17 Burst results for "David Thornton"

"david thornton" Discussed on The Larry Elder Show

The Larry Elder Show

02:56 min | 2 months ago

"david thornton" Discussed on The Larry Elder Show

"That's my pillow dot com promo code Larry, or one 808 9 1843 one 808 9 O 1843. There's a guy named ray chitta. He is a former journalist, and media critic with the Columbia journalism review is considered to be one of the leading media journals in the country. Here's what he said about the media and I'm quoting on balance the press has been a destructive force on this story. From its beginnings, in the coverage of Jacob, Jacob Blake, shooting, they set off the whole thing, which we know was justified. To the downplaying of the $50 million in destruction done by looters in Kenosha, to the libelous portrayal of rittenhouse, and the particulars of what happened. There have been innumerable journalistic disasters in the Trump era. But this is the most blatantly reckless one of them all. Van Jones is now just open season a bunch of white people running around. Shooting people, killing people. Do I need to remind you that of the homicides in this country, almost half of them are black victims almost always killed by other blacks? Jesse Jackson was in the front of a protest in Chicago. People were Channing Black Lives Matter Black Lives Matter to the matter in Chicago? Where would the population of 30% of the population? 80% of the homicides, black on black? And there are on track to have more homicides in that city than any year since 1996 I kid, you not. Did he lead the levo march? On that? In Baltimore and St. Louis, the homicide rate of three times worse than it is in Chicago. Again, 90% of the homicides in Baltimore, black on black, a city that 64% black, St. Louis, 90% black on black, a city that's about 46% black. Where's Jesse Jackson? Where's Black Lives Matter? Where is van Jones? It is absolutely insidious insulting. Triple 8 9 7 one S 8 GE triple 8 9 7 one 7 two four three early is in Woodbury Minnesota early and you're on the lario to show. Thank you so much for calling. Hi Larry. Hi. I was just wondering since all this with this kid, Kyle, where were all these black leaders and protesters when the retired black police officer was killed in St. Louis during the riots? Last summer, David Thornton. That's right. He was there to protect buildings. He was there to yeah, doing the same thing that the car written out was doing to protect property. That's right. Right. He didn't have a weapon so he couldn't, I don't believe, but either way he was killed. And I believe he was killed by a black VLM member. Where are all these black leaders on his behalf? You don't hear from them? Well, you sure you sure don't orlean? And where are they when all these gangbangers are shooting up other fellow.

ray chitta Jacob Blake van Jones Columbia journalism review Channing Black Jesse Jackson Chicago Larry rittenhouse Kenosha St. Louis Baltimore Jacob lario
"david thornton" Discussed on True Crime Garage

True Crime Garage

08:30 min | 4 months ago

"david thornton" Discussed on True Crime Garage

"There's two tapes. They talked to him the first day half-hour they go back the next day and pick up saying. Hey there's some things we we left out and they talk to him again for a half hour. The entire taped confession is an hour long. And if you've ever seen an interrogation or you know anything like that it's it's pretty common that the when the tape turned on is not when they first started talking so the question is always been what happened before the tape was turned on. Your law enforcement calls it a taped confession but seems like joe has a different story about that. He says it's naive in questioning from the beginning. It's it's simply Interrogation and he. He made some other claims as well. Yeah joe says that you know. They had him handcuffed to a wall and they spit on him and they were being aggressive to him. And you know that is joe's word but you know in one of the episodes. I go into all these officers backgrounds and if that did happen it would not surprise me. I have come across you know. Some false confessions coerced by them. I mean they're they're personnel files. One of the lead detective samson is personnel files. Pretty pretty damning with he's hit with lying forging documents. So you know. He was on the officers. Who who took joe's confession. You know something we we always forget. Even forget is that they went to him. According to joe saying David is in the next room. And he's he's putting this on you. If you tell us what happened. You will get a deal. So they did dangle a deal in front of him and as we know joe got thirty to life for taking the deal and saying quote allegedly what happened and as we know. David was not in the next room. David never talked to police. David had not talked to the police since that one time he went in with them with a lawyer and said i'm not talking to you and that was it so they did lied to him saying david's in the next room giving you up that's something to keep in mind. You know that's part of the what happened before the tape was turned on. That's really interesting to me too. Because you have scenario. Where according to our witnesses chris campbell and forgive me i see more of her rose more. According to witnesses the lead detectives to joe wilkes he. He's saying some guy hired me to kill a woman. It doesn't say that david thorne hired me to kill his ex girlfriend. Some guy hired me to kill a woman. So that leads them to joe wilkes but it doesn't necessarily lead them to david thorne yet. They're very quick to be saying david thorne sitting in the next room. And he's turning on you kid and it's going to be your ass that we put in the electric chair and fries and it could have been. It could have been this eric guy. It could have been several other individuals that would have hired. Someone like a joe wilkes to commit this murder now. The general statements inside of that taped portion of the confession or interviewer interrogation or however. We want label. It is basically the joe wilkes saying. I'm i'm remorseful for what i did. I kind of knew the victim. I'd met her on several occasions. I think that w- it's general knowledge that he even been to her residence at least one time before the murder and he says you know. I was remorseful for this the night that i did it. And and you can hear. I mean he's he's sobbing throughout a lot of the the confession and he's basically says look. I know this guy been friends with david thorne for for years. And he's complained about yvonne and he's complained about you know not wanting to pay child support that he wanted custody of his son and i had nothing to lose. I had hit rock bottom. I had no friends. I lost all my family. You know the only friend i had was david thorne and i had no money. No prospects he joe wilkes his life it. His childhood is incredibly tragic and sad it. Just i mean it's heartbreaking. What he says took place during the course of his childhood but then even after he gets away from that it seems to me like his life is always this roller coaster ride of. He needs help. He gets some help and whether he follows. You're not is is up for debate. But in this case he says our loss pretty much everything. I had hit rock bottom. My friend who i thought was my friend. David thorne took advantage of that took advantage of me and he offered to pay me and help me out. And he convinced me to go and kill this woman and not only kill her but kill her at a time when he david thorne could. It couldn't lead back to him. It would be impossible because he would have that ironclad alibi. And let's go through the timeline of events as it as it were according to joe and his confession and let's let's keep in mind as we go through this everybody out there and listener land that we're talking about a confession that was it's also it's a confession from joe wilkes but it's also a story that is backed by by the state or at least by the prosecution in this case and you have to wonder a lot of things fit nice neat and perfectly. I got to see that right upfront. You're magazine. they're they're they're a lot of things like when we go into these cases and you're talking about an unsolved murder and you're looking at different suspects. We're always looking for a smoking gun right here. It's kind of the reverse of that when you're looking at a possible wrongful conviction. You're looking for the smoking gun of why this guy is innocent and it's really tough to find that here because you have a very unique situation. Where joe wilkes could be guilty of this murder and david thorne had nothing to do with it. Now on the flip side of that coin is that if joe wilkes did not kill you von lane. Then david thornton didn't have anything to do with it. i mean it just. It wouldn't work out that way. So the timeline as it were according to joe wilkes and the prosecution is what when win does this because we start seeing things actions being made. According to joe the day of the murder the he says involved david thorne so the day before. So we're talking the thirty first. Which is the day of the murder yes. He allegedly go to the mall in the after in the afternoon. Rent the room and they get forget if it's the glove. I think it's the gloves they get the gloves that afternoon. And then david brings joe back to the inox where he was staying staying with a friend and then david goes about his day. He goes to his his martial arts class. He brings his lion cub. You know what that's how. They knew for sure he was there that night. He got a lion cub with him. Which isn't unusual for david. I mean he had wine cubs and he brought them around with him So the police did try to say he made this obvious alibi blah blah blah. I mean i. I don't know that's up for debate. I guess but so. That was the alibi. Joe allegedly gets a ride to the mall. That evening brent knock. The father of joe's friend said yes. I brought him to the mall. He wanted to stay there. He said he was staying there and then they say that joe walked to her house sometime after seven. We know he was seen at the mall. Allegedly by rose and chris around a so he wouldn't have gotten to vaughn's house until at least nine nine thirty and then you know. She founded twelve thirty the next day. That that's really what we know. Joe says the next morning. David picks him up. This is where things a little dicey he says. David picks him up the next morning. Sometime around eight thirty nine looks like he made a phone call from a payphone to david. I'm.

joe wilkes david thorne joe David eric guy chris campbell David thorne samson david yvonne david thornton cubs Joe vaughn rose chris
"david thornton" Discussed on BirdTalk Radio Podcast

