kong
China’s coronavirus - Here’s what we know

Fresh Air

11:11 min | 5 months ago

China’s coronavirus - Here’s what we know

"This is fresh air I'm Terry gross the new corona virus that emerged in Wuhan China has killed almost five hundred people and prompted the Chinese government to impose severe travel restrictions within the country the virus has spread to at least twenty four other countries including the U. S. American air carriers have suspended flights to and from China the US government is barring from entering the country any foreign nationals who visited China within last fourteen days our guest science writer David Coleman says the new corona virus is just the latest example of an ominous trend humans contracting deadly contagious viruses from wild animals other examples include H. I. V. west Nile fever anthrax bola and another from the corona virus family sars severe acute respiratory syndrome which also emerged in China and killed more than seven hundred people David common has written frequently for National Geographic and is the author of several books including spillover animal infections and the next human pandemic he spoke with fresh tears Dave Davies well David common welcome back to fresh air yeah this is scary stuff this virus and it's also a very fast moving story you and I are talking on Tuesday afternoon things may change a bit by time people hear it but us a sense of how serious the threat is of this virus compared to other outbreaks we've seen well it is very serious and needs to be taken very seriously and yet it's not an occasion for panic it's an occasion for calm effective response comparing it to other viral outbreaks he is is illuminating in some ways and problematic in other ways compared say to influence every year there's a seasonal influenza sweeps around the world F. infects hundreds and hundreds of thousands of people kills something like thirty thousand or thirty five thousand people in the US every year and yet it has a very low case fatality rate case fatality rate how many diaper the number of people infected it's down I think usually around point one percent a tenth of a percent sars virus that emerged from southern China with the syndrome caused by a virus that emerged from southern China in two thousand three a severe acute respiratory syndrome it infected eight thousand people a little over eight thousand and it killed seven hundred and seventy four for case fatality rate of almost ten percent in other words a hundred times seasonal influenza the average seasonal influenza and it scared the be Jesus out of the public health and disease scientist experts that I know they told me that that was a really scary one because the case fatality rate was so high and it spread quickly but they managed to stop it and we can talk a little bit about that so here's this novel coronavirus as they're calling it to two thousand nineteen novel coronavirus and it comes in somewhere between those two case fatality rates and that is one of the most important numbers at the experts have been watching and I've been watching over the last week or two as the numbers of infected people have exploded and the number of deaths have increased steadily the case fatality rate has hovered moving downward slowly from about three percent to a little over two percent now and it it is still very unpredictable we don't know how many people it's gonna infect and therefore how many people it's gonna kill but it's in the range that that requires being taken very seriously so let's look at what's what officials are doing to try and contain this novel coronavirus and your describes what what's happened in China China was slow to react to this particularly the officials in the city of Wuhan and the province of who by and then the course got out of the barn and the national officials reacted strongly and sealed off essentially first the city of Wuhan and then a number of other cities so I think there's more than fifty million people who are essentially in locked down with no public transportation going in and out of those cities China has been cutting internal flights in and out and to other countries have been cutting flights international flights in and out of China the US in terms of flights of foreign nationals are barred from entering the U. S. if they have recently traveled to China and US citizens coming back from Wuhan or who day province are being quarantined for fourteen days which is the suspected incubation period of the virus other countries are eliminating flights in and out of China I saw this morning that Japan has eliminated flights in and out of China so there is this international curtailment of flights in and out of China and in some cases people are being screened at airports and in a limited number of cases people are being quarantined if they have been and bay province and and want to come back to the U. S. or to another country do all these seem like reasonable and appropriate steps to well the the controversial to some people but to me they do seem reasonable controlling containment is important at this point I don't think it's an infringement around do infringement on anybody's personal rights we have to control cases and monitor cases and trace contacts and any time the thirties learn that an infected person has written on an airplane and then then we headed off into the city where they've arrived medially there three hundred people roughly on that airplane who are contacts that have to be traced and have to be monitored if not isolated and the person who is to enter the city and has gone to his or her family and they're more context there that will immediately have to be traced that's what happened in Toronto early on during the sars epidemic one case got into Toronto and she spread the the infection rather widely as soon as she's gotten there right so so the steps that managed to bring the sars epidemic under control back in the early two thousands were exactly these kinds of steps exactly these kinds of steps we knew less about sars at the very beginning except that it there was some very dangerous infectious disease caused by an unknown pathogen that had come out of southern China to Hong Kong and gotten to Toronto Beijing Bangkok and one or two I think Hong Kong one or two other cities and then there was very rigorous no medical isolation and containment and contact tracing and public health officials were able to reduce the transmission rate of sars to a very low level now in terms of the average secondary cases caused by each primary case the average number of infections that each infected person cost they brought that to a very low level and essentially they stopped the sars outbreak right now they've been some rip reporting suggesting that the trump administration has over the last couple years reduced the government's ability to fight a viral epidemic do you have an opinion about that yes I think it's I think it's well documented in the trunk budgets and it's been I think disastrous for the CDC and for our preparedness my understanding is that trumps twenty twenty budget proposed cutting one point three billion from the CDC budget that's twenty percent below the twenty nineteen level in the twenty nineteen level contained cuts of seven hundred fifty million including I look this up recently including a proposed cut of a hundred and two million specifically for emerging and zoonotic diseases which is what this is so the trump administration budgets have been hamstring the CDC and our ability to react to circumstances just like this course budget proposals aren't always inactive your point is well taken that budget proposals don't necessarily translate into approve budgets but the effort has been there by the trump administration to reduce drastically the CDC and I think that they have succeeded to a very great degree there's been around understandably on protective masks and gloves should should people be trying to get them what's it's a it's a sign of panic that there has been around but there has been I went into my local drug store here in Bozeman Montana yesterday to see if I could buy some masks to take with me just in case when I fly to Australia on Thursday I thought well what if on the way back a typhoon re routes me through China or something so I thought I would carry some masks my local drug store was sold out of masks and that has happened a lot of places around the country is that called for I would say no despite the fact that I was one person trying to buy some is and you know an emergency travel precaution but masks particularly the simple surgical mask that you see on so many people specially travelers I hear the experts saying that those are very helpful in containing the spread of infected droplets from people who are infected containing costs containing CSE sneezes buy a sick person but much much much less effective in protecting a well person from the sneeze is coming out of another person so in other words where mask if you're sick if you're coughing as a courtesy to people around you don't be nearly as concerned about wearing a mask just as a preventive when you step on an airliner go to a big store right I think the CDC our recommends that ordinary civil citizens don't really need to worry about masks but health workout probably should I think this I think the CDC is also saying look ordinary people we have a shortage of masks let those masks be used by health care workers who need them most rather than wearing and when you go to the hardware store David common is a science writer and the author of the book spillover animal infections in the next human

Wuhan China Chinese Government
Bat Soup, Anyone? How Viruses Transfer From Animals To Humans - Yahoo News

