20 Burst results for "David Weston"

"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:42 min | Last month

"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is Bloomberg Wall Street Week. What's the state of corporate governance of deficit is a real issue. The music on Ammi continues to send mixed signals the financial stories that shape our world Fed action to calm concerns over dollar liquidity, encouraging China data the 500 wealthiest people in the world through the eyes of the most influential voices. Larry Summers, the former Treasury secretary, stomach CEO, Kevin Johnson SEC chairman. Jay Clayton Bloomberg Bull Street Week with David West. From Bloomberg Radio. Another week of waiting for stimulus for Brexit and Ferko VID to Peak. Welcome to Bloomberg Wall Street Week. I'm David Weston. Getting a vaccine that works in so short a time, maybe nothing short of a miracle. But now that we're on the cusp of getting it, Catherine Baker, dean of the Harris School of Public Policy at the University, Chicago, says, we made in another miracle to get it distributed to those who need it. It would be a Herculean task under any circumstances, but I think it's made all the more challenging by the fact that this is the same health care since that that's going to have to be caring for Lots and lots of people who still get Cove it. We're gonna need to do all that we can to suppress transmission of the disease during this period and also to introduce a new therapeutics. It's going to be months and months and months before everyone is vaccinated, and in that time, unfortunately, hundreds of thousands of people are going to be getting cove it at this point 200,000 day. What is that require of the system? I mean, is that money? There's talk about further money coming from Congress. Is it people? Do we have enough trained personnel to actually be administering This kind of system is you say it's vaccines, punches, Therapeutics, Plus dealing with people who have the disease. Yeah, I think it takes money. But I think you're right that people are probably going to be in the shortest supply. Right now. Our health care system is incredibly strange, just caring for the people who have Cove it so adding on the layer of distribution of Vaccine is going to be an added complication. But fortunately, the kind of training that's required to administer back the vaccine is not nearly as intensive is the kind of training that's required to be qualified to care for somebody in the eyes to you, So the hope is that we're going to be reducing the number of people in the hospital at the same time that we're ramping up vaccine distribution, But we can't take our eyes off of suppressing transmission. The masking the Washington's keeping distance if we forget About those While we focused on vaccine administration, we're gonna be in big trouble. I also wonder whether, as happened last spring, Frankly, some of the people who are most vulnerable most head of the people with the least resources to deal with it. We're talking about blowing company. We're talking about Norrie groups, particularly in urban centers. But also for that matter, Native Americans. We've had disproportion problems. These people didn't have that great a health care system supporting them to begin with, did they This is compound in all sorts of disparities in our system, of course in health care where the people with the most help vulnerabilities such as diabetes, high blood pressure, they're the most likely to get coated and the least likely to have access to the health care resource is, but that's only part of it. They're also the economic disparities. That lineup is well. People who are least likely to be able to do their jobs from their homes are also and that's more likely to be exposed to the disease are also the ones with the biggest disease burden. And then the fewest economic resource is toe weather, a recession that's been generated by the pandemic. So people who are losing their jobs maybe losing their health insurance. This is all exacerbating disparities that line up for the most vulnerable populations. They may also be the people least likely to take a back seat. There is some longstanding distrust of the health care system that has been well justified by past inequities that I think will make people differential likely to take up a vaccine. The talk What do you make of the team that President Elect Begum is now announced So far? The people even now he's announced, have clearly demonstrated that they take the pandemic very seriously, and that they're very concerned with addressing the inequities in the system. I think that concerted attention to the message that people receive about how to prevent transmission, the efficacy of a vaccine as well as the focus on the economic disparities that have been exacerbated by the disease. It's about I'm to be helpful for addressing some of the challenges that vulnerable populations have faced over the last month. How big a difference because they make at this point. Well, I wish that somebody had a magic wand to make all of this go away, but that is clearly just not possible. And so I think we're in under the best of circumstances. For many months more of wrestling with the pandemic. My hope is that by spring things will start to look better on the disease front and that that will enable Morrell economic activity. I also think along the way Maximize economic activity to keep businesses open to keep people at work. Paying attention to the disease helps with that. And so if we had been more consistently reducing transmission by having people keep social distance and wearing masks, we could have had a lot more economic activity without the surge that we're wrestling with right now. As an expert in Syria. What worries you the most over the next 2 to 3 months, you said. Until we get to the spring, people are telling you two or three months. It's going to get worse before it gets better. What is the thing that worries you the very most. I think it is the fatigue with the pandemic and with the restrictions that we've all been talking about so much. I think it's real and I think that people are letting their guard down, especially around the holidays. As people focus on the coming vaccine. I worry that the spike that we're seeing is gonna overwhelm the health care system and we're gonna end up with much more loss of life and well being that we otherwise would have had. You also don't know what the long term consequences of covert are there. We're learning more about the long haulers, people who wrestle with symptoms of the disease or downstream consequences. Months afterwards. It's been around for less than a year, so we don't know what to 34 years out. Looks like so the more we can reduce the spread of the disease now not only the more economic activity and while being can we have now, but perhaps help consequences in the future can be averted, thanks to Dean Catherine Baker of the Harris School.

Catherine Baker Bloomberg Wall Bloomberg Radio Jay Clayton Bloomberg Larry Summers Ammi Brexit Kevin Johnson Harris School of Public Policy David West wrestling David Weston China chairman Harris School CEO diabetes
Fresh update on "david weston" discussed on Balance of Power

Balance of Power

00:55 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "david weston" discussed on Balance of Power

"And at Bloomberg Quick Take This is a Bloomberg business possible above World Headquarters. I'm Charlie Pellets. Stocks Rise Bonds Drop Earnings picking up right now we have got the S and P close to session highs. Up. 33 points up 9/10 of 1% the Dow was up 165 up 5/10 of 1%. NASDAQ Up 186 Up by 1.4% Tendered on one 32nd 10 Year Yield 1.8% Gold little change now down 53 cents the onset 18 40 West Texas intermediate crude up 1.1%. Hired by 56 cents a barrel to 50 to 91 after earnings. Bank of America Down 1/10 of 1% Goldman Sachs Down 1.6% after the bell Today we will be hearing from Netflix up by 1.8%. That David Weston is a Bloomberg Business. Five. Thank you so much. Charlie Pellet. This is balanced Power on Bloomberg Radio. President Biden has proposed an ambitious spending program totaling $1.9 trillion to pull the economy firmly back from the brink. And to help the 11 million people put out of work by the pandemic. This is how the president elect described it. In order to keep the economy from collapsing this year and getting much, much worse. We should be investing significant amounts of money right now. Grow the economy. For his take on the plan what it would accomplish and how we might pay for it. Welcome now. Brandon Arnold. He is National taxpayers Union executive Vice president. So thank you so much for being with us. Mr Arnold, Give us your take, and we've just heard from from Janet Yellin at some length, testified before the Senate Finance Committee. Saying, We have to do this. We realize there's a lot of debt, but we have to do this to really save the economy. Is she right? Would respectfully disagree with the incoming secretary. I think there is a need for certain targeted amounts of spending. I think a broad based plan like this $1.9 Trillion on the heels of a $920 billion program that The ink is barely dry on that on that spending bill that just passed at the end of December. We need to see how that $325 billion pays off for small businesses, for instance of the expanded unemployment insurance benefits people who are out of work before we commit to spending His broad based $1.9 trillion package all together, so let's take that. Where would your target you just mentioned small businesses. Some of the people who are unemployed are those a couple of the targets you would hit. Possibly. Yeah, My biggest target here I think is everybody's and that is getting the vaccine deployed and fighting, including this plane about $20 billion to get the vaccine out. Get that administered as quickly as possible. I support that. I think the $50 billion that he has to extend testing and tracing. That makes a lot of sense. That's also package with a plan to get schools open as quickly as possible. Something I think we can all support s O. I think those air that the immediate news but things like unemployment insurance. What he's talking about doing is expanding unemployment that's already extended into March all the way to September. I think it's a little premature to do that. Let's see how the economy recovers because by increasing not just the duration of these programs, but also the generosity of this additional benefit going for the bonus of 300. Dollars a week. Up to $400 a week you could have a negative effect on a recovering economy as workers are being re integrated into the economy and being rehired. There's also a substantial amount of money for state and local government. Something has been a real political football before between the Republicans, the Democrats up on the hill. We heard Janet Yellen again this morning. Say We need that money to get to teachers to get Tau firefighters to get two policemen Does she have a point there? To an extent, but I think we're still gathering some data. When we initially projected the size of the state budget shortfalls back and April may of last year, they looked enormous and it looked like a huge crisis that we were facing. It's still a problem. But some states have done much better. Most states have done much better than expected. Even states like California have about a $15 billion surplus. Right now. Connecticut has a small surplus. Maryland was expecting about $1 billion deficit, which is enormous. They ended up with about $100 million deficit, which is still large, which is still a problem, But it's about 1/10 of the magnitude that they were expecting. So we need the right size this aid and just be a little bit more cautious as we proceed with sending money from from the federal government to the states to help them out. Just staying on the spending side a little bit longer before we get to the revenue side because I definitely want to get there. We also heard a lot of build back better. Basically Janet Yellen saying, Oh, we need this sort of like a bridge because about bridge to get us past the pandemic, But then we need to invest in infrastructure. We need to invest in jobs training. We need to invest in R and D. Is she right there? I'm not fully supportive of that. I think the focus right now needs to be getting through this crisis getting through the pandemic getting the vaccine deployed. I'm very skeptical of these big spending programs that are going to supposedly generate a lot of economic growth and so forth. I think once we get The fundamentals in place Once we get the vaccine deployed. Once we get people back to work, we're going toe revert back to that economy that we had roughly in 2019. There are other things that this administration should do. I think reversing a lot of the trade policies of the Trump Administration would would go a long way to getting us back on our feet, but that combined with vaccine deployment, I think it's going to be sufficient..

