3 Burst results for "David Ware"

"david ware" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:25 min | 2 months ago

"david ware" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Let's just mention the Qatar World Cup kicks off this Sunday. And as does the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, the final race of the Formula One season this year. But it's not just about fast cars and football this weekend, as billions tune in to watch human rights abuses and anti LGBTQ laws in the gulf region are under the spotlight. Monaco's Emily sands spoke to doctor David waring an author and expert on UK golf relations. She began by asking how golf states are profiting from sportswashing to improve their images ahead of these events. The concept of sports washing basically refers to an authoritarian regime like cater, but also like Russia, China and UAA Saudi, which uses sports as a way of whitewashing its public image, regimes which are guilty of human rights abuses, but which want to show the world more sympathetic face and do that through hosting sports events. Why does sporting governing bodies allow places such as Qatar, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi, to host these events, especially sports like Formula One, their slogan is we race as one, which is supposed to tackle inequality and is working towards being more diverse and standing against racism and human rights. And this Sunday is the beginning of the World Cup in Qatar, and it's also the final race for the F one season in Abu Dhabi. Both places don't have sporting history. So why are these events still going forward and why are they still managing to build these huge stadiums and new race circuits to hold these events? I suspect almost the entire answer is money. These regimes are incredibly welfare, especially when the price of energy is high, as it has been for most of the last 20 years. They've just enormous revenues from the high price of oil for most of the last 20 years and the high price of gas as well. Sort of absolute swimming in cash, huge amounts of sovereign wealth, which they're spending not just on arms. They're some of the biggest arms and porters in the world, but they're also spending on investments in the west, part of which is about sports washing or just biding themselves closely to the west. Sport is a business, you know? The football is big business, SF one is big business. I mean, however, some brands have protested against the human rights record that Qatar has. I mean, you've got hummel Coca-Cola, Andy das homo announced that it would had a toned down kit in a protest against what's happened in Qatar. Why do you think that more brands haven't spoken up and what difference can bigger brands do and bigger sponsorships make in countries with a checkered past? I think it's really bad judgment, the ones that haven't done anything. And the ones that have, it's all a bit too little too late. And these corporate brands, but it's also the football associations as well. You can understand why. Perhaps an outright boycott isn't something that they do. But some of the gestures that they've tried to do to smooth it over have been pretty favorable. I think that the English FI players are going to wear like an armed band of multi colored armband that says one love on it. I mean, what does that mean? Well, that actually brings me on to my next point. And surely it's a good thing to have sports people like Lewis Hamilton and Harry came wearing the rainbow flag in these countries on the global stage. And without these sporting events surely such campaigns would never be visible in these territories otherwise. Do these messages have any recognition and in a sort of way, is this progressive to have the spotlight on these countries to force entry and open debates like this? I mean, this is why sports watching is such a double edged sword from the point of view of these regimes. The calculation clearly is that they can improve their public image by hosting these events. But they attract a spotlight and the thing about it is that that tyranny, those human rights abuses, they can't just be magic away, and they can't be covered up with a kind of potemkin village of a sporting event. They've attracted this attention to themselves, and that attention has gone in place where they didn't want it to go. So in that sense, it's a miscalculation, and it's a miscalculation, which may have improved beneficial from the point of view of human lives. Because you take the situation of the migrant workers. They're still treated appallingly, but there have been steps taken by the Qatari regime, which have improved their condition to a degree. Now, the Qatar is will say, you see, it's all been a catalyst for change. And it's helping us to do this year, as though, as though they weren't the problem, as though they were surprised as anyone to find. Margaret work has been exploited in their own country. The reality is they were forced into doing that. They spent 6 or 7 years after the World Cup was awarded. It's just in total denial that there was any problem. They were finally forced to make some reasonably significant changes. And so this is an example perhaps of the way in which this might be a miscalculation from their point of view. I'm sure these concessions, this concessions certainly weren't concessions that they wanted to make. They've been forced to make them because of the scrutiny that's been placed in them, which was scrutiny. They didn't want. So to the extent that those sports paper you mentioned are doing those things are raising those issues and I think Lewis Hamilton in particular has been pretty principled and pretty good. More than you might expect from the average sportsman. That's all part of that dynamic. And just finally, other than global sporting events, how do you think the Gulf states can try to change their image going forward? What can these countries do to improve their international reputation? You must stop abusing human rights. I think the more pertinent question is from our point of view, because remember these regimes didn't come out of thin air. They were built up and buttressed by the west. They've been armed by the west, security forces trained by the west, including when they've crushed peaceful demonstrations like in Bahrain, for example, in 2011, that was the crushing of the pro democracy