20 Burst results for "David Tyson"

"david tyson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:20 min | Last month

"david tyson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Stuff. We appreciate that. Well, supposedly Matt Miller and Katie Griffin, they have a TV show that focuses on ETFs. And I hope it's today. Today as a matter of fact, and we have Katie greifelt in our studio. She's cross asset reporter on Bloomberg quick take co anchor. Katie, what do you and your co host? Have in plan in store for the show today. Okay, so it's going to be a big one. We have JPMorgan to kick us off joining us is Brian Lake of JPMorgan. He is the head of ETF solutions. JPMorgan is interesting is because they converted a bunch of their mutual funds into ETFs. That's right, that is a thing. It is a thing. It's not, you haven't seen a ton of it yet, but you've had some big names to it, JPMorgan now, and also dimensional has converted billions of dollars of mutual funds into these. Because I see dimensional on shareholders lists all the time. Is that simply to lower the fees to users? Is that the primary reason why we do that? Exactly. ETFs, they're lower fees. They're more tax efficient than when I talk to these issuers about why are you doing this? The answer I always get is really it's just responding to clients, clients have been asking for more ETFs more strategy and ETFs wrappers. So we kind of have to follow where that demand is going. Yeah, not just lower fees and more tax efficient but easier to trade. Right? Exactly. This is the new way. This is the way kids are trading these days, Paul. Are they? They're not just buying, you know, putting a $1000 into fidelity contra fund. No, I don't think so. No, okay. Outside of the mean stocks, you also have ETFs really appealing to the younger generations of investors. And the meme stocks are probably hopefully over, right? There's a crypto winter. I think it's fair to say hopefully. It's not right for people to invest money in stocks. Companies that make no money at all. I enjoy covering it, but it's not super the latest one last week that was kind of looking like that. It was kind of like a hurts. Yes, revlon, revlon. Thank you. This hurts was the OG. Meme down bankruptcy. Sort of similar, but very different companies and situations. Well, revlon could stand to get hundreds of millions of dollars from city, right? Or keep. Oh, right, yeah, exactly. How do I make an ETF around that? In terms of ETFs, though, they're here to stay. The growth has been even during this downturn. We're talking about this last week. There's still $6 trillion of ETFs, and that's just in this country globally, there's like $8.7 trillion of ETFs. Wow. Yeah, and I mean, if you look at any sort of flow chart comparing ETFs and mutual funds, it's one of my favorite charts. I mean, it's just absolutely black and white. All the money is going into ETFs and all the money is coming out of mutual funds. It's very zero sum. So what are the mutual funds, how do they respond to it? I don't see a well, so they kind of become ETFs. There's a big advantage because again, a thing I ask issuers, as well, okay, you're doing this, why not convert all your mutual funds into ETFs and ETFs don't yet work in a lot of U.S. retirement accounts. That's where a mutual funds are still the incumbent. Four-o-one-ks haven't been set up that way to sort of have intraday trading. And they wouldn't even you wouldn't even want that flexibility in your retirement account. I assume, unless you're really playing with fire. And the best story about ETFs versus mutual funds is from Eric balchunas is trillions podcasts. If you listen to that. Oh yeah, I've been with Joel ever. Have you, I recommend listening to it. They do, I think it's a 5 part series on the invention of ETFs. And the guy who invented them, I can't remember if his name is most or best, in any case, it's one of those. On the AmEx back in the mid 80s, he had this idea and he actually went to Jack bogle at Vanguard and was like, I had this idea, which and it's gonna steal all your business, you know? But Jack was like, that's a pretty good idea. I would change this and that. And then got on a train, changed this and that, and then went immediately to file it with the SEC or something. And it's a really cool thing. Who would have been the big ETF provider today? Aren't they just the big will Vanguard? State street, but increasingly it's just Vanguard and BlackRock. State street is kind of falling off. Is that a good market structure where I've got just two or maybe three? Well, players. It's a good question. It's great for Vanguard specifically because they're set up in such a way that but the answer is no. For an investor, you don't want to giant companies controlling the only things you can buy in. I mean, if you look at the trend in that sort of duopoly, it's just this race to zero on fees. I mean, you can get the entire S&P 500 for three basis points a year, which is pretty incredible. With a spider one. But Matt. Yeah. David Tyson. Oh, yeah. Tell me about that. Oh, man, I'm super pumped. So David tice is an old friend of mine, but you may remember him from the prudent bear fund. He was a very famous bear back in the day. During the financial crisis, when bear funds were all the rage, he sold his to fidelity for like a $1 billion and got a sailboat. And started producing movies. But now one does. Yeah, he made that movie where the girl gets her arm bitten off by a shark. But it's not so crush. No, blue crush is just about girls who surf. Yes. I thought she didn't have an arm. This one is called soul surfer or something like that. In any case, it was very, it was a big success. I went to Dennis Quaid. He's making another movie with Dennis Quaid right now. It's a documentary about. But he also failing grid because they live in Texas. But yes, he also has an ETF, a new ETF, because he was drawn back in. He said, this market was just too good not to not to play in as a bear, right? So he has a big bear fund and he's going to come on and talk about it with us. All right, is Eric Altoona on your show as well? Is the big tuna joining us today? Oh, yeah. He's finally back on vacation. I did a lot of walking last week because he was out, but he's back. Around the studio. He also his vacation was probably at an ETF conference

JPMorgan revlon Katie Griffin Katie greifelt Brian Lake Matt Miller Eric balchunas Bloomberg Katie Jack bogle Paul David Tyson David tice Vanguard Joel BlackRock
"david tyson" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

03:40 min | 4 months ago

"david tyson" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

"Gorka. Dear Friends, this show is not possible without those who support it, great patriots like Mike lyndell. If you want to support us, support him, they have shut down 9 of his bank accounts because he's a conservative, the big box stores have also banned him, go to his web page, step go to dot com for over my pillow dot com, use mining gorka for up to 60% off his more than a 150 products. That's my pillow dot com 808 to 9 8 four 6 8 promo code GORA. Toby allows question your sigils said, I just want to talk about the book I don't want to talk politics. Hopefully you won't see this as a political question. You have interviewed dozens of people. Hours, hundreds of hours of interviews. Allegedly, you know, if you want to use that phrase out of control, whether it's at schools or in the military, my buddies brag complain about it. Are you concerned or have you heard from those you spoke to that the capabilities that you've learned about that these people were able to deploy 20 years ago? Are they in threat? Is the military able to still do these amazing kinds of missions? I think they are. I mean, I think there's a lot of stupid stuff around and there's a lot of angst about it. And you know, I speak to members of team alpha, some of whom are still serving a couple duke contracting and I speak to lots of serving special forces people. And they tend to be like roller eyes and these things come and go. But this is a depressing time, I think. You know, you mentioned the Afghanistan withdrawal. I mean, you can just imagine how. All the people who fought for Afghanistan all the allies who helped us the liaison services. I mean, Shannon spann, who, you know, I met with David Tyson a couple of days ago, she's working sort of every waking hour to get Afghan allies out of Afghanistan now. And she's devastated by what happened last August and angry and dismayed. And so the members of team alpha. But what I think is incredible about these people is how rather than getting diverted into the stupid stuff. And they're angry and they're upset and some of them, this is a degree of kind of mourning. They have to come to terms with this because, you know, what do they fight for? But instead of kind of going down the rabbit hole or into a dark place on this, they channel things into their channel themselves into getting things done. Yeah, something productive. Yeah. And so the work they've been doing on getting the Afghan allies out, the work they've been doing for organizations like the third option foundation, which helps not only the widows and children, of families of those who have been killed, but also serving personnel. I mean, they pay for counseling for them and all sorts of things. So it's about keeping the fighting force fit. So that's what these people are focused on. And I think it, for me, it brings everything full circle because I think the spirit of 9 11, which is part of the spirit of America, that still sort of beats in their hearts. And it's still there, even though there is a lot of silly stuff and ridiculous arguments and focus on things that are utterly meaningful meaningless. It is still there. All.

Gorka Mike lyndell Afghanistan Shannon spann David Tyson patriots Toby third option foundation America
"david tyson" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

04:22 min | 4 months ago

"david tyson" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

"Tell us Toby after that story. What happened to David Tyson after the attempt to rescue Mike span? So David managed to fight his way out of the southern compound. He has grenades bouncing off him that don't explode. He has people. And he was there originally with just the pistol just to hang out. Yes, yes. He has Al-Qaeda fighters who were still someone who still tied up flinging themselves out in trying to headbutt him. He's shooting them over his shoulder, shooting them in the head, shooting. We're very close range. I mean, at any point, he's just waiting for sort of curtains. I mean, I don't know what is his chances of survival would have been, but. He miraculously manages to make it through the gate into the northern compound and he makes his quick calculation. He could have gone for the main gate, but he thought Al-Qaeda might already be there. He'd probably be killed. So he goes to the headquarters building, which was the sort of office complex at the top of the fort and decides that's the plate. He knows the layout, the lots of rooms in there and so he runs there. And there was a German TV crew that happened to be there that day, and they caught footage of him running across the compound with Kalashnikov in one hand, a pistol in the other. He's wearing this sort of amalgam of Afghan gear and American gear and that in a way, when I first saw that footage in Iraq in 2004, oddly enough, someone showed it to me. That was the trigger for this book because I was like, what did that guy go through? What had taken him to that point? Who was he? And what's life been like for him since, and I remember there's close up footage when he bursts into the building and is staring eyes, you know, the thousand yard stare and he's just been through incredible trauma and he's still got a lot to do. So basically, he raises the alarm, he calls his wife in Tashkent, his wife, Roseanne, who drops the phone. Eventually picks it up again. She takes the notes and calls the station chief Charlie Gilbert in Tashkent and a rescue force is organized with 20 guys from at the Turkish school in mazar E Sharif. 8 of those are special boat service. British. Which was another amazing thing about the story of Brits were there. One of them was the seal, a stef bass who was a navy seal who was awarded a navy cross for his actions that day. There are green berets, major Mark Mitchell, was commanding it, and there was a CIA medic called Glen, who is still serving, who performed field amputations. Oh, that's the guy who used a multi tool to remove somebody's foot. Yes. That's when. And the multi tool is currently in the CIA. Museum. I'm glad it still works. It's clean. There's no blood on it. I'm like Trotsky's ice pick, which still got the blood on it. I think of it. Do they rescue him? So David, after about 5 or 6 hours, he's been knocked off his feet by air strike, American air strikes coming in. He's shooting Al-Qaeda from the roof of the headquarters building through the gateway, which was sort of nicknamed the fatal funnel that day, and he eventually manages to, he helps some of the Red Cross workers and some of the German journalists and Afghans out. And he slips over the slipped over the back wall just as it was starting to get dark and they all run across this field. One of the J dams misses the fort and lands pretty close to them, this huge explosion. Danger close. And yes, exactly. And he catches a taxi. Well, he used his Kalashnikov to hail it back to taxes. Yes. And they're driven back to the Turkish school in mazar E srif and David at this point is kind of like a gibbering because all the sort of shock is hitting it. But incredible heroism and fortitude and David was awarded the distinguished intelligence cross, which is sort of the CIA's equivalent of the Medal of Honor for his actions that day. But, you know, there was still another four or 5 days of battle. They had to recover Mike's body and they had to stop these Al-Qaeda fighters breaking out of that force and retaking mazar I Sharif. Absolutely, you know, that is, I don't know what the phrases.

