18 Burst results for "David greybeard"

"david greybeard" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:03 min | 8 months ago

"david greybeard" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"East, Africa that's from the National Geographic documentary. The hope which came out earlier this year goodall taught us how much we have in common with chimpanzees over the decades she expanded her work and became a leading conservationist and climate activists. Jane. Goodall. Is the founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and United Nations. Messenger. Of Peace She's also dame dame of the British Empire and she's the author of more than a dozen books including my friends, the wild chimpanzees which came out in Nineteen sixty-nine and reason for hope, a spiritual journey which came out thirty years later, lots more books in between Jane Goodall welcomed on point and congratulations on sixty years of research in Gombe Bay and it's truly an honor to have you on the program. Well. Thank you. Antony, and it's lovely to be on the program which I've been on the number of times before and yeah, sixty years is pretty amazing. He is gone. Well, it is amazing in the work you've done is truly amazing I wondered if you could serve take us back. We heard that clip from the documentary, which is wonderful by the way take us back to July of nineteen, sixty, nineteen, sixty or twenty, twenty-six you land in Tanzania to study chimpanzees. What was the first challenged you faced when you arrived? Actually the first challenge was getting to the Gumby National Park where it was a game reserve than. The the problem was that on the other side of Lake, Tanganyika just to cross the were. They Belgian. Congo's it was then had erupted. There was violence, and so the little town when when we arrived was absolutely fall of fleeing refugees love step Olympus. So it was it was about two weeks before I was allowed to proceed along lake and get to the Gumby. National Park but once I got there. It will seem rather unreal. It just felt am I really here can this really really be me Climbing up after the tent was erected and looking out over the lake and hearing baboon sparking. Breathing, in the smell of the forest really was magic. I bet it was I have to imagine that just finding your subjects that chimpanzees I mean. It wasn't like you arrive there put up your tent and then sort of sat down with your notebook and just started studying them I mean how did you? How did you go about finding them first of all? I put the first three weeks. I was made to take a local guy with me by the British authorities. It was still part of the crumbling British Empire back then. They wouldn't let me go out alone. So he showed me some of the trails and the could was you climb up to a place which overlooks the valley and then you wait and you hope that the windows to violent. So you can see trees moving and often it turned out to be baboons or monkeys, but sometimes, it was chimpanzees and once I was able to be on my own, which is. Exactly what I wanted to do. Then, I, would find a tree that was ripe fruit. They're very early in the morning and wait and chimpanzees away. As soon as they saw me, we've never seen a white eight before. You. Know they just they're very conservative. And Well I was really worried though Sony money to six months. I was afraid that the money would run out before I found anything really exciting. Of course you did find lots of exciting things. One of the things I wanted to ask you is to talk about your connection with them and to to animals in general because one who has watched a film of you interacting with chimpanzees I mean, there's this incredible sense of. Connection it's it's not just a skilled scientists observing. There's something. That is really human to animal connection I'd love you to describe that because it's quite powerful. It always brings tears to my eyes when I watched the footage of you working with these animals. I think it started when I was born loving animals until all my life by being outside and Magadan waiting for. Eggs to hatch into baby birds waiting till they've fledged and keeping very quiet. So the parent birds got used to me and would come in and feed the babies and I would watch squirrel occasionally there was Fox, and of course, I had this wonderful dog who taught me so much about animals. So when I got to Gumby I hadn't been to university nobody else was studying gyms fact virtually nobody was studying anything in the wild and so I just did the same thing and gradually gradually chimpanzees got used to me. and. Was David. GREYBEARD. Beloved David Greybeard who I began to lose his fear and he really helped the others to lose fear because if he lives in a group with them instead of running away they social I suppose they thought well David sitting and he was a leader. So she comes so scary after all Aman gradually the lack of fear turn to aggression that was a pretty nasty. Through four weeks where the chimpanzees three to like Predator, it wanted to go away. But I. Didn't I just sat pretended I was interested in them and interestingly it was specially when it was raining and you know if you're watching people in the pelting rain, you see him take risks though. The road they normally wouldn't an chimps go a bit like that. But anyway eventually they realize I wasn't going and luckily they didn't try and attack me and much much stronger than we are. And then that aggression turn to tolerance acceptance and trust and the seems that you saw in that in that documentary, you know we couldn't do that today. We don't interact with them today. We know they can catch diseases we can catch this. So it's not today but back then. Anybody who was studying animals tried to have a close relationship and I those days absolutely. The Best I knew the chimpanzees so well, I trust them may trusted me. And it was wonderful. It sounds absolutely magical. I WanNa ask you about. One of these major discoveries that chimps make and use tools nobody knew.

goodall David Greybeard British Empire Jane Goodall Jane Goodall Institute Gumby National Park Africa Jane Gombe Bay founder Tanzania Congo Tanganyika National Park United Nations Antony Magadan Sony Fox
"david greybeard" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:42 min | 9 months ago

"david greybeard" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"So and you know fascinating more and more highly intellectual people most offensive signs, physicists and so on. On Francis Collins, he started off some agnostic. Then when he began unraveling the human genome, he changed completely and became a believer and all of these great brains have said there is no way that what's happened is just John's. At intelligence behind the universe is. What it is, who it is, probably what it is I, haven't the faintest idea, but I'm absolutely show that that is something. Seeking for that something. To being human. Well Jane. Goodall. Thank you so much It's a real honor to speak with you and a pleasure and I was very glad as I was getting ready for this been in your presence physically those years ago because I can imagine you and. Your, thank you for all the gifts you've given to. Really, than I've loved talking to you and I was just going to depress my video, got a billion press. So I can see you. Oh, I, don't actually I only have sound. Sorry I'm sad about that. But maybe in this strange world we inhabit, we will physically be in the same place again, one of. Not. Okay. Good I'm glad to hear you say that. You can see the icon see. Rusty. That he is special. Special. Here. Is Mum Cookie people in my life and David Greybeard. Greybeard what's up here, but he's GonNa each case. He's in the house. Okay It, was me talking to you. Thank you so much. Jane Goodall is the founder of Jayme Goodall Institute, which has a presence in more than thirty countries. She's been the subject of many films and documentaries including Jane Goodall. The hope and her books.

Jane Goodall David Greybeard Jayme Goodall Institute Goodall Francis Collins John founder
"david greybeard" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:02 min | 9 months ago

"david greybeard" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"That moment which you wouldn't get if you didn't have empathy either been also the code scientific approach I, believe post led to a lot of suffering on this planet. I. Mean, you also experienced because I think you were open because you are seeing observing. You also experienced empathy. On the part of the chimpanzees you were studying, right? I mean that there's that moment with David Greybeard that you've described about offering him a piece of fruit which he did not take. But he took your hand instead, he took it drop to gently squeeze my fingers which. Chimpanzees reassure each of. which you understood as him, sensing, motivation and honoring it. Well you know the thing was we totally understood each other in a language that clearly predated human spoken language language off the postal languages. So almost the same holding hands passing on Olympic Kissing. Embracing. You know a judge just. When we communicate nobly, virtually the same as chimpanzees swagger, shake off his son. Male, chimpanzee is sometimes remind. Number, human. Male. Politicians. Lay Bristol, and they tried look big important and intimidated by punching the lipson furious I'll. Leave. A.. I'm Christopher Tampa. Being today exploring what it means to be human with the legendary primatology St- Jane.