Fresh Air

08:10 min | 5 months ago

Bat Soup, Anyone? How Viruses Transfer From Animals To Humans - Yahoo News

"Let's get back to the interview. Fresh air's Dave Davies recorded yesterday with science writer. David common about the new Corona Rona virus epidemic which broke out in Wuhan China. Kwame ince's the corona virus is just the latest example of how were increasingly contracting dangerous. Viral infections since from animals in his book spillover published in Twenty twelve kwame attractive viruses spilled over from animals to infect humans with HIV West S. Nile fever anthrax. Bola and another from the corona virus family SARS severe acute respiratory syndrome which also emerged in China China. You know you're right. That as scientists tried to track down the source of the SARS virus back in two thousand three and four. They focused on this practice in southern China of eating and in some cases raising wild animals. Not kind of things that you typically think of as food or or where we don't want to just explain this trend and how it figured you're into this yes There is a vogue. There has been a vogue for eating wildlife wild animals when I was in Southern China researching searching the book only briefly. I got to see some of these markets. Where all form of wild animal were on sale A lot of the trade by the time I got there had gone underground because it was suppressed after the SARS outbreak but then it gradually came back and it had been allowed to continue in you again and proliferate win this new virus began but if you go into a live market and you see cages containing bats stacked upon cages containing porcupines stacked upon cages containing palm civics stacked upon cages containing chickens and hygiene is not great and and the animals are defecating on one. Another it's just a natural mixing bowl situation for viruses. It's very very dangerous situation and and one of the things that it allows. Dave is something that we haven't mentioned. I think so far and that is the occurrence of of amplifying hosts hosts that are not the reservoir host the permanent hiding ground of a new virus but represent intermediates between the reservoir of our host and the human population for instance those horses in Australia. From the point of view of a horse they were ultimate hosts and they were being killed by this virus but from the human point of view they were amplifier hosts the virus got into them it multiplied abundantly it caused them to froth and Chauque and bleed through their nostrils veterinarians and trainers. Were trying to take care of them. They amplified the virus. So that One trainer in one stable form and got very sick from that virus in the case of this new corona virus. One of the questions is was there. An amplifier host in that wet market where these cages are stacked are called wet markets white wire called wet markets. Well assume they're called wet markets because the animals are alive alive rather than butchered and in dead and refrigerated They're also wet. Because there's there's water flowing everywhere. They usually have seafood as well as as wild mammals and birds As I said hygiene isn't great. Animals are being butchered on plywood. Boards blood is flowing down into the gutters in the water and there is just a great Liquidity Mix in these markets at at their worst now when scientists were trying to track down the origin of the SARS virus Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome which was associated with the virus in in the early two thousands. They eventually focused focused on something called the civic cat What is that? That's right the civic cat is not really a cat. It's more accurately called the palm palm civic the civic type of mammal that belongs to the to the family of Mongooses But it's a it's a medium sized animal and and it is both captured from the wild for food and captive bred and raised for food And it was the first big eggs suspect of In the SARS outbreak It was found that some of the people who got sick very early on had eaten a butchered civic and so in the civic head though the the antibody for this this virus right and they and they tested him civics and they found they found evidence of the virus. They found antibodies. Antibodies or fragments of DNA A. R. N. A.. In these civics suggesting that they had been infected with the virus and That didn't prove they were the reservoir host but it made them the number one suspect until a couple of Chinese scientists did further work and they established that in fact virus was not living permanently in the civic population in the wild or in captivity. It was it had a different reservoir host it was living in bats and it had passed presumably market somewhere it had passed from a bat into one or more sits and they became the amplifier host. Right and the the Chinese government I think decreed that all sits in captivity would be slaughtered. Right that's right. Thousands of sits in captivity were butchered an an electric electrocuted and and smothered and drowned In this I panicked blind reaction in China to the SARS outbreak. Now when you were looking at you actually went to China with and spent some time in the field with people who were investigating this right. Tell us tell us about that experience. I I went. I went with a fellow named Alexi. Kamara was working as a researcher for a group. That's called ECO health alliance based in New York A group of disease scientists who study see these emerging viruses these emerging pathogens in animals around the world. They generally have cross training in Virology Veterinary Medicine Ecology combinations nations of skills so Alexi was one of them Alexi and a number of Chinese colleagues and I flew to a city called Gua Lynn In the province of Guangdong southern China and we went out climbing into into caves that caves in the karst mountains the limestone stone mountains and hills outside of the city of Gwynn Looking to trap Various different kinds of small bats insectivores bats not giant fruit bats Small bats at lived in these caves including Horseshoe bats which is a particular group of bats so that Alexi and his colleagues could draw draw blood samples and test those for Looking for the SAR SARS virus that point or or any other virus that suspect unit. Just describe a little bit of what what it felt like to be trapping bats and these caves well. It was a little bit claustrophobic. It's not for everybody. Had Castle Castro. We climbed through. We climbed on our bellies through a very low hole to get into one of these caves. We had we had to squirm down and then and up through this whole to get into the cave and then the cave opened out and Alexi and his Chinese colleagues had essentially pillowcases and butterfly nets. And that's how we caught these bats. The Bat started flying around and they would catch them in butterfly nets and they were wearing gloves and and they would untangle a bat from a butterfly net and then Drop it into one of these cloth bags that were like pillowcases. And in this case as I recall they they would tire tied the knot often then handed to me and I would go over and and hanging on sort of a clothesline. So that the bad dangle and we were doing this I don't know if we were in there for a couple of hours oddly enough. We were not wearing masks of any sort we were not wearing with the called. Personal Protective Equipment has met suits or anything and and described this in the book. I asked Alexi. Why the hell

Alexi China Sars Kwame Ince Dave Davies China China Wuhan China Bola David Australia Writer Respiratory Syndrome Chauque Guangdong Southern China Personal Protective Equipment Kamara A. R. N. New York Castle Castro Virology Veterinary Medicine E
How Coronaviruses Jump From Animals To People: David Quammen Explains