BirdTalk Radio Podcast

11:59 min | 6 months ago

"david thornton" Discussed on BirdTalk Radio Podcast

"Nine hundred seventy one. We've got David thornton net wants to Wants to talk with us about an unusual non native. Let's say hello david either. I just call him because there was a story out of California that this peacock was with always roaming around this town and the people call it. Mr p somebody somebody on wednesday shot and killed it. That's what i heard. Yeah heard about it. And i thought that too sad story i mean. I can't believe people would do something like that. Who hit peacocks are very loud and actually at times they'll call and at night time even and often it sounds like a human being killed and evidently we folks that were not tolerating the sound for mr so it is hard to imagine that Somebody would do that but evidently in this area. I thought there was also a report that there was. Mr p was just one of the peacocks in the area that there might have been some hints in the area to that. I didn't hear all i heard was. I just thought that was set. Just had the story. Yeah yeah you know. there's nothing else. They could capture it and put it in a safe place or something you know. They don't have to kill it. No no and usually these are birds that are owned by somebody and sometimes people will collect wild birds. That are not native in the us. Because you're not allowed to keep well. Bert native wild birds in the us. But you can keep things like peacocks and checkers and other game birds and exotic birds and exotic waterfowl. Sometimes if you go to the stock show you'll see all these different exotic birds and things and those people are allowed keep but sometimes they'll release them when they get tired of feeding them or maybe they're a little too noisy they'll release them and they'll wander around in the wild then but that's just like peres. Those are come up from out of the country. Yes often area imported. There's even certain populations of different parrot species that have started to breed in the us that have been brought up here and released. Yeah anyway. I just didn't know if he had heard about that peacock is i just started with such a sad story. Yeah yeah he is but thanks for calling david. I imagine there's some people out listening hadn't heard about that story but yeah that's that is n can be the same thing with a variety of animals. Birds people that birds are protected. You can't you can't collect ness. You can't collect feathers best thing to do if you see a feather and and it's beautiful or you want identify it. Take a picture of it rather than collecting it because it's not legal to collect and it's not legal to bother these birds when their nesting a this is a federal laws and they're also some state laws that protect them. So you want to be careful about that. Yeah if you'd like to join us a number three zero three six nine six nine hundred seventy one. Last two days of the tidy dining sale at the denver store in the r vata star in these two stores of the stores that sponsor bird talk so be sure to frequent those stores They support bird talk and we want you to support them. And even if i mean there's a lot of ways you can listen to bird. Talk can listen on the radio on seven ten cain. Us nine ninety. K or k as you can listen to live streaming. I talked to some folks from texas earlier today and they were going to listen live streaming or on the podcast so soon as the show is over. We have podcasts. That people can listen to. And i'll course facebook online so a lot of different ways you can catch up with bird talk but maybe you're out of state. Maybe you are wab. Farther away from the stores you can go to bird. Tot guys dot com pick either the denver store or the of eta store. We have my wbz you and we can ship to you. Bird food and bird feeding products and and things like that directly from the store and seventy five dollars or more at ships free to less than that's like seven ninety nine something like that so flat fee so you can shop online if you can't get in and of course we encourage you to because we love to see folks and hear about their stories but that way you can have it shipped directly to you through my wvu dot com now. Three zero three six nine six one thousand nine hundred seventy one is a number. Be happy to talk with you today. By what what is going on in the wild kingdom of your backyard have been a lot of questions and comments about hummingbirds and how fascinating it is to be able to see these birds. How interesting it is to see how they remember exactly where a feeder was even the previous year but in north america. They're eighteen species of hummingbirds in colorado. We can see four species commonly the most common species of hummingbird is broad tailed hummingbird and this is a hummingbird. That looks like a ruby throated hummingbird that you'll see in the east but it is a broad tailed hummingbird and the male has at red throat but also when he flies has a high pet high pitched metallic like trill that you can hear as he flies now the ruby throat. You won't hear that another one that we can see is a black chand hummingbird and it has black where it's ten would be if it had a chin and under that it has a purple throat patch. And this is a hummingbird we can see in colorado. The rufus hummingbird is one. That's been coming into the state this month and heading south. But it's passing through. And they can take over a feeder and guarded as their own. So of course solution is by another hummingbird feeder from wild birds unlimited nets going to. That's going to make the difference for you. So that's the way to do that. And another one. The smallest hummingbird that ness in north. America is Kaleida hummingbird actually the smallest bird period. That ness north. America is the colli hummingbird nisa hummingbird. We can see in colorado and week before last. I think it was. David was telling me that he has had a colli be humming burden is yard so they're probably the least common for the denver metro area to be able to see but they are the smallest. And once you see come in and compared to the other to the broad taylor the other hummingbird you'll see how tiny it is in comparison so these birds when you make your solution one part sugar for parche water. No red food coloring no red dye in that. it's not needed and there is a concern that it might harm. Hummingbird said it's not hit. Certainly not helpful for them. It's not a nutrient so they'll find insects and spiders in our yard to feed on their nutrition and their energy can come from nectar whether it's natural nectar among flowers. Or if it's a nectar that is in your hummingbird feeders. Some really popular flowers for hummingbirds to be able to attract them to create a hummingbird garden. I get statue. This is one of their favorites. Probably top of their list for attractive plans to be able feed on nectar. So mostly it's going to be tubular type. Flowers salvi as or really good flower to attract them columbine of course penn station so a variety coral bells. That can be another one so a variety of different flowers. And if you wanna create that hummingbird garden wild birds. Unlimited stores have lists of plants that you can plant in order to attract not only humming birds but also lists for butterfly gardens and of course butterflies different because they need nectar as butterflies caterpillars. They need a host plant so the host plan is where a butterfly will lay its eggs. And then as the as the larva the caterpillar starts feeding on this plant before it goes into the cocoon. Stage it's That's the host plant for the caterpillar. then of course once they hatch out there looking for nectar so We have plant list for that too if you wanna create a butterfly garden in addition to your hummingbird garden. We talked about how hummingbirds have such a wonderful memory for being able to find remember where food is and they do this with a brain that is about the size of a bb. Can you imagine birds. Brains will get larger and smaller during migration. You'll find that often. Birds brains will get a little bit larger so they can remember the pathways or remember where the food sources are but it is just remarkable just All birds are remarkable like that. We wanted to remind you also that today until four we have four. Different species is at each store of birds of prey. So at the data store we have a red tail hawk. An american kestrel a barn owl and he saw wet l. in saw wet. Al is named after the sound of its call. People don't know what sharpening saws sounds like anymore but it. Somebody thought it sounded. Somebody was sharpening the saw when they heard that call of the saw wet l. and that's how it got. Its name the denver store here. We've got a red tail hawk a harris's hawk which is hawk in the southwest de- desert in which is the fastest animal. It can in a dive or what they call a stupid go over two hundred miles an hour in a cute little eastern screech. Also stop by the stores now until four. Bring your cameras bring the kids and we wanna thank you for joining us for another exciting episode of talk next week. David will be back. And until then. We want to say happy birding..

Mr p David thornton us denver eta store david colorado Bert peacock California Flowers salvi texas north america facebook Hummingbird taylor David caterpillar southwest de
"david thornton" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