David Greybeard primatology St- Jane Christopher Tampa lipson Bristol
"david greybeard" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:09 min | 10 months ago

"david greybeard" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"L. V. Leaky. She has observed the daily lives of chimpanzees in east. Africa That's from the National Geographic Documentary, the hope which came out earlier this year goodall taught us how much we have in common with chimpanzees, and over the decades she expanded her work and became a leading conservationist and climate activist. Jane, Goodall is the founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and United Nations Messenger of peace. She's also dame dame of the British Empire and. She's the author of more than a dozen books including my friends, the wild chimpanzees, which came out in nineteen, sixty nine and reason for hope, spiritual journey, which came out thirty years later lots more books in between Jane Goodall welcomed on point and congratulations on sixty years of research in Gone Bay, and it's truly an honor to have you on the program. Well. Thank you and to me and it's lovely to be on the program which I've seen on the number of times before and yeah. Sixty years pretty amazing. I don't. Go well, it is amazing in the work you've done is truly amazing. I wondered if you could serve, take us back. We heard that clip from the documentary which is wonderful by the way take us back to July of nineteen sixty, nineteen, sixty, twenty, twenty-six, you land in Tanzania to study chimpanzees. What was the first challenged? You faced when you arrived? Actually the first challenge was getting to the Gumby National Park. It was a game reserve and. The the problem. was that on the other side of Lake Tanganyika just across the world. They Belgian Congo's it was then had erupted, there was violence and so the little town when when we arrived was absolutely full of fleeing refugees lost their. Possessions, so it was, it was about two weeks before I was allowed to proceed along lake. Get get to the Gumby National Park, but once off their. You know it seem brother unreal. It just felt am I really here. Can this really really be me? Climbing up after the tent was erected, looking out over the lake and hearing baboons, balking breathing in the smell of the forest, really was magic I. Bet it was I have to imagine that just finding your subjects, the chimpanzees I mean it wasn't like you arrive there put up your tent and then sort of sat down with your notebook and just started studying them. I mean how did you? How did you go about finding them first of all? Well I for the first two three weeks, I was made to take a local guy with me by the British authorities was still part of the crumbling Grisham Empire back then? and. They wouldn't let me go out alone. So? He showed me some of the trails and the secret was you climb up to a place which overlooks the valley, and then you wait, and you hope that the window to violent, so you can see trees moving, and often it turn turn out to be baboon on monkeys, but sometimes it was chimpanzees. And once I was able to be on my own, which is. Exactly what I wanted to do a then. I would find a tree that was ripe fruit. That very early in the morning and wait and chimpanzees runaway. As soon as they saw me, we'd never seen a white eight. You know they just the very conservative. and. Well! I was really worried Sony money to six months and I was afraid that the money would run out before I found anything really exciting. Of course you did find lots of exciting things and one of the things I wanted to ask you is to talk about your connection with them and t to animals in general, because anyone who has watched a film of you interacting with chimpanzees. I mean there's this incredible sense of. Connection it's. It's not just a skilled scientists observing something. That is really human to animal connection I'd love you to describe that because it's quite powerful. It always brings tears to my eyes when I watched the footage of you working with these animals. I think it started when I was born loving animals, and said well. My life I being outside in Magadan, waiting for. Eggs to hatch into baby birds waiting till they've fledged and keeping very quiet, so that the parent birds got used to me and would come in and feed the babies. And I would watch squirrel occasionally. There was Fox and of course I had this wonderful dog who taught me so much about animals, so when I got to Gumby I hadn't been to university. Nobody else was studying gyms. Virtually nobody was studying anything in the wild, and so I just did the same thing. And gradually gradually the chimpanzees got use to me and. It was David Greybeard. Love it, David Greybeard I began to lose his fear, and he really helped the others to lose their fear, because if he was in a group with them instead of running away, they sort of I. Suppose they thought well David Sipping Man. He was a leader, so she so scary after all and then gradually. Lack of fear, turn to aggression that was. Pretty Nasty. Through four weeks, where the chimpanzees treated me like Predator, it wanted me to go away. But I didn't. I just sat pretended. I wasn't interested in. And interestingly it was specially when it was raining. And you know if you watching people in the pelting rain, you see, take risks. They'll run across the road. They normally wouldn't an chimps to a bit like that. But anyway eventually they realized I wasn't going, and luckily they didn't try and attack me much much stronger than we are. And then that aggression turn to tolerance, acceptance and trust, and the seems that you saw in that in that documentary. You know we couldn't do that today. We don't interact with them today. We know they can catch. Diseases can catch this, so it's not today, but back then. Anybody who was studying animals tried to have a close relationship and I. Those days were absolutely the best I knew the chimpanzees so well. I trust them and may trusted me. And it was wonderful. It sounds absolutely magical I WANNA. Ask You about. One of these major discoveries that chimps make and use tools. Nobody knew that before you did.

Jane Goodall David Greybeard Gumby National Park Jane Goodall Institute goodall Lake Tanganyika Africa Tanzania Congo Jane Gone Bay Grisham Empire United Nations Messenger of pe founder Magadan Sony Fox
"david greybeard" Discussed on Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls

Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls

07:37 min | 10 months ago

"david greybeard" Discussed on Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls

