18 Burst results for "Davide"

"davide" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:10 min | 2 weeks ago

"davide" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Special edition of Bloomberg best, from the Bloomberg new economy forum, in Singapore. Now, Denise, of course, one of the big topics of the forum inflation, the end of easy money and policy making for an inflationary era. And we had a chance to hear all about it from Gita gopinath. She's first deputy managing director of the International Monetary Fund. And also, axel Weber, chairman, institute for international finance, and davide Serra, founder and chief executive officer of algebra's investments. And this panel at the NES in Singapore, moderated by Stephanie Flanders, head of economics of Bloomberg editorial and research. Starts here telling the panel the big question is not how high the fed goes, but how long it keeps interest rates there. Let's listen in. That's a doubt. One of the biggest challenges economies around the world are facing is inflation. And to bring inflation down, at a time when growth is also slowing for other reasons because of other forms of supply shocks. I think what central banks around the world have clearly recognized is that they need to move in the determined fashion to durably bring inflation down. And after a period of substantial rate increases, I mean, if you see the total amount of rate increases that we've seen in the U.S., this past year, this is their few parallels in terms of the last several decades to see this much of an increase in such a short period of time. But I was needed to address the kind of inflation that we haven't seen for decades. So I think there was a point where the U.S. fed is at a point where they've raised interest rates around 375 basis points. They are very likely to raise interest rates another round before the end of this year. And then the question is, what comes next? And I think 2023 is four 2023, the question is more about how long are you going to keep these rates at the levels that they move them to? And we see a need to keep it at over 4% for all of 2023 to be able to bring inflation down durable. And like you said, it's very important to do that because it's extremely regressive. A high levels of inflation. Now there are countries that other different points in their cycle, but I focused in the U.S. because in terms of spillover was the rest of the world, U.S. policies have the biggest effect. Actually, you're the former central banker on this panel. And we should record that you were on the record early in morning about inflation at the end of 2020. But you have now had at least 90 central banks raise interest rates this year. At least half of them, more than 75 basis points in a single go, which most of them had not done before. Are we now at a point where central banks can have a more leisurely? We're not talking pivots, but a more leisurely pace. I think as Gita was indicating as a central banker, 75 basis point moves are usually conducted over the last couple of decades, only on the way down when you are have been hit by a shock. And you were behind the curve by construction because something unexpected hit the economy like in the financial crisis. On the way up, I think it's a mirror image. And again, we don't want to talk about the past, but it's a bit of a mirror image of being late. In my view, by design, from the inflation targeting regime that was adopted, and therefore having to do faster steps because inflation didn't just rise from below 2% to just above 2% or 3% or 4% when all the way up to double digit. And that's where I think a lot of action was needed. If central banks have a dual mandate, which many of them have explicitly or implicitly, the most violated objective in the Central Bank objective function at the moment is inflation. It's way out of line with the target whilst the employment in the economy has been holding up relatively well so far. And there is a new shock with the war in Ukraine that has added another negative supply shock to an already strained environment that central banks were facing. So I don't think they're done. I think they got some more work to do. I think the believe in markets that central banks will go up and then come back in next year is, in my view, both premature and not ideal from a Central Bank point of view and with Vita, they probably have to keep rates at which they go over the spring next year at that level for the remainder of the year and into 24 to bring inflation down towards their objective. And it will take them two years to really be in the vicinity again of their objective, bearing further shocks. But very further shocks is a very brave assumption. And a lot of the things that are in the pipeline, the transition to a greener economy, all of this will have inflationary impacts on energy prices. And on other parts of life. So I think there is a likely scenario where you will see repeated shocks that will keep inflation high and more persistently high despite central banks having adjusted monetary policy and have embraced rates substantially. At least for the next year or two. And as we know, is it's not just the move to net zero. It's climate change itself also produces more volatile inflation. I think we're pretty clear on that. Davide, from the investor standpoint, where do you think we are on this road? I think capital numbers. The first one, if only the last 50 years, we have calculated, had the world priced, carbon emission efficiently, today, a bottle of $1 would be one 50. So first of all, I think we have, in a way, a paid to price for what we have in price for 50 years. This in my view was not captured. Secondly, investors right now have this view, at least what's priced

Bloomberg new economy forum Gita gopinath axel Weber institute for international fi davide Serra Stephanie Flanders Bloomberg U.S. fed Singapore U.S. International Monetary Fund Denise algebra Gita Central Bank Ukraine
"davide" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:03 min | 2 months ago

"davide" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Free bread to be distributed by a local charity. Teenage girls aren't allowed back to school by the Taliban. They're also going hungry. Sometimes my children eat. Sometimes they don't. One woman cries. Doctor Abdullah Al dari is the UNDP's Afghanistan resident representative, and he told me about the state of the Afghan economy before the Taliban took over. It was a very small economy. A country of 40 million people with such vast natural resources and a strategic geographic position had a GDP of $20 billion only. That's less than Lebanon. It was not competitive and was not inclusive. The growth rates were going down in the few years before COVID-19, they even dropped further, even during periods of GDP growth, unemployment and poverty were going up, which means that this was not an economic model that was sustainable anyway. So the Taliban took over with an inauspicious economic record behind the country. What has happened since they've been in charge? On that day on 15 August, the country suffered what we call a dual shock 70% reliance on grants on foreign aid for dropped completely were cut off in one day that creating a demand shock in the economy and also supply shock because of trade interruption inability to do trade financing. The banking system just completely grind to a halt, causing a 20% decrease in the economy. And to compound matters, women taken out of the economy as well. That had actually massive impact. We estimate that the loss due to women leaving the economy between $600 million and $1 billion as an immediate impact. So part of the 5 billion that were lost was attributable to women leaving the economy. And the reaction of the donors towards the Taliban, what impact has that had on the subsequent development of the economy? We haven't seen the results yet. However, we believe that engagement is bearing some fruits in a sense. There is finally a public debate within the Taliban about the question of sending girls to secondary education. We explained the $1 billion loss resulting from women exiting the labor force. We explained that, in fact, female productivity in Afghanistan is actually higher than made productivity at the same level of education. So losing women out of the workforce is an incredible negative shock to the economy. We also say that a large part of the informant economy in Afghanistan, which is 80% of the economy anyway, is made up of small enterprises owned and run by women. Is there anything else that the international community could be doing that would ameliorate the situation? The engagement is multidimensional. We have to put the question of girls and women at center stage, but at the same time have many dimensions from economics to infrastructure to trade, to the question of reserves, of course. It's the people of Afghanistan and money. There is economics and then there is the pure humanitarian side of this, and we've seen starvation, famine, how urgent is it that the Afghan economy gets back to something approaching where it was before the Taliban took over. In these situations, saving livelihoods is as important as saving lives. If we only focus on humanitarian assistance, which has done a wonderful job, by the way, so far, averting the worst case scenario had it not been for the tremendous work of the humanitarian agencies. However, we all agree we need to start creating jobs in order to reduce the humanitarian load. If we want to reduce the number of people relying on humanitarian assistance, we have to bring back the 700,000 jobs that were lost since August 15 last year. I'm just interested in your interaction with the Taliban. When you present these figures, the empirical evidence of what's happened in the country since they've been in charge. Are they now engaging in a way they didn't perhaps initially with you with the facts and figures? Well, let's say better than before. I see at least more listening, more willingness to read, what we are producing. But at the same time, they want to know what's happening. Who is doing what, where is the money going? And so on. So it's a difficult engagement, but we hope that continuation of this engagement don't forget they provide security and they provide access. So we need to be engaged, but within, of course, the parameters of sanctions. Doctor abdallah Al dari, the UNDP's Afghanistan, resident representative. Now scientists have identified a small flightless forerunner to the great winged dinosaur that pterodactyl, it was a 20 centimeter long fossilized creature that had been found inside a block of sandstone in northeastern Scotland more than a century ago, but it's only now powerful x-ray scans have been able to place it on the family tree of those first flying reptiles which took to the skies more than 200 million years ago would join now by the lead researcher on the study doctor davide fuer from national museum, Scotland. Welcome to the program. All very exciting. Tell us about your fine. Hi, thank you for having me. So yeah, design has been known for over a hundred years, but because it's very poorly preserved, we have not been able to understand its anatomy very well. Fortunately, we were able to do cities scanning on these animals and a lot of more detail came up. And so we were able to place it in the family tree in more precisely. So what does it look like? So design was fairly small about 20 centimeter long, very light build, long legs, long arms, fairly big head for an animal of its size. And it would be going around on its legs on the ground of the triassic. Any sign then of wings, not at all. We still don't know where the wings came from for terrorism. There's still a big gap in the fossil record that we have to investigate more. So how do you draw the line then between this creature and the flying ones? Right, we compile a big set of features in the skeletons and we compute our programs. We try to understand how similarities is designed to others that are already known. And the computer told us that is more similar to the terrestrial branch of the pterosaurs line rather than the flying line. And it's much older than the first pterosaur. It's about 15 to 20 million older than the pterosaur yes. Gosh. And just very briefly, it's been there for a hundred years. It's going to be known about, but what is it then in the new technology that has enabled you to identify it more in more detail? Right, we have a lot of more details on its tail and very minute features that previous techniques were not able to capture. And do you have any other rocks lying around with things in that you might not be able to identify? Material from the algan deposit. So we are hopefully able to apply the same techniques and find more about these other ones. Well, we await with interest your findings at doctor davide fofa from national museums, Scotland, thanks very much for joining us with that news of the new, very small forerunner to the pterodactyl that's been identified. You're listening to NewsHour