07:53 min | 7 months ago

"david thornton" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"It is emblematic of how so many people across this country know so little about slavery, and they think they know because they did their you know, Black History Month project and they May have watched 12 years slave or they may you know, they know the name Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass. But it kind of goes back to what we were saying before like, we're made to feel like we talk about slavery all the time, but we don't talk about it in any way that is commensurate. In our public discourse. At least we don't talk about it in any way that is commensurate with the impact that it has had on this country, And I think the risk to your original question. Of failing to Help people like Donna and Grace understand how slavery has shaped our founding through the people who were our founders, uh and and has shaped our contemporary landscape. Of inequality again. The risk is that people think that someone's personal failure or an entire culture or demographic of peoples. Inability to reach or that or the disparities that certain demographics of people suffer. The demographics. We're going to be specific in this context that the the disparities that black people experience Are the result of things that black people have done. Or not done themselves and not the result of Hundreds and hundreds of years of state sanctioned public policy in which black people were literally second class citizens. When I mean they begin not as citizens and then when they were ostensible citizens were not even Real citizens and and had no actual way to meaningfully vote until 1965 right. And so, so I think that that is deeply important. Um, and I think that what part of why I wanted to lift up these places is because I think they have a unique Ability and opportunity to to tell the story of slavery to folks who might not come pick up a 300 page book. Who might not, um you know, like hundreds of thousands of people. Visit Monticello every year. And what David Thornton can do in a 45 minute or 60 minute tour is something that is really special and unique and and something that can reach folks who might not otherwise be able to be reached in a different way. And I think that the work that so many of us are attempting to do Is to attempt to whether it be in writing or podcasting or public history or academic history or journalism or teaching or activism. Organizing is trying where we are all engaged in the project of trying to build a more just and equitable world. And trying to recognize that people have accountability and need, you know, should be held accountable and they need to do work on their own, but also that there, I think what's true is that there are a lot of people Who like aren't even aware of what they don't know. Um and I think it's about striking that balance of accountability and also generosity because I think about the moments and we've talked about this like when people have extended generosity to me. About things that I didn't know in ways that they didn't have to, Uh And and I think that you know, you got folks like sons, Confederate veterans where you know their sense of history is not based on empirical evidence. It's not based on primary source documents. It's something that's much more deeply emotionally entangled in their sense of themselves and who they are, and so you can present them with information. But that doesn't mean that that's going to shift how they Think about history or think about themselves in relation to that history. But I do think that there are a lot of people Who just don't know. And I have no. You know, Donna and Grace could have left there and nothing might have changed in their lives. They might have kept going. You know, these were folks who admitted to me. They were like Voted Republican conservatives watch Fox News Love Tucker Carlson. They could have gone on and kept doing those same things and nothing meaningful would have changed in their lives. Or maybe not. But but that's not up to us. All we can do is try to meet folks where they are and present them with the information and we don't have control over what they do after that, But that doesn't mean that Presenting trying to get this information in front of folks isn't Something that's still a noble endeavor. Absolutely. So I have a million more questions, but so does our audience. So I want to go to a couple of those before I ask you my last question before we go. The launch of your book coincides with the 1/100 anniversary of the Greenwood massacre. Um, whether it wasn't or was intentional. How do you contextualize your text with Green wood Black Wall Street and that legacy? Yeah. I mean, I think that we're this book most centrally is about memory. Um, and how we remember What has happened in this country on this land and in in many ways, that is what the sort of contemporary project of Tulsa Is centered on is is recalibrating our memory and understanding of what that was. You know. Joe Biden gave that speech in which he He said that what happened in Tulsa was not a riot. It was a massacre. And that's not to say that will like that, in and of itself is going to solve the problem that that in and of itself makes it all okay, and now everything's good, most certainly not. It does mean something, and I think it is it does. It is part of a larger project of of reframing. A a piece of history that was specifically framed in a way too obvious, Kate. And to cast a veil over or uh, pushed to the side, one of the most horrific race massacres, if not the most horrific in some ways race massacre in the history of this country. And because it was pushed aside. We are now attempting to Use Tulsa almost as an entry point to think about the way that more broadly. Black people through the Either direct force or complicity of the state had their wealth and resources. And bodies and lives taken away from them. Um, in in, um, in the myriad of different, different ways. And so I think that you know, I I hope that my book can be one contribution to helping us recalibrate our memory around slavery and again, like our proximity to it both our physical proximity to it. Our proximity to it. In terms of of time. We are not there. People. One of the most powerful things about everything I saw this weekend with Tulsa was that their survive of survivors of Tulsa who was still alive today. Right survive people who are still alive who lived through This thing that that that our history books attempted to pretend never happened. And and that is a reminder in the same way that I think the woman uh, Who stood alongside the Obama family in 2016 is a reminder, uh, that that these that this history, whether it be Tulsa or slavery wasn't that long ago. And that it it undoubtedly shapes. Um why So much of our society looks the way that it does today. So this next question comes from Jacob. They say Clint How did you tend to your spirit Throughout your research and writing what self care did you do while physically entering the spaces of such deep hurt and harm? Yeah, I mean, so I started this book. Um in 2000 May 2017, which is the same month My son was born and So it is. It's actually very difficult for me to disentangle the experience of being a parent to young Children, Um, from the experience of writing this book and.

David Thornton Harriet Tubman Joe Biden Frederick Douglass 2016 45 minute 60 minute Donna 300 page Obama Grace Monticello Jacob 12 years Clint Kate Black History Month 1965 Tulsa 2000 May 2017
"david thornton" Discussed on Murder In Alliance

Murder In Alliance

02:54 min | 7 months ago

"david thornton" Discussed on Murder In Alliance

"Knew dwayne was right. Turns out i didn't open a can of worms. I opened a barrel of rattlesnakes corrupt cops scandals drugs and sex. I'd wind up exactly or dwayne was over a decade ago with one special and david still in prison despite the heart and work that went into the reporting so i decided to bring in professionals coming up next time on murder in alliance with a lot of time on that i guess one question is three hundred dollars to murder a woman in cold blood. The reason david thornton and gerald now. Some of the knowledge is fucking liar. I know that the allegations are out there. That even some in the police force were taken advantage of yvonne services. If that's in fact what was happening..

david thornton three hundred dollars david one question dwayne gerald yvonne services one a decade ago over
"david thornton" Discussed on Big Fellas Basketball

Big Fellas Basketball

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"david thornton" Discussed on Big Fellas Basketball

"We've got a few of our friends and partners that are college coaches involved in it. It's it's it's awesome to see how much it's grown originally originally started and then thinking even back to Which would the lessons you learn especially thinking about and try to inspire guys and that must be so hard especially from high school college. It's always a challenge. But especially at the g. league level where you have so much roster turnover. It must stay. Get especially challenging. What's been like now becoming the first head coach of the blackhawks and kind of how that ended up happening. Forty one in what you've taken from experience so far. Yeah so. I got really lucky. That the new orleans. Pelicans you know the new orleans. Pelicans bought the g. league team. In when i was there orlando had owned it. And then they moved their team to lakeland than the atlanta hawks owned it. Then move their team to atlanta new orleans. Got it in for me. Out very four towns coaching in jerusalem. And they were looking for an american international coach and when david griffin. I got the job. David thornton a little bit in recommended me to him in general and then they were looking for an american and international coach. They reach out to their international scout. Iran are bell. who's israelis living in israel. And he'd put together a list of coaches in. My name is also on the list. So that was kinda the second name and then i heard he was interested and we happen to have amari stoudamire. Who on our team and part owner and I'd coach tomorrow. That was my second year coaching him. And a maureen david griffin ward together in phoenix and so amari made a phone call Which was huge. Help me get the job. And my agent. Brian elvis in they. They did an excellent job. pushed in an interview with trades in line. And this really fortunate. You know it's what you learn as a coach and in general ride is you need someone to believe in you in whether it's the player whether it's who is a coach in your career for most players and people you need someone to believe in you and give you a chance in at thirty three was trying to be an intern in the nba. In and was like. I'll be an intern. Mba i don't care if i'm an intern. I'll out work every one. And i'll work my way up then right and no one would hire me except fred hoiberg fred. Hoiberg was only one who is willing to hire me and he couldn't get it approved. Because i was too old and too experience to be an intern and i go from more than willing to accept in an intern to getting offered the new orleans. Pelicans daily job. And i got really lucky. That david griffin in trajan langdon took a chance on me and believed in me. When you look at it. it's something that we almost. All of us need whether it's a player whether it's a coach right you need someone with in your career to take a chance on you in believe in you and for some people have had twenty four ride for some people. It happens at thirty four for some people happens. Forty four and for some people. Unfortunately it never happens. And it doesn't doesn't determine who they are as a coach or who hours of player right. It's not like when i signed contracts. Become the head coach. That i was a better coach. That day was the day before. The difference was david. Griffin trades in landon took a chance on me and they believed in me and i was super fortunate to get the job what you realize when you get the job..