Bloomberg Business Janet Yellen President Trump Brandon Arnold Bloomberg Bloomberg Radio Charlie Pellets Goldman Sachs Bank Of America Netflix Charlie Pellet David Weston National Taxpayers Union Janet Yellin Executive Vice President West Texas Trump Administration
"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:41 min | Last month

"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"T makes research breakthroughs and his rank one of the nation's most research intensive universities. By Carnevale Carnegie Classifications Board in jail. He got CTU slash are one stocks mostly little changed as a jump in crude oil prices pushed the share of energy companies hire Treasury yields climbed for a third day, while the dollar fluctuates. Take a look at these numbers. Every 15 minutes. The S and P is now little changed up to the Dow is down 1/10 of a percent down 26 of the NASDAQ's little changed up 1 10 year is currently down 7 30 seconds with the yield of 300.94% West Texas Intermediate crude's up 2.7% 45 76 a barrel comics gold's up 6/10 of a percent 18 29 60, an ounce of allergy and one of 4 51, the euro dollar 2093, the British pound the dollar 33 52 That's a Bloomberg business Flash. I'm Gregg Jarrett, now more Bloomberg balance of Power with David Westin on Bloomberg Radio. Yeah. This is balance of power on Bloomberg Television and radio. I'm David Weston. We turn now to Mark Crumpton for Bloomberg. First Word knew David. Thank you very much. With the Corona virus pandemic picking up steam around the country, President elect Biden is putting the final touches on his health team. Bloomberg has learned his front martyr for secretary of Health and Human Services is New Mexico Governor Michelle Luhan. Grisham Sources tell Bloomberg that former surgeon General Vivek Murthy is also a top possibility the HHS secretary will have the tough task of rebuilding Obama care which Mr buying has promised to expand. Top Georgia elections official is slamming President Trump and the state's two Republican U. S. Senators for not condemning and for encouraging threats of violence being made against election workers. Gabriel Sterling, says his boss, secretary of state Brad Rapids, Burger Republican had received death threats and his head. Trump's supporters driving caravans around his house and entering his property, his voice shaking with anger, Sterling said. Quote it has to stop. Russian President Vladimir Putin says his country should begin a general vaccination of the population against Cove in 19 next week. President Putin says more than two million doses of Russia's Sputnik five vaccine will be ready within the next few days. President Putin's announcement comes the same day that UK authorities cleared a vaccine for use beginning next week. And speaking of vaccines in the last few minutes. New York's governor Andrew Cuomo, said he expects the state's first vaccine delivery December 15th, He says it will be 170,000 doses..

Bloomberg President Putin Bloomberg Television President Trump Bloomberg Radio President Carnevale Carnegie Classificat Gabriel Sterling Andrew Cuomo David Westin secretary Gregg Jarrett David Weston General Vivek Murthy Governor Michelle Luhan Mark Crumpton David
"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:57 min | 2 months ago

"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I'm David Weston. Pole's pretty much agreed that this was not going to be all that close an election. But right now it doesn't look that way. So what went wrong or did anything really go wrong for more on what the Poles told us in the lead up to the election? We welcome now famed Pulsar Frank Luds. So you were a student. You're an expert in this, Frank. Did the poles get it wrong because a lot of people this morning are really grousing about it. Yes, they did get it wrong. Based on that assumption based on the numbers that we saw, and the best example is Wisconsin, The Washington Post, which is supposed to get this stuff, right? Had Joe Biden winning Wisconsin by 17 points. You've seen the numbers you've been reporting them. Biden has a one point lead. Getting it wrong by 16 points is not a mistake. It's not an hour. It's pulling malpractice, waiting to see whether the post and their partners acknowledged that they blew it. The problem with things like this is that the American people start to assume something and that can have an impact on their behavior. The idea that because they're assuming it's going to be so wide Victory for someone and a big loss for somebody else. Some people don't participate. Some people will actually assume the election's over. Uh, we'll assume that their vote doesn't matter. David getting it right is a requirement of polling not being bought by your clients. Not being paid for by the politicians. Of doing the science as a service to the American people. And frankly, the polling industry really fail this time s Oh, and let's not mince words here. We in the media sometimes make it worse because we take those poles. We report them, and we assume that they're right. And then it gets out in the water tables is work, and by the way, the pole the partner for the Washington was mild shop. The A B A. B C news. So do the pollsters get it that they have a problem? If you're right that there's a fundamental failure, malpractice? You called it the starting point for fixing that is that you know what I think We have a problem. Let's see how we can fix it. The problem actually is not with him methodology. They're trying to get it right. The problem is that they don't understand the Trump voter because they themselves on talking to those trump voters. They're not connected to them Trump the way that we do it differently to give you of listeners and viewers. Chance to understand is that we actually have to add a couple of extra paragraphs. We have to tell people up front. We're going to share your information with elected officials in Washington. You're going to have an impact. Your voice is going to matter. This is your chance to be heard that gets trump people to participate. If you don't include that, Then they assume that you just with the media and they don't want to help you. They don't want to participate in what they call the swamp. It's not that hard to figure out what it takes to get trump people to participate in Poland. But they don't do it. And so they make these mistakes. So Frank, let's get a little personal here. In a sense, is it version of what we hear accused of the media that we have to money? Us. And the media who are left of centre isn't that there are too many pollsters who are left of center, so they just is not that they're purposely doing it. They just don't see it. Well, that's not left something that could be right of center as well. I get ridiculed by some of my colleagues because I do these focus groups that you've aired on your network. Reason I do the focus groups that it helps we can confirm or challenge what I'm seeing in the numbers. The focus groups were telling me that that Some people just do not like talking the pollsters because they don't want to help certain networks don't want help certain newspapers and then I want to help. Established that control that Washington has, and that's why you have to tell them you will no longer be for gotten. You will no longer be ignored. Your voice will be heard, And when they hear that, then they want to participate. And they want to help the process because then they feel like they're doing something. Don't do that. If you want to the focus groups don't do the personal interaction that you need to understand these people. Then you're going to get it wrong. But let me come back to my question from your exposure to these posters. You know them so terribly well. Do they know they have a problem? The beginning of getting help. For example, psychotherapist is that you don't have a problem. I need some help. Oh, God, I don't know. I don't I can answer why the problem exists. I can't tell you if they know whether or not because and by the way. Trump's pollster who I've been critical of on Twitter actually ended up getting it right more than the published polls that you would have expected to have gotten it right. Look, we just need to fix the system and we need to make sure that the public trust this area politics because in the end polling can be so informative. It can be so helpful in understanding the way people really think the way they feel and the way they were going to behave. We need to do this. We need to get this right from now on. It's such a powerful point, cause you do lose credibility over time. No question about it. Thank you so much to poster. Franklin's. He is founder of Lunch Global Coming up the balance of Power continues on Bloomberg TV and radio. In.