Fresh Air

11:08 min | 5 months ago

How Coronaviruses Jump From Animals To People: David Quammen Explains

"The new corona virus that emerged in Wuhan China has killed almost five hundred people and prompted the Chinese government to impose severe travel restrictions within the country the virus has spread to at least twenty four other countries including the U. S. American air carriers have suspended flights to and from China the US government is barring from entering the country any foreign nationals who visited China within last fourteen days our guest science writer David Coleman says the new corona virus is just the latest example of an ominous trend humans contracting deadly contagious viruses from wild animals other examples include H. I. V. west Nile fever anthrax bola and another from the corona virus family sars severe acute respiratory syndrome which also emerged in China and killed more than seven hundred people David common has written frequently for National Geographic and is the author of several books including spillover animal infections and the next human pandemic he spoke with fresh tears Dave Davies well David common welcome back to fresh air yeah this is scary stuff this virus and it's also a very fast moving story you and I are talking on Tuesday afternoon things may change a bit by time people hear it but us a sense of how serious the threat is of this virus compared to other outbreaks we've seen well it is very serious and needs to be taken very seriously and yet it's not an occasion for panic it's an occasion for calm effective response comparing it to other viral outbreaks is is illuminating in some ways and problematic in other ways compared say to influence every year there's a seasonal influenza sweeps around the world F. infects hundreds and hundreds of thousands of people kills something like thirty thousand or thirty five thousand people in the US every year and yet it has a very low case fatality rate case fatality rate how many diaper the number of people infected it's down I think usually around point one percent a tenth of a percent sars virus that emerged from southern China with the syndrome caused by a virus that emerged from southern China in two thousand three a severe acute respiratory syndrome it's infected eight thousand people a little over eight thousand and it killed seven hundred and seventy four for case fatality rate of almost ten percent in other words a hundred times seasonal influenza the average seasonal influenza and it scared the be Jesus out of the public health and disease scientist experts that I know they told me that that was a really scary one because the case fatality rate was so high and it spread quickly but they managed to stop it and we can talk a little bit about that so here's this novel coronavirus as they're calling it to two thousand nineteen novel coronavirus and it comes in somewhere between those two case fatality rates and that is one of the most important numbers at the experts have been watching and I've been watching over the last week or two as the numbers of infected people have exploded and the number of deaths have increased steadily the case fatality rate has hovered moving downward slowly from about three percent to a little over two percent now and it it is still very unpredictable we don't know how many people it's gonna infect and therefore how many people it's gonna kill but it's in the range that that requires being taken very seriously so let's look at what's what officials are doing to try and contain this novel coronavirus and your describes what what's happened in China cities China has been cutting internal flights in and out and other countries have been cutting flights international flights in and out of China the US in terms of flights of foreign nationals are barred from entering the U. S. if they have recently traveled to China and US citizens coming back from Wuhan or who bay province are being quarantined for fourteen days which is the suspected incubation period of the virus other countries are eliminating flights in and out of China I saw this morning that Japan has eliminated flights in and out of China so there is this international curtailment of flights in and out of China and in some cases people are being screened at airports and in a limited number of cases people are being quarantined if they have been in bay province and and want to come back to the US or to another country do all these seem like reasonable and appropriate steps to you well the the controversial to some people but to me they do seem reasonable controlling containment is important at this point I don't think it's an infringement around do infringement on anybody's personal rights we have to control cases and monitor cases and trace contacts and any time the thirties learn that an infected person has written on an airplane and then we headed off into the city where they've arrived Lee there three hundred people roughly on that airplane who are contacts that have to be traced and have to be monitored if not isolated and the person who is to enter the city and has gone to his or her family and they're more context there that will immediately have to be traced that's what happened in Toronto early on during the sars epidemic one case got into Toronto and she spread the the infection rather widely as soon as she's gotten there right so so the steps that managed to bring the sars epidemic under control back in the early two thousands were exactly these kinds of steps exactly these kinds of steps we knew less about sars at the very beginning except that it there was some very dangerous infectious disease caused by an unknown pathogen that had come out of southern China to Hong Kong and gotten to Toronto Beijing Bangkok and one or two I think Hong Kong one or two other cities and then there was very rigorous no medical isolation and containment and contact tracing and public health officials were able to reduce the transmission rate in of sars to a very low level in terms of the average of secondary cases caused by each primary case the average number of infections that each infected person cost they brought that to a very low level and essentially they stopped the sars outbreak right now they've been some rip reporting suggesting that the trump administration has over the last couple years reduced the government's ability to fight a viral epidemic do you have an opinion about that yes I think it's I think it's well documented in the the trump budgets and it's been I think disasters for the CDC and for our preparedness my understanding is that trumps twenty twenty budget proposed cutting one point three billion from the CDC budget that's twenty percent below the twenty nineteen level in the twenty nineteen level contained to the cuts of seven hundred fifty million including I look this up recently including a proposed cut of a hundred and two million specifically for emerging and zoonotic diseases which is what this is so the trump administration budgets have been hamstring the CDC and our ability to react to circumstances just like this of course budget proposals aren't always inactive your point is well taken that budget proposals don't necessarily translate into approve budgets but the effort has been there by the trump administration to reduce drastically the CDC and I think that they have succeeded to a very great degree there's been around understandably on protective masks and gloves should should people be trying to get them what's it's a it's a sign of panic that there has been around but there has been I went into my local drug store here in Bozeman Montana yesterday to see if I could buy some masks to take with me just in case when I fly to Australia on Thursday I thought well what if on the way back of a typhoon re routes me through China or something so I thought I would carry some masks my local drug store was sold out of masks and that has happened a lot of places around the country is that called for I would say no despite the fact that I was one person trying to buy some this and you know an emergency travel precaution but masks particularly the simple surgical mask that you see on so many people specially travelers I hear the experts saying that those are very helpful in containing the spread of infected droplets from people who are infected containing coughs containing CSE sneezes buy a sick person but much much much less effective in protecting a well person from the sneezes coming out of another person so in other words where mask if you're sick if you're coughing as a courtesy to people around you don't be nearly as concerned about wearing a mask just as a preventive when you step on an airliner go to a big store right I think the CDC our recommends that ordinary civil citizens don't really need to worry about masks but health workout probably should I think this I think the CDC is also saying look ordinary people we have a shortage of masks let those masks be used by health care workers who need them most rather than wearing and when you go to the hardware store David common is a science writer and the author of the book spillover animal infections in the next human

Wuhan China Chinese Government
Pamela Anderson marries fellow five-timer Jon Peters

Celeb News Ride Home

03:42 min | 5 months ago

Pamela Anderson marries fellow five-timer Jon Peters

"Pamela Anderson got secretly married to this super-rich movie mogul Hollywood producer. Sir Guy John Peters yesterday in Malibu Congrats Pam Fun fact. John Peters produced one of my favorite movies of all time Bradley. Cooper's a stars born starring Lady Gaga. He actually also produced the Barbra streisand. A star is born. which haven't seen I know I should see it anyway anyway? The couple actually has quite the romantic love story. And I I'm into it. I'm I'm here for this Marital Union. According to the Hollywood Hollywood reporter the couple quote I dated more than thirty years ago reunited in recent months and have kept the relationship under wraps and quote. It's it's also their fifth marriage for both of them. I'm not like a numbers person. I'm not into like numerology or anything but it's both of their fifth marriages. I feel like that that means something like they match both had four marriages before this. This is their fifth. I think it's cool. They've they've sinked up on how many ex spouses they have anyway. When they first met and dated she was only nineteen but he was instantly smitten with her? It sounds like maybe they broke up because they have a bit of an age gap going on and she was very young at the time he gave sweet statement on their relationship to the Hollywood reporter saying quote there are beautiful girls everywhere could have my pick but for thirty five years. I've only wanted Pamela. She makes me wild in a good way. End Quote. Okay Dude I mean that is sweet. It's romantic but could do without the I could have my pick part. I mean come on like he could have his pick really are gonNA come in case. You Forgot Origin Watch. MTV's Davies the hills reboot last year that starred. Pamela Anderson's son Pam has been recently living in France. T. H. R. summed. MDA Her recent international paid saying quote. The former Baywatch star fifty two had moved to France and Morriston an international woman who was frequently photographed entering the Ecuadorian Embassy in London to visit Julian assange or addressing animal rights issues at the Kremlin before Vladimir Putin and quote. Well who knows if she's GONNA keeping an international woman of mystery or if she's back in Malibu for good either way. I'm happy for the the newlyweds. The best part about this secret Malibu leading and secret relationship is that Pamela Anderson confirmed it to the Hollywood reporter in the best way possible. I've never seen this before this. This is actually wild. Her statement to the Hollywood reporter a media site was not like a normal statement. She didn't like say I am so happy to be married. Like you know like. Please respect our privacy or whatever. She confirmed their marriage in a poem. That's right it wasn't just a poem that she wrote and published herself is a poem that is specifically statement to the Hollywood reporter. I love okay. I don't have anything else to say about this marriage. I'm just GonNa leave you with me. Reciting Pamela Anderson's poem that's also a statement to the Hollywood reporter here. We go quote. John is the original bad boy of Hollywood. No one compares. I love him deeply like family. His life used to scare me so much for girl like me. Now I've seen more of life and realize he's been there all along never failed me. I'm ready now. And he's ready to we understand and respect each other. We love each other UH with out conditions. I'm lucky woman proof. God has a plan.

