17 Burst results for "David Waxman"

"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

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01:43 min | 2 months ago

"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

"Right. Thanks take care but all right. That's the show set out to david waxman. Great to have you on man. Thanks for coming on the show. That was great for everybody out there listening. I hope you enjoyed that as much as i did like. I said at the top of the show. There is a link in the description of this episode to go. Hit up ultra music. Keep up today with everything they're dropping you know whether it's releases from some of your favorite artists or brand new artists that you've never even heard of older music with the track record that they have You might as well just go for the ride man. David is always hard at work. And as you heard that conversation. They're working on a lot of exciting projects. You can also follow me. Keep up today with me. My name is willy joy or at back-to-back pot on all social media. Back back potted gmail.com the email address. Or if you want the best way to get in touch with me you can always just come join the back-back discord. The league for the discord is also in the description of this episode. It's a great group of folks. Man you gotta come join up and that is the best way to get in touch with me. I'm in there all the time. So if you got something to say you got a question to ask come ask it on the discord. Talk to me there and then we will be best friends forever. I hope everybody out there is doing well. I love you all. I got a lot more exciting episodes coming up for you in the next couple of months but until then be good. Have a good week. And i will talk to you guys next tuesday for back to back. This is willie joy peace..

David willy joy next tuesday david waxman today willie joy potted gmail.com next couple of months
"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

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02:28 min | 2 months ago

"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

"Let's be honest but now of course it's a whole fudge career in this great great courses in grade schools and everything. It's it's incredible now. And and i encourage my son to be part of the. He loves music. He's he's like my little. Anr scout now. He's a little he's fourteen but he's got incredible said years and he's he's discovering music for me so it's great to have like a kid who's years or in the street because at street level you really hear what they're listening to organically in how they discover it so eleven fourteen year old. It's great to discover music again In a very pure sense in a very organic way. Yeah yeah. I mean first of all. That's just great free labor right i. I'll give him a little extra voters for their allowance. If they find something. I love about what you said is that you know you talked about that moment for yourself. Listening to the smiths in the winter. And it's sort of being the soundtrack you didn't know you needed and then having seen that experience again through the eyes of your children i mean. That's that's what we're all looking for right. That's why all of us stay working in music. Deal with all the stress in the weirdness that is the music industry is is for moments like that. I think that's beautiful story. Man abs- absolutely and i think you know there's so many times when you discover a song for the first time in a nightclub and you remember that moment i remember like you know. Nineteen ninety three or ninety four. Is an artist called christine. W a caulfield what you want. And i remember did leave the exact time when i heard this song for the first time. And there's so many times when you discover that moment and again it goes back to you know being around with your friends. I don't know what it is. It's there's something that just it. Just it's stamped into your brain that like i. You know Whenever i hear songs for the first time in a specific environment it all just remember that moment forever you know And going back to the smith yala percent and you know now not only do you get to as sort of chase that moment over and over but you get to create it. Hopefully for other people read by so that. That's why that's why i love it. I hope that i have that. Other people experience it for the first time. The same way i did you know. Yeah one hundred percent and why. I think that's a great note to end it on. I don't think i say better than that. Yeah thank you. Thanks for having me. I appreciate it pleasure good. Yeah it's been great to have you man. You're welcome back anytime all.

christine fourteen first time eleven fourteen year old ninety four one hundred percent Nineteen ninety three first
"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

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07:47 min | 2 months ago

"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

"You have people come to me like i remember this moment or this cd. Or and i think even like there was a wikipedia page about like having the most entries in electronic music on billboard and i was listed as one of them because of all these ultra ultra compilation. So it's kind of fun. Yeah that's did. Those plays a big art in the growth. Volts that the compilation series ultra. Dan's ulcer trans ultra chilled ultra. electro of. That's how we built our brand in the very beginning. Sure and you tell me if this is a reach. But i was looking at those and looking at the different editions of them chilled weekend. Electro i it occurred to me that you guys sort of predicted the playlist paradigm that. We're now all in with spotify playlists of you know very separated genres and styles and moods. You guys were doing that a decade or more before hand yet. I think. I think we're doing number. Twenty two twenty or twenty twenty one twenty two coming out next month. Actually so yeah. He's been annual. So yeah we. We were trying to at one point. I think we're doing about six of a year. And i think it was starting in two thousand one so yeah they were great. Great great series. Yeah oh one hundred percent. I mean i definitely had many of them early on as well. I mean you know you mentioned ultras turning twenty five years old which is a crazy number to hear what what keeps you hear. What what are you still excited about. What's the most fun part of what you do. Twenty five years into this game. I live e breeze sleep not just music electric as long as know again as long as i could remember it's just always been some kind of electronic music and rhythmic to I was actually just going through Some of the classic records classic songs you know before i got into electron- trunk music and to remember they all had one wants similar Component which was the bpm most of the songs that glistened to growing up all were in like a more uptempo range. And i always thought like i. I kind of look back. I'm like wow. And when like whether it's like depeche mode or smith's all the alternative stuff. I was listening to the songs. I typically gravitate towards. Were more uptempo and it's just funny. How like oh. Maybe i should do remix this or bootleg that or cover this and Because it's all it's all in that same kind of rhythm of went one anywhere from one fifteen to like one twenty five thirty you know. Yeah yeah that's actually that's interesting to hear you say because that's sort of how you first got knowing right. Was these bootlegs. you're making a is. I was like nine inch nails queen back off all these sort of influential artists in the eighties and nineties and to think about that from lens of what you just said that. Yeah it's a common tampa. It's about the energy connecting all of it. That actually makes a lot of sense to be thinking about your current job where you're signing people who make wildly different sounds and styles of music but there is this sort of shared energy. This shared aesthetic to absolutely. Yeah and as we're kind of wrapping it up here you know. The last year for anybody in the music industry has been interesting to say. The least and i think we've all had to make a lot of adjustments. No matter what side of the business were on. How has your experience been you know working through the pandemic are you. Have you still been you know finding new artists. Have you guys been operating as as much as normal as you've been able to. What is what is the pandemic been like for you. Yeah i'm grateful that the companies. I it's will first patrick's legend and you know he. He's an incredible Incredible boss hand credible president of the company and everyone really on top of their game. And and i think keeps everyone positive. It's always it's always been a great company to work for. I think even more now than ever because we're seeing that despite us every working at home were able to work at full capacity. We've gotten into a groove that we're able to continue to do what we do. So i'm very grateful for that But i think from the the label with what's interesting was really interesting. Is you know a lot of the producers and artists that we've been working with were touring three hundred days a year or on the road constantly and now with that gone they're focused so much on music And so it's been there's been a lot more. Creativity love more content coming out. That wasn't before because the other just wasn't enough time. Ford so i think it separates touring brands and the performance from the actual artists. Because there are some guys. They're they're delivering the same amount of records that they were when they're on the road and then there's some that are just like seem like every every couple of weeks over sunday's just new music coming you can really see the real artist kind of creative output slowing now. Because that's all they're doing you know who's i don't know who the first person to come up with. It was but who was the first guy to say that. Edm produces Preparing for this all their lives by locking themselves up in the studio recording by themselves in preparing for the is there anything. You're working on right now. Any artists any songs anything. You're you're really excited about. That's on your mind. yeah. I'm very excited like there's a new act They're based in sicily. Cold julian asiya while so intrigued. Them is because they built this incredible youtube channel on that. I think when i first met them they were at like maybe four hundred thousand subscribers under tunnel which is mass. Yeah and i think now a year later like seven hundred. Seven hundred fifty thousand subscribers and they. They've always had a incredible youtube performance videos of them performing in these really beautiful landscapes. Whether it's at night thinking sicily or you know all these different kinds of beautiful backgrounds in a very excited with with what's going on with them another new artists that had been working with is so And he's been incredible because like every song that we've been putting out his continued to grow some very excited about him as super excited about carnage being back on the label on you know. We work with him on album about five years ago and now we're working on another album. I'm hoping that swearing comes back soon. you know seeing the random tour dates here and there was just talking to australia. Who was saying that. They're starting to do shows again because they've been very diligent about covid being protective of everything. I know about asia. It's been a lot easier. Because they've been very strict with the quarantine so they've been able to do maskless festivals which you know i. I can't even imagine it's great to know that no carnage was there. There's there's a bunch of guys that were there a couple of weeks ago doing shows and were strict about. Was there a couple of weeks ago as well. You know that stayed in a hotel for two weeks and then once they're out and i was even talking to one of the artists that will look. I changed my slight like five times. Because i don't wanna go back a little restaurant. I can go. I can just do whatever i want. And not even think about it because it's cool So i'm hoping that i think there's a light at the end of the tunnel for us. Send them hoping it comes soon But we'll see you know. Yeah same here man. Same first of all. Thank you for doing this man. I hope you had a good time. It was really fun. I'm just going to ask you one. Last question is the same question. I asked at the end of each one of these interviews. Just looking for a moment in.