"By October, van returned to England. As much as Jane loved sharing the campsite with her mother. She relished her time alone in the forest. Jane New the too much noise and activity scared away the animals. At first whenever they spotted her, they would dash away. She could only watch him at a distance with binoculars. Jane work hard to slowly establish the chimpanzees trust. She dressed in a simple outfit that blended in with four surroundings, and she wore the same clothes embry day. She mimicked the chimp's behavior. Each day she packard tin box with a blanket, sweater, food and coffee. And prepared to spend hours upon hours. Silently sitting, waiting and always observing. Most scientists at the time for to give the animals they absorb numbers instead of names. But as Jane grew to not be chimps and their distinct personalities. She named them all. Flow was a popular older female channel and a caring mother Fabian Vegan I'm baby fee. Not all the champs were always carrying. A chimp was charge that Jane causing tumble off the edge of a cliff. She was injured, but okay. Thanks to the soft pushes. That broke her fault. Her favorite champ was David rapier. He was the first. Let chain close. Perhaps he was curious about her as she was about him. On like the others when Jane Approached Them David didn't run. He came to accept her even picking up a Nana from her hand. So gently, no snatching. She wrote in a letter home. It was thanks to David that Jane me to important discoveries. I she saw him eating a Bush bake. Prior to that, scientists had believed chimpanzees only ate plants now. She had evidence that they were omnivores. The second and more important discovery happened when James. Watch David at a termite mound. He broke off a long stalk of grass and inserted it into the mound when he pulled it out, it was covered in termites tasty snack. Soon Jane saw other chimpanzees fishing with grasses. They also strip steaks of their leaves to make crude tools. Something scientists call object modification. Till Ben. It was thought only humans could do that. According to Jane these was cost to either redefine man or accept chimps as human. Careful observations as twenty six year old self pod scientists where a breakthrough in understanding animals. Before those discoveries. Jane had feared that funding for her project. That Kombi would be caught because she hadn't learned anything new. But after she documented the chimps, using tools and National Geographic, society gave a grant to continue chains were. Some critics tried to discredit gentile because she hadn't received academic training beyond high school, so Lewis helped her get admitted to Cambridge University. They recognize the value of her work at Gumby and count the back door her classes. Eventually gene would earn a doctorate from Cambridge in nineteen sixty two. Becoming Dr Jane Goodall. National Geographic wanted to publish a magazine article about Jane's work. And it was hard for her to take pictures in the midst of observations, so they arrange for a wildlife photographer Hugo van logic to join gene. At first, she wasn't happy to have a stranger in what she called her little paradise. Pleased to find out that Hugo love nature and animals as much as she did. National, geographic published Jane's first article. My life among wild chimpanzees with Hugo photographs in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, three, and the nine hundred sixty five. CBS aired the television, Special Miss Gell and the wild chimpanzees, a documentary national geographic made with Hugo's footage. Twenty million viewers watched fascinated by Jane's robbery, knowledge and hard work. quickly, she became a worldwide celebrity. As Jane grew to know and love the chimpanzees, Kombi. Baby came like a family tour. She would later say what an amazing privilege Wass to be utterly accepted by a wild animal. Flow fee David Greybeard under arrest. We're in James Only family at though. Jane and Hugo fell in love beer. After he's assignment and that and he left Gumby Hugo sent chain and urgent telegram. would. She marry him? She answered yes. The Cup of their wedding cake was decorated with a clay figurine of David Greybeard. Pictures of their chimpanzee. France lined the walls up their London reception. Nine hundred sixty four flow birth to another baby flint. Giving Jane an opportunity to observe chimpanzee mothering from the very start. Flow gave flint lots of cuddles. When he was being naughty, she distracted him instead of punishing him. She was playful with their children. Jane Nine that like people chimpanzees laugh when they play watching flows caring patient mothering was an inspiration to Jane when she and Hugo had their son whom they nickname rob. Jane had been more time keeping grub safe as a toddler in Gumby so her students spent more and more time in the field, meanwhile chain began writing books and continued making films with Hugo. As jeans frame grew and family responsibilities changed. She spent less time alone in the forest, observing animals chains. Books were so popular she would spend months away while sharing them with readers. More eager students join Jane At. To learn an assist with her work. In Nineteen, seventy, seven, the Jane Goodall Institute was founded there to study and protect chimpanzees. In one thousand, nine, hundred six chain, attended a conference that made her aware of the threats to welching. In some places in Africa. Hunted? In other parts of the world they were kept in cages for research. This horrified Jane. She? Later said I arrived at the conference. As a scientist, I left us an activist. She became committed.

Dr Jane Goodall Jane New Jane Goodall Institute Gumby Hugo Jane Nine Jane At scientist David Greybeard David Hugo van National Geographic James David rapier England Africa Cambridge University Cambridge Wass gentile robbery
"david greybeard" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