David thornton Brian elvis david griffin fred hoiberg israel orlando Pelicans david blackhawks jerusalem Griffin amari amari stoudamire atlanta hawks Forty four second year Hoiberg twenty four phoenix thirty four
"david thornton" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"david thornton" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Any costs or lecture or you have to do is sign up using our special euro. That's the great courses plus dot com slash space. That way they'll know you came from us and you'll be hoping to support our show. That's the great courses plus dot com slash space and of course we've included the url details in the show notes and on our website. That's the great courses plus dot com slash space. And now it's back to our show. This is facetime. With stu. Would gary anita threat to earth is being posed by the asteroid apotheosis. The earth asteroid nine thousand nine. Forty two office. I triggered alarm goes back in twenty four when initial observations suggested there was a real possibility that the three hundred and seventy meter wide space. Rock would crash into the earth on april the thirteenth twenty. Twenty-nine such an impact would have had global consequences will be beyond the destruction. It would create ground zero. You see a office. Would impact the earth with kinetic energy equivalent to one thousand two hundred megatons of tnt now by comparison the biggest hydrogen bomb ever exploded the soviet. Union's czar bomba was around fifty seven megatonnes and the infamous 1883 eruption of the volcano krakatoa had the equivalent of roughly two hundred megatons. And there was the loudest explosion ever heard on earth. Of course the exact effective any impact will be based on the asteroid's composition and the location and angle of impact. Still any impact with this man and eric covering thousands of square kilometers creating an impact crater more than five kilometers cross and triggering major land or cease niamey's depending on where it fell. That'd be huge seismic activity probably volcanic eruptions would be triggered by it and it would generate climate changing debris clouds. Luckily his astronomers gathered more detailed observations of offices orbit. They're able to eliminate the possibility of a twenty twenty-nine impact. Still a puff would make a very close approach missing the planet surface by just thirty one two hundred kilometers closer than the orbit. Geostationary satellites and the close approach will be visible from europe africa and western asia. In fact it'll be the closest asteroid size in recorded history becoming as bright as magnitude three point one and visible with the unaided eye from rural dhaka's suburban areas and clearly visible with innocuous from most locations and the story doesn't end there. There was a very real possibility. That profits twenty. Twenty-nine close encounter with the earth would send the asteroid through what's not as a gravitational ko an area of space just eight hundred meters wide. Which would set up. The asteroid on an impacting dejected. Exactly seven years later on april the thirteenth. Twenty thirty six now. The good news is that as observations continue to further refine the prophecies orbit the likelihood of an impact continued to decline until eventually it was ruled that completely in two thousand thirteen the twenty thirty six close encounter was moved to late march and the distance from earth closest approach increased somewhere between eight point four and thirty five point. Three two million kilometres safe fly by a is expected to gain closely. Approach the earth in twenty sixty six and twenty sixty eight. The twenty sixty six close encounter was never going to be a concern and neither was the two thousand sixty eight close approach that was at least until new calculations by astronomer david thornton from the university of hawaii uncovered some warring information them and colleagues noted that earlier researchers had failed to account for the aqap. Ski effect now. We've spoken about this before on space time. He kaczynski effect is caused by the sun. Heating of the day side of an object and this haiti stored in the rocks on the surface and then as this object rotates in its natural course of events that haiti's radiated back out into space on the nighttime side in the process. Degenerates a tiny measurable amount of thrust. Which over long periods of time does have an affect on an asteroid. Dejected felon has told a meeting of the american astronomical society's division for planetary sciences that the new data shows that the kaczynski effect is pushing office to one side. And it's pushing it with enough force caused it to drift by proximate. One hundred and seventy meters per year and with this new information added to a officers orbital path. It does bring it much closer to the earth. Now while there's still no indication at policies likely to impact the earth in twenty twenty nine or thirty six the twenty sixty eight encounter could be if somewhat great concern to find out more andrew dangling speaking with astronomer professor. Fred watson we're gonna get smashed to oblivion by an asteroid the doomsday or no. I'm thinking well it's really interesting. Object and night. Yet his yeah. So apologies will have a close approach to earth on. Love the date on friday the thirteenth of april twenty. Twenty-nine we know that will happen. And we know that it will come within the ring fist. satellites we know that it will be visible to the united. I will be so nick this things. Three hundred meters across. But what we also know is that it won't hit this. So that is not that friday the thirteenth twenty twenty-nine is not going to be doing say the headlines read. You know you know that. Going to be several pipers that Gloom in twenty twenty nine. I just can't go to sell the pipe anyway. So that's definite no hit but there is another close approach in twenty sixty eight and at the moment to the best of our knowledge not will also be a non hits. It will miss the earth. But what's been recognized is that a office is undergoing something. Cold yacht kofsky acceleration. It comes about when you've got a rotating objects being heated by the sun and of course an asteroid. Exactly that so if you think about it so if you think about this this thing moving along in its orbit the side facing the some is getting heated up but it turns out that the hottest part of the surface is not the part directly under the sun because these things turning so the hottest part of the surface is a bit further around. It corresponds to about two o'clock in the afternoon if you think of noon. Being weather sounds directly overhead. The things turned a couple of hours for you. Know a bit further not couple of hours on the street because the different rotations fate up that kind of if you very clear but it. The hardest part is not facing the it's actually facing slightly backwards and what that means is that part of the asteroid is releasing rather more for infrared radiation than the rest of it. So it's non uniform thermal radiation in red and that radiation basically exists a thrust slight very slight thrust on the asteroid. What it means is that essentially speeding up the work that's been done. This is from the university of hawaii ashley by scientists there and one of the day fallen. Who's actually one of the institute for astronomy scientists. Who works on this. He says we've known for some time. That an impact with is not possible during the twenty twenty-nine close approach the new observations. We've obtained with the subaru telescope. Forgot to mention that. Subaru is the japanese eight meter telescope. Amount of kea in hawaii have first class instrument. I on have a subaru lawnmower. Do you go. I used to have a soup. Fiber what subaru means. It is the japanese word for the planet. And that's.

gary anita volcano krakatoa niamey kaczynski david thornton aqap stu american astronomical society' western asia haiti Fred watson dhaka university of hawaii
"david thornton" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"david thornton" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Quality learning at an affordable price two topics that always come up for discussion among space time listeners. A dark energy and dark matter grant you that can be difficult concepts to grasp but the great courses plus can come to your rescue. All those browsing. They cost list. I found this great twenty. Four part course called dark matter doc. Energy the ducks out of the universe led by theoretical physicist sean carroll. It examines key concepts of an expanding universe from nine stein to edwin hobble. If you have questions this is where you'll find the answers in plain english. Brilliant the great courses plus offers unlimited learning at a time when we need it most but without adding the pressure of homework or grades it's in-depth learning at your own pace and the great courses that makes it easy. You can learn anytime anywhere in the world. So join me and sign up with a great courses plus today either for yourself or as a gift for a friend and for us based timelessness is the editor advantage of being able to check out the entire great courses bus library for free. That's free access to any costs or lecture or you have to do is sign up using our special euro. That's the great courses plus dot com slash space. That way they'll know you came from us and you'll be hoping to support our show. That's the great courses plus dot com slash space and of course we've included the url details in the show notes and on our website. That's the great courses plus dot com slash space. And now it's back to our show. This is facetime. With stu. Would gary anita threat to earth is being posed by the asteroid apotheosis. The earth asteroid nine thousand nine. Forty two office. I triggered alarm goes back in twenty four when initial observations suggested there was a real possibility that the three hundred and seventy meter wide space. Rock would crash into the earth on april the thirteenth twenty. Twenty-nine such an impact would have had global consequences will be beyond the destruction. It would create ground zero. You see a office. Would impact the earth with kinetic energy equivalent to one thousand two hundred megatons of tnt now by comparison the biggest hydrogen bomb ever exploded the soviet. Union's czar bomba was around fifty seven megatonnes and the infamous 1883 eruption of the volcano krakatoa had the equivalent of roughly two hundred megatons. And there was the loudest explosion ever heard on earth. Of course the exact effective any impact will be based on the asteroid's composition and the location and angle of impact. Still any impact with this man and eric covering thousands of square kilometers creating an impact crater more than five kilometers cross and triggering major land or cease niamey's depending on where it fell. That'd be huge seismic activity probably volcanic eruptions would be triggered by it and it would generate climate changing debris clouds. Luckily his astronomers gathered more detailed observations of offices orbit. They're able to eliminate the possibility of a twenty twenty-nine impact. Still a puff would make a very close approach missing the planet surface by just thirty one two hundred kilometers closer than the orbit. Geostationary satellites and the close approach will be visible from europe africa and western asia. In fact it'll be the closest asteroid size in recorded history becoming as bright as magnitude three point one and visible with the unaided eye from rural dhaka's suburban areas and clearly visible with innocuous from most locations and the story doesn't end there. There was a very real possibility. That profits twenty. Twenty-nine close encounter with the earth would send the asteroid through what's not as a gravitational ko an area of space just eight hundred meters wide. Which would set up. The asteroid on an impacting dejected. Exactly seven years later on april the thirteenth. Twenty thirty six now. The good news is that as observations continue to further refine the prophecies orbit the likelihood of an impact continued to decline until eventually it was ruled that completely in two thousand thirteen the twenty thirty six close encounter was moved to late march and the distance from earth closest approach increased somewhere between eight point four and thirty five point. Three two million kilometres safe fly by a is expected to gain closely. Approach the earth in twenty sixty six and twenty sixty eight. The twenty sixty six close encounter was never going to be a concern and neither was the two thousand sixty eight close approach that was at least until new calculations by astronomer david thornton from the university of hawaii uncovered some warring information them and colleagues noted that earlier researchers had failed to account for the aqap. Ski effect now. We've spoken about this before on space time. He kaczynski effect is caused by the sun. Heating of the day side of an object and this haiti stored in the rocks on the surface and then as this object rotates in its natural course of events that haiti's radiated back out into space on the nighttime side in the process. Degenerates a tiny measurable amount of thrust. Which over long periods of time does have an affect on an asteroid. Dejected felon has told a meeting of the american astronomical society's division for planetary sciences that the new data shows that the kaczynski effect is pushing office to one side. And it's pushing it with enough force caused it to drift by proximate. One hundred and seventy meters per year and with this new information added to a officers orbital path. It does bring it much closer to the earth. Now while there's still no indication at policies likely to impact the earth in twenty twenty nine or thirty six the twenty sixty eight encounter could be if somewhat great concern to find out more andrew dangling speaking with astronomer professor. Fred watson we're gonna get smashed to oblivion by an asteroid the doomsday or no. I'm thinking well it's really interesting. Object and night. Yet his yeah. So apologies will have a close approach to earth on. Love the date on friday the thirteenth of april twenty. Twenty-nine we know that will happen. And we know that it will come within the ring fist. satellites we know that it will be visible to the united. I will be so nick this things. Three hundred meters across. But what we also know is that it won't hit this. So that is not that friday the thirteenth twenty twenty-nine is not going to be doing say the headlines read. You know you know that. Going to be several pipers that Gloom in twenty twenty nine. I just can't go to sell the pipe.