Washington Frank Luds David Weston Joe Biden partner Wisconsin Trump Pole Poland Franklin The Washington Post Twitter founder Bloomberg TV Lunch Global
"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:48 min | 2 months ago

"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Has has has has has has has has been been been been been been been been hit with its fifth named Storm of the year, this one named Zeta because we've pretty much run out of names. Strong winds have left over a million people without power in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia. Louisiana Governor John Bell. Edwards is particularly focused on the southeast of his state. Because this was primarily a wind event has was predicted. There are lots of power outages across southeast Louisiana. So put this storm in perspective. We welcome Now Creek Fugue, a former administrator of FEMA. During his tenure, he organized recovery efforts for a record 87 count of 87 disasters in 2011 alone. So, Craig, thanks so much for being back with us. Give us some perspective on this particular storm of Zeta before we move on to the larger perspective. The governor said. It was mainly AH wind event. We didn't see a lot of heavy rainfall move fast. So really, the recovery is damaged roofs and power outages on it's not just in Louisiana, you'll get parentage is always to Atlanta from this storm. Is that easier to him in there? No, never easy, But is that easier to deal with one of these big drenching rains that comes on onshore just sits there. Yeah, It's never easy, but the difference is they'll have a pretty good idea of damages. They get back in most of these areas. And the big driver of much of this is going to be getting the power back on. So is it my imagination, Or has there been an awful lot of storms this year? They say we're to Zeta. I don't remember getting dizzy before. Has been busy, and it's really the number of landfalling hurricanes we're seeing. Ah, they were close to tying the record for Landfalling storms on Louisiana's much like Florida's been hit multiple times in one year and correspondingly in election years. It was in 2000 for We'll

David Weston Charlie Pellet Facebook Apple Google Pat Louisiana
"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:01 min | 3 months ago

"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Radio. I'm David Weston this week. We're taking a closer look at Wisconsin as part of our swing states, Siri's and today we welcome Republican congressmen from Wisconsin Brian Style from the South east of ST so, Congressman. Thank you so much for being with us really appreciate. We're taking a look at Wisconsin. What we can expect Election I give us your take right now and where the state is. I understand. There's something of a biped occassion of rural versus urban and suburban There's a jump all going on right now in Wisconsin, and I think it's going to come down to election night and who turns out the most voters. What we're seeing here on the home stretch is the Republican base is incredibly energized. People are ready to get out and vote about 50% of all people have probably already voted in the state of Wisconsin were approaching that level of turnout. With seven days to go, It's going to be a matter of making sure we get every vote across the line. In the few undecideds to be reaching out to them and having this conversation about how we're going to keep America healthy, how we're going to get Wisconsin backto work and how we're going to keep our community safe here in Wisconsin, talking about your district in particular so south of Milwaukee as I understand it, perhaps a lot of suburbs after Milwaukee, we'll give us your sense of where your district is. The first Congressional district is really a cross section of the state of Wisconsin. What has three blue collar family center towns of Janesville, Racine and Kenosha? It picks up some rural areas in between, and Walworth County, and then does pick up the southern suburbs of Milwaukee like Franklin, Oak Creek, Hales Corners, Greendale, So you have a real mix in southeast Wisconsin. So actually have a viewer writing a question here, and it is a proposal we had the Supreme Court just within the last day decide that. In fact, there would not be an extension of the time when you're counting the vast Rebalances understand. How is that going to affect the election? Do you think I think people in the state of Wisconsin No. There's an election on November 3rd on Tuesday, people have been voting leading up to this election. People have an opportunity to vote on Election Day, I think, following the written law here in the state of Wisconsin makes it really crystal clear. There's three ways to vote in Wisconsin. You can vote absentee early. You can vote in person early that's ongoing All week this week or you can vote. In person like you would traditionally do on Election day, November 3rd. I think we're going to see record turnout in the state of Wisconsin. There's three easy ways to do it, and I'm out, encouraging everyone to make sure their voices heard. Congressman President Trump obviously carried Wisconsin who was pivotal well, actually, I think it's fair to say in 2016 part of what the president then not president, and now president said was, we're going to turn manufacturing jobs really going to bring them back? Has he delivered on that promise? And particularly your district? You have some background. I know working as an executive in some manufacturing companies. I spend a decade working in manufacturing before I ran for office two years ago, before we were punched in the face by Corona virus. We saw jobs coming back to the state of Wisconsin in particular along the I 94 corridor. That's the Milwaukee airport down to the state line heading towards Chicago. We've seen numerous companies coming. I attended a groundbreaking of the company moving from Illinois. The Wisconsin just the other day, and there was news yesterday. Herring Bo, the maker of Gummy Bears, is breaking ground in Kenosha County in southeast Wisconsin, bringing jobs from international aspects here to Wisconsin. We saw that by putting in place program policies in Washington, D. C. The work in front of us is going to be to continue to put in place. Pro growth policies, trade agreements that Aaron the benefit of workers and farmers like USMC, Eh, so we continue to see job growth here in the state of Wisconsin said everyone who wants a job is able to find one. But but it has the president delivered what he promised. I want to go back to sore subject, Foxconn because there was a big thing with president flew out. There's gonna be a big factory in your district is under stand fast, kind of that ever get built. I visited Foxconn just the other day. Those buildings air going up work is getting started. What we're seeing is all along that broader Ari and Racine and Kenosha County in the southeast corner of the state is significant economic growth. It would slow down, obviously, by Corona virus currently, but I believe what we will see is jobs continuing to come back as we ultimately defeat this virus? We have cutting red tape were getting trade agreements that are positive. We have a competitive tax rate. Those are the kinds of policies in Washington D. C. We need to grow jobs right here in southeast Wisconsin. We saw really low unemployment rate environment. We saw the beginning of rising wages. People were quite optimistic before we got hit by Corona virus. I'm optimistic that as we ultimately defeat this virus, we're going to continue to see job growth and wage growth here in the Southeast Wisconsin, which is positive. I think that showing the president's policies delivering for our state congressman, you mentioned Kenosha and many of us remember the shooting of Jacob Lake, which was really quite an issue for your state, in particular, starting in Kenosha. Give us a sense of whether that's playing at all this election, either on one side of people who are claiming that we need more racial justice. We really have been unfair to African Americans and other minorities or on the other, the law and order issue. I just lost the sound feed. If you can. Can you hear me, Congressman? I got you were talking about Kenosha. If you look at what's playing people in, everyone has a right to feel safe. Absolutely everyone what we saw play out in Kenosha. Was at the beginning, People's First Amendment rights that then crossed the line into criminal behavior and that criminal behavior needs to be stopped. We need to make sure that we hold those who engage in criminal activity accountable. We need to make sure that we're bringing the resource is into Kenosha Toe, end the criminal destruction and reestablish public safety. There were three bad nights in the community of Kenosha. I was aggressively advocating For additional resource is our governor did not step up to the plate. But President Trump did come and provide assistance with additional federal resource is such as FBI tactical teams U. S marshals When you flood the zone with those types of resource is when the president said enough's enough..

Wisconsin Kenosha president Congressman President Trump Southeast Wisconsin Kenosha County Milwaukee Foxconn Congressman Kenosha Toe Racine David Weston Washington Walworth County Siri Hales Corners Illinois Brian Style Supreme Court
"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:28 min | 3 months ago