16:54 min | 1 year ago

"david greybeard" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Goodall. Welcome to the show. Thank you very much. I'm thrilled to finally connect. I don't use the word hero. Much certainly been a hero and an idol to me for many decades in a previous lifetime. I want to be a marine biologist and I am also very lucky in a sense that I have you in one place because your team has told me you travel and have traveled three hundred plus days a year for the last several decades but my understanding now is that you are in Bournemouth and I thought we would start perhaps close to the beginning and this certainly takes place in England just as context from your childhood. I understand that you grew up during wartime and I would love to hear you describe what that experience was like. Well now. I'm really glad I grew up at time because although it was shocking I mean we will in Bournemouth but some bombs were dropped here. The German fighters used to dump their bombs near the coast if they hadn't managed to hit the target and whistled of in the Middle. So we had the bombs falling. We had sirens air-raid warnings. We had to go into an air raid shelter which is a little tiny cage really supposed to be keeping people safe so families children were issued them and people were killed and damaged and we never knew the bums would fall in London. My uncle was a surgeon so he come back every other weekend with shocking tales of of what had been happening but the reason I say I was glad I grew up then is because I land take nothing for granted. One Square of chocolate was huge. Treat food was rationed closed garage and We had very little money was no television. Only television. Were the news reels. That was just about the war and so books became very very important and I still got my childhood books here with me in the room as I speak to you and so we luckily have. This garden is my grandmother's House and I spent lots and lots of time with my dog. So the really shocking part was hearing about the Holocaust and seeing photographs of the skeletons of the Jews in the camps were opened up. I mean skeletons of living people and that really changed everything. Life started thinking age ten about good and evil so that was my growing up in the wool. As you were growing up I I read a number of stories that seem to In a sense foreshadow much of what would come later but I read stories of your mother finding you observing earthworms in your bed. I read of stories of you hiding and waiting for more than four hours to see a hen laying an egg and the police almost being called. Because you are missing is is that comfort with patients and on some level isolation. Something that you developed yourself. Is that something? You've observed and other family members Would love to hear you comment on that. If you could it was just me. I mean on the family in a loved animals but they didn't observe them a watch them. I didn't have any Any example tour. I was just born that way and having such a supportive mother. I mean UH swims in my bed imaginable. The Earth and the muck and lots of mothers will be horrified and and throw them out of the window which she just required. Lee said You die here and we took them back in the garden amend the Hen House Story. It's one I tell a lot because we went to stay on a farm in the country and I was given. The job of collecting Henson was appropriate from there. Were no animals. Cooped up in tiny prison-like would Animal concentration accounts. They will free roaming in the field and the hens and the NFL but they lay the eggs in these little hen house. Apparently I began asking. Everybody wins the egg. Come out nobody. Distinctly remember seeing hen go into a hen house and I crawled off to her and skulks of fear. She flew out. I can still feel her wings itching. My face and I must have sought in that little four and a half year. Old Brain will know Hen Malayan kids dangerous place so way to that was the time. I waited and waited in this empty house but was rewarded the head and came in and I didn't know the family being read. I was rushing towards the house and that was mom. You can imagine how worried she was having nearly called the police but instead of how dare. You often do bed that again. We should have killed the magic. She sat down to hear this amazing story. And the reason I love it is less the making a little scientist curiosity asking questions. Not Getting the right on to find out feel self making a mistake not giving up and learning patients. A different kind of mother might have crushed that early scientific curiosity and I might not have done or not done. It seemed to really cultivate your not just ability but perseverance with observation and in watching footage of you and we'll we'll certainly get to Africa and other experiences in your biography that you have to have many sensitivities and I could be off base with that but I want to ask you a bit more about your mother because in reading a New York Times profile from Suppose about a year ago there was a one paragraph that caught my eye and it was related to your childhood during wartime and related to your father's brother. Rex who had joined the Air Force and was killed and the sentence that caught. My eye was one day. We were in Bournemouth in the evening and suddenly she. Your mother screamed wrecks and started sobbing hysterically and it was the very moment he was shot down over Egypt. So just for clarity. Is that to say that. She somehow intuited that he had been shot down before receiving news. I'll absolutely I mean nope we didn't know for quite some time under a different. Asians like we were walking on the beach. Normally we have to go up to our little guest house. The quickest way but on mom decided to take away which she never did. She had a week hot but she took us the long run. I still remember looking up with the Blue Blue Sky. Emceeing an aeroplane quite high and seeing to black things that looked like cigars coming out on each side. Among through me and my assistant to the ground I can still hear the terrible explosion. Am One of those bombs felt right on the path where we would surely have seen if we go short way the normal way. Have you experienced any of that for lack of a better word intuition in your own life in the field or elsewhere or is that something that was unique to your mother? Pretty unique to her. But you know I experience very vividly the presence of my second husband after he guide and it ties in with what other people have seen them felt so in other words. We're going into a different realm here but I don't know what people believe and I'm not quite sure what it all means myself but it's a p people have been asking me what's next big adventure and always say dying because you know when we die the nothing which is fine or something and if there's something what's an adventure to find out you've had you've had more adventures than most and I suppose. This is a good time for those who certainly recognize your name. I think almost everyone will recognize your name. And they'll know that you're considered to be one of the world's foremost experts on chimpanzees but beyond that. I think many people don't know about the early chapters and I'd like to Segue to that because it opens up a number of doors that we can explore. Let's flashback could to March nine thousand nine hundred eighty seven and I believe your passport is missing. Can you explain what has happened? Well we've done a last minute shopping and of course in those days when planes going back and forth that's how long I've lived and it was by boat and we actually I suppose train hustle. Something I can't remember the details and suddenly I found. I didn't have my passport and I remembered we'd been shopping in Peter Jones and so mum rang up shops at they funded. We found somebody to go and collect it who rushed to the dock otherwise I couldn't sailed and all my money would be wasted. So what's the drama with a way to start and that money just just for those? Who aren't familiar W that was painstakingly. Gathered over rather long period of time with various jobs was not. It's not like you had this in a bank account just waiting to be used for whatever purpose for a long period of time school. It was no money for university. I have to have a job. You know we had very little money so I I pulled it a secretarial course which was boring but I got my diploma. I got a job then. Came the letter from a school friend. Inviting me to Kenya so you could save money in London so I went home and got a job a waitress in a hotel around the corner very hard work in those days families coming to spend a week by the seaside. And you've got to look after them for whole week. If you wanted any so the tips the small but hunt made sure they own you. I was saving up for Africa. So it's how I got the money I would love just to spend a moment and we don't have to spend a lot of time on this but discussing Louis Leakey and I've read various accounts of how you connected with him. But I'd like to to hear it directly from you and In perhaps you could describe what it was that he saw in you but that initial contact is and how that came to be is is of great interest to me two could speak to that. I would appreciate it like be staying with my friend for about a couple of months and somebody said to me at a Party. Appeal interested in animals. He released me yours leaky He was curator at that time. A Natural History Museum but of course. He's best known as a a very eminent paleontologist. He'd spent his life with his second wife. Mary Leakey searching for the fossils are stone-age ancestors across Africa and so I was very shy back then but I rang. The museum said I'd love to make an appointment to meet Dr Leaky Voice and I'm leaky what you want. But anyway I was so passionate about animals anyway. Went to see him and he took me all around. He asked me many questions about the stuffed animals. That were there and I think he was impressed. That because I read everything I could about Africa. I on so many of these questions while I mentioned earlier that boring secretarial course. I did two days before I met leaky. His secretary had suddenly quit. He needed a secretary and there. I was never know in this life. So I'm suddenly surrounded by people who can answer all my questions about the mammals and birds reptiles amphibians the insects the plans. It was heaven. Oh you leykis wanted. He see in. May young a feeling that women may better observe us. They were more patient. He also wanted somebody to go and study chimpanzees because of his interest in human evolution. So the fossils of early man that he was uncovering can tell a lot from up fossil about whether the creature walked upright muscle attachments. The wear of the tooth shows roughly. The kind of Diet behavior doesn't plus lies so he reckon there was a apelike human like common ancestor about six million years ago? Just now generally accepted and that he thought Jane Behavior in chimps and humans today is similar or same maybe it came directly from the common ancestor and has been with us through a long separate eagerly journeys in which case he could have a better way of imagining how his early humans used to behave so he wanted a mind uncluttered by the reductionist thinking of the animal behavior. People at the time. It was a very new science. They were anxious to make it a hard science which it shouldn't be and so the fact I hadn't been to college was plus the fact that I was a woman was plus. I was lucky for he. He seems to have picked the winning lottery ticket or at least a a very formidable combination of traits and if we take that mention of patients or his belief that in part women make better observers because of more patients if we flash forward then to you landing in Ghamdi Stream National Park Tanzania from getting the pronunciation correct. I was watching The first net gio maybe not the first but the one of the more recent NAT. Go documentaries about you titled Jane and in that and also in your writing. I believe it took something like five months of constant effort and having chimpanzees flee from your presence to finally be what we might call accepted and I have two questions related to that. The first is what do you think made the difference? Why did they go from fleeing to accepting and second is when you I really had the opportunity to look deeply into a chimpanzees is what did you? What did you see and just as importantly? What did you feel alright? Well the acceptance in the in the movie it sort of look to survey something accepted made. It wasn't like that it was very gradual. It was partly thanks to this one male who began to lose his much ahead of the others. Michael Him David Greybeard subtly white band and because he began to let me get closer and closer I think if I came to group in the forest and he was with that group because they separate into you know separate small groups and sometimes but if he was there than the others were ready to run but he was sitting calmly and I suppose that made them feel well. She can't be so dangerous after all so gradually. I could get closer. And the first time I came close to a group. That didn't run away. I think was one of the proudest moments of my life. You know it made it just in time before the six months money ran out and So go I'd seen David.

Africa Bournemouth Jane Behavior London secretary Hen House Goodall. David Greybeard Louis Leakey New York Times England Peter Jones Mary Leakey Dr Leaky Voice Natural History Museum Henson Kenya NFL scientist
"david greybeard" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