two weeks Ford youtube sicily eighties one hundred percent four hundred thousand subscrib spotify next month nine inch Seven hundred fifty thousand s five times Twenty five years a year later patrick asia Edm twenty five years old twenty wikipedia
"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

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06:11 min | 2 months ago

"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

"Forty stations is great because it gave me a little bit of relationship with him and i ended up opening up for him. Like you know. We did. Parties with emits yellow and pasha Different places in the opening. Dj for him so that was fun. That was great. Yeah that's fantastic and with love is gone and having that kind of you know that radio hit not just hit but a big radio hit. Was that one of the first times that it happened for. Ultra like we're the yeah. That was a big one. I think it was around the same time. I think between that and then again pit bull. I know you want me. And then we had also another artists called a newer than record columbia. Which had a big saxophone riff in it. I'm sure with it. So i think it was those three records on pit bull. I know you want me. Were probably a little bigger than love is no actually. They were all in the same kind of pool of while this is when we realize. Okay this is crossing over. This is getting big now because those were all within the same. I think it two thousand seventeen thousand eight and we had a couple of a couple of big records back then when that happened at the time was it a surprise or had it. Been something you guys had really been trying to make happen at the time. We're always trying to get hit records and troy to make it records. But i remember the first week you look at soundscan back and you look at what your first week. Sales are records of cds and downloads. And i remember when we first released a pit bull. I know you want me. And i wanna say like the first week it was like twenty thousand downloads or it was a big number and i think it was the biggest first week we ever had a single. And it's exciting. Because that's when you know people i know you want me Prior to that record is nothing distinct story without one we had this columbia record right north la brea and he was doing a record called the anthem and it had the same sax riff in it and both records were kind of competing for airtime so neither one of them went all the way number one. But some stations were playing the anthem stations. Were playing calabria. And i was like well. Who is this guy because before that he was just doing right and that was kind of his i kind of more dancing rhythmic record so i was like well. Who what do i do. How do i get in touch with this guy. Pit bull so. I called my friends said your who. Who's on the label the time and cedric studio happen to be in the same studio as pinscher and so i was like you know what's going on like you know. Can you get number his shirt and he gave cedric pit bulls number and i just called them. I'm like look you got this record. I got this one. Let's do something together and he's like our. Let's do it and within two weeks. I know you know it was a beat. Instrumental beat called us seventy five brazil street and then he turned around. I know you want me within like two weeks and then like like okay. This is going to be who knew because also that was a very simple record there was but it was all hooked. There was no real crazy versus. It was all like one two three four hundred. Oh says quattro it was. I know you want me. They were just so many. It was just hook after hook after hook absentee now like the first exciting record that we had really crossed over to beyond us but also internationally to about the ripple effects of something like that too because to hear that you just called up pit ball and it was that simple random. Yes the ones though but then look at what he did. Afterwards i mean. I feel like he went so hard on that in the you know it makes me wonder if you hadn't called him when you did. What would his career would he be making those kinds of records. It's it's really interesting to think about those little moments it is and it's always. It's always the random moments like that even like. I remember like you know going and few years later with only cheerleader. And you know we had. We had reggae record cheerleader. And we're like well. We need to get a deep house remix of it because that was starting to pop. And we're like whoa this there. Here's this guy walking. The streets goldfield yawn in germany. Let's get him to remix this record. Okay sure and he just you know it's always these these moments that you have that no one can predict it. You can try to put the biggest writer with the biggest producer of the biggest artists. But it's always those kinda special moments that are just like it so it's just random and it's like the stars aligned feeling. Yeah absolutely and especially. It's got to be a great feeling to because the you know there's no bigger plan than what you just said right. It's just something you do in the moment and then it ends up you look back on it and it looks like this genius. You know this lightning strike of genius but at the time it just feels like well this you know i kind of this seems like a good idea. Let's try this ad. Yeah yeah it's interesting. I saw it. So when i knew i was coming to talk to you. I was looking at you. Know your background and looking at some old articles about you. And all that and i found this interesting quote From octo octa. I don't know if you know her but she's a fantastic. Dj and saw that recently yeah. Very flattering very right. Yes she said that you know the first mix cd she everbod was one of yours. It was one of the ultra compilation mix cds in that was hugely formative for her and that may be set her on the path. And it's those kind of ripples that are really interesting to me. Because that's probably something humid ten years ago that at least that i have to assume you know you probably haven't thought about in a while but then years down the road. It affects another artist at a different time. In their life. I was so passionate about doing these. Ultra compilations especially ultra electro Altered those were like we had the first disc which was like you. Put the big hits in. What's hot at the moment. And then you have. The second is which is more like the really cool stuff and i love mixing those they were just so much fun and it was like. Yeah i do have every once in a while..