"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Down to dice. Bloomberg radio snap shares are surging after reporting strong earnings snap up now by 32%. Among other social media companies. Also advancing today. Twitter is up by 7.8%. Facebook Up by 5.1% Re Capping US stocks Trading Mix The down lower NASDAQ Higher SNP A little changed up by three points. Balance of power continues once again. Here's your host, David Weston. Thank you so much, Charlie Pellet. When it comes to the presidency. Everyone agrees that Pennsylvania will be key to the election. And there's already been a fair amount of contention over how votes will be counted. And when we welcome now Michael Berkman, he's professor of political science at Penn State University, where he is director of the MK Courtney Institute for Democracy and also host of the Democracy Works. Podcast. So, Professor Thanks so much for being with us. We'll talk about some of the controversial we're already had. We've been up the Supreme Court once already what the controversies left about how to vote and when the votes get counted. Well, sure, I'm not sure how controversial it is at this point, but the votes will not be counted until election day. I think probably when the polls close and because the because the mail ballots are so disproportionately Democratic. It could mean that we have one sort of result from the in person voting and another. Result as the mail in ballots get counted over the next several days after Election Day Other are there issues heads. There have been other states now about what needs to be done to formalize mail in ballots. Things like signature verification are various signatures thing outside the envelope inside of the ballot. Well, I believe all that's been settled. I mean, the big issue in Pennsylvania has to do with what are called naked ballots because there's an internal envelope in the external enveloping the internal envelope is not in there. Ballots considered naked and it's not going to be counted. And as I say it went up to the Supreme Court and for for they didn't overturn what happened below. So evidently the Falcon get in what within three days of the election day. Yes, that's right bloggers. It's postmarked, which is a big issues. So at this point, do you think it has been sorted pretty well for Pennsylvania? We won't have many disputes, at least after the fact. Well, we could certainly have been settled this how it's going to operate, But there is no doubt that we're gonna have all kinds of issues if the vote is closed because it's going to take several days. Account all these mail in ballots. Will we have something in your judgment approaching what we had in 2000 in Florida, where you had people representing both campaigns in there, as there were people reviewing those hanging chads remember the video of it the equivalent of that with these absentee ballots, looking at the signatures and which ones they have in which they're valid in which one or not I think that's absolutely possible. A lot depends on how close everything is and how important penciling it turns out to be. After we see what happens in other states, But yes, it's certainly possible there's both sides are well lawyered up. Resting. Go back, go more broadly across the country. What do you make of this election? And what? What are you expecting in terms of disputes and resolving those disputes? Well, overall, I find the election quite stable for a long period of time. I think they're a bunch of states and they all happen to be northern battleground states. Where counting mail in ballots can take a while. And that's gonna be a problem because the Democrats have pushed the mail in ballot mail in voting much more than the Republicans have, so these are going to be disproportionately democratic ballot. They're coming in later. So you have the thing called What is the Red Maraj? Somebody named it. But mother and I have also heard about a blue wave and things like that. It can go either way, right? I'm told, for example, in Florida might go the other way, because if the Democrats are overwhelming on the absentee, those get counted advanced. They come up fairly soon after the polls close. Absolutely. Florida is very different in Florida will know probably when the polls closed or shortly there after what happened in the whole state because they've been working on those will have been working on those mail in ballots. But that's not going to be the case in Pennsylvania with constant and I believe, I mean, you're a student of the way people vote. Obviously we are evolving in this country. There was a time you really just have to go to the polling place and it was the day of absentees were by far the exception. You had to have a really compelling reason. Are we going to a world where we don't really have to go to the polling place? Well, we might. You know, it's going to be interesting to see how this all shakes out afterwards. You know, there have been some states that had been my mail for quite a while. They're very good at it, and they know how to do it. The problem here is that because of Cove, it Several states. Quickly try to get on the bandwagon of using mail in ballots, but they're really not used to it. They don't have the procedure set down. That's where I think we're going to have problems. If you look down the line, then I think other states are going to be able to get this going. A student of this Is there any correlation with causation, not correlation between increased use of absentee particular mail in ballots and voter fraud, or at least legitimate questions were raised about the legitimacy of the process. To my understanding. There is really very little to the idea that there is fraud connected with Belen voting, and certainly voters in Colorado and California and states have been doing this for a long time. Will agree with that. But they just haven't had problems now. But I do think it's possible, though, is that a larger number of mail in ballots end up being contested and perhaps thrown out? Just because there's so many more steps to them. They're much more complicated, and there's clearly a physical thing that you can look at. And you can looks like the hanging chads down in Florida and South and Southern Florida back in 2000. You've got physical evidence that people could dispute. Yes, but here will probably be comparing signatures. Yeah, faster if you had your druthers, because you know this area so well and you were gonna have one fundamental reform toe are voting process in this country. What would it be? Very interesting. Well, I probably make Election Day a holiday. Yeah. A lot of countries do right. Yes, they did make Loki may just make voting easier. I also think that early voting has been turning out to be a very good idea. In many states. It takes a lot of the pressure off. Cultural systems on election Day. If you go back in history, how did we get to this place? Because if anything, we make it hard to vote. We may make it so you really have to have to take time off from work. You have to go in his particular time to face waiting a line should we make it eat a vote? Well, I think we should make it easier to vote. But think about the United States is that decisions about how to conduct elections are being made by political bodies. And so there's always an incentive on one side or the other to make voting either easier or not. And so questions over. How easy it is to vote. How accessible it is. Vote end up. Come in. Partisan political issues. Is that right? I'm sorry Prices and a right left issue or incumbency issued by definition, people in office got there with the existing system. Yeah, well, that's a good question, because I think traditionally we always thought of this Morrison incumbency system. For example, we also thought of redistricting district in terms of protecting incumbents, But increasingly, I have no doubt that it's becoming a partisan issue. It's fast thinking this is really great. Thank you so much. You've got a really interesting job. That's Professor Michael Berkman.

Florida Pennsylvania Professor Michael Berkman Supreme Court Twitter Facebook Charlie Pellet United States Bloomberg David Weston Professor MK Courtney Institute for Demo Penn State University professor of political science Morrison
Changes in population of Arizona swings state more left

Bloomberg Law

03:09 min | 3 months ago

Changes in population of Arizona swings state more left

"This is a special edition of Balance of powers. Look at election 2020. I'm David Weston. Today We look at three critical swing states that could help decide who occupied the Oval Office next January. We start with Arizona once solidly Republican state that is now Maura, Va. Toss up. Arizona has 11 electoral votes and polls show a tight race. As for Vice President, Joe Biden hopes to become the first Democrat to win the Grand Canyon state since Bill Clinton did back in 1996. Or an overview. We spoke to Bloomberg contributor Rick Davis, who ran the 2008 presidential campaign of the late Arizona Senator John McCain. Four years ago in 2016. It was not a swing state, so it's one of those that have moved into the Swing column primarily because it changes both demographically in the state, but also ideologically demographically, I think you know, the increase in Hispanic population have moved it a little bit closer to the Democratic column. Hispanics make up almost a third of the Voting population now and on ideologically in 2016 trump one white suburban voters in Maricopa County, the largest county in the state. What really decides the outcome in states and in 2018, those same suburban voters fled the Republican Party, causing Martha McSally running for Election to the Senate to lose a Republican, so it's going to be an interesting ride there, but it's definitely a swing state this year. So if you say Maricopa County is I understand, you know better than I really determines the state. Largely. It's a really big count and a large portion of the voting populace. What has changed 16 4018 has the Democratic nature of Maricopa County's changes it more hetero genius than it was before is that they've changed their attitude towards things like immigration. Maricopa has been changing for a long time is one of those state or one of those counties. It's the city of Phoenix is in Maricopa County that has grown at an enormous rate. It's been one of the top five fastest growing counties in the United States for the last 15 years and is one of the top five of the largest counties in America. So it is a complex political beast. I would say What is starting to change is the Republican lock in the suburbs. In the past, we've been able to win the state by winning Maricopa. And if we are not able hold onto especially white women suburban voters in Maricopa County. We can't win the election for a perspective on what it takes to win statewide office in Arizona. We spoke to someone who's done it. Former Republican governor, Jan brewer. She admits the state is changing, but she hopes it hangs on to its conservative roots. There's a good chance that it is probably turning a little purple hair in Arizona, which is very distressful US Republicans, but the bottom line is is that we've had a lot of people moving in and out of California and other places coming to the great State of Arizona czar demographics. Have really changed. I think that we have to take that all into consideration were out there.

Maricopa County Arizona Maricopa Republican Party Jan Brewer Oval Office United States David Weston Senator John Mccain Joe Biden Bill Clinton Vice President Martha Mcsally Phoenix Rick Davis Bloomberg Senate Grand Canyon Maura
New York Times: Trump paid no income taxes in 10 out of 15 years beginning in 2000

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:33 sec | 4 months ago

New York Times: Trump paid no income taxes in 10 out of 15 years beginning in 2000

"Paid no federal taxes in the past 10 or 15 years. Well, the president The New York Times has been doing its fake story after fake story. I've never seen anything like it, and Bloomberg's David Weston says It may not mean as much politically or for the election. I do think it maybe raises questions about his business acumen. I mean, he's raised his run as a billionaire and said that he's so a student businessman. According to the New York Times report, at least where they went over two decades of his tax returns, it appears that he's losing a lot of money.

The New York Times David Weston Bloomberg President Trump
"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:24 min | 4 months ago

"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I'm David Weston as part of our swing states. Siri's leading up to the election, and we're learning this week about North Carolina and welcome today. Republican congressman from the Tar Heel state. He's Patrick McHenry, who, of course, serves as ranking member of the House Financial Services Committee. Welcome back, Congressman. We watched it yesterday, so I want to talk about that a little bit. But first talk about North Carolina's We're going into this election. Give us you're sort of prissy. Exactly where North Carolina's stands Red Blue purple. Where is it? Well, I think it's uh, purple, but more on the red side of that, Hugh. I think President Trump wins the state of North Carolina, and I think he went in similar fashion that Aziz did in 2016. Andi think Senator Tillis follows closely behind. I think I think the clarifying battle about the Supreme Court nomination is actually politically. The winds are on the side of Senator Tillis on that. That's where center right state and I think that reinforces good policy and good objectives on their court will explain that to us in the tragic loss of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg obviously is a Very hot issue right now. How does it play in North Carolina? Is it Is it just a simple as the abortion question? If so, is that because of the evangelical population in your state? Well, that could certainly be a component of the larger. The larger piece of this is, in essence, a lawn order message. People want Orly courts. They don't want legislating from the bench. They wanna reserve judiciary. And this reinforces with the electorate. North Carolina once and seeks Andi think this highlights the good work that President Trump has done through his appointees in the administration and to the courts and the good votes that Senator tell us taken along the same lines of appointees in the courts. So give us a sense of the sort of the segmentation of North Carolina. We hear that there's a difference between some of the suburbs on the one hand in some of the more rural areas, and I think maybe you have some of both in your district. That's right. And in North Carolina, we had a court mandated redistricting this year, so that scrambled congressional map good. But North Carolina is a diverse state way have five media markets fully contained within the state. Seven media markets total.