16:56 min | 1 year ago

"david greybeard" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Goodall. Welcome to the show. Thank you very much. I'm thrilled to finally connect. I don't use the word hero. Much certainly been a hero and an idol to me for many decades in a previous lifetime. I want to be a marine biologist and I am also very lucky in a sense that I have you in one place because your team has told me you travel and have traveled three hundred plus days a year for the last several decades but my understanding now is that you are in Bournemouth and I thought we would start perhaps close to the beginning and this certainly takes place in England just as context from your childhood. I understand that you grew up during wartime and I would love to hear you describe what that experience was like. Well now. I'm really glad I grew up at time because although it was shocking I mean we will in Bournemouth but some bombs were dropped here. The German fighters used to dump their bombs near the coast if they hadn't managed to hit the target and whistled of in the Middle. So we had the bombs falling. We had sirens air-raid warnings. We had to go into an air raid shelter which is a little tiny cage really supposed to be keeping people safe so families children were issued them and people were killed and damaged and we never knew with the bums would fall in London. My uncle was a surgeon so he come back every other weekend with shocking tales of of what had been happening but the reason I say I was glad I grew up then is because I land take nothing for granted. One Square of chocolate was a huge treat. Food was rationed closed garage and We had very little money out. There was no television. Only television. Were the news reels. That was just about the war and so books became very very important and I still got my childhood books here with me in the room as I speak to you and so we luckily have. This garden is my grandmother's House and I spent lots and lots of time with my dog. So the really shocking part was hearing about the Holocaust and seeing photographs of the skeletons of the Jews in the camps were opened up. I mean skeletons of living people and that really changed everything. Life started thinking age ten about good and evil so that was my growing up in the wool. As you were growing up I I read a number of stories that seem to In a sense foreshadow much of what would come later but I read stories of your mother finding you observing earthworms in your bed. I read of stories of you hiding and waiting for more than four hours to see a hen laying an egg and the police almost being called. Because you are missing is is that comfort with patients and on some level isolation. Something that you developed yourself. Is that something? You've observed and other family members Would love to hear you comment on that. If you could it was just me. I mean on the family in a loved animals but they didn't observe them a watch them. I didn't have any Any example tour. I was just born that way and having such a supportive mother. I mean UH swims in my bed imaginable. The Earth and the muck and lots of mothers will be horrified and and throw them out of the window which she just required. Lee said You die here and we took them back in the garden amend the Hen House Story. It's one I tell a lot because we went to stay on a farm in the country and I was given. The job of collecting Henson was appropriate from there. Were no animals. Cooped up in tiny prison-like would Animal concentration accounts. They will free roaming in the field and the hens and the NFL but they lay the eggs in these little hen house. Apparently I began asking. Everybody wins the egg. Come out nobody. Distinctly remember seeing hen go into a hen house and I crawled off to her and skulks of fear. She flew out. I can still feel her wings itching. My face and I must have sought in that little four and a half year. Old Brain will know Hen Malayan kids dangerous place so way to that was the time. I waited and waited in this empty house but was rewarded the head and came in and I didn't know the family being read. I was rushing towards the house and that was mom. You can imagine how worried she was having nearly called the police but instead of how dare. You often do bed that again. We should have killed the magic. She sat down to hear this amazing story. And the reason I love it is less the making a little scientist curiosity asking questions. Not Getting the right on to find out feel self making a mistake not giving up and learning patients. A different kind of mother might have crushed that early scientific curiosity and I might not have done or not done. It seemed to really cultivate your not just ability but perseverance with observation and in watching footage of you and we'll we'll certainly get to Africa and other experiences in your biography that you have to have many sensitivities and I could be off base with that but I want to ask you a bit more about your mother because in reading a New York Times profile from Suppose about a year ago there was a one paragraph that caught my eye and it was related to your childhood during wartime and related to your father's brother. Rex who had joined the Air Force and was killed and the sentence that caught. My eye was one day. We were in Bournemouth in the evening and suddenly she. Your mother screamed wrecks and started sobbing hysterically and it was the very moment he was shot down over Egypt. So just for clarity. Is that to say that. She somehow intuited that he had been shot down before receiving news. I'll absolutely I mean nope we didn't know for quite some time under a different. Asians like we were walking on the beach. Normally we have to go up to our little guest house. The quickest way but on this occasion mom decided to take away which she never did. She had a week hot but she took us the long run. I still remember looking up with the Blue Blue Sky. Emceeing an aeroplane quite high and seeing to black things that looked like cigars coming out on each side. Among through me and my assistant to the ground I can still hear the terrible explosion. Am One of those bombs felt right on the path where we would surely have seen if we go short way the normal way. Have you experienced any of that for lack of a better word intuition in your own life in the field or elsewhere or is that something that was unique to your mother? Pretty unique to her. But you know I experience very vividly the presence of my second husband after he guide and it ties in with what other people have seen them felt so in other words. We're going into a different realm here but I don't know what people believe and I'm not quite sure what it all means myself but it's a p people have been asking me what's next big adventure and always say dying because you know when we die the nothing which is fine or something and if there's something what's an adventure to find out you've had you've had more adventures than most and I suppose. This is a good time for those who certainly recognize your name. I think almost everyone will recognize your name. And they'll know that you're considered to be one of the world's foremost experts on chimpanzees but beyond that. I think many people don't know about the early chapters and I'd like to Segue to that because it opens up a number of doors that we can explore. Let's flashback could to March nine thousand nine hundred eighty seven and I believe your passport is missing. Can you explain what has happened? Well we've done a last minute shopping and of course in those days when planes going back and forth that's how long I've lived and it was by boat and we actually I suppose train hustle. Something I can't remember the details and suddenly I found. I didn't have my passport and I remembered we'd been shopping in Peter Jones and so mum rang up shops at they funded. We found somebody to go and collect it who rushed to the dock otherwise I couldn't sailed and all my money would be wasted. So what's the drama with a way to start and that money just just for those? Who aren't familiar W that was painstakingly. Gathered over rather long period of time with various jobs was not. It's not like you had this in a bank account just waiting to be used for whatever purpose for a long period of time school. It was no money for university. I have to have a job. You know we had very little money so I I pulled it a secretarial course which was boring but I got my diploma. I got a job then. Came the letter from a school friend. Inviting me to Kenya so you could save money in London so I went home and got a job a waitress in a hotel around the corner very hard work in those days families coming to spend a week by the seaside. And you've got to look after them for whole week. If you wanted any so the tips the small but hunt made sure they own you. I was saving up for Africa. So it's how I got the money I would love just to spend a moment and we don't have to spend a lot of time on this but discussing Louis Leakey and I've read various accounts of how you connected with him. But I'd like to to hear it directly from you and In perhaps you could describe what it was that he saw in you but that initial contact is and how that came to be is is of great interest to me two could speak to that. I would appreciate it like be staying with my friend for about a couple of months and somebody said to me at a party. If he'll interested in animals he released me yours leaky He was curator at that time. A Natural History Museum but of course. He's best known as a a very eminent paleontologist. He'd spent his life with his second wife. Mary Leakey searching for the fossils are stone-age ancestors across Africa and so I was very shy back then but I rang. The museum said I'd love to make an appointment to meet Dr Leaky an appointment. I'm leaky what you want. But anyway I was so passionate about animals anyway. Went to see him and he took me all around. He asked me many questions about the stuffed animals. That were and I think he was impressed. That because I read everything I could about Africa. I on so many of these questions while I mentioned earlier that boring secretarial course. I did two days before I met leaky. His secretary had suddenly quit. He needed a secretary and there. I was never know in this life. So I'm suddenly surrounded by people who can answer all my questions about the mammals and birds reptiles amphibians the insects the plans. It was heaven. Oh you leykis wanted. He see in. May young a feeling that women may better observe us. They were more patient. He also wanted somebody to go and study chimpanzees because of his interest in human evolution. So the fossils of early man that he was uncovering can tell a lot from up fossil about whether the creature walked upright muscle attachments. The wear of the tooth shows roughly. The kind of Diet behavior doesn't plus lies so he reckon there was a apelike human like common ancestor about six million years ago? Just now generally accepted and that he thought Jane Behavior in chimps and humans today is similar or same maybe it came directly from the common ancestor and has been with us through a long separate eagerly journeys in which case he could have a better way of imagining how his early humans used to behave so he wanted a mind uncluttered by the reductionist thinking of the animal behavior. People at the time. It was a very new science. They were anxious to make it a hard science which it shouldn't be and so the fact I hadn't been to college was plus the fact that I was. A woman was plus. I was lucky. Well he he seems to have picked the winning lottery ticket or at least a a very formidable combination of traits and if we take that mention of patients or his belief that in part women make better observers because of more patients if we flash forward then to you landing in Gumby Stream National Park Tanzania from getting the pronunciation correct. I was watching The first net gio maybe not the first but the one of the more recent NAT. Go documentaries about you titled Jane and in that and also in your writing. I believe it took something like five months of constant effort and having chimpanzees flee from your presence to finally be what we might call accepted and I have two questions related to that. The first is what do you think made the difference? Why did they go from fleeing to accepting and second is when you I really had the opportunity to look deeply into a chimpanzees is what did you? What did you see and just as importantly? What did you feel alright? Well the acceptance in the in the movie it sort of looked to survey something accepted made. It wasn't like that it was very gradual. It was partly thanks to this one male who began to lose his fear much ahead of the others. Michael Him David Greybeard subtly white band and because he began to let me get closer and closer I think if I came to group in the forest and he was with that group because they separate into you know separate small groups and sometimes but if he was there than the others were ready to run but he was sitting calmly and I suppose that made them feel well. She can't be so dangerous after all so gradually. I could get closer. And the first time I came close to a group. That didn't run away. I think was one of the proudest moments of my life. You know it made it just in time before the six months money ran out and So go I'd seen David.