Pamela Anderson Hollywood Reporter Barbra Streisand Malibu John Peters Sir Guy John Peters Lady Gaga France Cooper MTV Bradley Marital Union Producer Vladimir Putin T. H. R. Julian Assange Morriston Ecuadorian Embassy Davies
"davies" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:24 min | 6 months ago

"davies" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Gave the Davies Dave Davies who along with his older brother Ray Davies founded the Kinks in nineteen sixty four you can often recognize the king saw before a single word is song thanks to the sick signature distortion of Dave Davies guitar Dave had a ten watt opal coal amplifier that he hated so he ran the speaker output leads through a vox AC thirty then slashed the speaker cone of the elco which resulted in the epic guitar tone on you really got me and this okay go the the yeah okay we'll post.

Dave Davies Ray Davies Kinks
Poland's judicial reforms put EU membership at risk, warns top court

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:39 min | 7 months ago

Poland's judicial reforms put EU membership at risk, warns top court

"Poland's Supreme Court says the judicial reforms proposed by the country's right wing. Government are in violation of EU rules. And and could mean that oiseaux would be forced to leave the block well on the line from also Christian Davies. WHO's a journalist in Poland Chris? Thanks for for joining us. What are the proposed reforms that the government wants to push through what I think the important background? This is earlier. This in in the altern and the European Court of Justice issued a ruling saying that a body had been taken over by the Polish government am and had his loyalist Putin which which appoints punish judges had to be assessed by The Polish sue prem- cool to it helps to decide whether the judges in the the members of that body were appointed properly or not and and The Supreme Court of Potent then ruled that these People appointing judges would not am We're not legally appointed and what the government is now. Doing is responding by saying that police judges are not allowed allowed to declare other Polish judges illegally. Appoint judges as having as not being properly appointed and so the government is essentially doing is telling Polish judges that they're not allowed to criticize the illegal appointments of government loyalists am which is a escalation of the battle is being going on for several years The second point is at which is what the head of the Supreme Court was really referring to when she said that pardons that place in the EU is under threat was In order to preempt the fact that the European justice has been issuing rulings against will the pump has been doing with its own judiciary The Polish government wants to make it illegal for police. Judges to apply European law directly. They must instead Referred the question to the constitutional tribunal which is itself controlled by government lawyers. So what they're trying to do to shut down any avenues of not just descent but all the other court's ruling lead doing as legal so there's no actual mechanism for expelling an e you member so if the ruling Lauren Justice is this party doesn't back down on this. What happens next well at oversee it would be completely unprecedented? I think am him. What the head of the Polish cold is saying She's not saying it would be immediate. It would be instant that potent will be thrown out. She's he's actually just pointing out something which has been the case for a long time. which is The changes in the Polish judiciary giving the ruling party direct control. All of opposed judges are simply incompatible with the requirements of European law of European membership am at that is is already the case it would be even more stock if this legislation to go through and the comes a point when you can't Violate the basic conditions of of membership forever. So she simply saying that and the situation. The long-term is untenable which I think is correct and but no one has really got round around two to thinking what the consequence might be. Everyone I think both in Poland and in Brussels a hoping this will this issue would just go away. But it hasn't and I don't think it will I mean is the government likely to back down. Well people have been hoping especially I think in the European Commission and the that member states at every stage at the government will back down but actually this process started in the in around December. Twenty fifteen. So it's been going for four years and people have been talking about whether the Polish government might back down and for four years and they haven't so am I don't see why they would but now I mean one possible course of action for the e us to to not allow parents have voting rights. Well the mechanism the M depriving voting rights requires unanimity in the European Council which they weren't get and the the commission and the member states it's sort of went halfway up this path during the last commission and then realized they didn't have the political support to complete as they found themselves stranded so the next sort of way of doing it could be to restrict a funding through the next budget process but of course post war Poland has done quite cynically but quite cleverly is to a hold up the budget process on climate change. So am a potent knows that it's it may get less money over the over the judicial issue. And so what they're trying to do is demand more money on the climate issue needed to compensate for. It said what they're doing. The thing is dragging in all these other issues in order to make it extremely complicated and to make any effective action much much more difficult. I mean an the U. member since two thousand and four and it is a major beneficiary of e you funds. How does the majority of citizens Polish citizens feel about membership? Well if you am. Nearly every bit of survey data polling data suggests at very high support plus for leaving in in many surveys the highest level of support you membership in the of any member of the EU. The problem is not so much that people in principle The support meme should the the. It's the the Polish people have now twice elected a government which does not share at basic liberal democratic mctighe values which underpin the European Union so at which is why these Control see why these fights keep keep coming up so so even if one hundred percent of Poles wanted to stay member of the EU you can only violates the fundamental European values and laws for so long and that's what the the head of the Supreme Court was trying to say. Do you think finally we could see some kind of brexit contagion. I mean his Poland lightly to leave leave voluntarily. I don't think so simply because there's no public appetite title for it and a lot of Polish as people at whatever. The views on the judiciary don't really believe that there's any imminent threat opponent leaving the European and I think that's correct. I don't think the threat is imminent because it would be such a catastrophe and in many ways worse Problem for the EU than in Britain leaving. And but I I can't see any resolution to this quickly and it's it's been going on for many many years and it may be that supported. The government may start to reach this conclusion that they can't actually implement that program. They want which is actually a restoration of a form of authoritarianism opponent as long as you members visit and that is true at whether they drool the natural conclusion and start to advocate. Leaving Is another question but for now they Rather trying to do is simply to comment discontent discontent with the EU but not necessarily to support departure but that's a very dangerous game to play Christian. Thank you very much. Indeed that's Christian Davies. Speaking to us from

Government Polish Government European Union Supreme Court Poland European Court Of Justice Christian Davies European Commission Brussels European Council Lauren Justice Putin Britain Four Years One Hundred Percent
"davies" Discussed on Marathon Talk

Marathon Talk

02:50 min | 7 months ago

"davies" Discussed on Marathon Talk

"End Martin and talks about what she didn't training Christmas. What will you be doing in the next week or say or careering into Christmas? Of course goes we what we're GONNA do for the next few weeks shows is. We're going to record a Christmas specials. We will have a show at Christmas. Day falls on a Wednesday this week so we will have a Christmas show. I guess all together the idea of next week me Tony Holy Tom. We're GONNA get together imaginary Christmas dinner with you all holidays bring crackers and Brussels sprouts and have a lovely lovely Christmas dinner. I this week what am I doing. I'm I'm kind of working at the rest of this week. Did a facebook live last week. Got Another one off the Christmas. Got Some stone break meetings right now. If copy for out some research you cade idealism workweek or some filming a school on Sun on Friday the surf the forecast looks pretty good for Friday. Looks like a wind. Probably GonNA get blown out so I think he'll have to drop that one Dan. I'm going to Kingston Lacy on Sunday Day busy going to look at the lights. Look at the festive. Lights are made birthday party on Friday night of Christmas dinner on Saturday night and we're going carol singing on Sunday in Cairo. Singing we go into five zero to actually road which through church along. Oh well because I am going to be in that Ariel that we on next weekend I'm some carols. We are going to sing. Oh Carols I'm going to be actually running the Fedex. I know some going down there to visit relatives on Saturday and staying. They're standing in really Nice hotel on Sunday. Night you might know is not far from me. Really Swanky went on the air bags. Yeah which when I mean destiny. Yes lovely thank thank you saying yes I love it. I'm saying it was like she added. It was actually a present given given to me while box. So yeah really looking forward to that. which will of course involve lots of Etang which is one of my favorite pastimes and Yeah just running running the running liftoffs and waiting in Christmas. I guess because we back on on the Monday yet might see some say. Thank you fall are incredible interview David Davies and as always awesome volunteer production team. Because we couldn't do any of this without them. I'm Lee Rush. He was Martin yelling that was marathon tool Pity Yeah.