edwin hobble gary anita volcano krakatoa sean carroll niamey stein stu western asia david thornton aqap kaczynski dhaka eric haiti american astronomical society'
"david thornton" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

07:35 min | 1 year ago

"david thornton" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Break from show for a word from our sponsor the great courses plus you know when we look at the demographics of this show we fund their people age groups. Listen and they're listening because they have one theme common they have a love science and a love of learning. Okay that's two things and really. That's what the great courses plus is all about. it's a streaming service with thousands of engaging lectures from top professors an expert. It never ceases to amaze me how they attract so many of the world's best minds to the lecturing staff is quality learning at an affordable price two topics that always come up for discussion among space time listeners. A dark energy and dark matter grant you that can be difficult concepts to grasp but the great courses plus can come to your rescue. All those browsing. They cost list. I found this great twenty. Four part course called dark matter doc. Energy the ducks out of the universe led by theoretical physicist sean carroll. It examines key concepts of an expanding universe from nine stein to edwin hobble. If you have questions this is where you'll find the answers in plain english. Brilliant the great courses plus offers unlimited learning at a time when we need it most but without adding the pressure of homework or grades it's in-depth learning at your own pace and the great courses that makes it easy. You can learn anytime anywhere in the world. So join me and sign up with a great courses plus today either for yourself or as a gift for a friend and for us based timelessness is the editor advantage of being able to check out the entire great courses bus library for free. That's free access to any costs or lecture or you have to do is sign up using our special euro. That's the great courses plus dot com slash space. That way they'll know you came from us and you'll be hoping to support our show. That's the great courses plus dot com slash space and of course we've included the url details in the show notes and on our website. That's the great courses plus dot com slash space. And now it's back to our show. This is facetime. With stu. Would gary anita threat to earth is being posed by the asteroid apotheosis. The earth asteroid nine thousand nine. Forty two office. I triggered alarm goes back in twenty four when initial observations suggested there was a real possibility that the three hundred and seventy meter wide space. Rock would crash into the earth on april the thirteenth twenty. Twenty-nine such an impact would have had global consequences will be beyond the destruction. It would create ground zero. You see a office. Would impact the earth with kinetic energy equivalent to one thousand two hundred megatons of tnt now by comparison the biggest hydrogen bomb ever exploded the soviet. Union's czar bomba was around fifty seven megatonnes and the infamous 1883 eruption of the volcano krakatoa had the equivalent of roughly two hundred megatons. And there was the loudest explosion ever heard on earth. Of course the exact effective any impact will be based on the asteroid's composition and the location and angle of impact. Still any impact with this man and eric covering thousands of square kilometers creating an impact crater more than five kilometers cross and triggering major land or cease niamey's depending on where it fell. That'd be huge seismic activity probably volcanic eruptions would be triggered by it and it would generate climate changing debris clouds. Luckily his astronomers gathered more detailed observations of offices orbit. They're able to eliminate the possibility of a twenty twenty-nine impact. Still a puff would make a very close approach missing the planet surface by just thirty one two hundred kilometers closer than the orbit. Geostationary satellites and the close approach will be visible from europe africa and western asia. In fact it'll be the closest asteroid size in recorded history becoming as bright as magnitude three point one and visible with the unaided eye from rural dhaka's suburban areas and clearly visible with innocuous from most locations and the story doesn't end there. There was a very real possibility. That profits twenty. Twenty-nine close encounter with the earth would send the asteroid through what's not as a gravitational ko an area of space just eight hundred meters wide. Which would set up. The asteroid on an impacting dejected. Exactly seven years later on april the thirteenth. Twenty thirty six now. The good news is that as observations continue to further refine the prophecies orbit the likelihood of an impact continued to decline until eventually it was ruled that completely in two thousand thirteen the twenty thirty six close encounter was moved to late march and the distance from earth closest approach increased somewhere between eight point four and thirty five point. Three two million kilometres safe fly by a is expected to gain closely. Approach the earth in twenty sixty six and twenty sixty eight. The twenty sixty six close encounter was never going to be a concern and neither was the two thousand sixty eight close approach that was at least until new calculations by astronomer david thornton from the university of hawaii uncovered some warring information them and colleagues noted that earlier researchers had failed to account for the aqap. Ski effect now. We've spoken about this before on space time. He kaczynski effect is caused by the sun. Heating of the day side of an object and this haiti stored in the rocks on the surface and then as this object rotates in its natural course of events that haiti's radiated back out into space on the nighttime side in the process. Degenerates a tiny measurable amount of thrust. Which over long periods of time does have an affect on an asteroid. Dejected felon has told a meeting of the american astronomical society's division for planetary sciences that the new data shows that the kaczynski effect is pushing office to one side. And it's pushing it with enough force caused it to drift by proximate. One hundred and seventy meters per year and with this new information added to a officers orbital path. It does bring it much closer to the earth. Now while there's still no indication at policies likely to impact the earth in twenty twenty nine or thirty six the twenty sixty eight encounter could be if somewhat great concern to find out more andrew dangling speaking with astronomer professor. Fred watson we're gonna get smashed to oblivion by an asteroid the doomsday or no. I'm thinking well it's really interesting. Object and night. Yet his yeah. So apologies will have a close approach to earth on. Love the date on friday the thirteenth of april twenty. Twenty-nine we know that will happen. And we know that it will come within the ring fist. satellites we know that it will be visible to the united. I will be so nick this things. Three hundred meters across. But what we also know is that it won't hit this. So that is not that friday the thirteenth twenty twenty-nine is not going to be doing say the headlines read. You know you know that. Going to be several pipers that Gloom in twenty twenty nine. I just can't go to sell the pipe.

edwin hobble gary anita volcano krakatoa sean carroll niamey stein stu western asia david thornton aqap kaczynski dhaka eric haiti american astronomical society'
"david thornton" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"david thornton" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"They're letting in Arrowhead. You and this is an air head is what the argument of the loud stadium so it's going to be really, really strange. But I'm excited to see football, man. I can't wait now for those who might not know your story. Your old man was a police officer back in California, and you played a number of years in the league Pro Bowler fans here in India. Remember your time with the Colts. So let me ask you this if you are picked up on a roster right now. And the team gets together and says You know what? Screw the police. We're all going to take a knee before the game. How do you address that? Knowing what your old man did for a living? Well, first, I would have to say that I mean being in these difficult conversations with teams and meetings and having the discussions wanna want on small groups? It's really never Bin. So one sided. You're gonna have obviously have a roster of 90 guys. So you're never going to get everybody to agree on the same thing you're gonna have, if if guys aside the Neil, you're goingto doesn't have guys kneeling standing hand of their heart embracing each other linked arms. Some teams, I think, maybe staying inside the locker room during national anthem. You decided to stand up, though, and a lot of your other teammates aside, have taken me. Does that make you like the bad guy in the locker room? And and that's where the that's where it gets really kind of messy because obviously what's been going on and in the protests and rioting and these awful things going on with the police. There is no question that there are some bad things going on with. Police brutality if you if you want to call it that or just lack of training and all there's no. I've been talkto one police officer. My dad, including my brother included, who's active right now that Doesn't see what's going on as being disgusting and awful. And it puts its such a bad mark on their profession. Because honestly, these thes men and women love what they're doing, and they want to do better and do it's right. The good cops are as pissed off as pretty much anybody at the backgrounds, no question, and not only that, it's just you know, they don't They can't afford to take the day off and say I'm not working today. You know, my brother is right there in the thick of the riots and protests and near Oakland and, um You know, it's scary. It's scary to be a police officer, and but at the end of the day, it's it's one of those things were all always support the great ones who wear the badge of the right reasons. And I will always speak up against the wrong You can't imagine what it was like for somebody. It must have been like for somebody being relative much Leslie brother, who was right in the thick of the riots, and in those Protest. He would have been checking on him every day. Yeah, Scary it is. I mean, he would work those late shifts and be out there for, you know, 34 days at a time with very little rest. And you know, people have to understand that these These men and women out there are sleep deprived and they're scared, just like everyone else's. They're on edge, just like everyone else is. They don't want to be like out there for these reasons. But they do it because they, you know, pay the note, and they were that badge because that's their duty, and that's their job. How much do politics get discussed in a locker room right because prior to all this stuff going on, you know, sports fans. We just think you guys were in there. It's camaraderie. You're talking about the game. But do you guys get into serious discussions like politics and the presidential race and racial injustice When you guys were all in there together? My experience is not really. I can't imagine what discussions were going on now with Were you in the league? When Colin Kaepernick thing all went down a few years ago, you were still lead. Watch it. Yeah, we had guys on the On the team, Neil that I was in 1000 Jacksonville. We were in London playing against the Ravens. That's right. I remember that, Trump said. Some remarks and that really pissed a lot people often and it led to a lot of people kneeling and whatnot. But remember that you know, I've been involved in the discussions I've been, you know, with the Colts here, you know, our community here is pretty tight knit. We had a great leadership from David Thornton and You know Robert Mathis and military and other guys that really wanted to pull guys together, sit with city officials chief of police You know the F o p. I mean, there's been there's been those discussions, and obviously we haven't had Ah, a solution. But you know, now it's even even more important. I think, because now it's in every sport really tryingto do something and create a positive impact. And I really enjoyed the statement that the players in coach right Those guys over the Colts put out a week or two ago and really kind of their initiative for the year. You know whether it's player voting or just educating guys on the voting process. I'm just getting involved with Other initiatives in the city, and it's not just one specific thing. I mean, there's a lot of things that need to be addressed since it's it's well outside of just the police brutality thing..