movement in that country was done with western arms and western China security forces. So the question really comes to us as people in western states, what are we going to do about the fact that our governments have been consistent supporters of just utter tyranny in some parts of the world for so long? We need to move beyond I think this idea of look at us with our wonderful western liberal progressive values and look at those backward Arabs with their oriental despotism and their Islamic tyranid and start to realize that that's not what's going on. What's really going on is authoritarianism in human rights abuses which are a joint venture between golfer leads and western elites. That's what's really happening. And then we can start asking ourselves as western citizens, the question of what we're going to do to challenge our government support for these human rights abusing the shames. And then we might get some progress. Well, that was Emily sands in conversation with David waring. You're listening to the globalist on monocle 24. Well, it's time to talk TV news with critic and broadcaster Scott O'Brien. Scott, thank you for joining us. Firstly, neighbors went off air just three months ago, the classic Australian soap, but it's already making a comeback. Yes, I mean, this is a thing I think not even the people who are in the show really expected either. It's going to be relaunched the much love Australian soap by

Qatar Emily sands David waring World Cup Abu Dhabi Saudi Arabia football hummel Coca Andy das homo Abu Dhabi Grand Prix golf gulf region Bahrain Lewis Hamilton Monaco Cola China Russia swimming UK
"david ware" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"david ware" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The biggest drop in a week in a single week for stocks since the pandemic with the S&P down 5.7% in just the last 5 days This morning market participants are seeing more reasons to move away from riskier assets like stocks with the news the U.S. is telling families of its diplomats in Ukraine to leave that country in case of Russian hostilities Right now London's 100 share index down 1.9% Germany France and Amsterdam all down in a similar range Add to this a U.S. Federal Reserve policy meeting on interest rates and inflation later this week Here's marketplace's nova sapho David ware money is flowing in and out of tells you a lot right now oil prices are around a 7 year high as Russia is threatening military invasion of Ukraine Russia is of course a major oil and gas supplier the U.S. and Europe have promised a strong response The question is what would it look like if Russia and fates what would that response be And what would it do if anything to global oil supplies We just don't know yet Meanwhile stocks are in a sell off especially tech stocks which reached very high prices during the pandemic so many investors see them as riskier now especially if the fed starts raising interest rates sooner and faster than Wall Street has been expecting The NASDAQ composite index which includes a lot of tech companies is down about 13% for the year That's in just three weeks It's only late January It's been a rough few weeks for tech stocks Yeah and recently when we've seen dips in prices investors look for bargains and there's a jump in buying the next day not so much in recent days Yeah not so much that pattern doesn't appear to be holding this time around at least not on a big scale They've also been some disappointing headlines with regards to recent corporate earnings reports Netflix last week of course as we reported surprised by projecting subscription growth will be slow a lot over the next few months That adds to the uncertainty suggesting the effects of pandemic are a stimulus are waning What might change the narrative is the fed We'll see what comes out of their policy meetings tomorrow on Wednesday All right nova thank you The key stock index on the Moscow exchange is down more than 4% right now that would be as if the Dow Jones Industrial Average were to drop 1400 points The Dow future is down 227 points or 7 tenths of a percent The S&P future is down 1.1% The NASDAQ future is down one and a half percent Not a how bugs a terrible storm in Western Canada last year and pandemic distortions are contributing to sky high lumber prices in the U.S. wood is up by almost a third since September affecting new home prices and the cost of fixing up older ones Here's marketplaces Justin hoe A lot of what's been going on with lumber prices has to do with the supply of Canadian lumber Mark Fleming is chief economist at first American Canadian pine is highly sought after for home building because of its strength And in November a major storm hit British Columbia Washing out the rail lines that lumber mills rely on Brian Leonard is a lumber analyst with RCM alternatives It stopped shipments by a good 20% and a 100% certain places Leonard says that complicated the supply chain problems the lumber industry had already been dealing with Less truckers less rail employees because of COVID showing up things like that So the whole system kind of broke down At almost the same time last year a 40 year ongoing trade dispute with Canada came to a head says Rachel Brewster a professor at duke law school The core of the dispute between the United States and Canada is whether or not Canada subsidizing their lumber industry And in November the commerce department doubled its tariff on Canadian softwood lumber imports to almost 18% Doubling the tariff rates I mean that is going to increase the price of lumber This is also happening while the Canadian lumber industry is dealing with another older problem A beetle infestation that's been devastating pine forests in Canada since the 1990s leaving behind millions of dead trees and the risk of wildfires Since economist Mark Fleming with first American Increased risk of wildfires increased devastation of wildfires in the 2017 and 2018 error has effectively created now a shortage of trees to be cut down in Canada and exported to the United States Fleming says this is different from the supply chain problems that have caused shortages of other home building materials during the pandemic How do you fix a supply shortage driven by a sheer lack of something like a tree which takes a long time to grow And in the meantime Fleming says demand for new homes will continue to.