North Carolina congressman President Trump Patrick McHenry Senator Tillis Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Andi Supreme Court Tar Heel Siri House Financial Services Commi Senator Hugh Aziz President
"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:39 min | 4 months ago

"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Bloomberg law special, the life death and legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. I'm David Weston. She was only the second woman in history to serve in the highest court in the land. For 27 years of the Supreme Court continued a tireless fight to advance the rights of women, something she'd pursuit is one of the most effective advocates in the Supreme Court and on the court of Appeals. She built a record is one of the most liberal justices supporting gay rights, abortion rights and restrictions on the death penalty. Now, Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died at the age of 87. Ginsberg passed away from complications from pancreatic cancer surrounded by her family at her home in Washington. Over the next hour, we examine the life and legacy. Of the justice affectionately known as notorious RBG and bring you the view of her career, in her own words, with excerpts from an interview conducted less than a year ago. But first we welcome Bloomberg News Supreme Court reporter Greg Store and Bloomberg Law Supreme Court reporter Kimberly Strawbridge Robinson for their reactions to the loss of a legal giant. So let me start with you. If I may. Greg what was her effect on the bench? How did she change the Supreme Court over her 27 years? Well, it's it's hard to overstate the impact that she had, in part because she became such an icon to the world. She was incredibly well known on and deeply admired by, but by people on all sides of the political spectrum, but especially among liberal people and young women. She represented a woman who was incredibly bright, incredibly hard worker somehow manage to be very good friends with one of the most conservative justices Antonin Scalia, and really left a legacy, uh, particularly with regard to women's rights on women's place place in the law. Get Kimberly. We think of her, obviously, as ah, really important Supreme Court justice. But the fact is, if she had never been in the Supreme Court, she would have had a profound effect on the law, particularly with respect a woman's rights as an advocate for the CP, and also at Columbia, and then, as on the Court of Appeals. She had a very distinguished career, very effective career long before she came to the Supreme Court. That's right, And she's one of the huge justices to actually was very noteworthy before she came to the bench. She co founded the Values Women's Rights Project, and in that role, she brought several cases that really led the way on how we now think of women's rights and gender equality, not only on behalf of women, but she also brought several cases on behalf of men that really changed the landscape. For the way that we think about gender and gender in the law. Greg as we say she was the second woman coming to the Supreme Court, but but she really had an influence on the way women were regarded basically in the law, and particularly on the Supreme Court. She did. Justice Sandra Day O'Connor was the first one for a short while. Justice Ginsburg was the only woman before Sonja sort of my urine. Alina Kaykan joined her. She, uh, you know, did it both through her opinions. And and probably the most memorable of her opinions in the majority was the one that said that the Virginia Military Institute Had to admit women. Uh, but you know, even more. So it was what she stood for The fact that she, you know, made very clear that she wanted more women on the court that she was such a tireless worker. And that she became really a heroine to so many people in in this country can really it's interesting. President Clinton once said about her that she was akin to Thurgood Marshall. And the extent to which she changed law by the way, she said she did not like that analogy because Thurgood Marshall risked his life on the course in the cause of civil rights, and she did not do that. At the same time, she does Tower as a figure. That goes beyond even the Supreme Court. United States. Well, that's true, but it's it's interesting that we do think of her as such a towering figure given that she is such a small person and stature she really does. Really outshine her own stature in history and write that many have compared her to go to Marshall based on the work that she had done of the value on behalf of women's rights. Andi. So whether or not she enjoyed that particular comparison. I think it's one will definitely continue to hear a CZ. Her legacy continues to grow. She also just to be a little more personal about this great. She was part of a partnership with Marty Ginsburg. Very, very distinguished, very respected tax ular and and as diminutive as she was, and frankly, as quiet and shy, spent a fair amount of time with her she was not really out spoken. Marty was the opposite of that. Yeah, he sure Wass. You know, he was a very engaging person. He was the chef of the family. She admitted she was a terrible cook, and he did most of the cooking. But as you said they were a true partnership in one of the stories Bye. That was most told about her is is when she was in law school. He contracted cancer. And while he was also in law school, and she helped take care of him. She went cheap, so stayed on as a law student at her own studies. She went to his classes took notes for him, and she took care of their young daughter, all at the same time on when it came time for her to be in the spotlight on the federal appeals court, and then the Supreme Court. He was her biggest supporter and couldn't have been more proud of her. And that was part of one of what people loved about Ruth Bader Ginsburg was that she showed both that a woman could have an incredibly successful career and have a very loving marriage. Okay, many thanks to Bloomberg News, Supreme Court reporter, Greg Store and Bloomberg Law Supreme Court reporter Kimberly Strawbridge Robinson. We'll hear more from them later in the program, but first we'll hear from the justice herself. The challenges and the accomplishments. Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the.

Supreme Court Ruth Bader Ginsburg Bloomberg News Supreme Court court of Appeals Greg Store Kimberly Strawbridge Robinson Bloomberg Marty Ginsburg Thurgood Marshall reporter Antonin Scalia David Weston Bloomberg News Ginsberg Sandra Day Virginia Military Institute United States President Clinton
"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:10 min | 4 months ago

"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Hour of Bloomberg balance of power. I'm David Weston. President Trump has had a remarkably loyal base of support through thick and through thin and the number of undecided voters appears to be unusually low 55 days away from the election and the president win this election by concentrating on making sure his bass turns out to vote. Robert Griffin has taken a look at the numbers and he has his doubts. He is the research director. Of the Democracy Fund Voters Study Group. Welcome back. It's great to have you with us. Fascinating analysis. Give us your take on this. Get out the bait votes based theory. Sure. And thanks for having me. You know, I guess the really big points here are that every election cycle when somebody is sort of down by a pretty significant margin theory starts floating around, saying Listen, You know, all you gotta do is turn out the base. There's one specific group, and if you could turn out the vote, that's the path to victory. The issue is that we just don't see that historical record right, much more often. What's happening? That groups of voters are deciding sort of. Collectively, there's a shared political environment that they're in that says whether this election's important or not what the stakes of the election are, so it's much more common to see everybody's turned out kind of go up and down together for the most part, rather than seeing A big spike among one group that that kind of theory would call for The initial poles. At least I've seen. You can correct me if I'm wrong indicate there's an unusual level of enthusiasm, which tends to correspond Asai understand it with voter turnout in this election, and that's for both Democrats and Republicans. Is that what you're seeing? Yeah, absolutely. I mean, what I think there's two indicator side. So the first is when you ask people, you know. Are you enthused? What you tend to see happen is that that ramps up right before the election That is to say, you know, there's a steadiness to it before the election and closer and closer to get it goes up and up. The rates that we're observing even you know, a couple of months ago were as high as the rates that we saw in prior elections just days before the election, So there's indicator signs from folks that you know. Turnout is probably gonna be up just because they're so enthused about it. We're also seeing a lot of early voting this time around. There's a lot of mail ballots being requested a little less clear what's happening there just because mail in voting might be more popular this time around. But it still seems like a side that we're headed for a high turnout election. If you have a high turn election. Is there any received was about which of these two Candice might benefit from that. Well, even in this scenario kind depends What your kind of thinking. So in this case, high turnout election probably favors Joe Biden, right, and because even you know, and that sort of turn out the base theory, it makes it harder and harder to have one group started just dominate the electorate by turning out a really high rate If everybody's turnout rates are going up But even so, a lot of the modeling that's been done around. This seems to suggest that lower propensity voters, it probably gives Biden just a little bit of edge, so given the intensity selection, I suspect there's no such thing as low hanging fruit. But what's the lower hanging fruit? If it's not getting out? You're base. Then is it persuading people to switch their vote? Again. I think partly the story. There's just a mass of it right. Switching a vote is about twice as powerful is turning out one extra person because you're also taking a vote away from the other person. So any effect side that you're talking about is going to be kind of doubled in that swing the vote territory Now there's a question as to whether Trump can reasonably do that, given that we're this partly in the race. The You know, the pandemic is kind of where it is in the United States. Maybe they'll improve over the course of it. Have people's opinions already settled about it? And even you know, with the economy improving, But the question still isn't improving enough and do our people still sort of Understanding the backlash of all of this as part of their assessment of Trump so his path forward, probably it seems likely a combo of turnout and, you know, getting more swing voters. It's uncertain how much he could do this late in the race. Is there an opportunity here for the Trump campaign in the numbers? I've seen particular from some battleground states. If you look at the people who didn't vote, they tend to be over indexes. You might put it. Among white, non college educated voters. Yeah, So I mean, especially in a lot of these swing states, big portions of the population. Non voters are white, non college. And the reason for that is because a big population of the state is white, Non college again. We're talking about Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania. Now, so that there's a couple of things there where, if they turn out to vote in a much higher rate if they could spike turnout among those folks, it seems like that would probably help Trump now. But there's other questions there is to say like, Who are these folks because we don't necessarily know their political allegiance because they were nonvoters. But even that said, it does seem like that would be an advantage for Trump. If it's still sort of pretty hard to pull off. Where'd you get the most bang for the dollars Because there was a report over the weekend? Actually, that President Trump has been burning through his campaign funds pretty quickly. In fact, there's even a Bloomberg report that he may dip into his own wallet. A very substantial degree to support his campaign. If you're trying to get votes, what's the most effective way to do it? It's probably we were just saying from a combination of both turnout and switching votes in the Midwest, so going for that narrow path that he was able to escape through the electoral college last time and trying to sort of do a repeat of that. These other strategies That sort of, you know, potentially rely on winning other states that President Trump has won the past or something like that does seem far less likely. But is it television? Is it radio? Is it online? Is there Ah, basic rule of thumb here about what the most effective way to spend? The dollars are? So I don't know if there's an effective sort of, you know, one size fits all solution for the whole country as a whole, because you know different media markets work in different ways, and the population's you're trying to reach are going to be, you know, accessible on different types of mediums at higher lower rates. But just generally speaking, spending money kind of in the right places like Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Michigan, probably spending it pretty close to the election in terms of just trying to sort of alter people's minds pretty close to when they're actually making decisions about stuff. It's always great to have you with us. We appreciate your coming back. It's Robert Griffin of the Democracy Fund Voter Study Group Coming Up here. Ah growing list of Republicans are backing Joe Biden for president will make a difference. We talk with Jonathan Bernstein of Bloomberg opinion who has his own opinion about whether it really will make a difference.