Lee Rush Tony Holy Tom Ariel facebook Fedex Kingston Lacy Brussels David Davies Cairo Dan
"davies" Discussed on Marathon Talk

Marathon Talk

16:19 min | 7 months ago

"davies" Discussed on Marathon Talk

"You'll pretty good to fuelling. Yeah I'm pretty fortunate the I'm pretty good with in terms of the body can take a bet. I do practice. Go to bed on Sunday morning as well not taking the jails and under drinks not during his third. Yeah I'd like to think my body's used to it is something that either in need to. I preached Alien Evidence Yourself. I don't deal with straight by putting into a race day because I haven't practiced until is pretty obvious. They also can I ask you the question I asked you before. We started the shave What she's wearing wearing new balance ballots? the new ones that come in today have dot com. Yeah Yeah Yeah there. We're good sweet so you will probably one of I shouldn't really brings up. It's just a budding questioning Estimating Times clip probably most people around. You were wearing the shoes ace. And how do you feel about that. My coach comments on A. Hey reckons I find with the top. Hundreds only five weren't wearing them. It doesn't bother me whatsoever. I'd just go to. I've got what I got I. Tony deal without sorgess get with. I'm not bothered one of the people aware that someone sent me an instagram film. Stays really interesting research. The I think it was the California in L. Sacramento Martha Wa. The weekend Yeah I'm older two point five. The women's qualifying Hundreds of them hundreds of women and it was he too. She's in the two. Different colors is incredible. Edible Green. Yeah it is incredible. Everyone's just just go along with that. I don't know if there's any difference so I'd be quite interested in. I have to tell you tally. There is linked to his. It also says that you will. It wasn't exciting plans or add some ultramarathons and Moshav running for next year. What what what does that it like? I don't really know with a coach And I need to Yeah answer one or two of them. If I'm not too late yeah I know one of them. My plans next year is but too late. Uh I'm hopefully I can get into one or two of them but yeah definitely GonNa hit the mountains early next year and see. I'm not goes really if YOU DONALD TRUMP before. Oh I know you oversee done trial mountain championships and stuff You you did you win. The age group Wells Mazdas Mountain. Running chumps is that right. Yeah last Austria Slovenia. Yeah I've gone up to. I did the world's trail trump's last dude that was forty four K. I would like to venture venture a little bit further in the next year or two but nothing so horrendous unending in a few years time then I can go to the hundred McKay's and I'm going to bet further. Yeah well that's a long way but we'll say we'll see yeah. Come on you want against the dark side. What's what's he got? They'll just take one hundred trial races and stuff line time. Especially you know. You're going to it longer and longer logger. So we all day yeah exactly say presuming having been harassed rast. Is that what you do. What you normally do Oeste marathons you take some time off yet at home so this week his first week to have done absolutely nothing which is nice and then I'll just start doing back a Second Week to win four or five milers and then in the third week will start again might do mini-session but yeah yeah. I'm in no rush to do anything. Thanks Oh yeah. I'm just taking it nice as these coal talk nights and it's Nice. Yeah I guess. There's actually quite a time of yesterday a marathon sheet because he couldn't really kick back at Christmas really unless you go early spring marathon. I guess you time to assertive. Enjoy the post race so feeling Christmas But yeah it some. It will be interesting to see what you do next to us. You're not going gonNA be doing spring. Marathon is that right yes right definitely not known so we may see you in Shamir. Someone like that like doing one of the one of the races. This is how bad if you can get in. Yeah hopefully will just I really. What's going to happen Hopefully get one too long trail races. I thought they ideal ideal. Maybe I might do A marathon Leeann so the year props. But I'm not a big city one. I don't think but props hilliard. Go something off road Well I'm going to ask you a question which she probably for the last time you should have done. I don't waiting and what time he said because I didn't have the all the details up in front of me but I'm GONNA I'll see against you may change. You'll see now you never know however Foster Marathan so is the the same question again if you had six months to train for one mile on the track and we're GONNA do do your job for you and we can look again judging. You'RE GONNA run a mile in on the track last time I think I said full Gene President is yeah. I probably won't be far off that of all. Go for four seventeen this time of a couple of years. They'll not say you've lost his seconds. yeah right. I'm going to get you to the list of autoclaves up nearly five hundred people. So what do you and your little bit behind but hopefully will one day. We're going to get everyone on the track and see what everyone can do. Because I think that her yet with so well sipping when the show and I really look forward to seeing what you do next especially if you guys the ultra It'd be really exciting to say. And congratulations on your record. Well thank you very much. Yeah hopefully see when the mountain somewhere. Thank you take This.

DONALD TRUMP Wells Mazdas Mountain Austria Moshav L. Sacramento Martha Wa California McKay Leeann Foster Marathan President
"davies" Discussed on Marathon Talk

Marathon Talk

04:51 min | 7 months ago

"davies" Discussed on Marathon Talk

"Yes Brett Lana at Japan running news or will he will do such an incredible job of covering covering. I'm sure all the distance events in Japan for the Tokyo Olympics. If you're not a fan of Brett's over Japan running news dot plots bogus go spot dot com. I suggest you become one. Breath certainly kept us in aware of all events in in in Japanese running over the last few years. He says with no access gate capable of handling a marathon. The construction costs necessary to make the Sapporo. The suitable venue were said to be in the area of several billion yen tens of millions of US dollars and when the IOC made its pro claymation. The wrote eventually be relocated to support. They estimated that that is the citizens. The First Association Group and the Tokyo Metropolitan Government estimate. The cost of relocating. The events would be around thirty four billion yen. Oh my goodness me. Based on the operating costs the Tokyo Marathon. A direct comparison between the two event is difficult. And they're saying expenses such as repaving roads Dotson included in that estimate well this is purely for staging the event transportation accommodation etc.. It's a four day schedule schedule. Side Mike out some of the money isn't it It's a lot of cash. Finally Wilson. Kipsang I I know on on news this week since you remember. We brought you news. Recently of David Madisha was in a car crash in Kenya. And recently Wilson Kipsang has been involved moved on Sunday night. This was in a road crash. Extensively wreck his vehicle say the standard digital in in Kenya. He was driving from Eldoret to ten. He sustained minor injuries. It was eleven o'clock at night in captivity area. He's two-time London and Frankfurt champion is driving his vehicle. He was lucky to escape unhurt. After his car hit a lorry he and his friend escaped on her. He said afterwards it was just by sheer luck that we survived his with you saying have you been inequality all in Kenya or anything like that. Uh well now I've been in. I've been in those areas and yeah I mean I've been a loyal fans and stuff in India in the poll which is yeah quite frankly horrifying. Yeah that seems to be a basic rule of both people can overtake at the same time but the biggest vehicle has to pull over. UH So yeah. It's like this massive game of chicken today beat until someone moves toward each other as you're accelerating trying take but the smaller of the two vehicles trying to overtake has to move in because basically otherwise they'll be crushed to death by the oncoming big vehicle who says the last person to dots to me seems to be the basic rule and night. Driving I think is also particularly dangerous interest in in some of those roads in Kenya particularly dangerous. So you're not the first time. Athletes have been involved in accidents world champion. He and former world champion Nicolas Bat died in a road accident in Ninety County in August. Two Thousand Eighteen and as book kiprop had another accident backing news who is a world champ fixed engine meets at the time I think is now is he served doping ban. I think so survived that accident back in two thousand thirteen. So thank God. You're Ok makes me think that maybe they should just roam everywhere really Roslyn drive and maybe don't drive at night the voice. Since we haven't at night these clashes stay at home. Have a Hook Chocolate Wilson. Kipsang has a has a stocking as ruined the theme of like Christmas. Asking being people about stockings do you think he gets his friends and family cake. Well Ourika cakes quote. A nice thing to have cake in. Kenya is really instantly definitely would take team cake with attacked. On this.