Colts officer Neil Arrowhead India football California Colin Kaepernick David Thornton Oakland Leslie Robert Mathis Jacksonville Trump London Ravens
The Science of Mindfulness with Thorsten Barnhofer, Amit Bernstein and Dave Vago

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

06:59 min | 2 years ago

The Science of Mindfulness with Thorsten Barnhofer, Amit Bernstein and Dave Vago

"Our guest. Today are David Vago. They've welcome to the PODCAST. Good to see you again Ted. Thanks so much for inviting us. It's really a pleasure it to be here with you. So much and Thurston Barnes Thurston. Welcome to the PODCAST. I said thank you for the invitation says present here and Amy Bernstein. I mean welcome nice to meet you I thanks very much. So let's begin by just talking a little bit about about how the three of you connected for this special issue of current opinions in psychology. What happened? How did you guys connect about about this? Particular topic. Wants to take that one who wants to take that one or you have to start amidst I should. I should start when you were the originator. I'LL START I think we'll talk a bit about The how the idea for this project came about and also how it really grew and changed and evolved after David Thornton. I started to work on together after we reached out to the field to to think through it developed a just initially. I had just sort of looked for two colleagues that I knew in respected did and liked I thought would ring. Perspectives that More commentary and that represented sort of different different not only this disciplinary perspectives but also sort of different communities of global. Mindfulness research in practice optus community. And so that's it was really just sort of sort of to a sort of thing. And they were nice enough to agree the little bit of convincing but the arm twisting on this guy I remember you saying something like Oh it will take much of your time is is out about something like that and how it went. When did I was telling talking earlier about when we actually met? I don't know in the two of you met. I remember meeting Thorson in Birmingham remember. Thurston your two thousand third scene. That was an impressive member of the year in. Did your your number either Hauer when you and I met. I can't remember I do I think it was the SP SP meeting and the sex Anak Society of one of those Social Sidka meetings that everyone goes to which was that one call the. It's or a clinical on that day fresco organized a table and And there was a meet and we were in a panel together new Judd and Oh yeah Oh yeah. ABC He'd be ready to yes. Ruth Bear Myself Judd. And you it yes in Chicago veteran Chicago you look it up or may have been actually Nashville Nashville. I go to Nashville thinker. So this is what happens. You get a video target or the oldest oldest chat for long and that's part of the intent of the guest is giving voice to him so great and Thurston Hubbub. That would probably I don't know how many years ago that was me but that was a while ago and that's when I I we I think we what we connected on on was The dialogue you had a nice way of teasing out answers to some of the difficult questions at thought. And that was you. I'm that that struck me as being You know a powerful tool in this discussion that we're having really about how contemplacion's good thing for us us in terms of mental health physical health right so that was the first time I thought that we we could potentially work again together. And then you reached out again I think or we reached out to get together. We saw each other at the mind and life Concluded studied and Thurston. How about you you and David touted you to meet you? RECALL THEY SA- longtime buck. Actually we must have met said minded knife some research institutes on so I remember exactly the it is through this community docks. We met since Michigan's Michigan's and kind of state and dialogue. I think thoughts does the networks thoughts cantonized allotted for war. We've we've reported on in the current opinion machine so let's talk a little bit about that and wondering how the just the idea. Hi Dear for this special issue came up well. The editors of the strengths as its current opinions ecology the Journal. Oh and that it's unusual in that it has is kind of like Meta chief editors. They tried identify special issue. Editors Editors who really across a very very wide scope of ideas and methods and questions and they they thought about an issue on. Mindfulness would be timely and interesting and they reached out and I said no a few times because because just wasn't convinced that another special issue in another group of papers really merits asking people to take the time it takes to right. He's kind of academic papers. But I sort of wanting this kind of fantasy and sort of condition. Were we able to do something of scale and scope that would really be unique and would really potentially have impact. I'm on the field Something that would really involve field. Then that could be a really cool project. And I knew that I could but not do that would not be able to put that together Not Intellectually but also not in terms of connections to this community so that was the sort of initiated the first conversations with David Thorsten which was well. If if we if we did this how might we go about doing it. So that it really actually mattered really had meaningful impact in the field. Do

Thurston Barnes Thurston Ruth Bear Myself Judd Nashville Thurston Hubbub David Vago Thurston Michigan David Thornton Chicago Optus TED David Thorsten Sex Anak Society Amy Bernstein ABC Thorson David Hauer Contemplacion Birmingham
"david thornton" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