David Tyson Mike span Qaeda Tashkent Al Charlie Gilbert Turkish school Toby David mazar CIA navy Roseanne Mark Mitchell fort Sharif Iraq Trotsky Glen Red Cross
"david tyson" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

05:41 min | 4 months ago

"david tyson" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

"Okay, Toby, you left us in the fort of war, the paramilitaries are split up, lots of fighting going on elsewhere. David Tyson is there. They've been in touch with koffa black. You've got Mike span as well. What happened in the rest of the story of the prison outbreak? So they go into the southern half of the fort. It's divided by a sort of east west wall with a gateway in the middle. And the Uzbek intelligence officers and tajik intelligence officers working for doctor are already bringing the prisoners out in sort of ones and twos from this seller and their lined up in long lines with their hands tied behind their backs pretty loosely really by their mostly by their own turbans. And this video footage of this that was tied with their own turbans. Yes. Not the curious form of prisoner handling in my experience as a former prisoner handler and intelligence court. You know, it's one of those if they'd had a big box of zip ties, the history that could have changed. Yes. Exactly. And so David, who speaks Uzbek a number of Central Asian languages and was a former academic, you know, it's like the sort of it's the peak of his sort of life in a way to be able to put those languages and all that cultural experience to use in the defense of his nation. And so he's trying to work out which there's goofy stuff, some of the same some of them are saying they work for Mossad. They vote for Al Jazeera, they work for the CIA. I mean, there's lots of kind of get out of jail free card. But there's also a lot of truth where people talking about training with Al-Qaeda, meeting bin Laden, been training, trained in biological and chemical agents. And so there's a lot of talking going on in David, is conferring with the Afghans about who's who's the foot soldier, who might be a commander, Mike, no language is, but this might spam was almost, I think, the personification of America after 9 11. With a saw against us, you know, take the fight to the enemy. He really wanted to be there and he had this sort of like burning desire to get to Al-Qaeda. And these were the first Al-Qaeda prisoners questioned by Americans after 9 11. So what went wrong? What happened? So around 11 a.m., they're just about to starting to think about wrapping up and David, you know, I've talked to endlessly about this. He had this sense of this is just overwhelming. There's so much intelligence value here at two men can't deal with it. And you know, they need to be split up, there needs to be FBI flown in, you know, the needs to be sort of rigorous and kind of methodical interrogations. Just as he's thinking about withdrawing for the day and him and Mike getting out, there's a sound and it's on video, although it cuts at the moment of the uprising of shouting, some explosions and gunfire and there's a point on the video when there's an Uzbek prisoner that's coming out and then he kind of turns around and you can see it. That's the start of the uprising. And so basically what happened was Mike span, and you can see its eerie on the video. Seconds earlier, he just walked away from that wet from where that prisoner was and had worked at walked over to a medical point with two Afghan doctors who I interviewed in 2020, still alive, miraculously. They were treating some of the Al-Qaeda prisoners. Mike was walking over towards them to try and find some English speakers he'd already spoken to the man who subsequently became known as the American Taliban John walker lind, but Mike was very close to the pink house and the prisoners came rushing out, they overpowered the guards, killed them, and Mike had a Kalashnikov on his back and he swung it round and shot several of them as they were running towards him. Unfortunately, the prisoners who were tied up with their turbans were getting up and they rushed him from behind and so he pulled out his Glock pistol took out a couple of them that disappeared underneath this pile of bodies. David Tyson, who was 50 75 yards away, he hears this commotion and he immediately goes into almost a sense of sort of psychological shock like time slowing down, losing his hearing, like almost sort of transformative. The tunnel vision that's slows down. But all his senses working overtime, he heard Mike shout, Dave, Dave Dave, and in that moment, you know, most of the Afghan guards, unfortunately, are running for their lives instead of fighting and trying to resist this uprising. And instead of running or just freezing or just sort of collapsing in a blubbering pile or whatever, David runs towards Mike. He pulls out his pistol he had a browning pistol. His prisoner comes towards him, firing a macros Russian pistol, trying to kill him. David shoots him twice, kills him, gets to Mike. There's all these prisoners grappling on top of Mike. David shoots the four on top of Mike. One, two, three, four, four, three, two, one. He shoots each person twice. And then, you know, he's trying to establish where the mics are alive. He kicks Mike, there's no movement. There's blood on the ground. And then at that moment, you know, I mean, there's no time to take a pulse or anything like that. David grabs Mike's rifle because David didn't have a rifle within that day. So David grabs Mike's clash and cough and fights his way out and kills, I don't know. Dozens.

Mike span David Tyson Qaeda Mike Al David Toby Mossad Al Jazeera John walker lind bin Laden CIA American Taliban pink house FBI Mike shout Dave Dave America Dave
"david tyson" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

03:28 min | 4 months ago

"david tyson" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

"Yeah. So they were bundled into the fort on the night of November 24th, 2001 into a building called the pink house, which is a Soviet built sort of schoolhouse, but it had a fortified bunker seller beneath, and they should be used to store arms and various controlled by the Taliban by the northern alliance by the Soviets. And so there was these prisons were shoved down there as they were going down there on the night of 24th, it was a suicide attack, a grenade exploded, killed a couple of dust and senior guys, weren't the warlord. After she dust and was the main U.S. ally that warlord from central casting sort of brutish character notorious of switching sides, lots of blood on his hands, but you know, he was our guy in 2001 and was a very effective fighter and was sort of revered by the CIA and the green berets. So this suicide bomber took out two of dostum's commanders. It was a very kind of ambiguous situation. It was a dust. It was very dangerous and so they were shoved into this cellar. That night, you know, Mike spann and David Tyson, who were two of the CIA officers from team alpha who were left behind while a bulk were spread out elsewhere. They spoke to Hank crompton, who was the CIA. The big trees. Yeah, he was, he was the deputy to cope for black, who was the head of the counter terrorism center, another legendary figure. But so David spoke to Hank crompton and you have to remember what the atmosphere was like in 2001. I mean, we'd just been attacked 3000 killed in New York and at The Pentagon and in Pennsylvania. Flight 93. Thanks for yeah, I mean, they were they were the first Americans who fought back and Americans, I mean, certainly they wanted, you know, we wanted vengeance, but we wanted to stop the next attack. We wanted to take the fight to the enemy and the forces were in Afghanistan very quickly and this was not an environment which you could wait until perfect conditions. And so David and Mike went into that for two, do an initial sift kind of interrogation questioning of the prisoners on that morning, knowing that it was a very dangerous situation. All right, we're going to find out what happened to CIA officer David Tyson and Mike span, I'm totally in the meantime. You've got to get this book you won't regret it. It is first casualty. The untold story of the CIA mission to avenge 9 11 with Toby hardens. How many interviews? Oh gosh, I don't know. Lots. Many lots and lots. I think I did 327 hours of interviews. 300. There you go. Look, he's got the figures and he's got the receipts. I am Sebastian gorka, this is America first one on one. A difference, if you want to celebrate your values, if you are America first all the way, check out our website. It's Seb goka store dot com. The most popular item right now is the zelensky T-shirt. It's his response to President Biden when Biden said, I'll get you out of there. I'll send you a plane. You can run away and hide and he said, I don't need a ride. I need ammunition. Check out all the gear, including the let's go Brandon. It's all made in America's Seb goka store dot com. That's SEB GOR gorka store dot com..

Hank crompton CIA David Tyson dostum Mike spann pink house counter terrorism center northern alliance Soviets Taliban America Mike span David Toby hardens Pentagon Pennsylvania Sebastian gorka Afghanistan Seb goka New York
"david tyson" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

04:24 min | 4 months ago

"david tyson" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

"You mentioned this story, the prison uprising, Mike spann, a former marine CIA paramilitary. For those who know nothing, give us the story of that incredible event and what that man did. Yeah. It is incredible. And so November 25th, 2001. Two CIA officers walk into this fort called calla jangi, which means literally like fort of war outside mazar I Sharif. Now, backing up a little bit mazarin Sharif had fallen to northern alliance forces, aided by our allies. Our allies aided by the CIA green berets and air force combat controllers and the awesome might have U.S. air power overhead on November 10th. Now, less than a month earlier, Mike spann had been one of 8 CIA officers who landed in the Darius souf valley, aboard two Black Hawk helicopters that had flown in from Kashi Khan about K two, a former Soviet air base that Uzbekistan government had given over to the Americans for this post 9 11 mission. So October 17th, 2001, they land at dropped into the unknown. First Americans behind America. So we are barely barely a month out since 9 11. Yeah. First Americans behind them enemy lines. Now there had been a CIA team called jawbreaker that had landed in the pantry of Ali on September 26th, but that was, you know, relatively speaking safe territory controlled by the northern alliance. But this was enemy territory, Taliban controlled territory. So 8 of them, four of them were paramilitaries, one of those was Mike span. So when paramilitary is somebody who's been seconded, usually from the military and is working in the CIA using their skills for the CIA. Yeah, usually they actually in the CIA sometimes their contractors or people who've been seconded and on some of the other teams that were actually serving members of the Delta force and seals. But the four paramount trees on team alpha were serving CIOs special activities, division. Scott spellman, who was on the cover of the book, he was later became very senior, it was the senior CIA guy on the National Security Council during the Trump administration. He became station chief in Kabul, but then a young officer, but already battle hardened he had been wounded in the battle of Mogadishu in Somalia in 1993. It was a guy called Alex Hernandez, who was the deputy chief, who was a sergeant major, gone full career in special forces and then joined the agency and two case officers, JRC, who was the chief who'd worked with the CIA out of Islamabad in the 1980s against the Soviets for the supply and stinger missiles to the mujahideen and David Tyson who you mentioned at the beginning who was with Mike span on November 25th 2001. So they're in unfriendly territory. This is the Ford of war, walk us through that event. So David was a case officer based in Tashkent and spoke Uzbek almost fluently. And so he's the linguist and the main linguist on the team, although JR, seger also he spoke diary, which was the sort of lingua franca in Afghanistan. But on that day, the team split, there's a big fight, a hundred miles to the east. It expected in Kunduz so the bulk of American forces are there. But the night before 400 Al-Qaeda prisoners had arrived on the eastern edge of mazarin reef to surrender, and it was extremely murky why they were there. They should have been surrendering in Kunduz. And basically, I mean, what I was able to establish almost beyond doubt is that this was a Trojan horse operation. It was a deliberate trap. Yeah, it was a Taliban Al-Qaeda operation to put pretend that for these 400 fighters had surrendered, but in fact they were made up remained armed. They sort of exploited Afghan custom to keep their weapons with them and they were planning an uprising. Because you can have lots of people surrender at once if it's a regular army during the Gulf War, we had thousands of Iraqis surrender at once. When it's irregular fighters, you don't usually get hundreds of them surrendering at the same time. It's a little bit