Taliban Afghanistan Doctor Abdullah Al dari UNDP Lebanon abdallah Al dari davide fuer Scotland national museum davide fofa
"davide" Discussed on Get Real -w- Caroline Hobby

Get Real -w- Caroline Hobby

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"davide" Discussed on Get Real -w- Caroline Hobby

"Is it armament fifty five minutes. That but i do feel like i'm excessive. Yeah it is hammer. Wrap this thing out even though this was like a joy for me to just do this in general. Why don't we do this in general doing wrap up really fast with each of you're talking actually ask you for. All of us have husbands. Who have interesting jobs you tour on the road who are gone. Have nasa highs massive lows Due to their career and very a very emotionally draining hot coal jobs ashley. How do you deal with or like your husband's. A big manager manages blackberry. Smoke amazing loved them selection and ben long time in done so many different positions enrolls within the music industry. It's it's crazy after this last year. it's been crazy. We he never think of music is something that will just not really be there. I remember him telling me one time. That music was recession proof. Let me tell you that. Touring is not coed. Proof the amen that Like how you deal with having a husband who is gone and who has so much emotional stake in their job. Because i know a lot of people have a lot of stake in their job. But like i feel like our husbands particular or like giving their entire personality sell soul. You know it's like it's not just like clocking clout. It's like a never ending job. It never stops never stops. I mean i remember on our honeymoon. He was working our wedding night. He answered a contract on our wedding night. everything's timely. Yes i think that two things one. I wife up with y'all with all my mom brands and we wife up and we just davide thing you know and then two with the highs and lows. It's even more important to me as a mom to be that likes stable positive safe place because trae is gone a lot and it's not necessarily on a routine time line said they don't ever get to feel like a sense of normalcy with the timeline. It's just one day. He's there when he's not one week there when you know so for me. It's more important to be like the safe steady arms wide. Open kind of loving mom and to do that with other moms. You know as we got happier. Leonard errands get tired. I do think that's what is so cool nationals. All of us do have husbands. That are gone so much that it has allowed us to have this really intense friendship. That is so good with each other that now maybe understanding. That's why the national community of women associated with enertainment industry. You know that's so true and because everybody has unique in creative everyone but a lot of us have unique creative careers ourselves our husbands do or not nine to five type of people. Emily can get together other nine to feel not nine to five type people. You can feel accepted and loved and like your normal. I mean we are normal while we don't fit the normal molds. Now yeah now. I will be back. That is i go for years ago. To hear like was really hard me. Because i never wanted to leave but now and looking back i would not. I don't know how. I would have made it out there with a career. My husband's on like caroline took me in under her wing. And like introduce me to all of you guys and everybody else was so kind to me. And i remember. I went to a party a birthday party at dinner when i for the week. I got here and a picture of me with you. A couple like ten other girls were county already your friends that fast like oh carolina hobby like she is the one introduces you to everybody that you feel welcomed and you know just with a group of great girls already and with a husband who travel so much. I was not like anybody in san diego and being here. This is normal. Like what ashley said. This is very normal for us. It's not normal but it's our normal and you start at times when you're tired and exhausted feel lonely and misunderstood or not heard or not seen by a lot of people because you were as a woman a mom handling it all and beaten us. If place like ashley mentioned in always being the constant one in being there for your kid or just being there for your spouse it's tiring it's exhausting and when you don't have relationships with other females that can actually relate to you. That was the hardest thing for me. And i was there before a lot for it because no one understood me and what i did in what my role as a wife was because none of my friends had to go through it prior to be here and i'm so thankful for Especially just the community or national what caroline was saying. Because it is. it's unlike anything else. And we have to experience. Like i think from the outside looking. A lot of people are like. Oh we're husband's touring with so and always. Managing so-and-so always fighting and it is cool and it's awesome and i wouldn't change it for the world but it has its own layers of difficulty and exhaustion. I don't think people or understand and it's only a lot especially as a mom with your kids in it. It gets lonely. And when you don't feel understood or like you have people to kinda come alongside you and she knew through it. It's really hard and so being here. National has been huge for me and and my development is being a wife and a month through this season. Because i couldn't do type by. It's i just i'm thankful everyday for it but it's just funny to look back on my gosh. I didn't even one. But i don't know where i would be if i would move because no one would have understood me. I think that from an outside perspective. Everything looks really perfect. Glamorous and i think this is. It's a lesson for me to to think everyone's that way everybody has their struggles and everything but a lot of when you're in an industry where someone's gone all the time. There's just a lot of things that might look. Glamorous it really not you know. Ncaa is in lows in. The highs are alike higher than anything. Experience in the lows are so low. Sometimes it's just ask the entertainment industry and to be able to have friends you literally can just sit up my ass couch. Do hang out ground. Glass of wine talk Adopt a little bit and not be judged for just know that like it saves and you actually will get good feedback you know and like really good support because we all understand this lifestyle. you know. it's really some older. I think older a really really appreciate the friends that sit with you in the lows. I feel like so many people want to be there for the highs and or just the you know everyday stuff but who sits at the lowes. That is something really really special to have people that will be there analyst and i appreciate those people the most man. I also think it's really special to i would say almost i mean i think all of my friends but specifically our industry..

ashley national community of women as trae davide nasa caroline ben Leonard Emily carolina san diego Ncaa
"davide" Discussed on The Final Furlong Podcast

The Final Furlong Podcast

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"davide" Discussed on The Final Furlong Podcast