Africa Bournemouth Jane Behavior London Hen House Goodall. secretary David Greybeard Louis Leakey New York Times England Peter Jones Mary Leakey Dr Leaky Natural History Museum Henson Kenya NFL scientist
Jane Goodall: The Woman Who Never Gave Up

BrainStuff

04:07 min | 2 years ago

Jane Goodall: The Woman Who Never Gave Up

"Some people just don't quit. It's okay to quit occasionally, it's best to, but let Dr Jane Goodall be an example, to us, all sometimes you have a far fetched dream and instead of dismissing it, you do it anyway. And when you've cheered what you set up to do, just when you're at the top of your game, your dream might change based on what you've learned along the way your knee dream is bigger and more difficult to realize, but you do it anyway. Repeat into old age never slowing down. And you might even get nominated for a Nobel peace prize. The key to Dr Goodell's persistence, seems to have a lot to do with knowing what she liked from a very young age. And then just insisting on doing it. Her father gave her a stuffed chimpanzee when she was a baby. And she took it with her everywhere, even though it was by all accounts terrifying. She grew up loving to observe and catalog animals, and dreamed of one day living with African, animals and writing books about them for a living. Her mother, who was a novelist herself told. All that, that seemed like a perfectly reasonable idea, even though it was the nineteen forties and not at all. But middle class English girls were expected to do after she finished school. Goodall couldn't afford to go to college. So she worked odd jobs in London for a few years until a friend, invited her to visit her family's farm in Kenya at which point Goodall, immediately quit her job, and waited tables, until she made enough money to pay for the price of boat fair to Africa. While in Kenya. Her friends, justed, she contact the paleontologist, Louis Leakey curator of the corn did museum in Nairobi to discuss. Primates Aliki was interested in studying primate behavior in order to better understand early human species leaky hired Goodall as his field assistant on a paleontological dig and later asked her to return to England to research primates and raise money for a long-term observational study on wild chimpanzees, the gun base stream, national park in Tanzania into live nineteen sixty twenty six year old Jane Goodall began setting up her field station at Gumby, which would become the site of the longest running. Wildlife research project in history. British authorities initially balked at the idea of a young woman doing this kind of work on chaperoned. So Goodell's mother van accompanied her for the first few months Goodall observed, the chip head See's daily for two years before she earned their trust. Her method was just to watch the animals, and imitate their actions, recording everything that happened in a field journal. Two of Goodell's most important discoveries during this period, had to do with what chimps eight and how they went about getting food Goodall was the first to observe chimpanzees killing and eating the meat of small mammals prior to this. They were thought to be vegetarian and perhaps her biggest contribution to our understanding of primates was the revelation that chimps used collected and modified grass stems and sticks as tools to fish, termites out of their nests Goodell's discoveries were so significant Leakey said, now, we must redefine tool redefine, man, and he arranged for her to write a dissertation at Cambridge University on the behaviors of wild chimpanzees. It was accepted and she became one of only eight people ever to graduate from Cambridge with her PHD without first earning her undergraduate degree in nineteen sixty four Goodall married. Hugh on, Loic a Dutch wildlife photographer who leaky sent to record her activity in the field. They had a son in nineteen sixty seven who spent his early life with his parents at Gumby after Goodell in Loic divorced in nineteen seventy four. Good. All Mary, Derrick Bryson in nineteen seventy five who was the director of Tanzania's national parks during this time Goodell published books about her experiences in research at gone BEI, including in the shadow of man, which was criticized by scientists because of good old habit of naming subjects of her research. She called her most famous study subject, David greybeard, but the book was Beilby popular and has since been translated into forty eight languages as she lived and worked in Gumby. She began to notice changes to the chimpanzees habitat deforestation and mining practices forced the animals out of their homes and into spoiler in smaller areas. More than one million wild chimpanzees lift in Africa hundred years ago. But today, only a fifth of that population exists Goodall saw the writing on the wall. Which is why in the nineteen eighties Goodall changed her focus from observing chimps to working to protect their habitat.

Dr Jane Goodall Dr Goodell Africa Louis Leakey Gumby Kenya Tanzania David Greybeard Nairobi Cambridge University Aliki Beilby Hugh London Cambridge England Director Mary Derrick Bryson
"david greybeard" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"david greybeard" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Studying and how. To study that particular species I was sitting in the forest. With David greybeard and I picked up a fruit and held it out to him He turned his head away and I put my hand closer Looking. Directly into my eyes. He reached out took the fruit dropped it really didn't want Then he very gently, squeezed my hand, which is how chimpanzees. Reassure each other so So in that moment. We communicated with a language or communicated, in a way that seems to predate. Words Perhaps in a way that was used by our own common ancestor millions of years ago It was an extraordinary feeding bridging these two well Felt like interacting. Equals Because, they were so smart but yet, at the same time the world of the towns press such different assumptions about what is important and what isn't And it's so slow paced It's hard to explain but it was like going into another universe when I think back about this early I can't forget You know how, sick I wash how thin I wash and how. We Kailash. Hungry I watch I remember how happy. I watch That audio is from interviews defaults and did with Jane Goodall and grew. To Galdikas about a decade ago Coming up restoring the history of women in science one Wikipedia article at a time.