14:55 min | 2 years ago

"david thornton" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"What the cost would be and many different payment streams and I've been working on how the exact details to make that work I still working on the details she says well of course that has allowed others to come forward and recognize the fact she's been really straight forward Phil Book From The Washington Post Yeah I mean it's definitely does seem like something that has been seized upon by a lot of folks in port because she has been deliberately ekg in answering the question I mean Bernie Sanders is very upfront and says yes we're GONNA raise taxes but on the on the other end people are going to see a lot less than cost because their costs themselves are going to go down his deliberately tried to avoid seeing that probably to avoid having those those sound bites so now she's sort of stuck in this position yes she is stuck in this position and you know who the media has been so the media's fixated on two candidates let's just be honest here wight reporters of a certain set are enamored with adage Pete Buddha choose just a mayor from South Bend Indiana that's just a mayor is running some sort of expert on all sorts of things with puffed up you may and the media absolutely loves him loves him and he's going after Elizabeth Warren hard on the issue of her Medicare plan would she at one point to the support and well Jake Tapper decided needed to hold him accountable on this the attack is kind of confusing because as you know in two thousand eighteen you were asked whether you supported Medicare for all and whether insurance does not belong in healthcare and you tweeted back in part quote I judge politician Doohan's fourth and four I declare most affirmatively and indubitably unto the ages that I do favor Medicare for all as I do favor any measure that would help get all Americans covered so what happened to that two thousand eighteen medicare for all plants the substance is the same obviously my tone their reflected here being a little cheeky but you are supporting Medicare Crawling no longer are I think Medicare for all means everybody can get into Medicare and somewhere along the line this year politicians started saying that it's only me Nick for all if you eliminate all private coverage which is why I now talk about my plan with the language of Medicare for all who wanted but I think the issue here really isn't terminology not the issue is what is it that we're going to deliver and does it give everybody access to Medicare and choice my plan does both of those things it's what most Americans want it's what most Democrats want it's the best policy and I'm not having these problems describing how it's going to be paid for Oh Bernie yes she's not having these problems as well that's really because people haven't gotten super into the details with him because everyone's medium is an afterthought but he's within just if you points of winning in Iowa and I don't know that he can pull that off listen I still think that the the racist going to be between Sanders Warren and Biden and Warren is fire up the crowd although now is other with Bernie Sanders and sanders ice where he will be the gift that keeps on giving to Donald Trump because he is so radical well Chris Wallace also pointed out to Pete Buddha Jr which you need to understand this is the fatal flaw for Pete Buddha Judge and Chris Wallace get to it Kudos however the peop- Buddha judge for going on a Fox News show with Chris well the last time you and I talk was in August and I pointed out to you perhaps not to chart a blade that you were zero percent in the polls among African Americans there's a new poll out in the last few days here now at two percent support among African Americans when we last truck you described a big outrage to minority communities the African American community why isn't it working for me isn't about polls this is about making sure it is about the polls but in order to do well you need to deserve to do well and we're focusing on the substance of what I had offer voters want to know how their lives will be different and in the case of African American voters they WANNA know what my agenda is for black Americans we're putting forward the most comparable insist plan of any candidate to tackle systemic racism in this country it's everything from empowering black entrepreneurs and fuelling business development to me I'm sure we deal with discrimination in housing and in health to cutting incarceration in this country by fifty percent because we know that the criminal justice system disproportionately harms African Americans Here's a problem seriously this is this is a problem for Pete Buddha judge he can say that but black audiences are embracing the message he's he is something that white people like Pete Buddha just so you know it's an Internet meme it's a website among other things things white people like what is the there's a website it is white people like things white people like there was a there's a stuff white people Mike there's a a blog that takes aim at all all these sorts of things of of stuff white people like and Pete Buddha edge is just stereotypical of things white people actually like and most people still haven't heard of him African American voters black voters they they don't particularly care for him he doesn't have a great track record you should understand in his own town where he is mayor too he to the black community police police claims in the black community and the like but wight millennial reporters in Washington love that he is a white gay male old veteran they love the fact that he speaks multiple languages they I mean he is something that these white people like the but you can't win Democratic primary if people don't like you the number one pool of voters in a Democratic primary outside of Iowa we'll be black women black women dominate the Democratic primary structure and so he may be able to go from high would in Hampshire and you know there will be sold as others say hey he's GonNa get a huge bounce out of this and that balance will fuel his momentum but I'm just not sure that's the case actually if he can't make inroads right now with black voters he's going you have a hard time doing it moving forward and that's going to be a problem it's going to be a problem with an I'm sorry I I should confess being distracted at this moment Charlie's going to kill me I'm getting like five different text alerts that something went up on my website that had a big typo in it but it's later to boot aged so it's all directly relevant in fact if you go to the resurgent right now and you you see the post Buddha he gets a leg up in Iowa and this is David Thornton writing about this and it's worth noting here a recent polling to the Democratic primary night which shows that the state is up for grabs and the most recent candidates the surge is Pete boot `age according to a new poll he's jumped to third place now he surpassed Bernie Sanders five hundred likely democratic caucus goers shot Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren in a statistical tie with Buddha judge judged thirteen percent now I gotta the ruler politics averages Dave Thornton over resurgent points out yes he is definitely showing some momentum you can see the momentum and interestingly enough and is probably the most interesting point of all if you look at where the decline or we're Pete buttigieg growth comes from the growth comes from the decline of Joe Biden and Kamla Harris with Joe Biden Kamla Harris declining boots WJR started to go up and Bernie Sanders headed decline and then a rebound and Elizabeth Warren has has gone up and gone down she is now uh-huh less point she is at twenty point seven percent in the realclearpolitics average and Biden is at twenty one point Buddha Djidji sanders are now tied for third place in the real clear politics average he has certainly got some major momentum going for him right now he's also very much is unknown candidate who has it been probed by the media and I don't know that the media would pro- Buddha judge heavily in the same way they want Elizabeth Warren because he would be a demographic checkmark for the media having a gay president or a female president the media chose advanced but we have the black president we now need Female President we now need the gay president then we will need the transgender President Dowell of them they'll put the Hispanic president the at the back of the line the problem here for the he is exactly that Hispanic and black voters tend to be more socially conservative even in the Democratic Party Hispanic black voters tend to be more conservative and black women tend to be hesitant at the idea of having a white male gay president as their nominee and they also feel a deep sense of loyalty to Joe Biden but there's something else in the Democratic Primary Right now Elizabeth Warren has momentum with black voters she didn't and now she does and that's hurting Joe Biden in the process what may help Joe Biden though is shift with Bernie Sanders Cheer about the Sanders Rally Bernie Sanders had a massive rally over the weekend in Brooklyn yeah a bunch of hipsters in Brooklyn ironed out for Bernie Sanders which is just perfect he had Alexandru Calcio Cortez come and she uttered some really inane things as she is what to do sater's himself said some crazy things sanders of course championing the green new deal legislation real whole of fossil oh industry accountable it will create up to twenty million new jobs as we transformed flook foods the renewed help lead the world in combating climate change and say this blotted for our children and Future Generations Yep Yep the green new deal the green new deal is the panacea for the Democrats it will will save us from everything ourselves the environment foreign policy disasters the like well he was joined the rally by Alexandru Qazi accord yes added quality of education in the Bronx and they looked at fifty percents lockout race old at the inequity of education the inequity of education funding the fact that teachers weren't paid the fans that kids to buy a small house about forty minutes north of here and that's when I got my first taste of the country who allows their kids destiny to be determined by the ZIP code that they are born and so much of my life was shuttled between these two worlds and not just the world's between the Bronx and Westchester county but the continental us New York state and the realities of work the Rico where my family is to can I just say that she just articulated the best case for school choice among Democrats you would think she would want school choice her parents moved her to a different school district so she get a good education shouldn't every family have that right and yet she's opposed to it if you know this is the problem with Alexandra causing cortes I don't think she's dumb he's not thoughtful she she has seen the world through one lens in one area and she hasn't really travelled in fact you get the that's when she does some of her instagram's of traveling around the country the thing she experiences that she's never experienced before look at her and and the garbage disposal never experienced the garbage disposal before and someone who's lived that sheltered that naive I shouldn't say shelter but naive alive who is not that will travel to is not that well experienced in America as a whole outside of Brooklyn wants to make public policy decisions that affect three hundred fifty million of us which should horrify us all that's one good thing about the electoral college enforcing candidates to move around the country parts of the country they might never experience maybe now she will see some of that and have an awakening although I'm not GonNa hold my breath for that but he yeah she is articulating the same statement that conservatives make for school choice that we should let the parents should not have to pack up and move to a new location to get their kids better education they should have the opportunities within their community where they can get a better education and she's making that and yet she can't take the next step and say let's let everyone do this where they are in fact I suspect she's opposed to charter schools there's an interesting study out has kind of funny a buddy of mine his text seen me this from the Atlantic it was what I was GonNa talk about anyway he's a have you seen this yes polling suggests that Donald trump basis totally unified behind him no matter what investigations might reveal.

port Bernie Sanders Washington thirteen percent fifty percent forty minutes seven percent zero percent two percent
"david thornton" Discussed on CincyBrewcast