Kenya Brett Lana David Madisha Japan US Tokyo Wilson Kipsang Tokyo Marathon Kipsang Sapporo Olympics Wilson IOC Eldoret Dotson Tokyo Metropolitan Government Mike First Association Group Nicolas Bat
Busy Padres trade Urias to Brewers for Grisham

Dan O'Donnell

00:55 sec | 7 months ago

Busy Padres trade Urias to Brewers for Grisham

"The breaking brewer news the trade is what made according to multiple sources the Milwaukee Brewers today have traded pitcher Zack Davies an outfielder Trent Grisham to the San Diego Padres in return they get a prospect who's an infielder second baseman Luis uraeus and left handed starting pitcher Eric Lauer so the brewers trades act Davies entering Grissom who was unfortunately outfielder who at the ball get by with that wild card game for a a prospect a second baseman's name is Louise theories who played a little bit for the Padres last year but didn't do well but again he has a huge upside and left handed pitcher starting pitcher Eric Lauer whose only twenty four years old has club control for like three or four years which is big with the

Milwaukee Brewers Zack Davies Trent Grisham San Diego Padres Luis Uraeus Eric Lauer Grissom Louise Twenty Four Years Four Years
"davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:10 min | 7 months ago

"davies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Davies this is for my my question you were talking about California's aiming really to create a prison to school pipeline to lower recidivism and some researchers in the in the shows that that can be done by improving the opportunity for those who are incarcerated or have been incarcerated to find their way into a pathway to education we have this minutes run kind you with us our education reporter for the California report and Rebecca silver who is director of corrections to college California and Terrence Williams and Charlie provoked on on and who were both essentially incarcerated in different ways tears in the juvenile system Charlie in the land the prison system Charlie you were just released pretty recently which yeah I was released in June of two thousand nineteen so so you have to get used to that after twenty two years of the world that was so in many ways I'm sure alien and like entering a different universe different Cosmo's yeah it was it was definitely a little challenging in the beginning I'm I'm starting to get a hang of some stuff but not all stuff is still there's still a lot of stuff that I'm I'm trying to learn and navigate and it's but it's it's you know it's it's a fun experience it's new it's it's something that is out of my comfort zone and you know I just I just enjoy it because it it's something that helps me grow you've got a great attitude so both both human Terence have very good attitudes which will help you and and help whatever the stigma stigma may be Rebecca was going to ask you about that because it's a problem for many years now it is it is and that I will never forget the story of one particular student who said I felt like I walked on campus and there was a neon sign on my head with a flashing arrow saying you know inmate Valen not worthy and one of the reasons that it's really important to think about that is it's great to talk about college in prison right it's a it's a very popular subject right now pal makes it a big national issue but if we don't talk also about what happens after prison were doing people a disservice because people come out thousands of people every month so it's a both providing higher education access in prison and also on campus I will say that the California committee colleges have really stepped up just as they have for the inside work you know in addition to rebound prior to twenty fifteen there were a couple of college Santa Barbara City College had a great program Shasta did continent to start a program but since then I believe there's about thirty community colleges that are opening programs and student support active and explicit and public a student support programs because look you know mass incarceration was real we have millions upon millions of Californians who have been in prison OR jail or they have their families have and if we can't start talking about it and removing some of that statement but nothing before it is a state this will also I know want to be independent financially and there's a real challenge there to put it mildly to sustain the programs that exist and create more programs here's a listener who writes in California we spend more than eighty thousand dollars each year to keep one person in prison while we charge nearly as much to send a kid to college over cal state LA even as to where they have this program that's happening quite figures I seen about twelve thousand dollars per student yes that's what the folks who run it have told me so it is expensive and and they're looking for sources new sources and so forth here's a student I'm gonna go to you with this if I made Terence's sis a woman Monica who tweets and says I have a twenty one year old niece without a high school diploma who is currently struggling in a dead end job she feels angry has low self esteem I want to encourage you to look into community college but coming from a mainstream adult this information could seem insulting have any advice for her any advice you have to be ready find something that she wants to do about getting your high school diploma or GED is the first that I felt like she would get out of that depression after she get a high school diploma GED and star seemed different doors and different avenues open it so you just encourage her move ahead exactly move ahead that's really what it comes down to never give up you might not find your niche right now but if you keep going you'll find your niche I know how it is to be depressing but in order to get out of depression you have to move you have to keep going your heart has to believe you are asked to feel and think of goals yeah exactly yes Sir let me get a call or board here we go first to Mike Mike you're on the air yeah Hey yeah thank you for having me so I just wanted to provide a quick commentary on these programs clearly there's a lot of data and evidence report they will absolutely reduce recidivism I just want to briefly share my story so off childhood I grew up in a rough neighborhood brought up in and around and.

Davies California eighty thousand dollars twelve thousand dollars twenty two years twenty one year
Peter Morgan Presents "Successor" To "The Crown" As Series Enters 1960s, '70s

Fresh Air

05:48 min | 8 months ago

Peter Morgan Presents "Successor" To "The Crown" As Series Enters 1960s, '70s

"Let's get back to fresh air contributor Dave Davies and his twenty eighteen interview with Peter Morgan creator and writer of the crown and writer of the queen the last king of Scotland and frost Nixon the third season of the crown starring Olivia Colman as Queen Elizabeth the second begin Sunday on Netflix you know therefore is just terrific in this role and I've been I assume you were involved in the casting what were you looking for and what did you see in her arms thirty one year old on the cost of care for which is now sort of with almost impossible to imagine we'll see you know she was overlooked so this doesn't reflect well on me but I will tell the story and live in shame so what time is we'd be so I would be sent the list of people coming to the costing some are looked on the list and Wednesdays as it were costing session would involve the following five young actresses I looked on the list like a one is that when that when that one of the other ones are interesting I'll come in at eleven to see that one I'll come in at twelve because I'm busy and important to lime faltered and who whoever the sky for business I'm I'm not into that I overlooked and snapped on no fewer than five occasions until there was one time where like simply couldn't avoid it because interest in the one before the one off the hook and so I then states to see her none of what what what no one should what's the matter with and if you want to talk to this when they said pizza she's been on for five occasions and each time you have studiously avoided and I suppose she's fantastic he what did you see what what did you see captivate what but it's not an easy part I mean you have to be both forgive me well I said but we have to be both playing in stunning you know the she has to have both and and then a number of the actors that came in was simply too beautiful you know to conventional beautiful too the faces did not have the full range because Elizabeth winter is a beautiful walls it is arguably still a beautiful woman but not all the time not from every angle and her face lights up you know with a smile and can look quite grumpy quite like a wet weekend when not smiling and be overlooking pulling quite plain and you need to believe she has intelligence and understand her intelligence because the queen country to what people think I think she has an intelligence and a very sharp memory and intolerance of fools but at the same time she's not that intellectually curious and so she three both quick and alert and yet at the same time capable of repose and being quite does fall so it's not easy and she has to be emotionally stable and I don't think and act to connect I'm across the chasm but it's so helps if they all thought and clamp brought a lot of thought into the pond and then active a lot of the stuff they shouldn't have to perfection eyesore in a in an instant but she could do it want to talk about we've talked a bit about the queen which is this the feature film that you did before you did the series the crowns was directed by Stephen Frears and we'll we'll hear seen here this is about the moment in nineteen ninety seven when princess Diana has been killed in a car accident and because she is divorced from the royal family the queen sees her death as a private matter with no need for a public appearance reason statement from her the queen in fact she takes her family and Diana's two boys who are her grandchildren to the royal St in Scotland come to to just get away while London is morning and be in this scene we're gonna hear she gets a call for the prime minister Tony Blair played by Michael sheen who is concerned because the public and the press are seeing the royal family as heartless because it's expressed no grief at Diana's passing so we hear the queen pick up the phone to speak to the prime minister prime minister good morning match day sorry to disturb but I was just wondering whether you'd seen any of today's papers we managed to look at one or two in which case five question would be whether you felt some kind of response might be necessary I believe a few over either editors are doing their best to sell newspapers that would be a mistake to dance to their tune under normal circumstances I would agree box well my advice is I've been taking the temperature among the people on the streets and all the information I'm getting is that the mood what would you suggest prime minister some kind of a statement ma'am I believe the moment the statements has passed I would suggest flying the flag at half mast about pounds and coming down to London the earliest opportunity it would be a great comfort to all people and would help them with that grief grief if it's come down to London before I attend to my grandchildren who just lost her mother