"My He's another one who hasn't been vatan. Okay semi one race but a again one race one win. Yeah Bush's bar is the same thing for davide moro one race one went. I wanna have we moved on from. That's mid season form there and we're looking to woods next year. I who says that hasn't been raised too often. A held back a ni- they're back to show what they'd rather than the the early courses that that were really good two or three months ago. Right they were. They were doing fine. And it's still there in their official rating isn't it. You see horses here. These two year olds Erase it in the nineties. But can they improve enough on that set to win a greek three as assist one against unexposed who got a lot more to get that. That was my thinking. It'd be agreement with unit. I think the fact that This fellow jala at the money Came out in. August and headmistress came out in late july and again in august some of the early season two year olds are going to be an forbid of right and i think we've seen some in recent days particularly in ireland but also in the uk with godolphin. We're starting to see some back in juvenile's come out that you know all point point lonsdale's done for the season and i think aiden lebron's not going to be losing too much sleep over that because i think he's got a few exciting ones come in through so we'll we'll see we'll see how it all plays out but we'll move onto the three twenty five at newbury and this is our magic heading the betting for or arawak even if a decided to not just add a there dyslexic. It's a great thing too much. It she to say. We knew. High gibson tom marco teaming up again You morrison david probes. Have king of clubs this that i like for you of to The aforementioned godolphin side been sarah. Rod dawson with mosses is six to one. And then charlie fellows and callum shepherd have got a horse whose name i will let professional commentator mackenzie pronounce. Shall i go for injured. Aunty there you go jots days word. Mystery it is inches. Auntie solve folks. And that's why you're paid the big bucks. So of the three twenty-five say was right. it was very waves by interpretation as lessons. Join together. I didn't say it was a correct. Just go with the man. It's right it's right said it's right go with the correct it What you're going to be a bit boring here. And i'm gonna say aromatic our make.

davide moro aiden lebron jala High gibson tom marco Bush morrison david lonsdale Rod dawson charlie fellows callum shepherd newbury ireland uk mackenzie sarah
"davide" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"davide" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To last year. But it's still early stages. Overall, there was 1.5 trillion of total loans done and only 93 billion of that was sustainability linked, So it's still in early days. But definitely there is a lot of interest from the banks and participate in because they can also show in front of their stockholders or regulators that they're doing something on the SD front, and they're kind of prompting companies. To to participate. What's so interesting about this story? Is that to me? One of the takeaways I have is, It's a story about incentives because the incentives are supposed to be there for companies to have these s G goals, but It sort of. Seems like the incentives aren't quite aligned between the companies that are being loaned the money and the banks because the banks don't want to loan money for, you know, an interest rate that is too low because then they won't make as much money talk a little bit about the misaligned incentives here because they're just slightly misaligned. Yeah, I think everyone is facing a dilemma here. So what we found in the story is that actually a quarter of the loans that we reviewed have no penalty whatsoever, And the incentive is only one basis point. So that's like $100 for every million dollar tiny. It's like tiny. These companies have hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue, if not billions of dollars, in some cases, so The size of the incentive is incredibly small, and there's a few reasons why that is one. The company may be reluctant to commit to very ambitious goals. They obviously want to maintain their cost of capital within a certain range, so they may not want to go out of the way and include massive adjustments. But at the under of the other end of the bargain is a bank and they make Money by making loans and these products, revolving credit lines and term loans that specifically revolving credit lines tend to be lost, making for banks to start with, and so any additional basis point that they give up as an incentive for the company to meet their goals. Is the basis point that don't make that they don't make in profits. It's a nominee. Where do we go from here? I mean, our US regulators looking at this and these toothless targets and potentially getting upset, Or are these banks and companies technically not doing anything wrong? For now. The sense we regard in our reporting is that regulators are really focused both in Europe and and on the U. S on the investment management site, So if there is You know, fund management companies that are marketing to their investors s G funds or green products, and those claims are not substantiated. That's what regulators are looking at. In this case, it's mostly between the banks. And the companies and so no third party investor really is is involved. Deputy Just the last 30 seconds that we have with you. What did you hear from banks? When you reached out to them about this The view from banks generally is that they are trying to help their clients do the right thing. It's one tool in a bigger toolbox that companies have And they're happy to do their part. Um, you know, some recognize that this want changed the world, but they say it's a small step in the right direction, and it's worth pursuing. All right. Well, the story continues, and it will certainly continue with Davide. She'll use a corporate finance reporter at Bloomberg News. He's joining us live from the Bloomberg Interactive.

Davide $100 Europe 1.5 trillion Bloomberg Interactive last year billions of dollars one tool US U. S both 93 billion one basis point hundreds of millions of dollar Bloomberg News every million dollar One of the takeaways one 30 seconds
"davide" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"davide" Discussed on VUX World

"Or ai. Automated workflows customers most customers. They're not cloud their on prem. It's working but they have issues and problems and their leveraging our cloud to integrate into that environment to solve unique solution so anything out of are composed platform is just that imposible to build into integrate into the environment that the customer has no customer could be in a customer could be a non via customer. Could be a cloud and other cloud they may have gone cloud for. Let's say you see. They need to solve the problem around inbound outbound automation it will work in any environment. That is critical. Because like you said for people to adopt and start your technology if the minimum threshold is throw everything out and go on cloud before you even get that return on the prom. Tron solid that said the barrier to entry so our our whole strategy is predicated on pushing innovation to the edge to the customers in our partners to build at their pace and giving them the tools to integrate it to their environment based on what they have. Today we call it our hybrid innovation strategy. Where it's layered innovation over the top to integrate to any customer requirements because again we're leveraging that platform as a service for experience building as you know and the ability to solve business solutions business problems trying to solve right so it's about creating use cases that they need. I talked about not boiling the ocean. Defining one on to that problem is with most ninety percent of those customers are on premise customers. Interesting interesting it's Interesting so it's like the more you think about it release of nor i'm finding it hard to think of an excuse. It's like an all the fruit gates have opened a little bit because of covid. And everyone's realized that you know we really should be thinking about how we scale things. Lots of contacts closed. Because they had on prem and couldn't get themselves working from home or whatever it might be seventy i understand. In general generally speaking there was some challenges. I think it made everybody think about you. Know how the world is going to be. I do think it's going to be a work from home. Culture for the future for companies even the companies who people are going back to. The office is at least a hybrid going on And also everyone is always under pressure. Not just in customer service. Marketing teams are under pressure to reach.

Today ninety percent seventy
"davide" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"davide" Discussed on VUX World

"Being digital but it's it's very similar thing of designing compensations it's all about trying to represent the analogous feel actual compensation and remembrance is so the goes back to what we said right so it's not. The is a tool to help the process. So that analog dictation of the conversation is really what defining the process. Not the i. The island facilities how that conversations can flow. And the same time. I might not use that same process if i want to replicate that same simple rich experience of someone's engaging me over the web we're over taxed. I would go through the same exercise that sort of like you said basic process of engaging back and forth tried to call conversation that would sort of map out what the requirements are then lead reggie ai to optimize what. We've just serve documented in that process so again it's not saying is basic it's about you know really focusing on the process on the experience of leveraging item you get rich in intelligent and engaging based on it accessing data and improving like again never forget the value the value that personalization and customization. I'd experiences so intelligent enough to know the next time. I call who i am what i liked. How that conversation went to improve the next conversations where he becomes dynamic so originally scoping that process. But that's not. The end result is can help me facilitate that and improve that based on ongoing conversations or engagements. You have with crow. Customers repeat customers because runner this becomes in our in our space round. Ai whites critical in the old days. When you'll get contact centers in customer service. It was all about cost containment. How do i process a caller as quick as possible at the lowest cost to say it was solved right. that doesn't exist pensive. That is that is a failure metric for contact centers today. Because you want people engage the more they engage you the more experienced more your tain the more revenue the more opportunity the more connection you create so now it's about every time they call me. How do i keep them connected. Not just in that conversation but into access to other areas that they might be able to engage with me so. Ai becomes important. Understand all my habits all my behaviors. I might call for service but they understand. David buys these products on a monthly basis. So i'm calling in for service. Might remind the i might also remind me other things i might want to do when i engage with you. You see that with amazon right when you're shopping also relevant you know the or social right. You've researched something you're now and social and all of a sudden feeding you up content. It's important to you and that's batting. Businesses need understand. That's you know that's what we've come to expect right that personalization so it might start off basic in analog but tool to amplify it from their interesting. It's that's that's interesting now. It's it's weird. How for years. That was the case that the contact center was. You know trying to get people off the phone. Basically then you start seeing things like toms shoes and lonzo examples of that way you know people have been on the phone for like six hours and so flat five on all of a sudden it becomes are actually maybe if we do focus on the customer and we do actually provide a decent service hop some bad for us. So it's nice. I can be used to do that..