Mike span David Tyson Qaeda Mike Al David Toby Mossad Al Jazeera John walker lind bin Laden CIA American Taliban pink house FBI Mike shout Dave Dave America Dave
Toby Harnden Shares a Story From on the Ground in Afghanistan

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

04:24 min | 4 months ago

Toby Harnden Shares a Story From on the Ground in Afghanistan

"You mentioned this story, the prison uprising, Mike spann, a former marine CIA paramilitary. For those who know nothing, give us the story of that incredible event and what that man did. Yeah. It is incredible. And so November 25th, 2001. Two CIA officers walk into this fort called calla jangi, which means literally like fort of war outside mazar I Sharif. Now, backing up a little bit mazarin Sharif had fallen to northern alliance forces, aided by our allies. Our allies aided by the CIA green berets and air force combat controllers and the awesome might have U.S. air power overhead on November 10th. Now, less than a month earlier, Mike spann had been one of 8 CIA officers who landed in the Darius souf valley, aboard two Black Hawk helicopters that had flown in from Kashi Khan about K two, a former Soviet air base that Uzbekistan government had given over to the Americans for this post 9 11 mission. So October 17th, 2001, they land at dropped into the unknown. First Americans behind America. So we are barely barely a month out since 9 11. Yeah. First Americans behind them enemy lines. Now there had been a CIA team called jawbreaker that had landed in the pantry of Ali on September 26th, but that was, you know, relatively speaking safe territory controlled by the northern alliance. But this was enemy territory, Taliban controlled territory. So 8 of them, four of them were paramilitaries, one of those was Mike span. So when paramilitary is somebody who's been seconded, usually from the military and is working in the CIA using their skills for the CIA. Yeah, usually they actually in the CIA sometimes their contractors or people who've been seconded and on some of the other teams that were actually serving members of the Delta force and seals. But the four paramount trees on team alpha were serving CIOs special activities, division. Scott spellman, who was on the cover of the book, he was later became very senior, it was the senior CIA guy on the National Security Council during the Trump administration. He became station chief in Kabul, but then a young officer, but already battle hardened he had been wounded in the battle of Mogadishu in Somalia in 1993. It was a guy called Alex Hernandez, who was the deputy chief, who was a sergeant major, gone full career in special forces and then joined the agency and two case officers, JRC, who was the chief who'd worked with the CIA out of Islamabad in the 1980s against the Soviets for the supply and stinger missiles to the mujahideen and David Tyson who you mentioned at the beginning who was with Mike span on November 25th 2001. So they're in unfriendly territory. This is the Ford of war, walk us through that event. So David was a case officer based in Tashkent and spoke Uzbek almost fluently. And so he's the linguist and the main linguist on the team, although JR, seger also he spoke diary, which was the sort of lingua franca in Afghanistan. But on that day, the team split, there's a big fight, a hundred miles to the east. It expected in Kunduz so the bulk of American forces are there. But the night before 400 Al-Qaeda prisoners had arrived on the eastern edge of mazarin reef to surrender, and it was extremely murky why they were there. They should have been surrendering in Kunduz. And basically, I mean, what I was able to establish almost beyond doubt is that this was a Trojan horse operation. It was a deliberate trap. Yeah, it was a Taliban Al-Qaeda operation to put pretend that for these 400 fighters had surrendered, but in fact they were made up remained armed. They sort of exploited Afghan custom to keep their weapons with them and they were planning an uprising. Because you can have lots of people surrender at once if it's a regular army during the Gulf War, we had thousands of Iraqis surrender at once. When it's irregular fighters, you don't usually get hundreds of them surrendering at the same time. It's a little bit

CIA Mike Spann Mike Span Calla Jangi Mazarin Sharif Darius Souf Valley Kashi Khan Mazar Scott Spellman Trump Administration Sharif America Alex Hernandez Kunduz Northern Alliance Uzbekistan David Tyson Delta Force Taliban ALI
"david tyson" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

04:22 min | 4 months ago

"david tyson" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

"You mentioned this story, the prison uprising, Mike spann, a former marine CIA paramilitary. For those who know nothing, give us the story of that incredible event and what that man did. Yeah. It is incredible. And so November 25th, 2001. Two CIA officers walk into this fort called calla jangi, which means literally like fort of war outside mazar I Sharif. Now, backing up a little bit mazarin Sharif had fallen to northern alliance forces, aided by our allies. Our allies aided by the CIA green berets and air force combat controllers and the awesome might have U.S. air power overhead on November 10th. Now, less than a month earlier, Mike spann had been one of 8 CIA officers who landed in the Darius souf valley, aboard two Black Hawk helicopters that had flown in from Kashi Khan about K two, a former Soviet air base that Uzbekistan government had given over to the Americans for this post 9 11 mission. So October 17th, 2001, they land at dropped into the unknown. First Americans behind America. So we are barely barely a month out since 9 11. Yeah. First Americans behind them enemy lines. Now there had been a CIA team called jawbreaker that had landed in the pantry of Ali on September 26th, but that was, you know, relatively speaking safe territory controlled by the northern alliance. But this was enemy territory, Taliban controlled territory. So 8 of them, four of them were paramilitaries, one of those was Mike span. So when paramilitary is somebody who's been seconded, usually from the military and is working in the CIA using their skills for the CIA. Yeah, usually they actually in the CIA sometimes their contractors or people who've been seconded and on some of the other teams that were actually serving members of the Delta force and seals. But the four paramount trees on team alpha were serving CIOs special activities, division. Scott spellman, who was on the cover of the book, he was later became very senior, it was the senior CIA guy on the National Security Council during the Trump administration. He became station chief in Kabul, but then a young officer, but already battle hardened he had been wounded in the battle of Mogadishu in Somalia in 1993. It was a guy called Alex Hernandez, who was the deputy chief, who was a sergeant major, gone full career in special forces and then joined the agency and two case officers, JRC, who was the chief who'd worked with the CIA out of Islamabad in the 1980s against the Soviets for the supply and stinger missiles to the mujahideen and David Tyson who you mentioned at the beginning who was with Mike span on November 25th 2001. So they're in unfriendly territory. This is the Ford of war, walk us through that event. So David was a case officer based in Tashkent and spoke Uzbek almost fluently. And so he's the linguist and the main linguist on the team, although JR, seger also he spoke diary, which was the sort of lingua franca in Afghanistan. But on that day, the team split, there's a big fight, a hundred miles to the east. It expected in Kunduz so the bulk of American forces are there. But the night before 400 Al-Qaeda prisoners had arrived on the eastern edge of mazarin reef to surrender, and it was extremely murky why they were there. They should have been surrendering in Kunduz. And basically, I mean, what I was able to establish almost beyond doubt is that this was a Trojan horse operation. It was a deliberate trap. Yeah, it was a Taliban Al-Qaeda operation to put pretend that for these 400 fighters had surrendered, but in fact they were made up remained armed. They sort of exploited Afghan custom to keep their weapons with them and they were planning an uprising. Because you can have lots of people surrender at once if it's a regular army during the Gulf War, we had thousands of Iraqis surrender at once. When it's irregular fighters, you don't usually get hundreds of them surrendering at the same

Hank crompton CIA David Tyson dostum Mike spann pink house counter terrorism center northern alliance Soviets Taliban America Mike span David Toby hardens Pentagon Pennsylvania Sebastian gorka Afghanistan Seb goka New York
Toby Harnden Shares a Story From on the Ground in Afghanistan

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

04:22 min | 4 months ago

Toby Harnden Shares a Story From on the Ground in Afghanistan

"You mentioned this story, the prison uprising, Mike spann, a former marine CIA paramilitary. For those who know nothing, give us the story of that incredible event and what that man did. Yeah. It is incredible. And so November 25th, 2001. Two CIA officers walk into this fort called calla jangi, which means literally like fort of war outside mazar I Sharif. Now, backing up a little bit mazarin Sharif had fallen to northern alliance forces, aided by our allies. Our allies aided by the CIA green berets and air force combat controllers and the awesome might have U.S. air power overhead on November 10th. Now, less than a month earlier, Mike spann had been one of 8 CIA officers who landed in the Darius souf valley, aboard two Black Hawk helicopters that had flown in from Kashi Khan about K two, a former Soviet air base that Uzbekistan government had given over to the Americans for this post 9 11 mission. So October 17th, 2001, they land at dropped into the unknown. First Americans behind America. So we are barely barely a month out since 9 11. Yeah. First Americans behind them enemy lines. Now there had been a CIA team called jawbreaker that had landed in the pantry of Ali on September 26th, but that was, you know, relatively speaking safe territory controlled by the northern alliance. But this was enemy territory, Taliban controlled territory. So 8 of them, four of them were paramilitaries, one of those was Mike span. So when paramilitary is somebody who's been seconded, usually from the military and is working in the CIA using their skills for the CIA. Yeah, usually they actually in the CIA sometimes their contractors or people who've been seconded and on some of the other teams that were actually serving members of the Delta force and seals. But the four paramount trees on team alpha were serving CIOs special activities, division. Scott spellman, who was on the cover of the book, he was later became very senior, it was the senior CIA guy on the National Security Council during the Trump administration. He became station chief in Kabul, but then a young officer, but already battle hardened he had been wounded in the battle of Mogadishu in Somalia in 1993. It was a guy called Alex Hernandez, who was the deputy chief, who was a sergeant major, gone full career in special forces and then joined the agency and two case officers, JRC, who was the chief who'd worked with the CIA out of Islamabad in the 1980s against the Soviets for the supply and stinger missiles to the mujahideen and David Tyson who you mentioned at the beginning who was with Mike span on November 25th 2001. So they're in unfriendly territory. This is the Ford of war, walk us through that event. So David was a case officer based in Tashkent and spoke Uzbek almost fluently. And so he's the linguist and the main linguist on the team, although JR, seger also he spoke diary, which was the sort of lingua franca in Afghanistan. But on that day, the team split, there's a big fight, a hundred miles to the east. It expected in Kunduz so the bulk of American forces are there. But the night before 400 Al-Qaeda prisoners had arrived on the eastern edge of mazarin reef to surrender, and it was extremely murky why they were there. They should have been surrendering in Kunduz. And basically, I mean, what I was able to establish almost beyond doubt is that this was a Trojan horse operation. It was a deliberate trap. Yeah, it was a Taliban Al-Qaeda operation to put pretend that for these 400 fighters had surrendered, but in fact they were made up remained armed. They sort of exploited Afghan custom to keep their weapons with them and they were planning an uprising. Because you can have lots of people surrender at once if it's a regular army during the Gulf War, we had thousands of Iraqis surrender at once. When it's irregular fighters, you don't usually get hundreds of them surrendering at the same

CIA Mike Spann Mike Span Calla Jangi Mazarin Sharif Darius Souf Valley Kashi Khan Mazar Scott Spellman Trump Administration Sharif America Alex Hernandez Northern Alliance Kunduz Uzbekistan David Tyson Delta Force Taliban ALI
Who Is 'First Casualty' Author Toby Harnden?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:45 min | 4 months ago

Who Is 'First Casualty' Author Toby Harnden?