President Trump Bloomberg Joe Biden Democracy Fund Voters Study Gr president Robert Griffin Trump Michigan Wisconsin David Weston research director United States Pennsylvania Midwest Candice Jonathan Bernstein Democracy Fund
"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:35 min | 5 months ago

"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"There. Hi. Carol. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says the tide is turning and world opinion regarding the Chinese community Communist Party and a news conference just concluded moments ago. He also said U. S APP. Stores need to bar untrusted Chinese APS and regarding Iran when I could let the arms embargo expire on October 18th of this year, one of the central failings of the way And a pad thing for the world. Toronto by and saw you sing. You see in the comments in the press about a deal between Iran and China, they're our nation's lining up. Assault weapons that will destabilize the Middle East put Israel risk. He also said sending Secretary Cesar to Taiwan is to help in the fight against covert 19 and doesn't care if it angers China. Intelligence community interfered with a 2016 election to help Donald Trump. Former acting attorney general, Sally Yates pushes back against the Trump administration's move to dismiss charges against Michael Flynn Yates says before Congress today The conclusion is that Russia saw Undermined faith in our democratic processes. To hurt Hillary Clinton's chance electability. Pinto aged the candidacy of now President Donald Trump. And she says it was a direct attack on the homeland. President Donald Trump, once again dismissing the seriousness of covert 19 says kids need to get back to school. My view is the school shit opened. This thing's going away. It will go away like things go away. But Dr Anthony Fauci here on Bloomberg with David Weston says testing because.

President Donald Trump Iran Chinese community Communist Pa China Mike Pompeo Michael Flynn Yates Hillary Clinton Dr Anthony Fauci Sally Yates Pinto Carol Secretary Toronto Middle East Assault Bloomberg acting attorney general David Weston Israel
"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:27 min | 5 months ago

"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Conventions loom from New York. Welcome to the second hour of Bloomberg balance of power. I'm David Weston. Last week, President Trump shook up his reelection campaign, replacing his campaign manager as polls showed him trailing Vice President Joe Biden in some key areas. Welcome now. Mark Slaughter. He is director of Communications for Trump. 2020. Mr Lauder. Thank you so much for joining us. I can't think about Mohr authoritative source than you are. Where does that campaign sit right now, From your point of view. Standing there poised to win. You know, this is nothing more than the president making sure we have the right people in the right place at the right time. And, you know, Brad par scale did a fantastic job building a behemoth of an organization focused on re electing the president. And right now we put our top political mind in charge, and we put our top digital guy as Brad Bar scale in charge of digital and focusing on what he does best. So this is this is a natural evolution of this campaign, pushing us The edges. So assuming you get pushed over the edge that you have victory in November, what will be the cause of it? Because we wanted would have thought the president would really be running on the economy. The economy is not in great shape right now is that is that really an advantage for the president going into this election? I do because I think most Americans realize that this is this is an economic people that was not caused by economic reasons. There was nothing wrong with the economy. This was a public health emergency. Why we had to push a pause button on the economy. So the man who built that rocket ship of economy is the one that can get us back going again. You don't want to go back to the failed policies of Obama Biden, which caused the slowest recovery since World War two last time, they had a chance. At the same time, the question was having had the pandemic, which was certainly not President. Trump's fault. Nobody's fault here that I'm aware of. The question is how you deal with it, and there's some questions and people's minds. I think about how effective how early the president wasn't jumping on it, and even to this day how consistent he is, has he handled this the best way that could have been handled from the point of view of the economy? I do think so. And I mean, look what we have learned in this through this entire pandemic. You know, if you remember when I was listening to your opening when you're opening a sound there you had. Somebody said we should listen to the doctors. Well, if we listen to the doctors in the beginning, the president wouldn't have shut down travel from China and Europe, which actually proved out to be and they now admit was lifesaving. So we have learned so much about this virus throughout business. This current up ticking in positive testing is not like the earlier one. We've also learned that the causes of those who have a negative outcome we can identify them better. We can also have better treatments. So there is a way that we can Both open up our economy again and have a safe and healthy community again, and we're learning to do both. I think that the American people get that and right around the corner, I sense that will have better, even better therapies and a vaccine on the horizon. At the same time, the American people at least a kind of poles and polls aren't always accurate. I'll be the 1st 1 to say that You tend to give credit more to the governors for responding effectively to this barren virus pandemic rather than President Trump. And I think that's fine. You know? I mean, this is a government of the president who believes in federalism and knows that these kinds of national emergencies start at the local level. Then and then what the federal government does best is empower local officials and then acted that backstop. We saw it in New York when they didn't have enough hospital space. They didn't have enough ventilators. They didn't have enough doctors and nurses. To the president built the hospital. In a matter of weeks, He sent the hospital Navy ship into New York and also into Los Angeles. We used military doctors and nurses to help give local doctors and nurses some breaks. That's what we do know as a federal government. It's just like how we do with clean up from from a disaster like a tornado or a hurricane. It's primarily a local activity, but it helps by the federal government paid for greatly by the federal government. And when they get overwhelmed, we can step in and do and do more so mark. We're less than three weeks away as I counted from the Republican convention coming up in typically and this is not a typical year, I admit, but typically that's where both parties sort of set up their candidates set up the The issues that they want to run on, give us a foretaste of what we can expect in terms of the themes you want to hit in the Republican convention coming up Well, I think first and foremost, you you'll hear that You'll hear that same about what the president has already done in four years. Whether it's on an economic basis, whether it's renegotiating horrible trade deals, uh and and bringing workers and standing for American workers. First things that Joe Biden obviously doesn't do and then you'll talk about what we need to do even further, which will be to continue. To have that logo. Low government regulation, keep taxes low, strengthen our our allies overseas deal with some of the national security threats but always do so from a from a standpoint of America's interest going first. And that is a huge contrast with what Joe Biden record is. It's one of tax increases more regulation, weak national security and not even standing with police officers. So I think we've got a very strong case to make, and we look forward to making it. The president looks forward to making it here in a few weeks. What's your specific message to places like my home state of Michigan and Pennsylvania and Some of those northern Midwest states there tend to be industrial I'm from Indiana. So I know exactly what that message is going to be. Don't forget the Joe Biden voted for NAFTA that ship to your jobs overseas. Don't forget that. Joe Biden was the top cheerleader for Tpp, which even the labor unions hated because it would have caused millions of more jobs to go overseas. Joe Biden has a record of being weak on China, whether it's their entry into the W T O or most favored nation status. That caused our jobs to go overseas. Joe Biden is no friend of working men and women. And that's why blue collar men and women they supported President Trump in 2016 because he said, he'd fight for their jobs. He's proven he could do it and he'll do it again. We're going to see any adjustments by the president in what he says or how he says it. You know, I'm not gonna get ahead of the president. The president. Obviously he speaks. He speaks with his own voice on Do you know it's one that really has a connection. I've never seen a any kind of politician from either party.

president Obama Biden President Trump Vice President Joe Biden federal government New York Mark Slaughter Mr Lauder China Bloomberg David Weston director of Communications Brad Bar Mohr Trump. Europe hospital Navy
"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:27 min | 6 months ago