Forty stations twenty thousand downloads germany first disc ten years ago three records both records first few years later two weeks first mix cd second seventy five brazil street two thousand seventeen thousan number one first week one first exciting soundscan eight
"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

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06:38 min | 2 months ago

"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

"I remember getting links in it in an mp. Threes and everything. I would open up a try to open up. Every piece of mail. Could just to hear because i always wanted to find again. It goes back to just hearing something having lunch on it. I always wanted to find that one diamond in the rothen and just like know and have moment of like a random cd it or or whatever and just and here and be like. This is the one but usually what i've found over the years. Is that unsolicited emails. Just from random people usually is. If they're if they made a great song they can find a better way to deliver it to me. And that's why like even the packages you know. I ended up having like whether it's a lawyer manager an artist or a producer. Someone that i know at the end of the day is very small world and you can find a way to link to connect to someone if you really. If you're really good at producing music you should be able to find a way or you have a great song you really believe in. There's probably a better way than emailing info and ultra music dot com. Don't mean yeah and and that's what. I always thought that if you're smart enough to make incredible music you. You're probably going to be crafty enough to figure out a way to get into my hands. Not just from a just a random. Oh i got your email from what whatever. There's got to be a connection. Usually that works a lot better. You know yeah. I think that's good advice. I yeah i mean you gotta do a little homework for if you spent all this time making this music you can spend a little time doing a little homework right back in the day. It was like you know. I would have people send me. Cd's and they didn't even put their email address on the cd. And i'm like the second. I open up throughout the envelope. And i'm like okay. Put it in and you gotta do a little bit of you know you're right. You'll be a little crafty. I get provos to this day where people have been tagged the mp threes. That's yeah that's definitely a pet peeve because the second i opened up that song and then it goes into my you know how many hundred thousand songs in my i tunes playlist. It's gone and it's like you know. And then if i do happen to like it and it happens just playing something on shuffle or whatever and all of a sudden it comes up and just the title of the song and i'm like oh actually like this but i it's as good as gone hundred or so say impact has happened to me absolutely so you know talking about these these. I the first time you hear an artist and that moment that exciting moment of discovery. Have you had any white wales where you had that moment and wanted to work with somebody and just weren't able to to make it happen for whatever reason in the very beginning of ultra There was a record call. We like to party by venga. Boys had the reality is is like. I'm like oh my god. This is the worst record i've ever heard. I hate it also back then. I think my dj tastes really drove my aa our skills. Right if i liked it as a dj. I wanted to sign it. And if i could play in the club. I would want sign it so i was like. Oh this is just not my thing. So i don't mean it's bad it just not my taste right and sure enough. That became just a mega mega mega anthem. That's when i realized that. Sometimes if i really dislike record i think it's going to do really well. That's that's absolutely right because we are if if if any art and i will be generous and say boys. This is the cause again. It goes back to the reaction caused the reaction. Whether it's making you like rather like nauseous or gets you like it gives you the chills. Oh my god. This is atrocious. But there's something there because if you don't have a reaction music again you're you're you're white noise wallpaper just sitting in between the records and in between the music and you're never gonna get noticed you're just trying to sound like a pop record like everything else. What's the point because it's just there's too much of it out there and you you gotta stand out talking about all these these names you've worked with. I kind of just want real quick just bounce around a couple names. Just throw them at you. See if any whatever comes to mind whether it's the story of the first time you met them over the first time you heard their music. Let's start there all legends. But let's start with the legend. Armin van held in our men held in while you know when i was i was arrested. Dj at a club called liquid in miami and liquid was like the hot nightclub. He was on espanola in washington and it was. This is like the late nineties. And you'd have like you know the big actors at the time. Like with bruce willis and he'd have madonna combined all the celebrities. Prince was coming by back when he was the recipes. One i think that was the moment and it was like he had those crazy. It was tori most professional widow. Cj sugar sweeter. It was a his brother Sneaker pimps like there were so many incredible records from from from from armand for some reason armand just it brings me back to like. It was like ninety six ninety seven and it was my liquid pinnacle of my miami. Nightlife career was armand. He played an important part of no. I don't really have a personal relationship with him. We've released music with armand But i just it brings back. It's more than the style. Yeah yeah absolutely. And i think that's appropriate for him to because he's someone who has managed to stay. I mean certainly relevant but estate innovating while still like all his new music still sounds nas daljit to me you know and then i think that's a really special thing about a person like David guetta david guetta. Yeah david's incredible We did is a pop life album. I guess this is again before it was easy and it was dance music. And the major labels didn't really wanna really be a part of dance music in in the early two thousands and so we met with david. Patrick i in miami and talked about doing some music together. There's releasing seau's music because label. The time didn't want to release didn't really do much with it. In america and sure enough the first record we diverse big record. We have which is. I thought forty record in america was love is gone and that was like one of the first. Big wreck is we gone. Selects z one hundred. And all the big top..

Patrick america Armin van washington bruce willis david guetta David guetta forty record david late nineties first record miami hundred thousand songs first time espanola one hundred first one Threes One
"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