Dave Davies Writer Scotland Peter Morgan Thirty One Year
June 17th, 1765 in Williamsburg Virginia

5 Minutes in Church History

04:10 min | 9 months ago

June 17th, 1765 in Williamsburg Virginia

"On this episode. I'm once again on location in colonial oneal Williamsburg in Virginia last time we were together. We were outside of Bruton Parish Church a congregation that was founded an Anglican congregation Gatien that was founded in sixteen seventy four Williamsburg was founded as a town in sixteen thirty eight and of course Jamestown Jamestown was the original capital but in sixteen ninety nine the capital of the colony was moved to here and it held that capital all the way until seventeen eighty when and during the revolutionary war it was deemed that Richmond would be a safer place well we are interested in the year seventeen sixty five in fact a date in seventeen sixty five on June seventeen seventeen sixty five a group of seventeen men got together and petitioned Russian the court here and Williamsburg. This is what they requested. We intend to make use of a house in the city of Williamsburg situated on part of a lot belonging to Mr George Davenport as a place for the public worship of God. According to the Protestant Austin dissenters of the Presbyterian denomination well. This is an Anglican colony. The Anglican Church is the the established church and these seventeen presbyterians wanted an authorized legal Presbyterian church to be established they actually actually added a ps two it and the PS was this as we are unable to obtain a settled minister. We intend this place at present only for occasional worship when we have opportunity to hear any legally qualified minister well. The city of Williamsburg granted their request. They established their church perch. It was just a small little modest meeting houses. They mentioned they're not even able to have a settled minister. I walked it off and it measures about twenty two defeat by thirty six feet and in this very simple meeting house these presbyterians met member how Paul ends Romans by listing listing off a number of people well here are seventeen names William Smith John Connolly Walter Lenox James Holdcroft Robert Burke Nicholson John orchiston James Douglas James Atherton William Gemmell Edward Cummins Thomas Skinner Daniel Hoy John Bell James Smith William Brown John Morris and Charles Hankins. These were carpenters vendor's craftsman. Some of them worked in the courthouse. These were the seventeen who started this church on June. Seventeen seventeen sixty five these presbyterians came out of the great awakening. They were a new side Presbyterian Rian Church that meant that they were not only in favor of the great awakening but many of these were likely converted during the great awakening some of them might have been in converted under the Ministry of George Whitfield. Remember that sermon that we heard a paragraph from by Steve Lawson. Some of them might have been converted by I Samuel Davies Samuel Davies was a Presbyterian Missionary Tha Virginia his first wife died and his second wife was Jane Holt. Her family was a prominent family here Williamsburg and so Samuel Davies made many visits to the capital city not only to see his in laws but also to petition before the Virginia legislature and before the Virginia governor for Religious Freedom and no doubt bolstered these presbyterians that were here in Williamsburg one of those ministers who came occasionally to preach actually to those ministers who came occasionally here to preach once they've established their meeting eating house were trained by Samuel Davies well. That's the Presbyterian

Williamsburg Presbyterian Rian Church Legal Presbyterian Church Samuel Davies Virginia Bruton Parish Church James Douglas James Atherton W Daniel Hoy John Bell James Smi Jamestown Mr George Davenport Richmond Jane Holt William Smith George Whitfield Steve Lawson James Holdcroft John Connolly Walter Lenox Religious Freedom Paul John Orchiston
"davies" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

05:00 min | 10 months ago

"davies" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes in churches hosted by Dr Stephen Nicholson where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past asked traveled back in time as we look the people events and even the places that have shaped the story of Christianity. This is our story family history. Let's get started. Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in Church history on this episode. I'm on location in Virginia and we're here to talk about the missionary or possible to Virginia's he was known Samuel Davies. Samuel Davies was born on November the third seventeen twenty three three as a young man. He was educated at Blair's log college. This is Samuel Blair. This is in Chester County Pennsylvania Blair's log college. It was modeled after the original log college of the tenants over in the shamanic Pennsylvania that of course became Princeton University but this is Blair's log college. When he was finished with his education he was ordained as a minister in seventeen forty seven at the age of twenty four and the presbytery sent him to Hanover County Virginia George Whitfield had gone through Hanover county in seventeen forty five and so are they sent along Samuel Davies to help some of those seeds that had been sown grow. The ten years that Samuel Davies was there from seventeen seventeen forty-seven through the end of seventeen fifty seven those years are known as the years of the Hanover revivals was during that time that Davies I started seven churches and he pastored those seven churches he taught many not only of the whites here in Virginia but also African Americans some slaves freed African Americans he taught Indians he wanted to establish a college log college like he had been trained at but he just wasn't able to all of those seven churches so we had a college on wheels he would carry along in his wagon books and he would just give out books to various students young men who showed promise in the church to be trained as he would go from church to church well in seventeen. I'm fifty three for two years. He took a hiatus from his ministry here in Virginia and joined Gilbert tenant to go to England on a fundraising tour for for the College of New Jersey which would come to be called Princeton. It was a very successful fundraising tour and they were able to raise enough money to build Nassau Hall aw there on the campus of Princeton and when it was built it was the largest building an all of the American colonies and Samuel Davies helped raise the money seventeen fifty nine year before the death of Jonathan Edwards as president of Princeton the trustees of Princeton invite Samuel Davies to come and be the president. He arrives sometime in the fall of seventeen fifty nine. He serves there for about eighteen months and he dies in seventeen eighteen sixty one of consumption as we look at Samuel Davies Life. We can see five things that marked his life. I was his oratory. Sorry he was quite a speaker. Patrick Henry would come in here. Samuel Davies preaches often as he could because he was just so impressed by his rhetorical skill skill and how he could just hold an audience and how he could be so persuasive with the spoken word. Secondly is religious liberty. This was an Anglican colony. He was a dissenter he was illegal here in Virginia and he constantly had to petition for his presence in for or these churches that he had planted to be established he would argue in the capital at Williamsburg based on the sixteen eighty nine act of tolerate that there should be religious freedom here in the colonies. Thomas Jefferson used his arguments to later argue for religious liberty. He was committed education should not only training students here as he pastored these churches but also as president of Princeton. He was a poet he wrote many poems. He wrote a hymn who who is a pardoning. God like the or who has grace so rich and free and finally he was a preacher he preached for the conversion and the salvation of men well that is Samuel Davies the apostle to Virginia born on November third seventeen twenty three died died on February four seventeen sixty one and I'm Steve Nichols. Thanks for listening to five minutes churches for more ordination or to listen to past episodes. Please visit five minutes in Church history dot com.