"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"David Weston's time. Now for stock of the hour is Ralph Lauren, which has had a pretty rough quarter because that pandemic is now going to consider yet another overhaul, and Scott, who is here with the whole story, Scarlett. It's an ugly story right now, David, you look at the stock it fellas Muchas 8.4% trading at a three month low, bigger than expected loss in the fiscal first quarter. With revenue declines across geography is although Asia held a better And everyone else that Asia was down 34% versus down 67% in Europe and down 77% in North America. What was particularly devastating was wholesale revenue, dropping 93% North America that is a sales to department stores, and Citigroup says that recovery in this particular channel will be slow to come. You add it all up. That's a 66% drop in revenue. CEO did say he expects this past quarter to be the toughest one throughout the crisis. Ralph Lauren not giving any kind of fool your guidance, but you can see that analysts expected declined to kind of moderate in the next few quarters. David So is this going whenever we talk about retail? We have to talk about online sales. It's proximity. It doesn't look like some of those department stores going to coming back. There's so many of bankruptcy now. So do they have a real growth opportunity in digital? How are they doing there? Well, Digital was better. It was one bright spot here for Ralph Lauren, up 13% in the quarter, but you look at what happened to North America. Is only up 3% and that's compared with a 77% drop at physical stores, so that just gives you a sense of the challenges ahead. I suppose the optimist would say there's the opportunity but really what it comes down to his Ralph Lauren is giving us an early glimpse into the kind of damage that we might be able to expect. When the retail sector really starts reporting next week. You can see that the stock has also underperformed the global luxury index as well. I would argue that it's in a tricky spot because Ralph Lauren is not a super high end luxury play like Montclair or Prada. It's more aspirational luxury. It's also had some strategic missteps along the way, missing out on the leisure trends. So you mentioned restructuring. That's the way out, I suppose, rather and trying to avoid becoming the latest casualty of retail, there's been 27 retail bankruptcies so far this year. And that's the only afford have months to go in the rest of the year. So we're going to surpass, obviously what we've seen in the past harassed Lauren outlining a plan to cut costs wherever it can. We're talking about organizational structure, real estate distribution channels. Product selection, David all the likely suspects. Okay. Thank you so much discussed. Who for that report on Ralph Lauren coming up next. Senator Mike Braun, Republican of Indiana, gives us his solution for overcoming at.

Ralph Lauren David Weston North America Asia Citigroup Senator Mike Braun Scarlett Europe CEO Scott Indiana Montclair Prada
"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:48 min | 6 months ago

"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is Bloomberg Wall Street Week with David Weston from Bloomberg. Radio. Thiss Week. Washington Tackle the question of whether big tech is too powerful House lawmakers grilled the CEOs of four of the biggest tech companies in a remote hearing following a year long investigation. Amazon accounts for 38% of online retail sales in the United States, according to E marketer and his congressional Will debut CEO Jeff Bezos defended his company against claims that it exploits small merchants in an inherent conflict of interest for Amazon to produce and sell products on this platform that compete directly with third party sellers, particularly when you Amazon sets the rules of the game. Thank you know, I don't believe it is way have way have Consumers, the one ultimate making the decisions. Apple is the most profitable company in the United States. It's app store is at the heart of criticism that it gives itself unfair advantage. There's a competition for developers, just like there's a competition for customers. It's so competitive, I would describe it as a street fight for market share. Social networking giant Facebook was accused of stifling competition through its acquisitions of Instagram and WhatsApp CEO Mark Zuckerberg shifted the focus to his competitors. In many areas were behind our competitors. Most popular messaging service in the U. S. Is I message Fastest growing out his TIC tac. The most popular video is YouTube. Fastest growing adds platform is Amazon largest adds platform is Google Alphabet owns Google and YouTube, both of which rank among the most visited website in the world. Google controls 59% of the U..

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"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:15 min | 6 months ago

"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I'm David Weston. We start, of course, with a market check to see what's going on with Abigail do little and chopping one of your favorite words, Avago, but it certainly applies to today. It really does earlier today on the open, up and down right now mixed all over the map on the bottom line is with the S and P 500. The Dow bit hire. Some of those cyclical sectors do a little bit better, while the NASDAQ 100 New York Fang index are doing less well. In fact, in the red and yesterday, David We, of course, had a very dramatic reversal for that New York Thing index at one point, up 4% than closing down 3%. That index, of course, has been really on fire out of the march lows that stay at home trade investors going into it. So a bit of an unwind there and interesting on the day we have the financials pushing slightly higher but a mixed picture for the big banks right now. Hey, P. Morgan, really putting up a great quarter despite a large loan reserve loss. That was the case Also, of course for Citigroup in Wells Fargo, Wells Fargo, though really a very bad day at this point, David as they put up a disappointing quarter, the first lost since 2008 and they cut their dividend to 10 cents from 51 cents. Investors not liking that butt again mixed messages. In a choppy day in a choppy time period. Quite frankly. Exactly. We're also getting mixed messages about the Corona virus. I think its spirit say, and yesterday it seemed like maybe the news out of California shutdown not have schools in Los Angeles and you go may have triggered some of that happening at the same time. Why would that hit the fame? Because I thought that if we have a more Corona virus, we'd like the thing better because we have to use it more from home. Well, you know, I think that the two are probably a bit separate, but news out of California yesterday it was one of the turning points that did take stocks lower. But the thanks started turn lower much earlier. And quite frankly, you have these stocks up in a huge Ridgeway this year because of that stay at home element. Also, these companies put up great quarters back in April for the March quarter. So we're into the earning season now will be curious to see how they fared over the last three months, of course, and there's something interesting here also David ahead later this month, we have the CEOs of Amazon, Jeff Bezos, Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook. Tim Cook or top executive from Apple and then Sunder per try from Alphabet testifying before Congress later this year. Some are saying it's going to be the biggest anti trust a tech hearing of all time. Not likely action happens, but at least putting that idea regulations. So when you have these stocks having run so far so fast this year, it doesn't take a lot. Push them back in the other direction, just a little bit of nerves and so much uncertainty right now between the virus. Earnings on quite frankly what's ahead as you put all this together, David Yeah, Fair enough. Although I have to say I've seen this play before about pulling the big tech companies before Congress. Nothing's happened yet. Maybe it will. This time. We'll see. Thank you so much to Abigail Do Little Congress has done an awful lot already try to support the economy and tally is really starting to mount up. In the month of June alone, the deficit, the United States of America was $864 billion. And more weight may well be on its way with 1/4 round of stimulus we bring in now Douglas Holtz Eakin. He is the President Mac American Action Forum. And, of course, the former head of the Congressional Budget Office. Doug It's always great to have you with us. So 18 60 Thanks, David in a month. We're looking at something like 14% of GDP. If you don't add some more in, can we afford this? We can't afford this and you know it's painful to see numbers this large, There's no question about it. The money is not free. I want to come back and talk about that. But in this moment, the most important thing is to support the American people. Get businesses back on their feet and get the economy to recover. And that's the route to getting the budget in better shape. That's the route to getting everything that we care about better incomes, less inequality. All of that comes with giving the comic back to full employment. So Do what is necessary Focus on what is necessary Don't do things you don't need to do and then recognized that at some point in the future, you know, 2023 45 There's going to be a moment of reckoning. When we have to be able to control the growth of the debt. You can't grow faster than the economy forever, and that will require some very difficult political choices in terms of higher revenues. Reduce spending and that moments in the future. Don't you say the money is not free? But it seems like Jay Powell, the chairman of the Fed has done pretty much everything in his power to be pretty darn close to free. How much is the federally supporting this borrowing level by keeping those interested so low? I think the feds done an extraordinary job of insulating the financial markets from the larger fall out of the cove in 19 pandemic. If you think back where this enormous cash flow hit. It was a mad scramble for liquidity and the Fed really flooded market liquidity, provided that and and buying large financial system function very well. In doing so they cut rates to zero and then there's a lot of cash out there. That's made it easier for the federal government's borrowed. But I think markets would have provided this financing anyway. It's it's essential to the recovery that the federal government have a large role, and I think market participants will be far from shy about that. What more needs to be done. I mean, there is talk right now in Washington. In fact, I think most people sort of think there's going to be another way that special win and how big it is. But if we learn anything about what's the most efficacious way to put money into the economy for we've done already. Well, what you hear people talking about are you know how much will we have an unemployment Sure its benefits another round of checks. Let's get money to states and localities, including the schools, but I think there's too little discussion off. The lessons we should be learning right now, For example, with California and other states, this is far from surprising from the beginning. We knew there would be likely recurrences, regional outbreaks and some headwinds from the virus itself. And the question becomes, How can we continue to operate the economy in the presence of this virus and not have to shut it down? To me that says, Focus on the business is what does it take to make those businesses safe for employees to go back and work say for customers to go in and engage in commerce? It might be pp it might be modifications to the workplace itself. That's going to be a business expense. It's a supply side sort of cost shock. Congress could offset that, to some extent with targeted policies to pay for those through tax credits and other things. I think that someplace they really had to think hard about. We also know that Hundreds of thousands of small businesses have likely already closed their doors. I think that's AH, hole in the discussion as well. We need to have an affect the program passed the PPP to get those small businesses, you know, starting up again and hiring workers again. Those of us who've been key pieces they're all in the business side. Oh, and Doug. It strikes me that this crisis particularly is difficult because there's a huge economic question. But you sort of can't answer the question without knowing something about the epidemiology on the other is they're essentially a hole in the bucket. That is the bucket that Congress is pouring money into, because the more we have to shut things down, like in Florida, like in Texas, like in California, we're not going to be able to be with filling that economic bucket. I think that's a very good point. You know, we know from looking at the Fed data, for example, that households have about $2 trillion Maurine the bank right now than they had in February..