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07:08 min | 2 months ago

"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

"I don't think there's ever a moment that i'm like you know this is going to be a hit. It's more like just believing in the artist and helping them. But i don't think there's ever been like the. I'm gonna sign this one because it's gonna have a hit record. It's more like. I just love the music and i want to be part of it. Sure yeah i mean that makes total sense a thing i talk about a lot with producers on this show is that you know anytime you sit down to write a hit and that's your intention you're never going to read ahead read the Exactly the same thing here. i think i. It's just interesting because hearing you talk. It sounds like you know you don't think of it from either an underground mindset or a mainstream mindset. It's much more. Just sort of i like this or i don't like this which which i think and correct me if i'm wrong but i think that's maybe a healthier way to look at it because there's all this sort of dichotomy between underground music in mainstream music and often they're pitted against each other but i've always felt that they. They kind of symbiotic relationship and that you know dance music going. Mainstream doesn't necessarily mean it hurts the underground or vice versa right. I mean there's some music that's just meant to live in the underground and they do phenomenal. shows you know like a working with local dice season iconic a legendary techno dj and. it's great. I helped get together with some producers and and do his thing but ultimately it's always been just great underground techno music but he'll do you know ten thousand tickets or do these huge festivals and do big shows but it's not necessarily music that's gonna translate outside of the club and sometimes it's just the best music you'll never remember is the best music that you feel in that moment at the time in that club. But you don't necessarily take it home with you and you're not necessarily listening to it. I in a sterile environment on a playlist while studying for us. You know what i mean. Yeah so so. I think that's that's there's a big separation i think and then you have the other artists that are just big streaming numbers but they can't sell out small shows inside you know small two hundred three hundred cap rooms. But they'll have millions hundreds of millions of streams on spotify. So it's just really interesting just trying to find that middle ground. And that's why always say i don't sign songs. I sign artists. Because i always believe in working with artists because i think it's just a lot more special than just you know signing a song that is going to be hit and i know that's exciting for the company But i i get more into you know. Just working with artists he absolutely. I mean if you think about the artists you've signed which there's so many i don't think we even have time to talk about half of them but You know take like you mentioned steve mckee right and he's somebody who who i've known you know from. I've seen the whole journey as well. Like i started working with him. What was he like. And how have you seen him as an artist over the years the most interesting aspect of steve is that he's never had a specific. Sound right he you know he's a guy that can do hip hop record do a more elegant trance record. He can do a core. Edm record you could do a track record. It's never been one. He's ever been consistent. But he's always had an edgy kind of Grinding kind of sound to his productions but he's never been really fit into one. He's just an incredible performer. You know up. But then again. There's this guy's like the euro in there is a method with carnage carnage is a super authentic artists. That can kind of merge in an authentic way hip hop and electronic right so You know so. He can do a core record but then he can do work with like a underground legends like martinez brothers in house. Legend like the louie vega. He's a great guy because he's very pure in that sense he he know he between working with like his first album that we did had like louis vernon migos in mccone in all these incredible rappers. He always had his finger on the pulse. Working finding these guys before they were really popping and the first album. Poppy gordo was phenomenal. That way because it really blended in a pure way you really core. Edm and electronic music with incredible wrath. And it's great to hear guys like that. Yeah i mean what what's working with a guy like cartridge like because he's a buddy of mine and you know he's a he's a force of nature that he has a he has visioned is generally pretty direct about what he wants and what he's gonna do. It's just interesting to think about managing all these different personalities and all these different styles of all the different artists york with. Yeah no he. He's great and again. It goes back to just being authentic right He he's very authentic. And i think that's why a lot of incredible artists gravitate towards him. Because it's just it's it's not like he's trying to be something he's not trying to go down a lane that because that's the flavor of the month he just he does his thing and people love it. It's just very pure. That's relevant carnage. Yeah i think that's right. Did you have a vision for what you were looking for. And maybe we can even say that vision changed over time as far as are you trying to you. Know set an agenda to promote a certain sound or a certain Styler perspective on dance music or is it more reactive that when you see someone doing something exciting you just want to amplify it at anytime. So incensed me a record. They think. I think this is great. For ultra and. I think that's always actually not what i don't wanna hear that i and i always tell people you know. Play me something that you just love and play me something that you don't think is right faltered because chances are that might be the one that i'm actually into Because people from hearing their music in the past they might have a perception of what they think. We would release and people ask. What are you looking for. And i'm just looking for interesting music. It doesn't have to fit a specific sound or fit in a box. It just needs to be different. You know so. I'd rather find here music. That sounds unlike anything else. As opposed to trying to to sound like what's hot at the moment you know yes absolutely. How should artist approach a label. You know what is what's good etiquette. What's what's a turnoff for you. If somebody does something that you know is gonna make you not wanna listen to their music. What sort of the etiquette there for you well I try to listen to everything you know. I think if. I hear that. It's playlist of such and such dj. That doesn't really impact me if you're sending music don't send a link to twenty five songs. maybe narrow down to like two or three or just think if you had one with what would shot be..

three two two hundred steve mckee spotify louis vernon migos Poppy gordo millions twenty five songs steve first album martinez ten thousand tickets three hundred cap streams Edm Styler hundreds of millions one half of them
"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

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06:01 min | 2 months ago

"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

"Was was vpn art. Virgin time. Supatra calls new virgin. He's like oh. I'm looking for enhancing our and i'm like. Oh that's really cool to mike. Oh it's got the inauguration virgins going to be great so a couple of years down the line and then as the we had just talking about music you know and at the very end. He's like when you go down to mind many startup old and i was like. Oh this is not what i expected. But i went down to. The office is six people. Stacks and stacks of boxes of records everywhere and it was just like a couple of people in the office. You know just started doing like you know compilations. There was more compilation label. The time with a couple of vinyl a little bit of vinyl going on and it was just interesting times because that was really my first real fulltime job into into doing a record label. That's why my life is like pre ultra and ultra because it's just like that was kind of a separation point horse. Yeah and i mean. It's i think it's such an interesting time to think about because dance music in twenty twenty one. I you know it's something pretty much. Everybody knows about it. it's on the radio. It's a normal thing of mainstream thing to go to a dance music festival but in the nineties and particularly the early to mid nineties. I mean dance. Music culture was not at the size that it is now and so hearing you talk about You know six people in its cramped office. You know all of that. That rings very true to me. Because i started. Dj going to ribs in the late nineties and did it. Did it feel to you in those days. I mean did it feel like you guys kind of you know you had a mission and you're trying to bring a sound to the masses like did it feel like a lot of your time was spent just sort of trying to get people to pay attention to it absolutely Dance music was like like the dirty word of the music business. If you can't make it into other genres of music you get into dance music. And it was like he was always just kind of the lower level lower tier. And i remember like you know. It was a struggle. We finally got. I think it was called p. Ym in miami the radio station and we had we got one record at. It's the to the station and we're like oh my god. We got a record on radio and we were concerned about trying to work a second record that station because we didn't think they were gonna play because it just it was unheard of. It's interesting because i think you know if we're just looking at the post two thousand so like the last twenty years there really. Is that line kinda right in the middle where those first ten years. You know. It was dance. Music existed in it was popular. But you know you're talking about ultra was putting out compilations and it was maybe just as a whole a little more faceless and then i saute like the idiom boom happened it became so much more artists driven and dj's becoming rockstars in a way that they hadn't been in the states list which had to. I must've been an interesting transition point for you. Guys ultras well not only going through it. But i mean actively participate. I feel like you guys helped make that happen. I think you know there were there. Were a handful of records and it was probably two thousand eight hundred exploded an e you name it and i think the rebranding of dance music coining this new term spark new life into it. You know even though lady gaga she was dance artist and it was just dance and then it was a it was like a david gupta. It was even like dimple. I know you want me which was one of our records said that We sit up there. Were like a handful these records at all of a sudden these these dance records started going. Edm had something to do with it. Because it didn't it wasn't dance. Music was edm and it just became a whole fresh new sound new genre almost a whole subculture in and of itself. I mean it's interesting you know for you coming from the underground roots right. I mean if we're talking about legendary new york clubs you know names like junior vasquez and you know these are these are legends in the underground for you did. Did you always have that pop year. That side of it to yourself as well like was it a goal for you to sort of bring it mainstream a bit more. I i actually. I've never been a fan of pop music But i always liked music. That was a little different and again it goes back to if it sounds a little different. I think that's the most important thing. I think It's not really so much about pop music for me. You know. I for some reason everything i've ever signed artists. I've ever signed is always been very early. And they just grow into it and even like stevie oh key like he oh he was doing mashups and he was doing like these like you know celebrity events and everything. He wasn't like the big festival digi that he is now. And you know even cascade or like. I remember like when i opened up for cascade. It was a little show at a place in the city. Was maybe two hundred cap room and it was. You know i remember going out for you know. Meeting was in before the show. We're like oh it's gonna be cool this going to be great and you know we went to the show and it was like the about two two hundred two hundred fifty people and then the funny thing is we fast forward about five years later and we were recording a shoot for him at the staples center this whole concert. They did about ten thousand tickets and was the same crew of us in that in like the green room that were at the bar a before the show and it was just such an amazing moment to see like this kind of this artists kind of catapult. Just into just into stardom you now from from doing these cool underground clubs to like you know becoming the star that he is well. Sure and and seeing the goal posts along the way right. But there's never..