"Before we get into these amazing stories, Mike span, David Tyson, John walker lind, who is Toby Honda. Tell us about what you did in the British armed forces and your life as a journalist before you became an author. Yes, well, you know, we share a somewhat similar accent as listeners and viewers will detect. You still got yours. Our minds kind of rubbing off a little bit, but I don't know. I'm worried. I'm worried about mind getting a little bit Americanized. But I trust yeah, you're a bit soggy in the middle of the Atlantic somewhere. Yeah, I mean the ace. So yeah, I'm 56 years old, I was born in 66. My father was in the navy. We moved around, we sort of ended up in Manchester, industrial city in the northwest. You don't have a mancunian accent. I think the Royal Navy actually did for the mancunian accent, which was pretty skin deep anyway. But you know, I sort of, you know, I wanted to follow in my father's footstep, I guess there's so many sort of young men do. And I also wanted to get out of Manchester and see the world and it just seemed like a very kind of insular sort of small sort of place. And so all that teenage angst was just channeled towards working hard to get out. And so I got a sponsorship from the I joined the navy at 18. Went to Dartmouth, which is the Britannia royal naval college, kind of the equivalent of the U.S. naval academy at Annapolis, but not really because it's more basic officers training. It's like santas is shorter. Yeah, that's right. I mean, I was there for less than a year. And I threw the navy I got a sponsorship to Oxford to study modern history, so I went off whilst serving naval officer, although I barely wore the uniform for those years apart from a few months sailing around sort of Hong Kong and the far east and Australia. So I had some good times. Yes, exactly. So I was serving naval officer for three years at college and then graduated from college and was pitched in to a career. Which I enjoyed immensely, but you know, it was after the Falklands War, which was 1982, I was joining and supplying to join just sort of join the Falklands actually, age 16. But I missed that. I was stationed in Scotland for the Gulf War, tried very hard to get involved. They managed to that's a long way away from Iraq. I know. They managed to win it without meeting my services. And I remember my boss at the time said, listen to, we don't worry about it. There's going to be plenty of time for medals. And I remember thinking, no, there won't. And of course I left after ten years of service without a single

Mike Span David Tyson John Walker Lind Toby Honda Navy Manchester Britannia Royal Naval College Royal Navy Atlantic U.S. Naval Academy Dartmouth Annapolis Oxford Far East Hong Kong Falklands Australia Gulf War Scotland Iraq
"david tyson" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

07:51 min | 11 months ago

"david tyson" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"Spent nine months twenty years. After nine eleven we just commemorated in remembered twenty years twenty years of forever war lots and lots of lives lost in afghanistan and in iraq. Lots of stories to be told and most of them haven't been including a bet. You didn't know the story you're about to learn now. Toby harnden is a former foreign foreign correspondent for the telegraph and the times of london and he's written a new book. That's just come out a little over a week ago. Entitled first casualty the untold story of the ci mission to avenge nine eleven. Tony i'm at toby. I'm gonna give you the floor. Take five six seven minutes to just tell the story and then i'll follow up with some questions. But i think this is a story you have to tell in its entirety without me interrupting. Well thank you so much. Michael great to be on the show and that's very kind. Yeah i mean we've seen this sort of tragedy in the turmoil of recent weeks we've had twenty years of war and so i think it's really important to go back to the beginning and look at the mission we had done Immediately after nine. Eleven to go after al qaeda and also to look at the man Maybe mentioning man on the ground. Who were so extremely successful And you know stories great stories. A timeless and these eight members of team was sale. is they weren't all power military's To the mckay officers there was a guy called. Tyson who's essential thing when the book was was an opec. Linguists a former professor and academic He was part of the team. Jay seaga who. Dari speaking Case officer who'd worked with the mohideen in the nineteen eighties He led the team Mike spann who was one of the time. He was a former marine corps officer. This was i mean. These were elite people They went all elite warriors. Some of them are kind of elite intellectuals. If you like on this team was was put together very short notice. Some of them badly knew each other before they go into afghanistan and they dropped into the mountains. South korea suri. I didn't know what they were gonna face And so you know. We know that the taliban was toppled nearly as quickly as the outgoing government collapsed last month. But success was not guaranteed. Plan was improvised Was lots of adaptation on the ground. they were working with abdulrashid dostam. An os beck warlord with certainly with blood on his hands. And he's four. Four the soviets against mujahideen which is by the eye on the us government at the time and they didn't know whether he was gonna shoot them or whether he was going to be that friend. I mean they certainly hope for latin. The intelligence indicates that the latter But they have to work with him. He had a rival haji Warlord the next all who was sort of nominally an ally but was also a rival. And there was you know the potential big dust up between those two groups we see. I could've been caught in the crossfire. So jay i'll see you guys had to work that They brought in three million dollars in non sequential one hundred dollar bills. So that kinda helps you know. Get people to switch sides and point people in the right direction Which was literally sort of towards mazari sharif to the north They wrote on horseback And know the saddles were built skinny. Afghans and these were sort of big beefy americans Twelve hour rides. You know they had to. You know pissing that saddles basically. You know. i mean this was pretty rough. Ready an uncomfortable stuff and you know the time we have just hundreds hundreds of americans on the ground in afghanistan instead of one hundred thousand plus we ended up with They were very much to the size. It was an afghan fights. I mean it was awesome. My of us airpower above and that was the crucial factor. Those ass strikes Instead of winning this This sort of battle but Cia was very focused on al qaeda and gathering intelligence about al-qaeda they want to kick house tiber out al qaeda out. They didn't really care about the taliban and the white house. I'm wearing the waste. Needs to get him out of the way so he gets all kinda and of course everything sort of sort of changed After this period but you also had An incredible to talk to these guys what they went through and sort of will like talk about the quiet professionals. He's guys just. They didn't wanna talk. They had to be persuaded and they should remain silence in the shadows but for for the past twenty years but you know they the sort of complexity and the danger of afghanistan we saw over the subsequent twenty years. I mean they. They faced all of it. I mean they had allies the worth kind of krizner's who shooting villages. And they have to sort that out. you know. This is afghanistan you know and everybody's got a pretty Pretty lovey tr- track record. But you know you have to work with these guys and keep them on the straight and narrow who was a fake surrender Which From from the taliban al-qaeda which which leads this uprising College i need a full outside mazari sharif and so what you really You really have that. Sort of crescendo of the book Where everything sort of came together. You had british british. Special forces sb s. You know with a g g. G general machine gums sort of killing al qaeda in industrial quantities. You had us s strikes went to stray and you have this uprising which led to the death of Cif's johnny mike spann. I'm david tyson ended up killing dozens of al-qaeda because he was in this incredible situation kill. Ob kills so you know. I'm a great believer. That the best stories are true. And i and i really feel that this was one of them. How did you learn of this story. So i was i was i was in washington dc on nine eleven as a reporter and so i was covering a lot and i very much from him but mike spann being killed and that was public pretty raffarin opposite to be made public even in death and being very affected by the words shannon spann at his funeral and she has sort of grace And then i. I was in iraq a couple of years later and somebody sets another me to see that footage of the cio running for his life and in afghanistan. I said no. I think i did and so i looked at it and it was david. Tyson He had an ak On a pistol times. You just killed all these al qaeda guys. I watched the footage. And i thought. Wow what was that. What that guy just being through what was going through his mind. And that sorta never left me. And i tracked him down I i met him about eight years ago and it turned out. He was living in vienna. Virginia in the dc suburbs. A few miles away from me. We mess it up panara brad. I think he was still serving in the cia. So he said you know i can. You know i can tell me a little bit but not too much But we kept in touch and then The beginning of last year. I got an email out of blue. And he's like. Hey toby david You know i just retired. I'm ready to talk. And so i kind of took it from that. That's awesome. thanks for being our guest. Toby harnden the book is first casualty. The untold story of the i a mission to avenge nine eleven. It's the story of the first person killed in what became our forever. War the longest war in american history. Interesting stuff. i've not read the book yet. It just came out a week ago. But i assure you i will. Oh.

mike spann afghanistan Toby harnden al qaeda mazari sharif Jay seaga mohideen abdulrashid dostam taliban haji Warlord qaeda Tyson Dari toby opec mckay iraq the times
"david tyson" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:36 min | 11 months ago

"david tyson" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Pretty Respert CIA officer to be made public even in death, And I'm rambling, very affected by the words of Shannon Spann at his funeral. And she her sort of grace. Um and then I was in Iraq a couple of years later, and somebody said another report admit to see that footage and the CIA so running for his life in Afghanistan. I said, no, don't think I did. And so looked at it. And it was David Tyson. Um he had an AK harms. He just killed all these Al Qaeda guys, and I watched the footage and I thought, Wow, what was that? What did that guy just been through What was going through his mind? And that sort of never left me and I tracked him down. I first met him about eight years ago, and it turned out he was living in Vienna, Virginia, in the D C suburbs few miles away from me. We met at a Panera bread and he was still serving in the CIA. So he said, You know, I could you know and tell you a little bit, but not too much. Um, but we kept in touch. And then the beginning of last year, I got an email out of the blue and he's like, Hey, Toby, it's David. Um, you know, I just retired. I'm ready to talk. And so I kind of took it from that. That's awesome. Thanks for being our guest, Toby Harnden. The book is first casualty. The untold story of the C I A mission to avenge 9 11. It's the story of the first person killed in what became our Forever war. The longest war in American history. Interesting stuff. I've not read the book yet. It just came out a week ago. But I assure you, I will. Here's good news. Even with high unemployment there is still need for hundreds of thousands of cybersecurity professionals in the U..