David six hours amazon toms today lonzo years five
"davide" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"davide" Discussed on VUX World

"I can afford to me the ability to invest on constantly brew. Because i'm not taking on any technical debt. I'm simply i know my process of working with partners the understand the process of working with customers stakeholders who give me feedback on the process and i keep reiterating optimizing to meet those new benchmarks to keep a rising interest in for those in the uk. I think debons top shop would certainly victims of kind of we just have to be online. We're not gonna do it. Well necessarily we just gotta do it. S also just absolutely stamina set a new level as far as inventory. User experience turnaround times. You know you just auto on us get some closed at the moment. We don't let them send them back and it's all you know no questions asked but you've kind of about subject matter. Experts demand experts so. We spoke to zamora last week stacey and gave him some all and one of their philosophies with zamel platform conversational platform. That's built on microsoft lewis and one of the philosophies about empowering business users for exactly that reason so when you deploy something and you start seeing some of your no your failed ruins. His comeback your. It's better for business user. Who understands the demand to be able to look at and say right well this. I think they actually meant this. Oh we're gonna wanna map back to this intent. All here's something. We need to work out. A new requirement again here and we know how we can fulfil out because we know what the businesses so. That's very much along. The lines of what. I is actually the next phase which is democratizing it and put in the hands of business user around them leaving huns of someone who needs to be able to court in order to build something. What's this might be what you're getting out with the composer framework Ammonia in what your thoughts how around How if The platform capabilities you're describing and who is the there's a user of d. Do you have to have those technical requirements. You on the on the fence of toronto empower the kind of business use unlike was. What's the what's the situation without my. That's a great point. That's exactly sort of some of the things. I was trying to touch on this early on. We we we had the concept compose ability in openness. The idea was you know we're gonna make this completely. Api based so we'd no longer programmers will be a web developer to access built. We realized we want to go. One level higher because it's so important to have the domain expertise part of the process we call them fusion teams. We wanna make the the ability of creating.

last week stacey Ammonia uk toronto microsoft lewis One level debons one philosophies zamora zamel Api
"davide" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"davide" Discussed on VUX World

"Gets technology's not the solution. The solution is the use case that you've created so in their case what's what was. The reason for that use case was appropriate customers work. We're not getting alive aged or they were getting frustrated because they know how to call no answer. We're customers asking them to be able to do it on their own without talking agent. So what's the problem. We're trying to solve and then leverage a i is a tool to deliver a use case or to the solution to that problem and then again as i said. These solutions are not static. They have to be dynamic. 'cause what worked a year ago four months later need more required the the the need changes and then what happened in the middle last year more needs change right because i can go live. I can't go live. It can go both live not live. I wanna combination thereof. How do i incorporate processes domain expertise in. The project is critical expectations changes. Well donna. the more people use voice assistance. The mall people have experienced talking to devices the expectation changes. I've said numerous times in the past like my the miles. Division of is not google over the is of trained people how to search on your expectation of war. Such box doors is basically built on top of what of trend you in and so you can go to any website and make a search and you expect it to work google trends trained to do the same thing with but i'm as a medical shop in you. You kind of expect to find what you want but you sit and they expect to be able to check out without a hitch and you certainly expected to be delivered in hours if not a day. And so your expectation is is immediately put onto the next retailer. Ikea is the most frustration retailer in the world because once equipped for every delivery and it takes six weeks. It's like this isn't the standard that we're expecting and so google and amazon in those. I'm sure there's plenty more examples that we could list of of companies who have raised the bar as far as expectations are concerned but those two companies. Our voice technologies conservative reservoir again. So even if you've deployed something two years ago people are expecting a lot more from it. Now would you say that. Would you concur with docks of philosophy that impacts with certain demographics of the population. The expectations rise it absolutely the minimum threshold is totally change in colin through another level because again no in person. Everything's remote so when i shop online. Guess what people like john google. That's the benchmark that i have to deliver as a retailer or as an organization y. Compose ability dynamic services are important because the bar changes and you have to be able to reiterate meet those needs. Now you know Examples amazing. Because you know what i was when i was married out at university thirty plus years ago the i key experience was by far as retail amazing..

amazon Ikea six weeks thirty plus years ago two companies john google two years ago a year ago four months later both google middle last year a day donna
"davide" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"davide" Discussed on VUX World

"As it's not about it being able to respond everything is about building a process relevant to what you're trying to sell. So let's say you the example because the this with a lot of internal helpdesks with some of our customers right there's hr requirements that people need to call it a password reset or meeting. There's there's a policy now. They need to understand right so now. I know the context that i want to deliver. So what does is allows us to expose data that people are looking for right so announced tapped into a certain use case in create a really natural Intelligent experience to when. I go and access that data. Now that might not be alive conversation. I might be text engagement. Might be alive conversation. But the ai is helping me. Facilitate that very seamlessly. But it only works based on the process that i created remember. I talked about domain expertise while they're critical is not about a experts. Solve the problem is experts are experts. They don't know your business and they won't solve. The problems is about building a process based on your domain expertise of knowing what customers want what information they're gonna be requesting. And you know how. I can make that accessible and make it seamless right and then implementing a i to really facilitate that rich experience around that engagement and you know. Give the example where we will ever stay. I on the flipside is alive. engagement. I'm talking to a live agent. It's a live conversation agents they need to focus on you. I don't know if you've ever seen a call center. But in traditionally agents talking to you and they're trying to access data and information same of human can only Can only handle so many things at once. What he does is it it. Think of it as a. It's being leveraged to sort of navigate filter the content make things relevant as you're talking engaging in hanau rich conversation with that person is giving you information is listening to you seeing what you're saying the topics that are rising and then Filtering that content to you to make it more of a you know..

hanau
"davide" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"davide" Discussed on VUX World