Supatra lady gaga first ten years two thousand six people david gupta stevie oh key late nineties junior vasquez two hundred cap first nineties second record one record p. Ym about ten thousand tickets edm Edm about two two hundred two hund miami
"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

Back To Back

06:16 min | 2 months ago

"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

"Think you know. There's there's a difference between being a great producer. A great artist so sure there are great producers out there but it definitely takes something a little more special to become an artist. Because you know you can you can produce great music. But i think you know what is the live show. Look like does he have a manager or not How is there a reason why the music is performing so there are definitely a lot of components to becoming a great artist. And i think it's not just about the music econo- you gotta see hear and feel you know have been artists in your career where you really felt like you took a risk on it. It didn't seem like an obvious win. But you know you just felt something. You had a high. They're really ended up working out in the end. The perfect example Zero has been a great great. I mean he. I think he's a billion streams on spotify now and he just had like one record like what was called melbourne balanced at the time. Just one record. That was kind of like popping on a youtube clip. Or whatever from the first time i heard it is just sort of distinctive and different and you know yeah i think he was one and even black coffee. Who's really having a moment now with his new album dropping in nippy in a couple of weeks i signed him close to five years ago. And you know he's been around for awhile. He's been at brown for for probably over ten twelve years at least But he's just having his moment now. It's great one to sign these guys when his early and wash them develop and and really just find their way well so that leads perfectly into my next question. Which is you know. I think for a lot of people just starting off their career. You know everybody dreams about getting getting signed this big contract. It's a thing you hear about a lot. But what actually say you find an artist and you like their music they like you and you sign a contract and decide to start working together. What happens after that. Because i think a lot of people don't actually understand what the process of building an artist. Is you know you were alluding to a second ago. Talking about putting records together but you know what what would that entail. Just take sort of a blank example. Artists say you just sign them. What are the next steps that you would usually follow. It's really hearing the music. You know it starts off in a an art starts off the song creation And it's helping them whether it's helping them find a song to work with or writers to work with vocalist to work with and helping them kind of develop their sound and work with them but then there are a lot of artists that just delivered great records and you put him out so it's really case by case there's no one particular method you know. Sure maybe that's a good way to talk about how you started doing this work in the first place right because we mentioned you came up in new york. You are promoting these clubs. You eventually start. Dj at these clubs quite successfully the tour all of that. When does when does old tra and the picture and when does You know starting to work with other artists on their careers in their projects. How does that take form for you. Yes so when. I was dj This is probably the late late nineties. I was teaching in a club. Gold swallow and twyla was great because it was the first time that a nightclub in new york city was starting in port. Dj's from outside of the not just the city or the state but the country so we had residencies from like sasha golden and paul van dyke and call cox all the kind of international deejays. And so i had my own residency. There off started on fridays with with some of the the international. Dj's and then. I switched over to saturdays. And i was opening. Dj for a digital junior vasquez. Who's like one of the most iconic legends of new york city. Dj of new york city house music and it was funny. Is that you know opening sets the opening. Dj sets own nowadays are like an hour hour and a half my opening dj sets. We're about eight hours long. So i would play from like ten o'clock at night until like four o'clock in the morning and then he played from four in the morning until you know probably the next afternoon or evening and so anyway so so when i was playing there i noticed that you know sometimes i was at. Dmc this Which was owned by. Nick and it was like a remix service so i was trying to help set up remixes for like really like Different kinds of records just finding exclusive remixes for for the vinyl and one time i found this random record called flippity gyp by an artist called lord lord running clam and so i gave it so what daca pellets who won. Dj to remiss the junior actually remix. And then i think what happened was the appel leaked and all of a sudden all these bootlegs and different remixes came out and i was like. Wow this is something. I discovered and it was really cool. It was just something that no one heard of. And what i did with is i turned it into this whole kind of moment of different kinds of music. And i'm like that's really interesting in that dot the whole in our side of me like creating records and helping people create records and not just me and it coincidentally instantly at the time Patrick moxie was the president of ultra. He had just started off. Ultra and that. That was the first release of altruistic ninety six or it's actually a twenty fifth anniversary this year And he was look. This is about ninety nine and he was looking for a in our so when i was at. Dmc and mixed bag. I had a colleague who is at a mixed bag in uk and what happened. Was patrick called my colleague Off his name allston looking for a based in london. And then so austin actually called me and my office is actually about two blocks away from patrick. And he's like oh. The looking for patrick was was vpn art. Virgin time. Supatra calls new virgin. He's like oh. I'm looking for enhancing our and i'm like. Oh that's really cool to mike. Oh it's got.

Patrick moxie sasha golden london new york patrick Supatra uk paul van dyke spotify Nick mike five years ago mixed bag twenty fifth anniversary new york city saturdays this year one record over ten twelve years lord lord
"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