David greybeard Jane Goodall Galdikas Wikipedia
"david greybeard" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"david greybeard" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"So you got their July and it wasn't until October that you saw your first champ. Those David greybeard right now I saw them. They ran over interactive David grape. It was the first one who didn't run away. And this, of course, just to bring it back to the wonderful documentary. This is the part of your story that we begin to see pick up in in the documentary. Was it that same month? I think starting in October, maybe that you, I again to reach the conclusions that really changed the game as far as the fact that chimpanzees construct and use tools that they. Were not. In fact, vegetarians as had widely been believed that was how soon were you reporting? Those kinds of findings back to leak was okay. So I began in July and those to begin toba and mum had just left shoot. He came full months so it was mating and to using and toolmaking and it was both times David greybeard I Tim to lose his fear who demonstrated to using toolmaking and hunting. Well, Mateen. Can you just remind I know this is a dress in the dock, but what was the tool in question here? This was, you know, we'll king on this trail and it had been raining mum had just left and cheat being so supportive and boosted my morale in those awful days in the chimps runaway. So there I see this dark shape hunched over termite mound. An ac- a black hand reach out and break off across them, and I see it pushed on into the tunnel in the two might moaned Kathleen pulled out and that termites clinging on bitten off and to up and then seeing of leafy twig picked before that can be used as a tool. The leaves have to be removed the side branches using and making tools. So if we see that today doesn't mean a things, lots of animals, but back then science thought humans and only humans use and make tools. So you immediately realize this was a very big deal. He is the, you know, the thing is I read a lot about captive chimps. I wasn't actually surprised, but I knew that science believed that only humans used to mate tools. I knew that science believed that any chimp in captivity. Somehow human intelligence had rubbed off on them. So I knew that what I was saying was kind of going to bake a big impact and it did. How did you communicate this news to leaky? And then how did he communicate his reaction back to you had to be by telegram because there was no internet or anything like that, but how do you even get off a telegram from the middle of took awhile because we send somebody by boat from Gumby into the nearest town, send telegram. So an also I waited till had seen it a couple more times, you know, wanted to be sure that what I'd seen was really unit. Sometimes you hallucinate cine way, then I sent it off to him and he sent back his famous reply. Well, because we're now defined as man the toolmaker. We have to redefine man redefine Cimpor redefined tool or accept chimps as human. How exciting was it to you to know that you're. Work was making a difference Bill. The sighting was that it meant the National Geographic came in and said, okay, we will continue to fund this research when the first six months money runs out and they up to that point had not been filming you onsite, right. It was only they want geographic wasn't involved tool. Okay. It was until it was just six months money from this wealthy American businessmen. And so that was what led to them I starting to document so that led to them a Saint will support the rook be sending filmmaker and Tokuda hookah fan Loic who of course later became your first week this film? Yes, beautiful unbelievable quality film which will talk about how that was rediscovered later. But you've made some comments in other interviews that I think people at the time were maybe. Saying some things, and then you've also talked about there may have been things beyond the research you were doing that entice National Geographic to come follow you. You feel specifically they saw potential covergirl in you? Well, let's say that I was foot born, not particularly ugly. And they like your legs..

David greybeard David grape Mateen Kathleen rook Tokuda Tim six months
"david greybeard" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"david greybeard" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Helping to organize events take for example the march for our lives which was this huge march took place in mobilizing millions of people against gun violence the united states in march that was coordinated by a bunch of high school kids who experienced gun violence firsthand you'll measuring the success of that by numbers some might say the fact that perhaps there wasn't really clear leadership it was a much more horizontal protest she that will limited success oh certainly i'm just pointing those out as examples where organizations were not taking a leadership role they were collaborators if you will and in fact the data collected show that less than a third of all people at all protests in the united states since trump took office were actually connected with organizations hosted the protest events themselves david greybeard this the way in which marches protests are organized whether they're top down or horizontally lead what different do you think that makes good makes an enormous difference i think that the powers that be can deal with groups with leaders they can coop the leaders they know how to do that there's a playbook and they'll make certain token concessions and then you can say that we're successful in certain degree but the threat of popular democracy is very much cut off on the other hand if you take the more direct democracy direct action route and you say we're not going to make demands of the government we're just going to try to run our own lives and data hell of them i mean probably the most effective movement in this regard was in argentina around two thousand one there's an economic crisis and rather than petitioning the government to do some stand up to the imf with a fine forget it we're just gonna have popular assemblies we're going to occupy factories we're going to just completely ignore the government there's liberals case avian toes basically they can all get hell all politicians we don't care it got to the point where politicians could even go to restaurants because people would throw food after they had to wear the skies and at that point the fact that they were just completely delegitimize made the government actually do some very radical things in fact they said no to the imf which no one had ever done that caused the wreckage effect that automatically led to the imf basically being kicked out of latin america which has been ever since so if they demanded that they never would have gotten it's only when you show there's an alternative or you don't take them seriously you don't recognize authority then they get scared and they start making real concessions well that's a very interesting thoughts on which to wrap up this half of the program thank you very much to.

united states imf latin america david greybeard argentina
"david greybeard" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:58 min | 3 years ago

"david greybeard" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Protests in scotland as well we see this as being me the first stop in a will tour of opportunities to bring out with trump baby where president trump is visiting because we received so much money on the crowd funding and we had so many positive responses around the world this can be an effective opportunity of creative resistance to trump in other parts of the world where he's visiting scholar i stop in this world tour of trolling trump kevin smith from the trump baby group data fisher this is an example of a protest which is undoubtedly visual it's entertaining it'll definitely get lots of publicity but do you think it will people actually talking about the issues i mean i think it's very important to understand that this trump baby is in a lot of ways what we in social movements research world called a tactical innovation using a balloon that is intentionally insulting for the president the united states is a perfect example in the globalization movement there were puppets and there were the billionaires for bush this is just another example and in fact it has really caught on quite substantially in addition to being a world tour now will it actually lead to meaningful conversations or will it just be trolling trump as part of resistance to his administration that's a question we'll have to see our place out i think it has the potential to bring people out to talking on more broadway but it also could lead towards less civil conversations were already seeing civilian ability in discussions around politics here in the united states david graeber interesting that you compare it to puppets because the puppets were extraordinarily effective two things everybody remembers about the alter globalization protests and direct actions were two things if they only remember two things remember there are guys in black breaking starbucks windows and there were giant colorful puppets that's what stuck in everybody's had the weird thing is the cops seemed to hate the puppets more were always trying to arrest the puppets destroy the puppets so they knew something was going on i mentioned to you does there is there an element of politics is a hobby here does it feel a little bit indulgent no it matters a great deal to someone like me i'm a muslim woman in the south and so what kevin smith does is as much to do with trump east sending a message to people like me people in the south to break the consensus around this politics of toot an important message for us to show that not everybody in the north agrees with this because the easer building germany around anti immigration islamaphobia the misogyny we see and so this voice is very important it's important to protest them as it east to tell us that the world is contested la kaufman if you think about protests more broadly moving away from this specific action does it need something a bit deeper does actual change require if you like prolonged spadework absolutely but i think this kind of protest is part of that we recognize that the army's for example pay great attention to morale movements have to pay attention to morale as well one of the things that's been very distinctive about donald trump's time in office is how many people have felt pummeled and demoralized just from taking in the news in order to keep people's energies and motivation up for them to do all the many kinds of work that are necessary to create change you have to keep up people's morale and something like the trump baby blimp is brilliant for that it's inspiring it's funny it does that work of de legitimizing and ridicule it gives you a new sense of momentum and energy in the way that that technical innovations do david greybeard let's talk about measuring success then outcomes surely in the end where everybody wants but if you think about occupy wall street was there an outcome measure the success of that well i measure the.

scotland
"david greybeard" Discussed on We Hate Movies

We Hate Movies

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"david greybeard" Discussed on We Hate Movies

"You don't even know what's coming talking she's innocent joke now right and then pans back to the right and the other side of the doors picture of hoover hoover and you're like look at these two weirdos they just kind of laughed to each other but i will say per weird ale any guys not violent maniacs they were violent main yes okay well like other alien two thousand eight seeing this theater that was like a big joke and loved oh yeah we were done with it we were like oh man here's the the last gasp but this horse shit yup and stick to that guy kind of thing totally sticking to well that's that's a the chris carter thing man that's always new things are too can we talk about the beard that he's where the sportman this element like come on come on movie you know what get david do company but david greybeard yup growing or or just don't like probably take him like a week like he's he's a he's a masculine guy do coveney's got that eastern european blotted them never fuck and field day three times a day totally aware wolf that guy and it's this fucking snl sketch beard dude i've seen will ferrell where this exact beard on that fucking hot tubs yet wingers get gully we fill our bellies with goto meats exactly the same muller why are you always looking off to the right every time you say something like you're reading cue cards.