Russia David ware Ukraine United States fed Mark Fleming Justin hoe first American Canadian pine Amsterdam RCM alternatives Germany France
"david ware" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"david ware" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In just the last 5 days This morning market participants are seeing more reasons to move away from riskier assets like stocks With the news the U.S. is telling families of its diplomats in Ukraine to leave that country in case of Russian hostilities Right now London's 100 share index is down 1% Germany and France are down one and a half percent and U.S. stock index futures turned down in the last two and a half hours add to this a U.S. Federal Reserve policy meeting on interest rates and inflation later this week Here's marketplaces novos safo David ware money is flowing in and out of tells you a lot right now oil prices are around a 7 year high as Russia is threatening military invasion of Ukraine Russia is of course a major oil and gas supplier the U.S. and Europe have promised a strong response The question is what would it look like if Russia Russia and faith what would that response be and what would it do if anything to global oil supplies we just don't know yet Meanwhile stocks are in a sell off especially tech stocks which reached very high prices during the pandemic so many investors see them as riskier now especially if the fed starts raising interest rates sooner and faster than Wall Street has been expecting The NASDAQ composite index which includes a lot of tech companies is down about 13% for the year That's in just three weeks It's only late January It's been a rough few weeks for tech stocks Yeah and recently when we've seen dips in prices investors look for bargains and there's a jump in buying the next day not so much in recent days Yeah not so much that pattern doesn't appear to be holding this time around at least not on a big scale They've also been some disappointing headlines with regards to recent corporate earnings reports Netflix last week of course reported as we reported surprised by projecting subscription growth will be slow a lot over the next few months That adds to the uncertainty suggesting the effects of pandemic are stimulus or waning What might change the narrative is the fed We'll see what comes out of their policy meetings tomorrow on Wednesday And Wednesday nova thanks Tao and S&P futures are down three 10% now for the NASDAQ down 5 10% Somebody's going into bonds with the ten year interest rate down at 1.73% Now to a story about how pandemic distortions and a terrible storm about two months ago in Western Canada is affecting the building of new houses and home renovations in the U.S. this week will get an update on new home sales covering December in the U.S. and the increased cost of building materials will be a factor Think lumber with prices up by almost a third since September marketplace is Justin Ho has that A lot of what's been going on with lumber prices has to do with the supply of Canadian lumber Mark Fleming is chief economist at first American Canadian pine is highly sought after for home building because of its strength And in November a major storm hit British Columbia Washing out the rail lines that lumber mills rely on Brian Leonard is a lumber analyst with RCM alternatives It stopped shipments by a good 20% And a 100% certain places Leonard says that complicated the supply chain problems the lumber industry had already been dealing with Less truckers less rail employees because the COVID showing up and things like that So the whole system kind of broke down At almost the same time last year a 40 year ongoing trade dispute with Canada came to a head says Rachel Brewster a professor at duke law school The core of the dispute between the United States and Canada is whether or not Canada subsidizing their lumber industry And in November the commerce department doubled its tariff on Canadian softwood lumber imports to almost 18% Doubling the tariff rates I mean that is going to increase the price of lumber This is also happening while the Canadian lumber industry is dealing with another older.