Back To Back

05:26 min | 2 months ago

"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

"After became twilight that i became resident at that club but this is like in the early nineties and it was a david morales remix of the thompson twins and it was one of these records at like he played it. You couldn't find it anywhere. I had a hard time finding a myself like it took about four years to actually track down this record and a friend of mine who happened to be in italy at some random record store happen to find it and bought it for me because he knows how much like the record short enough for like in two thousand and five thousand six. I was like oh well let me just do a search and sure enough in the click of a button. I find the mp three of it and it's just like all that time all those years. And i think that's where you kind of lose that appreciation a little bit for music because it's so accessible now. When there's thirty thousand song was going up a day or plus that on spotify. It's not. I think the value and literally because back. Then you're spending as much as fifteen dollars for an import vinyl where now it's all whether it's streaming for free or a dollar ninety nine download on beat quarter. Whatever i do miss those days of like and finding in that and feeling that sense of accomplishment of like. I'm the only guy that has the town i'm going to be playing it and i'm gonna play for six months before comes out or whatever i mean that to me that sounds similar to maybe some of what you do now at as an are at ultra right because that's also you're looking for a new sound that nobody's found yet or you know you're trying to work with a person that you know nobody else is gonna work with. Do you think it's that that same kind of chase that discovery Absolutely does nothing more exciting than discovering new artists and hearing that first song. And i always call it. The the the factor. Like as soon as you hear you like what the fuck is this and you have to find out what it is you want to know. And so you hunt down. Whether it's a song of the artists or whatever and i've had those moments and they're great where you just like. You just believe in something because you hear and you love it and you wanna you wanna just be a part of it and there's been so many times where like you know. They're relatively unknown are as they might have a couple of singles out. And you're just like. I really need to be a part of this and like you know. Some of the most amazing artists discovered and signs ultra has been through that author the process so like You know even as early as benny. Benassi senator action. This was like a white label. I founded the record store in the second or heard on. Like what is this record and sure enough. I managed hunted down and the other Am and all that found out who produced the record and automatically to sign him even with like dead mouse before the helmet before the big shows it was You know joel zimmerman. With his he started dead mouse monica and he was doing these records with his partner his production partner and they'll call yes. Od him during music conference in miami and he handed me three cds. And he's like yeah. Here's some of my music and sure enough. On those three cds it became like the anthems of dead mouse for the next two years Like faxing all these incredible records that were just like it. Just i love being apart even zero like the first time i heard the first year or record on mike who is this guy tracked down signed him and you know we've had a great run with him out. Continue to. it's i think that's the most exciting part of being. Anr off is finding a discovering new talent and helping them grow and and just watching them kind of the bloom you know. Yeah yeah absolutely and in a second. I wanna talk about how you got into that kind of work. But while we're on this topic you know. How do you find artists these days. You know what what are your discovery methods. And maybe how they changed over the years. 'cause i'm sure sort of finding new sounds and new people to work within twenty twenty one is a little different than say two thousand and one sure sure. Well i mean it's still it's still listening is still a connecting with people talking to people data plays a big part in an are now. Because you know. I always joke about how. There's a lot of data analyst south there disguised zane ours because they're looking at the numbers and they're seeing what's trending and we use those tools and as every in our should because you wanna know what's working what's not in your business but ultimately just comes down to hearing it because you know when you have music on spotify or on or and they're charting. Everyone's seeing that same information but if you dig a little deeper and you help create those records that's where it gets super excited because no one can own has a formula for that. Sure you can get. This was producer with this writer and this artist but putting the records together. I think a lot more exciting than you know. Finding those hit records that are just buzzing that everyone's playing in the club were that's going viral on spotify charge. You know sure sure. Yeah so so say you find an artist and you really like there southbound but maybe the numbers. Don't add up maybe they. They don't have good numbers on social media. They don't have a lot of engagement. What what is the balanced. I mean first of all do you ever. You know just sort of throw the data way and just say no. This music is too good. I believe in it. You know what is the balance that you strike.

joel zimmerman italy miami thompson benny spotify thirty thousand song three cds david morales first song first year early nineties mike one first time Benassi about four years zane fifteen dollars ninety nine download
"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

Back To Back

07:42 min | 2 months ago

"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

"Rapper. it's one of those funny things. And maybe you can relate to this. You know i started this the show about four years ago and you know just something on on the side for fine and it took on a life of its own maybe to jump into it. That makes me wonder you know. Does ultra have a similar thing in your life. Because i know you started as a dj yourself and you you were doing the dj thing. You had residencies at the influential nightclubs. All across the country. You are known in these circles as a as a performer. As an artist. You know when you started branching out from that was that was that a conscious choice was a you trying to make a change was at one of those things. Where it's sort of snowballed in became something else overtime Life is kind of like in two parts you know there was life before ultra and you're right. I was saying And this is you know. Free internet pretty much You know touring dj mostly in america. It was going from. You know club the club. That has all the Dj's do mostly new york miami for the most part montreal la san francisco chicago. I've been all over the place in the us. But i always as much as i love. Dj saying i always had my feet on the ground. And i always craved stability. So i always had an ear for music but i i was more dangerous than just loved having a stable job During while i was. Dj started off being like you know. Buzz chart editor for mixed mag- magazine when he was in the us I was running their label whole dmc. I did promotions for a an independent label. Emotive records all these little things. I always had the. I didn't know which was the side job because i was doing both of at the same time. I guess it started off as dj saying running a record label but before. That was kind of running nightclubs. Actually as a promoter manager. And then i slipped into the jiang so if we work back from there from dj to promoter i mean was dance music a part of your life at a young age. I would have to assume so. Yeah i think. I kinda got bit by the house. Music bug maybe when i was eighteen. Nineteen on you know. I think it was probably like in the early days of like jungle brothers and todd terry very early music and when i was in college we used to book a young. Dj colter heck sector. Who actually went on to become a grammy award. Winning at the news in two thousand and one he won the grammy for. I turn turns you. Mel see his remix and so we used to book him at our college parties and and inbetween we always want to play hip hop and all in between the hip hop. He'd be playing house records and hours. Like oh this is kind of cool but it was. It wasn't really my thing. Until i start getting into a more more than i discovered limelight. And all these kind of palladium and all these nightclubs in the in the very probably leads early nineties and this is in new york red. This is new york. Yeah i'm kidding. Up growth in brooklyn You know new york city was my backyard. I grew up in the nightclubs in new york. City and i just always wanted to be a part of the music. Somehow i found my way into doing my own parties and i ended up starting at at limelight doing a small party. There then moved onto the plate and just kind of started as it promoted. But i move more from from promoting into managing because i was offered a job managing a couple nightclubs from this owner. Peter gatien. I'm peter gatien owned the limelight palladium club. Usa and the tunnel. And these are all mega mega clubs in your city. Holding between two and five thousand people have gone jumping every night of the week and so he had his kind of crew of managers and one of the magic club. usa in the tunnel. The time. and i just. I don't know. I was more instant music and less incident management in the nightclubs because there's a dark sides running late nightclubs especially back then news free. You know instagram and all the social media so it was a little bit of a darker time for anybody. Anybody listening. Who doesn't know who peter gatien is. I mean there's there's a story there as well. And i was. I was in. It was in the middle of it during the the pinnacle of his career. New york city. And there's a great bloke that he just came out and there's also documentary of the documentary called limelight and it's interesting to hear the stories from back then the isles. I wonder you know. I think that period gets so romanticized and there have been movies made about it and you know all these sort of pass down legends about how crazy it was in this sort of unmatched feeling and vibe and atmosphere. You know as someone who is really there. Is that accurate did it. Did it really feel like sort of this. Just sort of wild time that there hasn't been since sure i remember autos manager club. Usa we'd have clients that came in deir or just always talking about the days of studio fifty four and they're always like oh won't it. these are just. It's not the same. And i don't wanna be that guy saying it just not the way you know. It's it's back in the day and it's not the way it's done the same but But it was an interesting time especially in york nightlife with you know we were spoiled back then because we had all the iconic deejays playing regularly every nightclub you know whether it was wednesday night. Go to see louie vega saturday night. He go see junior vasquez sunday night. You go to see frankie knuckles and roger sanchez. And and and Masters at work and all the iconic. Dj's the legends. We're all just residence at the local club so you got kind of got spoiled listening to the most incredible and cure house music back then so it was definitely a good time but there was a decadent side to and you know it's we in the michael l. league the club kids and there are a lot of stories from that are all true. They're all very accurate. All the stories that you read documentaries you see. It's all it's all very true was an interesting time for new york nightlife. Yeah yeah i mean what a what a time to. Just be there to be young and you know i think that kind of experience i mean it's interesting and i'm sure you've seen this you to connect it to what you're doing now even with say younger artists that you work with on the ultra label. It's so different now. From from when it was just the the club environment the performance aspect the politics of it you know all of it is so different and so much more above board in many ways. I mean if you look back do you. Is there anything in today's club culture or the way the dance music business is running now that you miss from the old days that i miss. No you got embrace the future you have to really evolve with it or i'll just get left behind so i don't miss yes. Miss going record stores on tuesdays and finding that gem record that no one can find. And i remember there was this one remix pet. I found there was a record. That university was playing on saturday nights at the sound factory. Which is a legendary nightclub. That seemed that soon..