coveney muller chris carter david greybeard ferrell
"david greybeard" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"david greybeard" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I became totally absorbed into this forest it's this i could give myself up to the shia pleasure of being on my own in the rugged terrain that i was coming to knows well as i have known the born must kits as a child she says it was unparalleled time for her when of loneliness was a way of life and as she was getting used to the champs they were getting used to her this strange white woman always at the outskirts of their camp in those days it was not voted tool safe for a young single go to go into the wiles of africa i had to choose the companion it was my mother who volunteered moms set up a clinic he handed out medicine to many of the local fishermen patients would walk for miles to get friedman i think the most important part about my mother was that she listened she was always fat she was never ends without a reason she supported me and my lava bombings she never said well he would just to god you can't do that white him to dream about something you penalty which is what everybody else told me so it was my mother tool really built up myself this theme with an inner determination and belief in her ability goodall persevered despite many setbacks and while chimpanzees are running away from you can't really get down to the details of their behavior and the back of my mind or waste affair if i don't find out something exciting the money will run out because all my earlier observations how i the chimps close up running away or sitting on the pico some other spot an watching them through binoculars emirates so even though from from those early observations very clear out of it but i wasn't really learning anything much good i'll had been in combat for five months when one morning she was tramping up and down three different valley is looking for chimps and finding none one approached her he seemed less fearful than the others he had a distinctive white tuft of hair on his chin and unlike the others he didn't run from jane she named him david greybeard and he was to be the first champ of many that she would come to know as well as she did her own family ooh mm of the months of patient and tireless observation i'd be rewarded the chimps had accepted me sell began the most important work of teens life together the two currencies of the birds and insects the teeming life of the vibrant forest formed one home part at.

"david greybeard" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"david greybeard" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The back of my mind that was always a fair if i don't find out something exciting the money will run out because all my earlier observations i will either chimps close up running away or sitting on the pico some other us thought an watching them through binoculars and so even though from from those early observations very neat out of it but i wasn't really learning anything much good i'll had been in combat for five months when one morning she was tramping up and down three two valley is looking for champs and finding none one approached her he seemed less fearful than the others he had a distinctive white tuft of hair on his chin and unlike the others he didn't run from jane she named him david greybeard and he was to be the first champ of many that she would come to know as well as she did her own family ooh mm of the months of patients and tireless observations i'd be rewarded the chimps had accepted me so began the most important work of james life together the chimpanzees the birds and insects the teeming life of the vibrant forest formed one hole all part of the great mystery and i was part of it too all the time i was getting closer to animals in nature as a result closer to myself the more in tune with the spiritual power that i fell to around they thought i have so often since what an amazing privilege it was to be utterly accepted thus by a wild free animal in order to keep her research going jane knew she had to secure more funding for her research station she she returned home began sharing her findings with the media strangely those picture and sexual can be transformed here we have a revolution day of levette evolution folded lovely english lady call jane that likewise stranger comfortable home in england for the primitive life but we african willingness among the african aids i now give myself that are warning play you presenting to you miss james at all who his complete trust in man surely it's up to us to see that at least some of these nearly human creatures survive the man that had the home loan beautiful she's one of those living with the wilds of africa was the geographic tough uphill and people said well light plane was.

"david greybeard" Discussed on WNYC 820AM

WNYC 820AM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"david greybeard" Discussed on WNYC 820AM

"Enough money to buy a little tiny book and a second time bookshop that was tarzan of the eight pts that's when i decided i would go to africa live with animals right books about them that was my dream concourse everybody laughed at me how will you get to africa it's far away you don't have any money this war raging and any way or just a girl but this girl had made up her mind addison sheet save the money she boarded a ship for kenya it was there that she matter renowned scientists coach louis leakey a pioneer in the study of human relations he was interested in exploring darwin's hypothesis that chimpanzees and humans shared a common ancestor and he suggested to jane that she go live among chimps to see what she could find out about them she jumped chance than headed off to the shores of lake tanganyika but us predicted it wasn't easy to get close to them two chimps runaway and ran away and run away it was months before they got used to have being there and started to relax that was when source something gang changing a chimpanzee using a piece of grass to fish termites from their nests this this was the first time that anyone at understood that chimps used tools that humans are not the only creatures that used to with them in a massive discovery right well we we defined as man of the tool makeup back then but david greybeard it was him the first jump to lose his fear of me and he was not only picking pieces of simple cross but he sometimes pick to levy twig so before he could use that he had stripped the leaves that's the beginning of toolmaking jane informed her boss who sent her nowfamous telegram summing up.

kenya darwin lake tanganyika toolmaking jane africa louis leakey david greybeard eight pts
"david greybeard" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"david greybeard" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This was the first time that anyone had understood that chimps use tools that humans are not the only creatures they use tools i'm in a massive discovery right well we would defined as man of the tool makeup back then but david greybeard it was him the first chimp to lose his fear of me and he was not any picking pieces of simple grass but he sometimes pick to levy twig so before he could use that he hits the leaves that's the beginning of two making jane informed her boss who sent her nowfamous telegram summing up the significance of what she had discovered now we must redefine man redefined tool or exception pence is humans where do you stand on that comment by louis leakey do we have to redefine tools or do we have to redefine humans or do we have to you see chimps as human none of them i think what we have to do is to understand how horribly arrogant we've been at least in the scientific and probably the religious worlds and what the chimps have taught us not only with their to using and toolmaking but in their emotions that they express and the fact that they all have their own individual personalities so it makes it very clear that we'd whom as a not after all the only beings was personalities minds capable of problem solving and above all emotions happiness sadness fear despair as well as getting a lesson and humanity jane west receiving more personal tuition from the chimps oh yes i learned a lot from the chimpanzees they taught me that in chimps society as in human society they're a good and bad mothers and the.

jane west david greybeard louis leakey
"david greybeard" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"david greybeard" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"And point it was really sad that she left before the break through observation which was when the first chimpanzee who began to lose his fear of me was very handsome michael in david greybeard i don't know why the david bit but he had a beautiful white beard and i saw him sitting on a termite mount and using pieces of grossest tools and stripping the leaves of a tweak to make a tool at that time thought something ohni humans could do and so that was what enabled leaky to bring national geographic in and they agreed to continue funding the research once the six months money ran out and you you also observed chimps eating meat which was not known at the time due to know epa time at at the sort of at the time you were making observations just out transformative they be readers eager to to report back to dr leaking well i i was excited because i knew it was a breakthrough of sorts the to using the hunting it was slightly startling because everybody had assumed that chimpanzees to pitch italians and they're they were this was a young paik they were eating and the the adult pigs for charging about on the ground underneath and so you know it was i knew that it was going to make a difference i didn't realize the extent of the difference would make up to that point that was the way that the humanity was to fight ray we were we relieve the toolmakers the to users who maker man the toolmaker that's how we were defined and so it was leaky sent that famous telegram i wish i still had it he said well we should just have to redefine man redefined tool or accept chimps us humans and all these years later kind of none of those things as yet.

michael david greybeard ray epa six months