David Tyson Shannon Spann Toby Harnden David Toby Afghanistan Iraq CIA Al Qaeda Vienna, Virginia last year first casualty first D C couple of years later first person about eight years ago a week ago Panera hundreds
"david tyson" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

06:10 min | 11 months ago

"david tyson" Discussed on 600 WREC

"20 years of forever war. Lots and lots of lives lost in Afghanistan and in Iraq. Lots of stories to be told, and most of them haven't been Including. I bet you didn't know the story you're about to learn now. Toby Harnden is a former foreign foreign correspondent for The Telegraph and The Times of London. And he's written a new book. That's just come out a little over a week ago, entitled First Casualty. The untold story of the CIA mission to avenge 9 11. Tony, I'm Toby. I'm going to give you the floor Take 567 minutes to just tell the story and then I'll follow up with some questions. But I think this is a story you have to tell in its entirety without me, interrupting. Well, thank you so much, Michel. It's great to be on the show. And that's very kind. Yeah. I mean, we've seen this sort of the tragedy in the turmoil of recent weeks we've had 20 years of war. And so I think it's really important to go back to the beginning. And look at the mission we had done immediately after 9 11 to go out after Al Qaeda and also to look at the men. Um, mainly, man, Certainly men on the ground who worked so extremely successful. Um and you know stories, great stories are timeless. And these eight members of team also, they was CIA officers. They weren't all paramilitaries. Two of them were case officers. There was a guy called David Tyson, whose essential thing in the book who was To an Uzbek linguist, former professor and academic. Um he was part of the team Jr Seeger, who was a diary speaking case officer who'd worked with the Mujahideen in the 19 eighties. He led the team. Mike Spann, who was one of the paramount He was a former Marine Corps officer. This was I mean, these were elite people, but they weren't all elite warriors. Some of them kind of elite intellectuals, if you like, and this team was put together. At very short notice. Some of them barely knew each other before they got into Afghanistan, and they were dropped into the mountains south of Mazar e Sharif, and they didn't know what they were going to face. Um And so, you know, we know that the Taliban was toppled nearly as quickly as the Afghan government collapsed last month, but success was not guaranteed. The plan was improvised. There was lots of adaptation on the ground they were working with Abdul Rashid Dostam and Uzbek ethnic goes back warlord with certainly with blood on his hands. And he thought for the Soviets against the Mujahideen, which was backed by the CIA and the U. S government at the time. And they didn't know whether he was going to shoot them or whether he was going to be their friend. I mean, they certainly hope the latter and the intelligence indicated the latter. Um, but they had to work with him. He had a rival magic, um, warlord sort of next door, who was sort of nominally an ally. It was also a rival. And there was you know, there's a potential big dust up between those two groups with the CIA could have been caught in the crossfire. So J. R. Seeger had to work that, um, they brought in $3 million in non sequential $100 bills. So that kind of helps, you know, to get people to switch sides and point people in the right direction, which was literally sort of towards Mazar e Sharif. To the north. Um, but they rode on horseback. Um, and you know, the saddles were built with skinny Afghans. And these were sort of big, beefy Americans. Um, that 12 hour rides. You know, they had to, you know, pissing that saddles basically, you know, I mean, it was It was pretty Rough, ready and uncomfortable stuff. Um, you know, at the time we had just one hundreds, hundreds of Americans on the ground in Afghanistan instead of the sort of 100,000. Plus, we ended up with And they were very much to the site so that it was an Afghan fights. I mean, it was the awesome might of us air power above and that was a crucial factor. Those airstrikes in sort of winning this this sort of Early battle, but the CIA was very focused on Al Qaeda and gathering intelligence about Al Qaeda. They want to kick out Taiba Al Qaeda out. They didn't really care about the Taliban in the way the Taliban were in the way. They just need to get him out of the way, so he gets all Qaeda. And, of course, everything sort of Sort of changed after this period. But you also had this incredible to talk to these guys what they went through and sort of real like talk about the quiet professionals, his guys said. Just they didn't want to talk. They had to be persuaded. Um, and they remain silent in the shadows, but for the past 20 years, But you know, they sort of the complexity and the danger of Afghanistan We saw over the subsequent 20 years. I mean, they faced all of it. I mean, they had allies, the worst kind of beating prisoners who were shooting. Villages and they had to sort that out. Because these were you know, this is Afghanistan. You know, everybody's got a pretty, um pretty bloody truck track record, but you know you have to work with these guys and keep them on the straight and narrow. There was a fake surrender. Um, which from from the Taliban, Al Qaeda, which which led to this uprising at? Um uh Callejon de the fourth outside Mazar e Sharif. And so what? You really, um you know, you really have that sort of the crescendo of the book. Um, where everything sort of came together. You had British British special forces, the SBS. You know, with the Jeep GP M B G general machine guns killing Al Qaeda in industrial quantities. You had us airstrikes that went astray. And you have this uprising, which led to the death of CIA officer. You know, Johnny, Mike Spann and David Tyson ended up killing dozens of Al Qaeda because he was in this Incredible situation of kill or be killed. So you know I'm a great believer that the best stories are true. And I really feel that this was one of them. How did you learn of this story? So I was I was I was in Washington, D. C on 9 11 as a reporter, and so I was covering all that and I very much remember Mike Spann being killed and that was made public..

Abdul Rashid Dostam Mike Spann David Tyson Johnny Michel Toby Toby Harnden $100 $3 million Afghanistan J. R. Seeger CIA Iraq 12 hour 567 minutes Taliban Tony Mazar e Sharif 20 years Al Qaeda
"david tyson" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

06:10 min | 11 months ago

"david tyson" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"1866554626 as we begin some remembering of 9 11 with the story that many of us Couldn't even forget. We were not really aware of what happened at the story of the book, First Casualty, the Untold Story of the CIA mission to avenge 9 11, it was told by a person used to telling such stories. A former foreign correspondent for The Sunday Times of London and the Daily Telegraph. He's an award winning author Toby Harnden with us tonight, and so the team Alpha is there and they They are being pretty successful. But then you write the Taliban hatches a plot with Al Qaeda to hit back. They fake a surrender. Yeah, absolutely. I mean, and one of the sort of chilling things about this period was, although it was successful in Taliban regime was toppled, a lot of the complexities and the kind of messy nature of Africa Afghanistan really came through. So the kind of The seeds really is some of the problems that were to come in in subsequent years. So yeah. Mazari Sharif, Um the, um Northern city had had fallen was the first big city to, uh, to be taken from the Taliban, and it looks like the Taliban worked staging a sort of a last stand in the north in Kunduz. And you have Al Qaeda units that were that were working with the Taliban. One of the members of Al Qaeda units was John Walker Lindh, California Um, And there was a surrender brokered, um, between the Taliban and the Northern Alliance and Abdul Rashid Dostam and, uh, it turned out, but it was sort of an Afghan tradition to not search people properly. There was sort of elements of honor in the surrender. But these are Qaida prisoners were not Afghans. They were mostly Arabs. And it emerged later on that many of the prisoners had, um, had secreted grenades and guns. You know, in in their road. And Mullah Fazal, who was a notorious Taliban commander who is likely to be help figure in the new Taliban government. Um, it seems that he was the mastermind behind this plot that these prisoners would, um surrender surrender in Mazari Sharif, while most of the U. S forces and the CIA and the Northern Alliance We're in Konduz and that they would stage an uprising in the port, and there were other other Taliban unit. Who were moving towards Mazari Sharif, and potentially if it's this uprising succeeded, and it came pretty close that the Taliban would have recaptured Mazar e Sharif. On the whole story of this war would have been different. So it was kind of fascinating to be able to put that together at the time. It sort of seemed like it was in sort of a random, spontaneous revolved by prisoners. But I was able to establish by, you know, talking to everybody and and researching this in great that this was this was the plan to take to take back Mazar e Sharif. Yeah, the the idea that you talked to everybody you're talking to people who do not as a rule of thumb tend to talk shop. They are not people who tend to run off at the mouth of radio. I'm wondering how you got all these people to do just that, and the extent to which the CIA itself was involved, either helping or hindering your efforts. Uh, that's good question. Yes. Well, it wasn't easy. I had no, you know, particular in with anybody, or certainly not the CIA. Um, but I've always been fascinated by this story for many, many years since I saw footage of David Tyson. Running through the fort after Mike Spann. His comrades have been killed, clutching a pistol. Um and I eventually struck David Tyson down. Think he was in 2013? Through. He'd been cited in a in a acknowledgements by an academic in Indiana University, and I contacted the academic and you put me in touch with him. And it turned out that David was living in Vienna, Virginia, just a few miles from From where I live now. It's a suburb of Washington. For those who don't know that's right. Yeah, yeah. Let's glamorous than Vienna, Austria. Um, anyway, so I met. I met Davis in a Panera bread and he was friendly, but he couldn't say very much because he was still serving in the agency. Um, And we sort of kept in touch, you know, spending Christmas cards, but you know, there was he wasn't really, you know, emerging to sort of tell the story. But then, um, the beginning of last year, he contacted me and said, Hey, you know, I've just retired. I'm ready to talk. Um, so I talked to him and he's a fascinating guy. I mean, a, you know, regional expert somebody who's sort of really lived. Fascinating life and whose life is sort of up, you know, turned upside down by the event in 2000 and one. Um, but I then went to J. R. Seeger, who was the chief? Um Justin sap, who was a green beret. He's still serving. And they were sort of semi public and I went to see them and I just I think I built up sort of trust and credibility. They could see that I didn't have an agenda. As I just want to find out what happened. And, Yeah, I was worried about the CIA was thinking that they might try to hinder me down. They might block me so I didn't Approach them until I was sure that I had enough to write a book. Um, And at that point, I've spoken to George Tenet that CIA director at the time because the black Hank Crumpton sort of senior CIA officers And again, I think they realized that you know I was serious. And so I contacted the agency and said, Hey, this is what I'm doing. And they helped me. I mean, they didn't open the vaults. I didn't get Documents for the Marine that I dare say some interviews and, um, I was surprised and very grateful, because you know some of these people..