Peter gatien peter gatien america brooklyn saturday night wednesday night new york two thousand sunday night todd terry Nineteen montreal la san francisco instagram eighteen york tuesdays two two parts early nineties Usa
"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

Back To Back

02:17 min | 2 months ago

"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

"Join the back to back discord. You can also reach out to me in various ways of discord is not your thing you can hit me up on social media at willie joy or back pain or you can email me directly back to back pod at gmail.com with any questions comments and or concerns. I hope everybody's doing all right out there. There's always a weird time of the year and particularly this year. You know winter drags on a bit. We've got vaccines on the horizon for everybody but not everybody has gotten them yet. There's sort of this sense of impatience because we can see the light at the end of the tunnel a lot of people are still going through it real rough a lotta businesses have enough time. So i'm sending love out to everybody out there. I hope you're doing are right on about everybody out there and no matter where you're at in life no matter what you got going on right now I hope you enjoy this conversation for the next hour. David's a fascinating guy. He's the kinda guy. I loved to talk someone who doesn't have a flashy public persona but you know has had a huge influence on dance music over the last couple of decades like i said the list of artists that he has signed to record deals the records that he has helped put together. I mean the list is just ridiculous. You know it's an interesting perspective. Seeing dance music participating in dance music at its most underground all the way to its most mainstream and back again. I hope you enjoy it and if you do enjoy it and you would like to support this show as always i say this every week but it is still true. The best way you can do that the best way you can support me and support back to back is just by helping us to spread the word let people know they should be checking out the show. Throw up a tweet tag us in your stories at willie joy at back-back pod telephone to check out the show. Tell an artist you love. They should come on the show. All of that. You love to see it anytime. I do see it. Of course i'm going to be reaching out. I'm going to be reposting replying liking saying hi. This is a community based show. I always love getting to know the community getting to know the people who support what i do so shout out to everybody out there supporting and with all that said. Let's get into today's episode. This is me and david waxman backed back. Let's.

David willie joy today david waxman gmail.com last couple of decades this year willie next hour
"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

Back To Back

02:00 min | 2 months ago

"david waxman" Discussed on Back To Back

"I it's too long for anywhere. I mean we can start the list with people like dead mouse. Esto calvin harris cascade paul hogan full. The vici carnage. Benny benassi steve. Aoki's i go. I mean look. John mara defining artists genre defining songs and older has been around for twenty five years. The twenty fifth year of ultra david waxman has been there essentially since the beginning. He himself has a fascinating career. Coming up in the legendary nightclubs of york city in the nineties holding down residencies all across the country working as a touring. Dj then joining ultra and kind of spearheading and releasing legendary series of compilation mixes. Which before older was known for its headliner superstar artists. They were known for these compilations and they were hugely influential to a generation of deejays. So we'll get into that in just a second as always in the description in the show notes for this episode. you're gonna find links to ultra music where you can go check out. Some of david's work check out some of the amazing artists he has worked with and signed to the label. The list is just ridiculous. We'll get into it but also in that link you're gonna find a link to the back to back discord. You've heard me talk about the disc or do you know what time it is. That is my little clubhouse. We have a great community of people. It is growing all the time. If you're a music producer man. We just redesigned the section for producers There's a channel where you can post what you're working on. Get some feedback link up with some other like-minded producers and that channel has been popping off. Man i love to see all the support all the advice. Everyone's giving each other and regardless of what you do if you to somebody who loves music we would love to have you come join up. Let us know where you're from what's going on in your neck of the woods what you're listening to turn on some new music talk some shit. Talk that shit. That's mainly what we do..

John mara twenty five years Aoki Benny benassi steve twenty fifth year york city paul hogan calvin second harris cascade nineties david ultra mouse Esto
"david waxman" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

03:19 min | 3 years ago

"david waxman" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"David, Waxman of Waxman. Welcome to crypto. Wanna one. Thanks for having me match. Appreciate it. You know, I was on your website Waxman dot com. And I was looking at your portfolio of all the crypto companies that you represent for your PR company dash polymath. I o h k steam it Lisk just a name a few. So who's better to talk to about the one one of PR in the currency landscape, then you what? I appreciate the kids come on here and talk with your listeners. So what we want to do today is I want to get to know you a little bit, then we want to talk about your company. How did it all start? Where did it come from? Where did you can get the idea to start representing crypto companies? Or was that an evolution? Then? I want to go into just representing companies some of the challenges. Some of the pros cons do ever tornado buddy of away from representing them or maybe some, you know, maybe hidden tidbits in the. World and then go into the crypto space in general, what do you think sounds like a razor, David? Who are you sir? Well, I'm actually a New Yorker from New York. So I'm one of the few people here. I'm currently sitting in a skyscraper in Manhattan who was actually born on this island, and I grew up both in New York and then in the joining areas and moved back here as a young adult have stuck around ever since my parents. My dad was born in Brooklyn and my mom is from Kansas. My dad actually has an interesting story. He was the earth Christmas with high school and managed to become a neurosurgeon than a lawyer. And I got to grow up with a lot of books around me. My dad however, was one thing he was not smart man is he is he is. He is not someone who understood the first thing about technology, and I got very lucky growing up. My parents supported me playing around with computers and trying to figure out kind of how this whole new internet thing worked. Kinda, Matt. It's very beginning and I'm always been interested in like really complicated technologies and trying to. Understand the mechanics of how they work. But I never considered myself a technologist and I didn't initially pursue a career in technology. It kinda just came on when were you born by chance? I was born in nineteen seventy nine or nineteen Eighty-three. So a lot of the people from in my era have started a lot of the internet companies from the college called the dot com. Two point knows right the the companies like read it. Facebook. I was actually in a high school class with Mark Zuckerberg hasn't turns out and these guys, they kinda created what we've seen kind of as the companies on the internet today. And it's interesting because they were disrupting media companies and internet companies from fourth them. And I think what we're seeing now with watt chain is a whole new series of entrepreneurs doing something very interesting. One of the most important elements of this happening much more globally today. It's not simply concentrated in the United States, and I think that's something we're probably gonna touch on later interview. Absolutely. And the reason why I asked about the age question is I have this theory that if you were born like anything. Before nineteen, say eighty or seventy nine. You almost kind of like missed it because when computers became popular in forcible, you're already in your your either late teens or early twenties. So if you catching it around fourteen years old than you just hit it perfectly. Yeah, absolutely. I think we, my mom started with an apple two GS a very, very long time ago in the eighties and early nineties..