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"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:27 min | 6 months ago

"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And radio. I'm David Weston. The president Mexico is arriving at the White House today as the U. S Embassy that successor agreement in after goes into effect. We welcome now Rufus York said. He is the president, the National Foreign Trade Council. Earlier he served in among other positions as the deputy director general of the World Trade Organization. Roof is great to have you back with us. Let's spend a minute or two on USMC. It's finally getting done is going to make much of a real different as a practical matter. Yes, Thank you, David. Good to be with you. Well as a practical matter, it is important because it reduces uncertainty about whether this agreement this North American trading relationship, which has been in existence for 25 years, is going to change dramatically or continue. I mean, there are some marginal improvements in the U. S. M. C. A. But I think the most important aspect of it is it is, it increases the degree of certainty. We will keep an open North American economy. There's less risk now of Ah president or Congress turning its back on this agreement, although there are still threats, as you know, even today on aluminum from the Trump administration to pose new restrictions, but I think it creates greater certainty. We're hopeful that it settles the situation won't make a dramatic, different and in imports and exports or investments immediately over time, I think it will strengthen North American trade. So you anticipated a question beautifully. Rufus isn't really going to create that much more certain, because, as you say the Trump administration is continues threatened as tariffs on aluminum the same time you got Senator Schumer, the minority leader in the Senate, saying, Boy, this does not take care of the agriculture problems either on President Trump has shown he's willing to impose tariffs no matter what the agreements are saying. I think that's the biggest concern is is how much will the Trump administration, you know, abide by an agreement they just negotiated. The president has shown a pension in the past, for, you know, posing new restrictions notwithstanding deals he's making. So you know, that becomes a question of trust between partners, but I think there are limits to how much you can do that sort of thing if you want to, you know. If you want to tell this agreement as as something good and knew which the Trump administration wants to dio I mean, they want to use the political benefits of they can't really turn their back on the agreement. So talk to us about your old organization in the World Trade Organization. You also by the way, worked for United States trade absent, but you worked for a good long time. 11 years of the W T o. It is about to be leaderless. Come August, with Mr Azevedo's having stepped down there's a lot of contention there was even before he announced he was stepping down. What are the prospects for getting somebody into leadership at the W T o in time? I think it's going to be a challenge. There are a number of candidates have already come forward. I think today's the last day for candidates announcing. I see that UK is putting forward their former trade secretary Liam Fox. There's a couple of Three candidates from Africa. There's a Korean. There's there's others around the world, so it will be a challenge. I think that the process in Normal times. If if Azevedo would stay to the end of his term, the process would have taken about nine months since he gave his announcement only in May. It's it's an abbreviated profits is obviously to September. But the real challenge is earned so much process. You have to carry consultations and narrow it down to two finalists and then get a consensus on the final candidate. That's a challenge, but the bigger challenge David is the politics of it. How do you get U. S. China European Union. Other big players not to disagree with each other's choices and you know, Ambassador Lighters for examples put some pretty strict conditions down. Saying of the kind of candidate he'll accept. You know, with a fundamental commitment to changing China's practices that will be hard for the Chinese to accept his candidate and vice versa. Probably so I think maybe a lot of people will be looking to see if They want to delay this past the US election. Exactly. That's the question for particularly for China, Don't they have some incentive to just slow walk this saying, you know what there might be a different president effect, although it's not clear, given what is being said now by Democrats and Republicans that whoever actors the White House is gonna go soft on China. No, I don't think it's a question of whether they'll go soft on China. I think the Europeans as well, who, as you know, have had a number of points of friction with Trump Might might say, Well, you know, maybe we oughta Wait awhile and see how the US election comes out. I think the calculation will be if Trump gets reelected. We'll have to make our peace with him and we'll we'll reach agreement on somebody. But if Biden gets elected. Why would we want to be saddled with someone that You know, we had to make a compromise with with Trump to get maybe we'll get a better deal. I don't know what these countries are thinking. But certainly that might be part of their calculation on and we'll see. You know, there have been periods in the past where there was not a sitting director general. They have to appoint an acting one. There's a process for doing that. That might be the case now. And remember that it isn't just the director general director General's actually not that strong, Ah role in terms of powers. There is ah, chairman of the council that's appointed by the members. There are Chairman of the various committees, so that keeps operating even if there's not a sitting director general. All of which raises a question in my mind. At least Rufus is the W T up to it, no matter who leads it as a practical matter, because when we come down to the two largest economies in the world, having a fundamental difference about how you run your economy, the center which is state driven or not, Is there any W T O that can really take on that fundamental issue. I said to you so many times before, David that you know the system like the Ghat before it is essentially a contractual relationship among major trading countries. And if the Partners in that contract are agreeing with each other about things there's very little a director general can do to alter the realities of a major breach between partners, so the main role of the director general is trying to figure out how to bring them together and create grounds for compromise between them. But that depends on the goodwill and the willingness of the countries to do it My sense Particularly in the U. S China relationship is at this particular point in the relationship. There's very little chance of them crafting a path forward together in the W. Two. It's more likely they're gonna have a number of disputes in the And so we're looking to the future over the next several years. Can we get back to doing business with each other in the W I think that's going to be the big challenge. Okay. Rufus is always a treat to have you with us. Thank you so much. That's Rufus York, said he is the president of the National Foreign Trade Council. And now it's time for first word news. And for that, we go to Mark Crumpton, David. Thank you very much. New York City's still plans to open public schools in September, Mayor Bill de Blasio said today he anticipates AH blended learning program, students.

president Rufus York David Weston Trump director general World Trade Organization National Foreign Trade Council United States China Mr Azevedo director general director Gene deputy director White House Mexico Africa New York City U. S Embassy U. S. China European Union
"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Influ zhu conversations from bloomberg television here's david weston joining us now is maggie gauge she's credit suisse head of washington research so give us your best on where we are with the tax plan and whether we're going thing let's tickets for the firstever 18 of saving holds seventy well as you know there are some important milestones from seventeen in that reform this we can will continue to see on as litmus test as we like to thank our van throughout seventeen and that is the first step being the big sex tax reform plan that we saw unveiled and the next will be whether they can actually get a budget resolution passed that would allow for the vehicle for tax reform to happen so we're we're actually optimistic right now we think the fact that one at the tea party kinda came out in support of both the framework and the path forward for our budget resolution as well as the meetings at the president himself has been holding at the white house i think that's pretty informative that there a live led work being done that that gives this bill real probability of getting over the finish line you mentioned the budget resolution there's talk about even introducing at this week on the four why is that so critical to whether tax reform will happen so the budget resolution to take office jargon out of it would allow congress kind of an expedited path to which they could consider tax reform this is particularly important in the senate because it will allow threshold to be at fifty votes simple majority rather than other senate procedure what acquire 60votes hear more interviews like this one on bloomberg television streaming live on bloombergcom and on the bloomberg mobile app or check your local cable listings the mobile business news 24 hours a day com the radio mobile app.

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"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"david weston" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"So you're saying midjuly they're supposed to be more detail outlined at the negotiating stretches commerce than august eighteen you really start the negotiations give a sense after that what is your hope on the timetable when you have something concluded with the mexican governor an and the canadian well both governments or quite receptive to the idea of a renegotiation they both know that this is a first an outdated agreement doesn't really address the digital economy the dozen very much addressed services in general certainly doesn't do much on financial service mrs also doesn't do very much a natural resources so those are some big gaping holes in it in part because the mexicans have changed their regulations for the better a natural resources and in part because nobody way back when after was negotiator did he even knew there would be the digital economy so i will needs of dating second of all the needs some reprovisioning to adjust to the economic realities of today so there are many things that need to be fixed and i think everybody is up to the idea of fixing that was us commerce secretary wilbur ross speaking with bloomberg's david weston coming up will speak exclusively with faced the sheryl sandberg you can see all the number stories fast this is business.

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