Samuel Davies Samuel Blair Virginia Samuel Davies Life Princeton University Princeton Dr Stephen Nicholson Thomas Jefferson Hanover county president shamanic Pennsylvania Patrick Henry George Whitfield Nassau Hall Steve Nichols Chester County Jonathan Edwards England Pennsylvania
"davies" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"davies" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"It's rahman. Big talker. It's elena. Davies high probably don't know me know ever. Are you kidding? You're part of the off the vine Facebook Greece, but grew I'm such a part of it. You are it. I'm a big big off the vine, Facebook group guy. Yeah you are. But isn't there like, what are the what are the people called that run the page a moderator? Are you a moderator? No. Okay. But I think they like me. Yeah. No, they really like you. And we just did it land podcast. And we're on miscellaneous podcast, miscellany where can people? Download it just on the internet. I, I dunno Google it. I'm not sure click the Lincoln my bio. Okay. I'm not I'm not as successful as an entrepreneur businesswoman as you. I'm just barely making it. But at least making it you went on the wrong reality show. Even on the just kidding killing both did, I think it was a really fun podcast. We did though it was it was loaded. We would stop. It was loaded. It went from everything from, like, questionable hygiene to like, really deep relationship shit too, like independence and chasing your goals authenticity, and being Daniel, and then peeing yoursel right and the thing we did all of it. Yeah, it was really good and happy about it. I'm saying, especially because it's mine, and the continental I'm kind of jealous. It wasn't on mine. You know you can have it all on. It gets a mash up. Yeah. Same. We make. On yesterday. I did a mash up with two people from glee. It was amazing. Wow glee. Yeah. Yeah, it was really fun. You're the biggest guests, I've had, by the way, what's for sure. Yeah, there's no doubt. Most of my guests are my friends. Is that going off Instagram following? Isn't that what everything? Let's just books breakdown imperial, the whatever they break it down for you now. So we've had a couple of cocktails and drinks since we were podcast before that. So this is classic drunk del Ray here and we thought because we got so into Elena podcast and everything else, we kind of forgot to do rapid fire and some questions. So we are going to because he went into my off the vine Facebook group and ask the questions. This makes really a lot of sense for us to just do a quick. This almost is a mash up because this is my podcast content that we didn't get to because we were covering so many other things, right. But I did go into your off the vine group and be like, hey guys, what do you want to know? And I went into knowing full well, that I wasn't going to get any questions because every time you and I sit down and fire buffer, the it's nice to have in case like conversation isn't flowing, but I'm like, I've never been short of conversation with, you know, we're good on that from and RAV he's like same. I have a lot to say, but I also love doing rapid fire like this, or that question. On my podcast just for fun. Because they start cool conversations. Okay. So do you want to do some of the questions from the group and then some rapid fire? Okay, if you were on a deserted island, and you could only choose one of your wind speed and spare to bring, which one would you choose?.

Facebook Davies Ray Greece Daniel
"davies" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

The Rich Eisen Show

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"davies" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

"Feet on the hang i score a goal is to get one that pulls out cool i'm going to be anyway almost anybody in the way again and again and again he's senate decade over decade just like superlative football drag on the wall wafting off him as he lifts so on a second hold on i've got roger bennett michael davies men in blazers you have we confirmed that rinaldo yeah doesn't fact used drew kanwar is that enough i tell the story into our car we all you edita it's ending the wall slash coma dreco twelve i was in donuts which is a beautiful city if you have the chance to ukraine my people with chased out of it for generation yes bit down on the behind every door in my life to this i'm full of fear of them they send me to to to to to donna i checked into a hotel just have to portugal been knocked out the world cup and lo and behold i was in brunell there's room i write in the book how like months later my look still stank of dreco on wall just by moose for having checked into the same the same role the beautiful room can buy experience still some days when the wind hits me in the right direction surplus drek i remember once when the first basketball games i ever watch was was what jing who's the guy used to do the nba rush the the amazing guy who's a mantra shot with sitting by speak roja translate forum.

brunell senate football roger bennett michael davies rinaldo ukraine donna portugal basketball nba
"davies" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"davies" Discussed on KOMO

"Is there is a decreasing chance of rain still cloudy skies around a shower or two we'll see what happens as the day progresses temperatures will still be in the mid to upper fifty s overnight lows upper forties we're still looking at some tripping showers into monday as well as temperatures in the fifties but in a few days warmer temperatures drier weather is the plan that's the latest macomer weather center with chris davies and harry chris this is own it welcome back let's go to the phones and talk to dawn good morning chris what's your question this morning well it's more of a comment chris chris you're talking about seattle all the news fancy things that are going up and being built revised and when i go into seattle i don't live there but i traveled into seattle quite often i see ten i see homeless everywhere i see problems a taxes are going out of sight people of ordinary means cannot live in a situation like that and to me it's almost like the space meal is sort of saying seattle is the or a symbol of the problem that seattle has with taxes homeless and they're not dealing with it so it brings the whole city down it's interesting to hear different perspectives and whatnot especially with the tax situation what do you find the negative part of the tax situation.

chris davies seattle chris chris
"davies" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"davies" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"Davies nets me me was so wrong brosseau totally trying to be was now so let me in the ten yup you know what become coming live knowing that i love go go one ten nah a mental let me eh.

Davies
"davies" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"davies" Discussed on Channel 955

"Hugh davies and not play oh that she will be yes the day north no so hands sampha has since fall enslaved even the baa prasong should gayle should pay thaddeus not good enough oh was chairs that only for new jubal they already knows no so pain bernie damning clinic one of the year would do bruno tonioli tu wien but japan not long ago was that i'm leaving nearly two the hello there are in in the know me down the thought japan in day oh as stairs that only clearly tu wien aw no at thermie etc no so so hands paul hayes no.

Hugh davies japan paul hayes
"davies" Discussed on FunnelHacker Radio

FunnelHacker Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"davies" Discussed on FunnelHacker Radio

"People do davies they go out into the world with an intention i wanna create a successful business but the but what's happening at unconscious level is a bunch of beliefs that aren't in alignment with creating a successful but business a beliefs that i'm not good enough belief that there's not enough time beliefs that i don't have a formal education and i need a formal education in order to be successful in business believes that other people somehow have something that we don't nuts why their successful and were not successful in the body moves when when we are attached to this type of thinking what we allow these limiting beliefs to persist it moves us into a lower energetic state and the problem with that is that in the low energetic state we lack clarity because clarity requires energy so now we we move into our day warning to create a successful business in a low energetic state because of our limiting beliefs lacking clarity and then what happens is is it we start to ask ourselves we start to notice all the problems because it's easy to notice the problems it's it's the way the brain was designed part of the survival mechanism of the brain is just to noticed what's wrong and it requires energy to kind of refocus ourselves around what's working and when we put our attention on what's working we feel good and we allow more intelligence to flow through a someone we focus on the problems with your crappy and it moves us into a lower energetic states that we start to compound these layers.

davies
"davies" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"davies" Discussed on The Big 98

"Davies a true you want you two in a true you wanna in he's the in vanity garmin on the menu moline you roll two two gamasutra gene jio go the david selma now you want to israel go a new one.

Davies david selma garmin israel