Waxman David New York Mark Zuckerberg Facebook United States Matt Manhattan apple Kansas Brooklyn fourteen years
"david waxman" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"david waxman" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"So much fun having debut on the show that i won't say hugh psyche to him giving out the time stay to appear on the show if you'd like to see more from him you can find him on twitter at t wax deed likewise i'd love to hear what you thought of the episode had over to the arms to download the 20minute vc app by searching for twenty bc to'serve e c and you can write the episode and provide feedback it really would be fantastic to your thoughts likewise i'm on snapchat eight stubbings with two bs ally said it's always great see you behind the scenes but before we leave each day as i've said before and past episodes after have joe shirt raid militia charade raden when we discuss some of that awesome features previously but there are also some other benefits that make it such an incredible products hit fits on every plane my favorite for this of course being the carry on it also has an extremely strong durable shell and his superlightweight when it comes with free fiveyear warranty with free shipping and returns some for those in the us when you purchase you will raden with the code 200 vc cuts twenty bc checkout you'll get a twenty five dollars of credit this season it's enough to pay for the ride via pulled i'm back maybe depending on where you live and for listeners in the uk you can head over to selfridge'scom or fall fetchcom i really cannot recommend raden enough is changed the game for me and travel and speaking of super high recommendations i'm sleeping well at the moment and before you suggest asked you to me he took consumption all credit has to be given to my new symbol hybrid hits the most of bombs mantras in the world with a unique combination of two thousand five hundred clinical pocket springs unresponsive memory foam it offers the perfect support for two people a matches the response to you and your partner sleeping patents delivered free with one hundred nights sleet schaal free returns and a 10year guarantee it's an absolute must and you can start your free trial is simba sleepcom likewise if he follow me on snapchat at age stabbings were to be his you'll see my love simba an raden visibly in all snapshot stories it be great see that but that's so if it's day and.

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"david waxman" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"david waxman" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Early just to sort of get the news and i'm an nestle user so i get a lot of recommendations from my from my network by listen to a lot of podcasts but i don't have any other daily read what's the difference team financing and counting found this maybe ten fully understand you did trapped one of my pet peeve finance and accounting are totally different disciplines finances completely prospective in a super important for startups it helps guide we're going alps model the future helps keep the company on the right track accounting is retrospective it's all about just making sure that the money ended up where you thought it was supposed to end up and while it's essential it's not as fundamental to the business planning process as finance companies delays know that terms zero day absolutely you need to know at any moment acea needs to know her cash zero day monthly burn and projected revenue to the following month sentence then on that the mice recent publicly announced investment for me i'm like he said yesterday that so we recently invested in a company called velocity and philosophy has created a huge catalogue of you in motion i think the cult the human genome motion and they can tell based on the motion sensors of your phone what you're doing at the time so as you know the the motion sensors in current mobile phones are extremely sensitive and extremely precise and so these guys have had people going up and down escalators and pushing shopping carts and grocery stores and driving around and it can distinguish between all these different actions that can tell if you're in a grocery store they can tell whether you're pushing a cart or standing in line if you're in a car that can tell whether you're the driver of the passenger and obviously this as applicable at cnn mobile advertising but it's also more broadly applicable in any app were the context of what the user is doing matters and as all of these apps get smarter and more personalized that contacts is really essential david as i said i had 70 great things from sue pre the show said thank you so much for joining me stay as than sunland from me to thanks.

finance companies zero day mobile phones mobile advertising david sunland nestle human genome cnn
"david waxman" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"david waxman" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Cotton it by a sees that affect bc so let's take loss aversion military painful when a company fills feels terrible and he's don't like it and i don't like it but that i try and remember that a one x loss is the same as the difference between a at twelve eggs or a thirteen next gain emotionally they feel completely different but financially through to say and if you look at the data the best of ici's have slightly higher loss ratios than a middling ones because they're not afraid to swing card it and take more risks and so actually right now our our loss ratio fund one is extremely well in it worries me i want to make sure that we are taking all the risks that we ought to be i would love to discuss allo media early or is there a real test system being built others a real tekes ecosystem being built there's so much going on here right now and and of course people think about olaf for the hollywood fashion in the media businesses that have always been here and there's a great reason that companies like snapchat and tinder are and and the like are being built here but there's also both a legacy of really hard tech and and a lot of really heart tech companies that are growing here all the time so you know our legacy industry like aerospace which has been here since probably the 30's has new life with space x and a bunch of drone companies at one were invested in called air map and vr was born here with oculus be born in in part in a usc lab and also in our mind and we have a whole legacy visual effects studios that i think is contributing to the talent in that space so there's really as the tech ecosystem your grows it becomes more rich and more diverse and were able to tap to the incredible talent we have in the universities and the la base and we have caltech usc and ucla in harvey mud and shrink to leave somebody out and make them feel bad but they're tons of great academic institutions that pizzas ecosystem and now more people than ever are looking at la as a place to move to which is which is terrific favorable unease esa rainy joel naroff i'm thrower as a rare c t light to sit on the same.

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"david waxman" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"david waxman" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Welcome back this is the 20minute abc with me harry stabbings and you can find me on snapchat at h dubbing would to be used or lance get a personal response remain an exciting news if you did not listen to our absolute recliner perkins being gordon on monday that really is a must by the way then you will not have heard that the 20minute vc now has a fantastic app essentially is your centralized home but we'll things 20minute bc so you can easily tag episodes and go back to them later days easily find him by resources mentioned in the show a most important me for me to continue improving the content you can race episodes and provide feedback a huge science to jason humphreys for all his work to make the apples brilliant as the days and you can find it on the app store by searching twenty b c plus to'serve e c i'd love to hear what you think however to the show today i'm one of my many joys of this role is shining a light on some of the incredible individuals who maybe do not have the public attention of others but of course ecosystems and that's very much the case today and i'm thrilled to welcome david waxman founding partner ten one 10 ventures one of the leading new venture funds in the right using tide of la tack that portfolio companies have been at exit from the likes of facebook google amazon cisco airbnb and include companies like ecommerce pioneer and unicorn wished and the walls leading aspe services platform adam up as for david price tam one ten key enjoyed incredible success in operation starting with the founding of his first company firefly in 1995 an early pinay in personalization amd previously technology which he sold to microsoft in 1998 davidenko founded people pc company dedicated to simplifying the process of joining the online world the company went public in two thousand one and was acquired by earthlink in two thousand and to.

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