George Tenet Mike Spann Hank Crumpton David Tyson 2013 Mullah Fazal David J. R. Seeger Al Qaeda Toby Harnden Kunduz Washington 2000 Northern Alliance CIA Davis U. S Africa Vienna, Virginia Mazar e Sharif
"david tyson" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

09:22 min | 11 months ago

"david tyson" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Years since 9 11 That's hard to believe if you are old enough to recall where you were and what you were doing, and if you're 25 or older that probably includes you. But here we are approaching that date, and we will do so, this first portion of the program tonight with the Toby Harnden. He is an award winning author, former foreign correspondent for the London tie Sunday Times of London and the Daily Telegraph. And he's written the book The first Casualty from Little Brown. Subtitle The Untold Story of the CIA Mission to Avenge 9 11 Toby. Good evening. Hi, Jim. Good to be with you. Thanks for having me on the show. Glad to do so. I must confess that this is not a story of which I was aware, and I thought I was reasonably well plugged into the news. Was this not well publicized Not really. I mean, obviously, CIA operations tend to be secret. Um, the eight men of female for included Mike Spann, Johnny Michael Spann from Alabama. Who was killed in action on November 25th 2000 and one and he was the first casualty of the title, so the fact that he was killed was publicized and his affiliation with the agency was But the details of the rest of the team not so much and in particular the experience of David Tyson, who was the CIA CIA officer who was with him on the on the day. That might span was killed. That was that was not known about, uh, give us a bit a bit of the background here. Was there, the feeling that we needed to do something quickly? Obviously, we Uh, once we were able to ascertain that, uh, Al Qaeda was behind this and Al Qaeda had come virtually, uh, a partner with the Taliban in the running Afghanistan. I understand. When they finally got to Kabul, the finances were hard to extricate one from the other. That, of course, was the long range goal to get the Taliban out of power. Was this, uh, something that was supposed to be done? I in a way, it almost makes me think of the Jimmy Doolittle raid during World War two in which Uh, army medium bombers bombed Tokyo. Not that we did a lot of damage, but it just let the Japanese and general particular in the world in general know that we were in the fight. Was that the point of this particular mission to let Al Qaeda? No. We were in the fight. Well, I think that was part of it. And I remember it vividly. You know, I was reported The telegraph in downtown Washington, D C on 9, 11 and I remember going home that night. And seeing Humvees on the on the street corners, and there was sort of sense of. Obviously we had 3000 people killed that day. And there was a sense that there's going to be another attack. And, um, I think it was Certainly a desire for revenge amongst the American people and the Bush administration. But I think it was also a policy thing where we knew almost immediately. There was Al Qaeda. We knew that they've been given sanctuary. By the Taliban in Afghanistan, and that was an ungoverned space and there was a sort of bipartisan desire very strongly supported by public opinion, but we needed to Find out the people who did this and get Osama bin Laden and Al Qaeda but sort of more importantly, almost to stop future attacks and to expel Al Qaeda from Um, this sort of ungoverned space so that they couldn't plan future attacks in the sort of weeks and months ahead. I recall that day vividly as well. I was also in Washington. And my usual trip home of a little less than an hour took me six hours that day at the entire city was moving out, and I remember as I came in that light. I got about a two hour nap and turned around to come back in to do this job. And, uh, my part of my way and involved coming in on Massachusetts Avenue and I drove by a little side street that most people didn't know about. It happened to know that was where at the time Bill and Hillary Clinton were living in retirement. The street was blocked by a A D. C national guard Humvee. So, yes, I remember that pretty well myself there in terms of putting this mission together. Uh, these eight CIA officers were dropped into the mountains of northern Afghanistan on October 17th of 20. Oh one team Alpha. And that, of course, is just A month and 16 days after the fact I don't know how long it takes to put together a mission like this, but my guess is that was pushing it. Yeah, absolutely. And there was another CIA team called Jawbreaker that went in on September 26, but the difference with them that they went into the Panjshir Valley, which was the only part of Afghanistan that was controlled by the Northern lines, and Sharma suited just been assassinated. Two days earlier, Um, team out for the first ones to go behind enemy lines. It's a Taliban controlled territory, and, yeah, I mean, it was very improvised, and it was it was put together. Um, in a hurry, because with this kind of sense of an imperative to sort of get in there and dislodge Al Qaeda and the guys on the team, they weren't all paramilitaries for them were Um, but, you know, you know, I think people might imagine that they would all be sort of elite sort of special forces like Tier one operators, perhaps like the seals that went in, you got bin Laden in 2011. But in fact, in fact, most of them once I mean, two of them were case officers, including David Tyson, Um, there was linguists and tribal experts and regional experts. One was a medic. One was a green beret and they didn't some of them knew each other. But some of them had barely met each other before they went on this mission, and they really did go into the unknown. They had to improvise. Has to link up with Abdul Rashid Dostam, sort of notorious, um ethnic Uzbek warlord and there was an incredible amount of risk every single day because Uh, this was sort of just unknown to range to them. Yeah, you describe in fact, into your book, first casualty at them as an eclectic band. A lot of people, I guess don't don't realize it. But special forces themselves tend to be neglected band and they do a lot of things. I mean, a lot of people would tell you that right off the bat. The Green Berets are first and foremost killers. Well, they can certainly fight and kill. They are, as I understand it first and foremost trainers that is to say they are to to teach, uh, guerilla forces on our side of whatever the conflict may be various things that will be helpful to them in their in their activities. And I don't know that maybe America should be more aware of the fact that, uh, that special forces as they are currently constituted, do a lot more than the floss with barbed wire. Yeah, absolutely. And to me. One of the fascinating things about this story was getting I mean, I interviewed all six of the still living members of team Albert. A lot of green Berets. Only a 595 famous, um horse soldiers from Doug Stanton Book of lead dogs being on the show A number of times, 12. Movie outside. I got to know a lot of these people and really buried fascinating people, um, with different takes on life, different backgrounds and within team Alpha They gels. Really? Well, um, because they have complementary skills and they knew you know one was a communicator. 11 was a medic. One Uzbek once spoke diary. You know, And they said they knew what they could do. And also the division of Labor between the Green Berets who joined team out for two days. 23 days after Alpha got in. Only 8595 came in. The Green Berets concentrated on the Taliban and calling in airstrikes and sort of winning the tactical battle If you like, while the CIA concentrated on the tribal relationships kind of Manipulating and managing the rivalries and and also looking at Al Qaeda and getting strategic intelligence on Al Qaeda. So it's fascinating because You know, there's a lot of Henry at the moment, and obviously we're in a very difficult um, you know, situation with Afghanistan, and we've had a 20 year war that ended in two ft. But this was a period of, you know. Early and, you know, I guess, um conditional. I mean, it wasn't final success that you know a large degree of success when with a light footprint and these sort of elite special forces And regional and linguistic experts were able to sort of fight along side the Afghan But let the Afghans do most of the fighting, and it worked pretty well. More to come with our guest, Toby Harnden. He is an award winning author, former foreign correspondent for The Sunday Times of London and the Daily Telegraph. And he has written the book The first Casualty, first Casualty of subtitled The Untold Story. Of the CIA mission to avenge 9 11, and it's published by Little Brown 18665. Oh, Jimbo is our number 1866. 554626 and we'll be back.

Mike Spann David Tyson Jim bin Laden Panjshir Valley 2011 Bill Al Qaeda Toby Harnden Johnny Michael Spann Washington Osama bin Laden Massachusetts Avenue Doug Stanton Abdul Rashid Dostam Kabul Hillary Clinton Taliban November 25th 2000 September 26
"david tyson" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

05:34 min | 11 months ago

"david tyson" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Believe if you are old enough to recall where you were and what you were doing, and if you're 25 or older that probably includes you. But here we are approaching that date, and we will do so, this first portion of the program tonight with the Toby Harnden. He is an award winning author, former foreign correspondent for The Sunday Times, Sunday Times of London and The Daily Telegraph. And he's written the book. The first casualty from Little Brown. Subtitled The Untold Story of the CIA Mission to Avenge 9 11 Toby. Good evening. Hi, Jim. Good to be with you. Thanks for having me on the show. Glad to do so. I must confess that this is not a story of which I was aware, and I thought I was reasonably well plugged into the news. Was this not well publicized Not really. I mean, obviously see a operations tend to be secret. Um, the eight men of female for, um included Mike Spann, Johnny Michael Spann from Alabama. Who was killed in action on November 25th 2000 and one and he was the first casualty of the title, so the fact that he was killed was publicized and his affiliation with the agency was But the details of the rest of the team not so much and in particular the experience of David twice in the CIA CIA officer who was with him on the on the day that Mike Spann was killed. That was that was not known about Out. Give us a bit a bit of the background here. Was there, the feeling that we needed to do something quickly? Obviously, we, uh once we were able to ascertain that Al Qaeda was behind this and Al Qaeda had Come virtually a partner with the Taliban in the running Afghanistan. I understand when they finally got to Kabul, the finances were hard to extricate one from the other. That, of course, was the long range goal to get the Taliban out of power. Was this, Uh, something that was supposed to be done that in a way, It almost makes me think of the Jimmy Doolittle raid during World War two in which, uh, Army medium bombers bombed Tokyo. Not that we did a lot of damage, but it just let the Japanese and general particular of the world in general know that we were in the fight. Was that the point of this particular mission to let Al Qaeda? No. We were in the fight. Well, I think that was part of it. And I remember it vividly. You know, I was a reporter for the Telegraph in downtown Washington, D C on 9, 11 and Remember going home that night? And seeing Humvees on the on the street corners, and there was sort of sense of. Obviously we've had 3000 people killed that day. Um, and there was a sense that there's going to be another attack and I think was Certainly a desire for revenge amongst the American people and the Bush administration. But I think it was also a policy thing where we knew almost immediately. There was Al Qaeda. We knew that they've been given sanctuary. By the Taliban in Afghanistan, and that was an ungoverned space and there was a sort of bipartisan desire very strongly supported by public opinion that we needed to Find out the people who did this and get Osama bin Laden and Al Qaeda but more importantly, almost to stop future attacks and to expel Al Qaeda from Um, this sort of ungoverned space so that they couldn't plan future attacks in the sort of weeks and months ahead. I recall that day vividly as well. I was also in Washington and my usual trip home of a little less than an hour. It took me six hours that day at the entire city was moving out. And I remember like, came in that light. I got about a two hour nap and turned around to come back in to do this job, and, uh, my part of my way in involved coming in on Massachusetts Avenue and I drove by little side Street that most people didn't know about. I happen to know that was where at the time Bill and Hillary Clinton were living in retirement. The street was blocked by a A D. C National guard Humvee. So yes, I remember that pretty well myself there. In terms of putting this mission together. Uh, these eight CIA officers were dropped into the mountains of northern Afghanistan on October 17th of 20. Oh, one team Alpha. And that, of course, is just, uh, a month and 16 days after the fact I don't know how long it takes to put together a mission like this, But my guess is that was pushing it. Yeah, absolutely. And there was another CIA team called Jawbreaker that went in on September 26, but the difference with them they went into the pantry, A valley, which was the only part of Afghanistan that was controlled by the northern lines up the suitors just being assassinated. Two days earlier. The team after the first ones to go through behind enemy lines. It's a Taliban controlled territory, and, yeah, I mean, it was very improvised, and it was put together. Um, in a hurry, because with this kind of sense of an imperative to sort of get in there and dislodge Al Qaeda and the guys on the team, they weren't all paramilitaries for them were Um, but, you know, I think people might imagine that they would all be sort of elite sort of special forces like Tier one operators, perhaps like this feels that went in. You got bin Laden in 2011. But in fact, in fact, most of them once I mean, two of them were case officers, including David Tyson. Um, there was linguists and tribal experts and regional experts. One of the medic one was a green beret, and they didn't someone knew each other, but some of them had barely met each other before..