"Or what's the process you need to fix and then defining different multiple ways to solve that problem and then like you said this is all services cloud services so it's not like you're caller has to go to a cloud this all layered innovation and when we push innovation to the edge. You can solve one problem. The problem might be. I don't have enough trunks. People getting busy tone. I wanna give the ability for people to call in Deflected a website which has a deflected text engagement and then provide relevant information on that. Call rain just to alleviate pain. You might start small where you're providing will call a scripted agent that has access to data and can provide ongoing data on a daily basis. And then from that and then it causes like wait. Because you don't touch anything you have. You're just adding value to your current process and you're proving out what you can deliver and then from there you can improve so that same thing that gave you immediate relief to capacity right. A scripted agent that has access to data and provides is the basic unit immediately can improve that by now layering in intent recognition. Where now. I can actually look at the conversation. They're having with that agent and discount. Are they aggravated. The excited our keywords. They asked for and then create a better experience and even richer automation through. That's what i call. I use case and then we can add even more intelligence right based on how many times you call who you call what you ask for the next time you call. I'll take you there even quicker. I'll deliver you know personalization. So it's all about not boiling the ocean. starting small. solve one problem. It will illustrate how easy and simple it is. The will be amazing. Because you're you're getting the value as you're spending so something very disrupted that people aren't used to it. Ah dispel the myths of the waterfall process. That's required to delivery and then from there. It just organically expands. And we've seen this like we've done work with many healthcare customers many government agencies when they brought us in immediately just Deflect calls to basic you a and as soon as they got there it expanded. They wanted to add toward three intense where it could be self service and then based on customer feedback. What they liked they just kept expanding more and more organically and two other use cases so again with healthcare we were just doing cohen test results. And then providing people instructions on what to do and that involved that that evolved to do providing ai to contact tracers up providing to people to call in and guess access to information it expanded the vaccine rollouts vaccine scheduling. So all of this is about not boiling the ocean. Highlighting kiki pain points illustrating how easy it is to layer in layer in the innovation from the cloud into your environment regardless of your cloud or not right. The key here is every business. Should realize that there's no reason to take on technical debt. Just subscribe to solution. Crewmate out and expand for there. I'm telling you it gets organic. Because once they realize the misconception they quickly realized that this is a way to really rapidly built in respond to requirements that they have just in in. Just i the when you're talking there about talking about barriers. You're talking about starting with one specific problem expanded from there. Some of the things that can can kind of prevent a suppose people from from using voice is one of the things can seem very daunting very new very so alike tricky and also someone mentioned today which i think is an interesting point. I've done ill. His name is image when things like alexa and google assistant with i kind of put into the marketplace..

today alexa one problem google assistant three one two other use cases
"davide" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"davide" Discussed on VUX World

"But as you deploy it. You're gonna get feedback. You're going to look at the analytics and the data and you're gonna easily pinpoint where it can improve and create more value. It's important to think about that pot around the whole concept of going through this big upheaval to launch something and this concept of rapid kind of interesting and things like nine something with with voice. I in conversation with to assist available these days. What is raving fantastic is that you can literally do that. You can start just with one conversation. Minimal risk minimal costs a little bit of all fronts. Build it but ultimately you you can go at your own pace and you can. You can take your by office much as you can choose all thing which Which i think is really good. The question that we've been debate in today is because this is related. I think because most organizations culturally have a very much a waterfall culture. Donna nudist dealt with this in in previous decades. When people were in viasystems. They'll come out you with huge procurement. Documentation huge requirement documents. And you need to prove that you can meet every single one of those requirements and all of the climates have the same priorities and so it just becomes this huge procurement exercise. And by the time you get to the point of actually install an assistant to use. Things have changed. The world's changed things have moved on the thing you were going to use if all as the environments now changing so organizations still have not coach in many cases and we'll voice i income seasonally i do is doing. Is it say look. You don't need to go through all of that. You can just experiment and try and so the conversation we've been having to deal. Lincoln is around barriers to adoption and wore some of the things that are preventing organizations from from adopted in composition. I lots of grew into a lot of the mind. Comparatively speaking give the number of businesses in the world. And so. I'm interested to get your thoughts on on not topic of barriers to adoption. What you envision right now some of the barriers to adoption of composition. I am what can you bring up a great point. Most the barriers are misconceptions of what's required to to deliver conversation A or the you know like you said they take that waterfall process. They look at and make it into this massive project that takes years to evaluate and they look at technology. And that's just not the case right. So as i said you your point is right conversational is very a very very simple to look at it. It's it's about finding problem and solving unique issue that causes you a lot of pain and then proving out and then expanding from there so we always talk about this with my specialty. What they do is they. Call it. sort of this three d. process Define problems so it's not about. Hey fork lifting the cloud and buying technology. What are the problems..

one conversation today Lincoln Donna nine one years single previous decades
"davide" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"davide" Discussed on VUX World

"Negative experience can have a dramatic effect on business. A neutral experience might not be negative. But it doesn't create value. It's imperative that these experiences when people engage with you are always positive and ai becomes a critical piece because it needs to be effective in needs to be engaging and it needs to be intelligent so built this one cloud strategy. The premise was compose ability. Because we know we can't innovate to meet everyone's needs so we need to make. We need to turn it via as a call center comey as an engagement platform where organizations who understand their business can innovate based on their requirements so compose ability became key and that compose ability cannot be basic. It needs to be simple but rich in a i provides because it allows us to address the effectiveness the engaging piece and making every element intelligent. And that's that's how. I got involved in that scene again. We we look at via and we've turned to many of our partners or with google and amazon and nuance and other vendors. Because we know that not one vendor can deliver everything. Ai is so broad that when we get into vertical and unique use cases we need to be able to tap into many partners to liberal intelligent experience interesting. Well known as a hell of a in that to get to dig into that. So the first the first thing that you mentioned which i think we've kind of we've mentioned on a ponca few times but it's interesting to to hear you talk about the importance of customer experience and i've kind of use the analogy in a few towns before where if you look most it's most of the time they all end up kind of in the early stages of innovation going on but then over time they all end kind of becoming very similar so if you look at any foreign the iphone galaxy phones. Something phones google phones. They're all about this size under the all got a big screen and of all comers so all becomes very very similar. Wall really matters. Is things like the operating system. How quick is the experience that the ability to integrate with your life and your ecosystem cars..

google amazon nuance iphone galaxy first first thing one cloud one vendor times
"davide" Discussed on The Radio Show

The Radio Show

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"davide" Discussed on The Radio Show