David Tyson Mike Spann bin Laden Osama bin Laden Jim Toby Harnden Al Qaeda Bill Massachusetts Avenue Kabul Johnny Michael Spann Washington November 25th 2000 David 25 Alabama two September 26 Taliban 2011
"david tyson" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

07:00 min | 1 year ago

"david tyson" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"As we begin some remembering of 9 11 with the story that many of us Couldn't even forget. We were not really aware of what happened. The story of the book first Casualty, the Untold Story of the CIA mission to avenge 9 11. It was told by a person used to telling such stories. A former foreign correspondent for The Sunday Times of London and the Daily Daily Telegraph. He's an award winning author Toby Harnden with us tonight, and so the team Alpha is there and they They are being pretty successful. But then you write the Taliban hatches applaud with Al Qaeda to hit back. They fake a surrender. Yeah, absolutely. I mean, and one of the sort of chilling things about this period was, although it was successful in Taliban regime was toppled, a lot of the sort of complexities and the kind of messy nature of Afghanistan really came through. So that kind of The seeds. Really, of some of the problems that were to come in in subsequent years. So yeah, Mazar e Sharif. Um the, um Northern city had had fallen the first big city to, uh, to be taken from the Taliban. And then it looks like the Taliban work, staging a sort of a last stand in the north in Kunduz. And you have Al Qaeda units that work that we're working with the Taliban. One of the members of those Al Qaeda units was John Walker Lindh, California And there was a surrender, brokered, um, between the Taliban and the Northern Alliance, and Abdul Rashid Dostam. And, uh, it turned out that it was sort of an Afghan tradition to not search people properly. There was sort of elements of honor in the in the surrender. That these al Qaida prisoners were not Afghans. They were mostly Arabs. And it emerged later on that many of the prisoners had, um, had secreted grenades and and guns. In their robes. And Mullah Fazal, who was a notorious Taliban commander who is likely to be help figure in the new Taliban government. Um it seems that he was the mastermind behind this plot. That these prisoners would, um so red surrender in Mazari Sharif, while most of the U. S forces and the CIA and the Northern Alliance We're in Konduz and that they would stage an uprising in the port. And there were other other Taliban units who were moving towards matter. E Sharif and Potentially if it's this uprising succeeded, and it came pretty close that the Taliban would have recaptured Mazar e Sharif, and the whole story of this war would have been different, so it was kind of fascinating. To be able to put that together. I mean, at the time, it sort of seemed like it was in sort of a random, spontaneous revolved by prisoners. But I was able to establish by, you know, talking to everybody and and researching this in in great depth that this was that this was a plan to take. Take back Mazar e Sharif? Yeah, the the idea that you talked to everybody you're talking to people who do not as a rule of thumb tend to talk shop. They are not people who tend to run off at the mouth of great deal. I'm wondering how you got all these people to to do just that, and the extent to which the CIA itself was involved, either helping or hindering your efforts. Ah, that's a good question. Yes, well, it wasn't easy. I had no, you know, particular in with anybody else, Certainly not the CIA. Um, but I'd always been fascinated by this story for many, many years since I saw footage of David Tyson running Through the fort after Mike Spann. His comrades have been killed for clutching a pistol. Um and I eventually tracked David tightened down. I think he was in 2013. Through. He'd been cited in a in a acknowledgements by an academic in Indiana University in my contact with the academic and he put me in touch with him, and it turned out that David was living in Vienna, Virginia, just a few miles from From where I live now. It's a suburb of Washington for those who don't know. That's right. Yeah. Yeah, but less glamorous than Vienna, Austria. Um, anyway, so I met they I met Davis in a Panera bread and he was friendly, but he couldn't say very much because he was still serving in the agency. And we sort of kept in touch. You know, he's spending Christmas cards, but you know, there was he wasn't really, you know, emerging to sort of tell a story. But then, um, at the beginning of last year, he contacted me and said, Hey, you know, I've just retired. I'm ready to talk. And so I talked to him and he's a fascinating guy. I mean, you know, regional experts, somebody who's sort of really lived. After making life and who's likely sort about, you know, turned upside down by the event in 2000 and one. Um, but I then went to J. R. Seeger, who was the chief Justin Sap, who was a green beret. He's still serving. And they were sort of semi public and I went to see them and I I think I built up sort of trust and credibility they could see, but I didn't have an agenda. I just want to find out what happened. And Yeah, I was worried about the CIA. I was thinking that they might try to hinder me down. They might block me so I didn't Approach them until I was sure that I had enough to write a book. And at that point I've spoken to George Tenet that Director at the time, because the black Hank Crumpton, sort of senior CIA officer And again, I think they realized that you know I was serious. And so I contacted the agency and said, Hey, this is what I'm doing. And they helped me. I mean, they didn't open the vaults. I didn't get Documents for the morning. Alright that I dare say they're sort of take some interviews. And, um I was surprised and very grateful because you know some of these people. They're still contractors. It's sort of taken, you know, sort of a vow almost of secrecy, and they wouldn't have spoken if the agency hadn't have given them the green light so that that enable me to sort of complete research. And talk to really everybody. I think he was involved in this. Yeah. Full disclosure for those who don't know, And I'm sure many of the audience do but I had a a top secret plus security clearance in in Vietnam. So I've been on both sides of this particular issue, and I'm aware of the not only The the hyper tendency Let's say to keep things secure, which in many cases is very justified, but also another tendency and that is to use a classified stamp to cover your butt. And that happens on on more than one occasion. I've seen things there were steps secret. There were hardly more than than mess Hall menus..

David Tyson George Tenet Hank Crumpton 2013 Toby Harnden Mullah Fazal Al Qaeda David J. R. Seeger Vietnam Kunduz Mike Spann Washington 2000 Justin Sap Mazar e Sharif CIA Northern Alliance 9 11 Mazari Sharif
"david tyson" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

07:11 min | 1 year ago

"david tyson" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"That's hard to believe if you are old enough to recall where you were and what you were doing, and if you're 25 or older that probably includes you. But here we are approaching that date, and we will do so, this first portion of the program tonight with the Toby Harnden. He is an award winning author, Former foreign correspondent for the Sunday Sunday Times of London and The Daily Telegraph. And he's written the book The first casualty from Little Brown. Subtitled The Untold Story of the CIA Mission to Avenge 9 11 Toby. Good evening. Jim. Good to be with you. Thanks for having me on the show. Glad to do so. I must confess that this is not a story of which I was aware, and I thought I was reasonably well plugged into the news. Was this not well publicized Not really. I mean, obviously, CIA operations tend to be secrets. Um, The eight men of female for, um included Mike Spann, Johnny Michael Spann from Alabama, who was killed in action on November 25th 2000 and one and he was the first casualty of of the title. So the fact that he was killed was publicized and his affiliation with the agency was but the details of the rest of the team not so much and in particular the experience of David twice and who was the CIA CIA officer who was with him on the on the day. Mike Spann was killed. That was that was not known about, uh, give us a bit a bit of the background here. Was there. The feeling that we needed to do something quickly? Obviously, we, uh uh, once we were able to ascertain that Al Qaeda was behind this and Al Qaeda had Become virtually a partner with the Taliban in in running Afghanistan. I understand when they finally got to Kabul, the finances were hard to extricate one from the other. That, of course, was the long range goal. Get the Taliban out of power. Was this, uh, something that was supposed to be done that in a way, It almost makes me think of the Jimmy Doolittle raid during World War two in which Uh, army medium bombers bombed Tokyo. Not that we did a lot of damage, but it just let the Japanese in general particular in the world in general know that we were in the fight. Was that the point of this particular mission to let Al Qaeda? No. We were in the fight. Well, I think that was part of it. And I remember it vividly. You know, I was a reporter for the Telegraph in downtown Washington, D C on 9 11 and, um Remember going home that night? Um, and seeing Humvees on the on the street corners, and there was sort of sense of you. Obviously we've had 3000 people killed that day. And there was a sense that there's going to be another attack, and I think it was certainly a desire for revenge amongst the American people and the Bush administration. But I think it was also a policy thing where we knew almost immediately. There was Al Qaeda. We knew that they've been given sanctuary by the Taliban. In Afghanistan and that was an ungoverned space. And there was a sort of bipartisan desire very strongly supported by public opinion that we needed to find out the people who did this and get Osama bin Laden Al Qaeda but sort of more importantly, almost to stop Future attacks and to expel Al Qaeda from um this sort of ungoverned space so that they couldn't plan a future attacks in the sort of weeks and months ahead. I recall that day vividly as well. I was also in Washington. And my usual trip home of a little less than an hour took me six hours that day as the entire city was moving out, and I remember as I came in that light. I got about a two hour nap and turned around to come back in to do this job. And my part of my way and involved coming in on Massachusetts Avenue and I drove by a little side street that most people didn't know about. It happened to know that was where at the time Bill and Hillary Clinton were living in retirement. The street was blocked by a A D. C National guard Humvee. So, yes, I remember that pretty well myself there in terms of putting this mission together. These eight CIA officers were dropped into the mountains of northern Afghanistan on October 17th. Of 21 team Alpha. And that, of course, is just, uh, a month and 16 days after the fact I don't know how long it takes to put together a mission like this, But my guess is that was pushing it. Yeah, absolutely. And there was another CIA team called Jawbreaker. The went in on September 26. But the difference with them was that they went into the Panjshir Valley, which was the only part of Afghanistan that was controlled by the Northern lines. Ahmed Shah Massoud had just been assassinated. Two days earlier, Um, a team out for the first ones to go behind enemy lines. It's a Taliban controlled territory, and, yeah, I mean, it was very improvised, and it was it was put together. In a hurry, because with this kind of sense of an imperative to sort of get in there is this large Al Qaeda and the eight guys on the team. They weren't all paramilitaries for them were, Um but, uh, You know, you know, I think people might imagine that they would all be sort of elite sort of special forces like Tier one operators, perhaps likely feels that went in got bin Laden in 2011. But in fact, in fact, most of them once I mean, two of them were case officers, including David Tyson. There was a linguist and tribal experts and regional experts. One was a medic. One was a green beret, and they didn't some of them knew each other, but some of them had barely met each other before. They went on this mission, and they really did go into the unknown. They had to improvise. That has to link up with Abdul Rashid Dostam, whose sort of notorious um ethnic Uzbek warlord And there was an incredible amount of risk every single day because this was sort of just unknown to range to them. Yeah, you describe in fact into your book first casualty at them as an eclectic band. A lot of people, I guess don't don't realize it. But special forces themselves tend to be an eclectic band, and they do a lot of things. I mean, a lot of people would tell you that right off the weather. Green Berets are first and foremost killers. Well, they can certainly fight and kill. They are, as I understand it first and foremost trainers that is to say they are to to teach, uh, guerilla forces on our side of whatever the conflict may be various things that will be helpful to them in their in their activities. And I don't know that maybe America should be more aware of the fact that, uh, that special forces as they are currently constituted, do a lot more than the floss with barbed wire. Yeah, absolutely. And to me. One of the fascinating things about this story was getting I mean, I interviewed all six of the still living members of Team Alfa, um, and a lot of green Berets Oda 595..