"I started going to those higher restaurants might just just give me to meet my what is what is all this. She goes to the kitchen normally. Like hey come here. Where's the rest. This is what you say. it's it's definitely You appreciate it more like that with those pictures and stuff like that. Being being put together understand. David wanted to take a detour into your podcast attorney chickens and break additions so i know that name has meaning behind the. Can you explain that to the arguments. Yes so because it's a football. Guess i have to think about something that was mean which is portuguese and try to tie a little bit the name so actually starting chickens breaking dishes are two portuguese. Phrases turning chickens means someone that has a lot of and breaking dishes means someone that exceeded expectations. So i thought i could have that title and even ask my so. I asked my guess at the end of each podcast. You know if turning more chickens or breaking more dish so that's a good hook you know with the name of the podcast. So that's why. Yeah i had some ideas Because we have some like food kind of related thing kind of Phrases but those two. I thought the mid more sense is is memorable like okay. You're not gonna forget to have one. So continuing with the podcast. What would you say has been the most rewarding thing about putting your story out in the public and letting them know your world of cooking and what it means. I think for me always. I always like to make fun. Saying i'm a very non well-paid portuguese embassador. Because i really love my country. And even i always starts asking my guests if giving to portugal into any portuguese. Words in for me was always put in the name of portugal out there. It's not exactly people know portugal but a lot of people still you know People always think about spain. I probably don't think about portugal right next to it. And that was something super proud in. You know whoever listens. I'm i'm sure some of them at least like let me just like search something here something we talk about. Just search that thing. And that for me. I want to believe it's the best thing you know. And i'm super grateful for everyone. That's so far that accepted to be on. You know i i. I think it's very difficult. You guys probably know this. I think it's very difficult. You have no name. Try to build something completely right one thing. Is you know someone was telling me like michelle. Obama has a podcast. well she's michelle obama. No one and build something. That's really difficult in this industry. Because it's just. It's a lot of competitions a lot of people out there at. Yeah but did that. I'm super proud. I'm proud the people. I got but definitely i really hope every time someone listens. They like I probably should visit portugal. So i will say that three of my three places that really have to be the wanna say book. Lakes salvo little morbid places. I really have to visit our portugal. Lisbon azores and the dark skin. But definitely definitely those who was puerto. No oh okay. Don't worry about where you remember coach. I'll tell i just listed out of the azores. Her amazing it's basically like the hawaii of europe is what i'm telling ya it's really. I'd never been to the island. So we have observed in madeira. Always they have like seven islands. I think for people like outdoor stuff. It's the pictures. Look out sending in. But i never been. It's really beautiful. Davis in okay so in you ever see yourself getting to the point where i mean. You're a chef obviously skill. Do you see coming to a point where maybe if the podcast is doing very well that you only do that where you always as some form be heavily involved with the cooking yet. I mean. i'm very realistic. And i mean the podcast has what eight months and not even close to be you know have making a living out of it so now not even know. The podcast was was created specially. I know he didn't ask that but it was crazy. Because of covert ice. I teach cooking classes and i was teaching twenty twenty five classes a months and when that stops i felt a big need to talk with people in the questions. I always ask the same questions to every guest on. The podcast is west as my students. I mean it's a. It's like workshops but we had three or four classes a day and it sixteen people total. And i will just ask these questions now. What was your first memory of. What was this was this and starting to you know i think the first month we covered everything was really weird. Probably for everyone writes. Like i got to stay home. The whole thing was really bizarre empty streets whatever but i just starting having these need talking to people. And that's why the podcast was created was just because of that and you know i started to ask some local people dc. And then. i just start for bigger names. Let's put it like that So so now you know. I i love my job a lot also. I also know that. I'm super lucky. I think heart. I think luck is a happens but you have to also be a hard work sometimes to keep that love your site and i'm being super looking my life. I'm thirty three. And i know being an embassy gives you the privilege of not having sixteen hours a day You know our industry is not very well paid the other thing that people romanticize about foods they love you love to cook but then they go work as a line cook and you make three dollars an hour. Whatever it's numidian. You make nothing so snow. I always going to be. I think i'm always going to be involved. A my dream dream dream would be probably ten. Years moved back to portugal But try to work at the embassy as much as you know until the end basically and You know then just see maybe teach classes there but no i mean unless the podcast. I'm seeing this. Is someone calls me tomorrow and be like. Hey we have million dollars for. You'll be like sure cooking but now i you know being at three three will be very very cocky for my sides to be like. Oh well i'm done now. I will more but Did you have something something. And then they got a little game that we do with our guest at the end here too so this quiz because i'm worried about that one. You better headed everything all my answers but no you got it okay. So the last thing was just. I know we mentioned you. Know what you do where you are on social media and the podcast. So is there anything. That we i guess. We've got the mission anything upon you. Let people know where they can find your line as well as any projects that we didn't touch on. Its want to mention guys. You guys said it before. Turning chickens and breaking dishes you can find on any podcast platform. Apple's spotify all of that's the instagram attorney chickens breaking dishes anybody has like a suggestion or a guest or something you can send an email to info at thirty chickens and breaking dishes dot com and bet spree image. I that's pretty much it. I started teaching glasses again starting yesterday. Actually after fourteen months. I'm back teaching. That's also exciting. If people wanna see pretty dishes also from the embassy. What i make sometimes i i also posted on online so yeah i just followed it. Okay.

David Obama tomorrow instagram michelle hawaii portugal yesterday madeira sixteen people three Lisbon azores Apple spain eight months two Davis million dollars puerto twenty twenty five classes
"davide" Discussed on The Radio Show

The Radio Show

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"davide" Discussed on The Radio Show

"'immigration. That was not a lot of immigration so So the immigration was like a big immigration from the former colonies in the eighties and then it was brazil and beginning of thousands and then was like eastern europe later. But he's not exactly. Those people were opening restaurants as make sense. Everything was very cheese. Orcher geese and i wish we knew more of in culinary school because when i left i was like. Oh wow there's a whole world out there as much as i love his assessment. So we're talking to david martin. He's the executive chef of the european union embassy in washington. Dc is a podcast called turning chickens and breaking dishes and you can catch him on instagram. At turning chickens for conditions are so i had a question So you're you're in dc so you're being in dc year. In american politics some show you have many different experiences with political figures who are some of who are some of the names that you had a chance to cook for and was there added pressure because these public figures that you were dealing with a like a quick story. My my dream was always to meet. When i was back in portugal. Brock obama and i was like this. Never going to happen rights in portugal. Sure i moved to the. Us and isis. See the car. You know when you see the car you know the presents inside. I was like i know he's there but it's not the same thing. So when president obama he left office he actually moved next to the embassy. So i work at the ambassador's house and he actually obama's move next to the house so my hopes got a little. You know hopes up but you know these people that don't necessarily have the normalized you don't they just start walking around. You have to leave the house you know in the through the garage in suv and they're not driving. It's a whole thing. Whatever but four years ago we had a party for actually as a welcome party. And i got the chance to meet them and to cook for damn meet them talk. We'd take a picture into so that was that was probably the i mean. I've met supreme court judges. I met senators. I cook for the prison. Portugal but the obamas especially the the figure that he is in euro. Even a lot of people love him. So yeah that was my probably the probably not probably for sure the the highest name i cooked for. That's pretty big name. That's year tattoo. I mean unless you cook for like kennedy or lincoln does it. You have a sentence. Their pictures on we can drop it in in the show. Yeah and i remember. I send a picture to my mom super proud right so i. I sent copies to portugal for family members. Call it. it's the whole staff. There's like six seven of us. We them with michelle and it. It's there and i remember when i asked him on. I asked my mom. Did you get the picture. And the first thing my mom says was it. She says you really fat nowadays. You'd think well that's exac alone. Not like i'm so proud of bats okay. Mum's cusack like we love that one. One obvious question on the table here. You probably was going to get super yeah. What's your favorite. What's your favorite dish to cook. And why is it your favorite. I have a very boring answer because the david at home. It's a completely different david. And that's my job. Not one of the chefs. That goes home at midnight and starts making homemade raviolis impetus on instagram. Not me super simple at home. I bet food sometimes a lot of people sometimes ask me how come i can eat like fast food or something. If i'm a chef. And i always tell them exactly because i'm a chef you know even talking even if i'm like Four or five different four or five shots were just hanging out. The conversations really boring because it's all about who's getting magin like five plumbers getting together and just talk about pipes for an hour and a half. That's not interesting for me and then you go home and you fix the house. Exactly so i i. I love food. But i love foods in the concept when when i know i have to create something like for instance tomorrow night. I have a dinner. My mind's setting that dinner. What i'm going to make how i'm going to present in my mind but i don't carry that when i come home so at home. Give me the the best lasagna. On earth spaghetti bowling. I'm super happy at the embassy to different story at the embassy. I tried to elevate and do things like the more buji more more more. A little fancy. But i don't have it. You know i love to make. I can tell you that i lived to make bef- watlington for my family for christmas which a bunch of side and i think before a good doctor. I'm not saying. I'm not sure if it's my favorite thing to do but there's a lot of things like to cook with like halibut and pork belly and things like that. But i don't necessarily have one dish that i would be like. Yes because what. I cook there. It's not what i cook at home. So your personal and your personal life do gravitate towards a particular style of food or a particular type of cuisine more so than than others. I've been more Into like we were talking about. Korean food korean. Thai food's loss of last four five years. Actually i love that. I feel like french food. I think it's really good because everything with butter and heavy cream makes everything better. But the i've been going towards more agent and also to be honest to learn a little more about southern food in us. That's something i didn't know as well when i got here just southern food and that's just something that's pretty deep. Fry everything here. Base a anything wrong with us. It's very much like french cuisine. It's heavy on the butter heavy on heavy on different milks and yet and no portion control whatsoever. No that was the adjustments. The first time is out like the day. After arriving dc. I went out to eat and i was like. Wow because even in portugal sometimes you can ask for half of the portion. You even pay less so you can. I have half of the salmon we broccoli whatever and then the instead of being six dollars you pay like four in here. There's that option in. Remember when i saw the first like yeah like now understand. It was that and it was the free refills. So i would ask for a coke and people ask you want when i was like no. I'm not going pay for either one so only after two months i realized i was like you. Don't pay for refills out in portugal. You pay even for water restaurants if you ask for water. It's not tabbies from the bottle. So you got to pay for the bottle so one question. You mentioned How you create elevate your dishes and stuff like that. And they got me thinking about plenty. Do you have a particular favorite technique or favorite garnish. Your favorite When you pleading in general is there something that you like to gravitate more toward. I guess this question. I tried to follow rule which is textures and it goes a little tied with asian food. A lot of people like asian foods invested in a. Why does it's probably the scenes in the world that when you eat something. There's always something crunch softy. And that's kind of when you have that in your mouth. It's much much better if if you believe just a chocolate mousse but if you sprinkle either now that's on top. That's probably more interesting because you have a texture thing so for me. I try more and more z. Years to play textures. Just make to understand if you have something creamy. You need to have something crunchy. So that's always where my brain goes. After i kind of visualize the this what can i add to have. That will crunch bids business to play a little bit with extra absolutely. That's why people like jelly jelly sandwich rights because some people like crunchy peanut butter. And that's i think that's the i mean i think i think the biggest once i really kind of i i have no background in it in terms of education but i do kinda just gravitated us. I comb their hearts will be more. My first adjustment really was like once like seeing all the different things that come together on a plate. Like your sam Play any other. You know boozy restaurant and you know they. They they.