Mike Spann Osama bin Laden David Tyson Toby Harnden Al Qaeda Abdul Rashid Dostam Ahmed Shah Massoud 2011 Johnny Michael Spann Bill Kabul bin Laden Massachusetts Avenue Panjshir Valley November 25th 2000 David Jim 25 Alabama Washington
"david tyson" Discussed on The Face Radio

The Face Radio

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"david tyson" Discussed on The Face Radio

"It. What happened to ricky taylor. Well you know. Richie was very very smart very intelligent man and i'm gonna tell you this story. I remember when i got into group. We did a lot of promotional tour because he didn't have a wreck. And i remember richie coming to me one day when somewhere. We was down south like new orleans or somewhere in the south mississippi. These are the words he said. I will always remember. He came to mason gerald. He said i'm going to have to leave the group when we get a hit record and you know he he said i was blessed by god to be here to help this group become a success and wanted made his first hit record in. I step off by other plans in my life. That god has that will be this and this is the lab and we had kissing say goodbye chain. Trust one day and he said The begin to take all he sent fellow. I'm gonna have to leave group completed my mission here my job with the manhattan and now i go on to the next step. And that's when richie left the group and became a muslim and he told me that years before you know that he would have to do. This is so amazing to me. And he never ever looked back shortly after you saw the to pursue a solo career. Was it difficult to leave through. It would be a big focus on the road. You don't know which way to join. Dd you just don't know which path to take us gonna fully haunt us by walk. And that's what. I did Patty at this point in my career. When i left the group i didn't have to deal with anybody and i remember. It was a point in my life. Because we've been working together. We were working so much until we didn't get a chance to rehearse like we want to and continue like we wanted to do and just how much work we work in six days a week. Travel sometimes travel on sunday. We leave home going out on the road for a week and ended up staying out there two weeks so i got so point. Wesson uses become a job. And i wanted to do it on. Turns and i came into office one day at a meeting until the guys look. I just had throat surgery on top of that. And that's all the guys i said i'd like to i think i'm going to pursue a so local media i just want to try and massive but i'll stay with you until you get somebody to take my place and that's when we we did. I left the group. Love eighty seven eighty seven And went out to california and can record my first solo album and the first single from that was Take me where you want. And it was a wonderful wonderful career and gratifying to me. It was How you choose those. I was on the motown label. Wasn't it and so you had a motel five albums and ten solo singles Up to nineteen ninety-five Most successful was open. Invitation not reasonable fourteen. A cooler was the great single slow motion. Oh my god slow motion. Take me where you want to getting back into the. Oh my god. Stay a little while Also did a cover of the eagles. I can't tell you why. Oh wow you still Business courses gerald alston and the manhattan's I would say you go plans to go into the uk but obviously not at the moment not at not at the moment but we're working on fontana are working hopefully by noon next day. Lovely said the next question is is only new material on the codes. Yes we are in the process of finishing up our new cd and the title of its manhattan featuring jerrell allston the legacy continues and we have like four or five new songs and then we have covered songs that we've already yeah And also i did. A solo project with george duke. Stanley caught back in the ninety. And i added that on news. A phone call Right by my side and this is like a solo thing but and we got a new song we had who releases the first singles. Call get it ready and today. We have a new release. that's called. She's coming home and look. That's the latest single from the forthcoming album and We're looking forward to it. You know To to continue to bring we will continue to bring music to fans all around the world and our website. That's just kiss and say goodbye dot com or facebook manhattan featuring gerald austin and on instagram the manhattan featuring gerald lawson lieutenant that and We just gonna continue singing. Good glad to hear it gerald. Thanks so much for your time of really enjoyed talking to you. And i wish you every success for the future you and also i just i just want to know that David tyson and choi may came in twenty seven ago and they fit right in. So we'll still carrying the torch and we will always always a trip to those five gentlemen. Glue loved kennett. Kelly stunning gibbons richard taylor and kenneth kelly. These guys laid the groundwork us be here today. And troy myself and they will keep it coming. We will keep the legacy alive exit right. Thank you again to yeah. Just keep doing what you're doing in the thank you absolutely pleasure chatting to you. Enjoy the rest of your day job. Thank you again you too. Thank you saw. What a great guy. I'm gonna play out now with a second of two tracks Seem release off the new. Lp is called getting ready and it's available for download now on all streaming sites stream today told the fellas gold do so candles and you hurry to get old. It's been quite a while since we've had so many other things were the kids found with just you. And we don't have the we can take as we have been and is nothing else could hear it in.

David tyson Richie ricky taylor kenneth kelly new orleans richard taylor four george duke Patty choi may kennett five albums richie first single Kelly two weeks Stanley twenty seven ago gerald austin two tracks
"david tyson" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

07:42 min | 3 years ago

"david tyson" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Van van comes to mind that did the same thing. I quit. The country. Very good. Yeah. Radna school. The other day. Big country came on. And I told Michael. Name this big country. Okay. Name the album's big country. Okay. Name of the band is big country. That's dumb. Want you to know. Did I mention that Katy man was sentenced to nearly two years in prison for trying to smuggle illegal aliens into the country inside of furniture? Ramona's posting right now. It's on my Twitter feed. A guy that they sewed into the seat in the back seat of a van you remember one Conde came out in that low in that outfit. Like a banana or what was he what was seven up can or a limit or something? What was he inside of avocado? It was something they made fun of because it was like, here's the, the fruit of loom dudes. Whole big thing as inside there. That's what these guys look like. You're not supposed to laugh not supposed to. It's not nice. If you laugh. You probably missed. Los a- in Louisiana Barry. It's in Lafayette off the university exit just off ten Louisiana may be a food desert. But this one beacon of light. Well, there's also that won't see lane. Yes, it has being released from prison tomorrow. John Walker lend aka the American Taliban early release from his twenty years sentence due to good behavior. Well, we're suckers, these guys aren't we? In November of two thousand one. C-i-s agent. Mike Spann by the way, his daughter Allison is a TV reporter in Biloxi, Mississippi. Was killed by a mob of prisoners attempting to escape from the remote fortress from a remote fortress in Afghanistan. After he had finished interrogating, Jon Lind. Shortly after Mike Spann, and his fellow CIA officer, David Tyson, questioned Lind, who reviews to tell them he was an American, the prisoners rose up and overwhelmed. The pair. Tyson opened fire with his pistol, and then ran for his life. Mike Spann was killed in the melee leaving behind three children, including Alison and her four year old sister, Emily who were born to his first wife, Catherine and six month old Jake born to his second wife, Shannon. After Mike Spann was killed lend now thirty eight was recaptured and it was discovered. He was an American who had grown up in California. Converted to Islam at age sixteen. And at twenty peaceful and tolerant. He traveled Afghantistan joining the Taliban before nine eleven and attending Al Qaeda training camps. After being captured by Northern Alliance fighters on November twenty on November twenty fifth two thousand one. He was taken to the remote fortress, that Afghantistan. Once Lind was in American custody. He was able to come to a plea bargain that put him in prison for twenty years, except he's been a good boy. And he's going to be released about three years early. The aforementioned daughter of Mike Spann man who was murdered Allison. She's really mad that lend is going to walk free. She said in an interview with the Washington Examiner. This man committed crimes against the United States and against my family my siblings. And I had to grow up without my father. My younger, brother will never know his father. And so my family is serving a life sentence. I've spent eighteen years without my dad. It never crossed my mind that the United States that someone like this out early Lind is a traitor. And I think his early release is a slap in the face. Over the years. She has researched lens background and his responsibility for her father's death. He's referred to as the American Taliban, but I think it needs to be clear that he was working and training with, Al Qaeda who carried out the nine eleven attacks. She said before nine eleven he was training with Al Qaeda after nine eleven. He stayed with al-qaeda. You don't accident stumble into an Al Qaeda training camp. She says he's still dangerous. He hasn't denounced radical Islam. And I think whether it's the US or the rest of the world that should scare everybody in. She may well have a point even though he's been a good boy in prison. He remains an unrepentant extremist to government assessments of Lind one from the Federal Bureau of prisons, and one from the national counterterrorism center of pain by foreign policy in two thousand seventeen say that he remains radicalized behind bars. Despite efforts by the span family, John Walker Lindh will walk free tomorrow may twenty third. But good. Just in time to vote for Bernie, although Bernie had his way. He would have been able to vote for Bernie while he was still in office. Twenty twenty is going to be so interesting for the Democrats, they're going to kick all the Republicans out of office. Guess which political party is in such dire straits that they're charging individual candidates. One hundred seventy five thousand dollars to accept to access donor data. Guess which political party has over six million dollars in debt? Guess which party has raised about one third of its Ravel? The Democrat National Committee is in big trouble. An add to that. That you've got twenty five candidates now. I'm not sure what's worse that they have twenty-five nut jobs running for president. Or that with twenty five choices they've already coalesced behind Joe Biden. The man was a Senator for thirty seven years, and the vice president for eight years. He's been at the highest levels of elected office for forty five years. Tell me again about that change thing. Tell me again about the new vision that the Democrats want..

Mike Spann Jon Lind United States American Taliban John Walker Lindh Democrats Van van Allison Bernie Louisiana David Tyson Radna school Conde Twitter Taliban Afghantistan Michael Joe Biden Washington Examiner