portugal david martin six dollars tomorrow night washington five brazil christmas four years ago eighties euro eastern europe five plumbers five shots obama michelle first one question four an hour and a half
"davide" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"davide" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Well, I'm talking about Will Ferrell against Norway. Oh, that is one of the Super Bowl ads as Mr Fair with, uh oh, my goodness. A pitchman for GM, and he is gonna take on Norway. Well, it's either gonna be really funny or really not. You know what these are polarizing there either. Really good. Or you're like walking out of the theater going on, man. I don't know if I'm just out of it, but I haven't seen him. And I mean, has he had a lot of new stuff Come out the last five years doing that Ron Burgundy podcast thing. Yeah, I don't know. Whole line. Yeah, well, OK, but that Z coming up with Super Bowl, of course on But of course you're asked us laugh had it because then that could spread anyway. Market over market today is mixed as the big news of the day would have to be the new CEO of of Amazon As Jeff Bezos has been there, only CEO and he's gonna Promote himself to executive chairman where he will still have full control. Believe me, but Andy Jassy is taking on the Davide operational role and private sector employment better than anticipated. Triple what was anticipated as some of the economic lockdowns and government lockdowns started to add just a bit, so there was little hiring done. 174,000 jobs added January in the private sector, according to 80, people here the real time numbers down down 56 at 6 30,031. NASDAQ Up three the S and P Up one point Gold is down. One oil is up 2% and our 10 year bond Yield 1.13 All right this afternoon, Christina and Sam remembering a fallen officer, Deputy Sheriff Adam Gibson. That's Kitty O'Neil. And that's what she's got coming up starting at four o'clock this afternoon. All right, let's get to what you're what happened for Wednesday, February 3rd. What do we have this hour? Albert? Yes, the first year. I'm sorry with this year 1977%..

Norway Jeff Bezos CEO Will Ferrell Mr Fair Andy Jassy Deputy Sheriff Adam Gibson Ron Burgundy GM Albert executive chairman Davide Amazon Christina officer Sam
"davide" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"davide" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Judge Clay Jenkins says residents must register for an appointment online at the most vulnerable will be selected based on specific criteria. We look that zip codes that are hardest hit for Cove it that have the most infection in them. They tend to be the zip codes that had the least amount of insurance and the most amount of essential workers. Anyone 65 are older are with underlying health risk are encouraged to register online. Deborah People's has officially announced she will be running for Fort Worth Mayor. Tarrant County Democratic chair and retired 18 anti executive is the only one in the race so far, but surprises not seeking re election candidates have until January, 15th to sign up. I'm not running against anybody. I'm running for this city, and so I welcome anybody that wants to get in the race. I think the more people you have. It brings different perspective to the table and we need that source close to council member Brian Bird says he will be making an Announcement next week on the race, and it's time now for the Kayla You have traffic watch. Here's Michael Scott. 3 60 traveling North bound construction and now, right, that's going to get your way. This is right that plan your parkway. The accident blocks the life lane. It's heavy from Arkansas Lane. And then just past that you've got the construction between Haberman division in the right lane. We're seeing about a 10 to 12 minute delay in the area with Kay alive right now, Traffic of Michael's brother This is the data show. I'm Amy. Now. This is Dave. Let us wake you up with all the news you need to know, plus traffic and weather on the five. It's real news and information in the morning with Davide Mi 5 to 9 a.m. on 5 70 K l I f If you're struggling with your mortgage,.

Michael Scott. Deborah People Judge Clay Jenkins Arkansas Lane Brian Bird Tarrant County Fort Worth Mayor Davide Mi Dave executive Kay
Internet Archive Book Scanning with Davide Semenzin

Software Engineering Daily

15:08 min | 2 years ago

Internet Archive Book Scanning with Davide Semenzin

"Welcome to the show. Thank you. You're on the Internet Archive. What does the Internet archive do. That's a great question. Deterrent archive is the world's largest digital library, and whereas most people may know of us because of the way back machine, which is this really rather needs tool that allows you to go back in time and kind of see what web pages used to look like. We really are fully-fledged online is the library and that we have different types of media types. We hold texts and television and audio images, movies, all sorts of things and yeah, the introduce archive you can think of as this huge repository of Internet. When did you start working there? I started here in two thousand sixteen. So. We've been yeah for years. And what do you work on their today? Well, I work on the books. That's mostly what I would I have always been on. I'm spending the bits inside of this. So usually when we think about our media types, we think of in terms of bits and bits out how we procured them, and how we distribute them. My specialty is working on the book bits in saw in order to build up our collection of almost four million books we have Candan, and my job is to sort of keep running the whole pipeline that allows us to do that. So over the last four years, we've my team, I built it. And now we achieved over our objective of being able to digitize million books per year which we're doing, and it's pretty interesting challenge so far. So you work on book digitisation and I WanNa talk about that. But first, let's talk more about the Internet archive at a high level. He told me about what is being stored across the Internet archive and who pays for it, and how do people use it just share a little bit more about the Internet Archive. Yeah. That's a great question. So I'm going to start from a WHO pays for it because I think that's the result of depth and that question Internet Archive. If you think about it as a repository, it's just essentially a bunch of hard drives spinning connected to the Internet. Somebody's GONNA. Pay For both danger and connection and hard drives and the electricity and all of that largely you can think. Of of our revenues in treated front weight. So we're a nonprofit and we don't really run for profit businesses. We don't benefit in any way of the data that comes on on our servers. We do benefit from your donations and so by and large, we are a community funded effort, and so if you type slash donate, we actually just added integration with apple pay so people will not help us. That'd be great. So we receive a fair amount of money that we we need to run from patrons, Cintas like people who supported us. On the side, we do have some some small some businesses. So we have our archive it. Our arm where essentially contract alto were machine capabilities and we we are maintaining a very large amount of curated website collections. In fact, we I, think we have about seven hundred can ization that are that are partnering with us to create these collections and if you tens of billions euros that have been collected for for our partners, and so they pay us to do the service and we do it for them and same is true for books. digitisation. So as we have built up to large infrastructure that is required to do this kind of tasks, we have to an extent, the ability to contract out to third parties, and so we do get some some revenue streams that way not anything particularly substantial in terms of like our ability to to sustain ourselves. But you know every little bit helps and then obviously throughout the twenty twenty, five years of our existence, our founder Brewster Kahle has. Chipped in here in Deir a significant amount, I guess over the years to to keep us running. So we have donations we have a little bit of our non for profit business, and then we have brewster who is there so This is in terms of who pays for it, but the question would be I guess who benefits from it. Right and that's a very, very large segment of the Internet. We're not the biggest website on the Internet. They think we are. We're ranking about two hundred and something the Alexa rank. But since we've been around for a long time, the users that that lovers the Lavas like I, every day I am in contact with people who tell me their story about how they use the Internet archive for their specific need always always amazed by the depth and breadth of. The of the use cases user spring to us. So it it spans from teachers to researchers, journalists to lawyers Theresa very, very large diversity also in terms of the country's from the backgrounds from from when users from. So it's kind of hard to to to paint them with the same brush but in general I want to say they are people who have some degree of laugh for knowledge and you may know our our motto, our slogan our mission is Universal Access to all knowledge, and so I guess people who have an interest in that eventually land on on our website. Okay. Well, let's talk about book digitisation as a particular project that is under the auspices of the Internet Archive. What is book digitisation? So, books digitisation is the effort of transforming physical books into digital artifacts. So that's the definition can take it forms. You know if you are if you have a scanner in your home and your scanning document in a way, that's obviously that's digitisation if you take pictures of the book. That's a book book digitization. So the definition that needs to be applied to the use case at hand, there have been other efforts at large scale of books. This decision famously Google had one but dare. Different From Ours, for instance, where they did distractive digitisation so they would pull the spines from books and and turn dot process into a sort of sensitive. Kind of problem we do non destructive book dissertation and I think non-destructive bit. It's just a little bit as important in the Beth nation as the fact that we're these books digitizing them so that we can keep them so that we don't destroy them. So the process by which we turn books into bits and then returned books to wherever they came from or wherever they need to go. So Why would I want to digitize a book and how many books get digitized each day just tell me more about the volume that's going through this. I'm very happy to answer this. So the reason why you would want to digitize book there's multiple. So think about for instance, the first thing that comes to mind is obviously preservation if famous birtherism is that accessibility drives preservation so if you don't have something. It's almost like it doesn't exist especially in this age of information, we do have immediate access to all of all of these resources and so if we if you actually think about this, if you have to go to the library to to procure a certain book chances are you won't, and if the if the record of that book actually doesn't exist, you may never get to it and were. This is a problem is for all of this huge amount of books that were printed in the twentieth century for which there is really no digital equivalent books nowadays that are published like currently obviously, they have a book artifacts. That stuff is not to get lost. and. That stuff is searchable and it's reachable but we have. Tens of millions of books that are unaccounted for and as time progresses getting lost, and if we if somebody doesn't save them, they will be lost forever and that's that would be a pity and huge loss of human effort and so but first of all, I think important to scope the problem I think the D estimates that there is about one hundred, million books out there. Give or take unique unique books and. Scanning them we're, probably not gonNA scan all all one hundred of them first of all because. You would be able to source and that's my fire the hardest thing. So we tried to scope down the problem and trying to figure out. Okay. How can we do this in a way that is useful for people so first of all, I think we had to come up with a list of books that we wanted to get into we knew. Books that are important and we need to can these first so that? We'll. We'll get. We'll get into to people and this will be evidently immediately useful and a good place for us to start was freaky Pedia, which is collected. A long list of SPN's the where commonly cited in Wikipedia compiled the list came out to a few hundred, thousand books, and so whenever we we come upon one of those sourcing process, we make sure that we get. We can talk about the senator sourcing, Proxima, little bit later but in general, we do have a little bit of a concept of priority or at least we did this was the first million million and a half. And then the problem was that we started running out of books you would be surprised how hard it is to source books by by the half a million you know and if you if you do it by your smaller scale, it doesn't really make sense to to us in terms of maintaining our our economic scale. So the whole system works only if you scan at huge volume and time and but huge volume, we're talking about a million bucks a year, which is about three thousand books day some things some days we'll do thirty, five somedays. We'll do twenty five on a seven days week averages houses about. Between Twenty to twenty, twenty, five, thousand books. Every book is about three hundred pages so that. COMES OUT PRETTY NEAT about million million pages per day five to seven million pages per week and you know that's not a huge amount of data in total. I wouldn't be surprised I. think like last time I checked it was about between ten and fifteen terabytes of data week. So we're not talking about huge amounts but it's not a small amount eater and we can talk about the challenges of Piping data over the Internet in a reliable way later but it's a significant volume and this operation is running you know twenty, four seven. And so. In terms of why even do this? So I called for the first part, which is obviously people want to get to the books. There is a second benefit in having digitize books, and that it's a wholly new format, it allows you to interact with the body of knowledge in a way that you never have before if you have. A physical book artifact, it has some very desirable properties, for instance, very low random access time and doesn't depend on the battery. It's very, very hard to censor, and these are not properties of digital artifact but this is the active factor searchable, and in fact that we have like it's pretty amazing next search engine where you can instantly search all forty million text items that we have. So that's a million books plus all of the patents papers I'll all sorts of stuff and you can search that instantly that was just not possible with the previous format. So I don't think this is dwell ISM in any way I think books. Digital format and books their physical format will continue to coexist. They just help each other out, and in fact, if we are able to digitize them in the first place is because of the properties of. Physical artifacts that they don't just disappear. If we find one, we can scan it. Well. Those are great summary of what you do and I can tell how excited you are about it. Let's talk a little bit more about the high level, and then we'll get into the engineering. So can you describe the steps of digitisation in more detail if I have a book how am I digitized it? Yeah. So, the books that position pipeline is predecing people and it's like in a way if you're an engineer I think is kind of what to expect so I D-. A physical sorting. Step where your book is ingested into the system. It's given ID and it's it's placed in a container. So we know that the the exists. So to speak the second step is it gets to a scanner. The scanner picks it up within the in the machine loads up the data necessary whereby The books method data we can. We're going to have to talk about that. I, guess it's pretty interesting facet of it all and then proceeded to actually scan it, which means they turned the pages page by page and they take pictures of the pages, and once this process done they click upload and the book vanishes into the ether and so at this point, we have a fork the digital artifact goes into our servers divisible artifacts either goes back to the person who gave it to us in the first place or it goes into our warehouse. and. This largely depends on what kind of book it is. So obviously, the recent larger conversation to be had about copyright and like what books is it is it okay to scan and under what guys it is but suppose we are just you know scanning Yearbook Jeff and you you just wrote the book and you want to have it digitized to risk no claim on it just wanted back at the end. So after we're done scanning it, we're handing it back to you with slip inside which will tell you the Internet archive identifier and the. Or is just the name of the item on the Internet Archive. Everything is an item and you're just going go to type slash details, slash your identifier and a few hours. Later, you will find her book. Wile you wait the second part of the pipeline is GONNA kick off. So That's the digital server side stuff and it's divided essentially three phases. We have a first phase which it's a preprocessing stage where we get a look this images that came raw from the camera we'll look at them crop firm we discovered them and we just make sure that everything is is ready to go. There was a second phase of Manual Review Sa- currently all books that we upload have to be checked by a human for correctness, and so this is a step were. Reviewer just goes through the images in shorts that everything is fine and then when this is done, they kick off the third stage of the pipeline, which is A. Is the real processing stage where we take all of these files and compiled them in such a way that they are suitable for consumption by our web front end what we call book reader and from their wheel derive. We call them to rotate formats such as PDF, Abi e POB and either a text file. So CR it all happens at at this stage. This is kind of like the bird I view of the of the books that decision pipeline.

Internet Archive Twenty Twenty Brewster Kahle Cintas Internet Google Alexa Candan Apple Theresa Manual Review Sa Senator Wikipedia Founder Engineer