CincyBrewcast

09:32 min | 2 years ago

"david thornton" Discussed on CincyBrewcast

"Talk to the person sitting next to you and have some kind of connection because I think that's when you really boil it down. I think that's what drinking is about. It's about connecting somehow and that's you you know with the people around you sure as a species. That's what we want. We want connections we want we want to know that we're relevant and and you know a lot of that. Relevancy can come from going to a place that you might not have been earlier that day and you know finding somebody that you can talk talk to and we've done. We've got a great staff. we have a lot of the original staff that we have work in the the bar. we have a new bar manager that has been and fantastic we obviously brought nick on we've talked about Nick Berwick and you know he's bringing in another element to this kind of neighborhood feel so we just continued to grow we're coming up on one year which just completely blows my mind and for the one year we're releasing a bourbon barrel and I have been like every time I have to walk past those things sitting there. I'm tempted to like take the Corgan I'm push. I am so excited for those com- excited. Let's let's try another beer in the anniversary that is that is called. the honks make me hazy. It is our hazy. I hops thank you have confused so it's called the hops. Make me hazy. It is our hazy. Ip a it is an eight point nine percent which we were quite white shocked about but the we use the tropical yeast which seems to have really knocked down the alcoholic kind of burn to it yeah just a very nice beer but man it'll get you there. Quick it It's not as hazy some of the other ones out there. It's it's not that like super kind of thick there. There's something about some of them that they just don't really sit really well with me like it doesn't doesn't feel right after you've sat there and drank one or two of them. I want something that is a little I guess lighter on the Palate. Maybe you know and this this fits that bill perfectly it still has that soft kind of fruity nece again the talked about and really really good. Thank you Haiti's I feel like there's definitely two schools of people and this world right now either love them or you hate them. Yes and there's a lot of a lot of passion so I'll be honest. I've told everybody that's happening. I fought making a hazy for ten months. I really I thought it was gonna it was a fad beer one that was going to come and go and as we've talked about before my my whole purpose is to stay true to you know be recipes and make them as good as I've made the best I possibly can and I really fought making a hazy beer but it's lasted in the market long enough for me to make one and we came up with a extremely good recipe. I love drinking them. You just can't drink too many I definitely can understand and a lot of ways agree with the the of reluctance towards the style but the way I keep trying to figuring out in my head is that at one time you know these big west coast I B as we're kind of the same way people looked exactly what is this one of these stupid Americans don't and this is not the and then as time goes the style gets refined. The style becomes what it is now and I think that Hayes are getting there. I think that they're here. Stay pay people had to kind of figure out and then experiment with only put some real time some talent behind making them what they are truly convinced me. Finally was is realizing that he's he's been around for a long time. They just haven't been called Hayes. the fact that the you know they added more and more wheat to give it that kind of hazy look and hazy feel like you said when it gets in your stomach I mean I it sits. Most big weeded hazies sit very hard in your stomach but we backed off a little bit on the on the flaked wheat to Kinda give it a little more clear flavor to it but that's why we were shocked at the ABC that came out but I the way that we developed a hop and the east profiles it really kind of masks that it doesn't really hit you hard as an alcoholic beer breath. Even though it's an eight point nine one of those one of those dangerous ones you gotTa Watch out in the sunshine and you're a little quicker. Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah. Let's talk about the anniversary reversal debate. Use Your hinted at a celebration. Which of course there is? How can you not celebrate? We got really lucky. Our anniversary is on a Saturday this year October fifth. We have a couple of bands playing. I'm David Thornton and thing one and thing too. They're playing probably starting around four or five o'clock into the night and we have a historic barbecue from Lebanon whoo yeah they're going to be all day. I don't know for sure what time he's playing here and then again we released the the Bourbon barrel. Is that Bourbon Barrel Stop Stout hip. It's a we we did obey stout and originally we thought we were going to flavor it with two different flavors and we're GONNA go with the white chocolate raspberry and a cherry vanilla but the more and more we've tasted over the last ten months. We realize the beers just too good to mess with it's is going to be a very good base out with a great bourbon barrel to we used Heaven Hill Barrels which draws Rosza great bourbon flavor off of it so we're going to stick with it and go with a straight bourbon barrel and everybody's anxious to have it out including me. I'm excited to try and so we're going to get we're going to get some some help from a local brewer really good friend of mine to get those off and get those and and we're GONNA be offering it on tap tap only as long as it lasts which depending on how many people are here might not be a long long time. I'm taking a bunch of growlers home. Then our manager Mike EP who has a lot of cocktail cocktail experience he is working on cocktails for that day to some that incorporate our beer and then others that are just a cocktail. He's really creative with with that cocktails any other fun tapping you guys are doing that day and he kind and the small batch stuff that you're no not that day. We've we've got a couple of test batches. That'll probably be ready to go but we've got some other plans going into the holiday season for the test batches. People are going to want to pay attention to because we're going to get extremely creative. When we get around the holidays? We're also going to have our our our neighbors untapped too so we hope to have saunder and sixteen lots on tap since the three of us are the only Mason Burris we liked to do things like to support each other so let's try another beer and I wanna talk about that kind of community side of things a little bit all right so the next one you're going to have is the F. N. N. blamed in Irish read actually found this recipe somehow buried in the annals of a seventeen eighty you too recipe book it's it's actually got we added some we to to give it a little bit more body than you would expect from a normal read so it's a a little bit thicker creamier great tasting red beer. It did extremely well around Irish Day and we have had to keep it on tap ever since Oh oh yeah that's good because there's a lot of a lot of radials Irish reds that are just really crisp and almost a lot more hoppy especially on the radio kind of side people are just over hopping omen. This is that have big bold kind of body the F. which if you know going back to you know Saint Patrick's Day and you're you're hanging out like like this is something that I would really want to drink a day like that where you know it fills you up a little bit. It's a satisfying it's not just dumping more liquid within your stomach yeah it's it certainly got a full body mult palate we use an ekg on that from a hot perspective but it's very minimal we really wanted to to have the Maltby the the predominant flavor that comes out and we put it up against some other of the more popular reds that are out there and the closest that people have been talking about in granted. This is coming from you know people that drink a lot of a lot of master spirit. Smith is about as close as you can get but even in that they're saying it's much more body much audio. I can't think of any Irish read that I've had that as as as big bodied as I really liked this one a lot this is this is really good yeah. I'm actually getting ready to re free review that this week because we're running a little bit low but I think that perfect fall beer to come into these what.

"david thornton" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

12:38 min | 3 years ago

"david thornton" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"Checkout code is Eric it will change the way you sleep. So just one quick additional note on this scandal. And I'm already getting blown up by some for saying this. I get there's an interstate component to the crimes, but seriously, this is a college bribery scandal. Why is it a federal crime? Why are US attorneys evolve? Yes. Yes, you can say interstate commerce is somebody in California using the mail or wires to bribe someone in Connecticut, so just because a federal prosecutor can exert control over it doesn't necessarily mean the the they should what we're having more and more in this country is an over criminalization of things at the federal level. There are things certainly that should be federal crimes, but that doesn't necessarily mean they should be federal crimes in and this was a crime. This is bribing college officials using your money to bribe college officials test takers and others or test givers and others to ensure that your kid can get into a college is actually illegal. It's immoral. It is legal. You are putting your spoiled kid who is unaccompanied ahead of more accomplished less fortunate kids and doing so by rigging the system in ways that are not legal. But couldn't this have been dealt with at the state level. Yes, I get interstate commerce. I get all that. I was a lawyer. I understand these things, but I still don't necessarily think that it should be wh-what. We see more and more are US attorneys finding ways to basically make everything federal crimes, and I don't like that. I think we need less federal crime. We we ne- wrote remember up until the nineteen sixties with these essays, John Kennedy. It was not against federal all to assassinate the president of the United States. It was a state crime. That's why Jack ruby killed. What should be killed Leo Riyaz wold in a state facility? Not a federal facility. He was arrested under state law. It was only after that that they made assassinate the president a federal crime. We need to have less federal crime. And I'm not saying assignation shouldn't be one. But this bribing college officials through interstate commerce means to prosecute. I don't think. So when we come back we got to explore the Boeing situation with seven thirty seven eight max. Oh, this is hilarious. The New York Post is now noting that Olympia Jj Nellie Laurie. Laughlin daughter posted sponsored content on Instagram for Amazon prime featuring a photo of her and her new door room at the university of southern California with the caption officially college student. It's been a few weeks since I moved into my dorm. And I absolutely love it. I got everything I needed from Amazon with prime students and headed all ship to me and just two days. So wow, Laurie Lofton her husband they paid five hundred thousand dollars in exchange for having two daughters designated as recruits to the crew team university of southern California, despite the fact that they didn't participate in crew, and then a Livia Jade gets to college and becomes a social media influence or for Amazon prime cash there really are two America's aren't there? John Edwards was. Clearly right on that. My goodness gracious to the phones we go four four eight seven zero seven five zero one eight hundred WSB talk and from Roswell you're up next, welcome. Hi, erin. Hi. Thank you so much for taking my call. But I I heard the question I just want to know what the the big hoopla is not like it hasn't been going on forever. And how is this different from people who have the colleges where you have to be. They can only accept so many to this. And then they have to have room for minority students. Whether they meet the criteria are not how how is different, and that's the woman of color. I get I think I if I asked that question. Well, I think it's different because they're bribing people. They're not it's universities can have quotas. I think it's wrong. Spring for is said, it's fine. And they can sit aside quotas for people based on race or based on gender. But to bribe a university into for example, in the case of this Libya J girl and her sister paying five hundred thousand dollars to a crew coach to claim that they were on the crew team. Even though they weren't which denies to people who actually wanted to be on the crew team in the crew team and gets them into college scholarship. They otherwise did not qualify for and that college by the way gets federal money and federal money and title nine and whatnot are allocated based on spots available in sports and spots available in schools. So they're they're rigging the system in ways that aren't allowed. It would be one thing. If the daughter went in and said, you know what? Hey, I am on the crew team and was qualified. It was able to get in. That's fine. Or to say, hey, I'm a legacy my mom and my dad both would here. So you have to put me ahead of the pack. You know, schools have a right to prefer Lynch. Preferentially treat people whose kids go to the same school of the parents into but bribery is wrong bribery is wrong. And when you are using your money as a parent to bribe someone to lie you are wrong. And I hope that's clear to everyone that you're paying someone money to lie and that is wrong. It's wrong in all circumstances to pay someone money to lie, and you shouldn't do it. And they got caught. And now they're going to be carted off to jail. That's the big differentiation. Now, I wanna go to the Boeing situation into kick it off just to give you an idea of how big a new story. This is this is the opening segment on CNN this morning mission this morning, I've grown. Number of airlines are grounding going seven thirty seven max eight after the deadly crash that killed all one hundred fifty seven people on board at this point. The FAA is not telling you carriers not to fly it, but they will quote continuously assess its safety as investigators try to figure out what caused the new plane to fall from the sky minutes after takeoff. It is unclear if there is a link between this crash and the lion aircrash in Indonesia, just a few months ago. We're also learning more about the victims include two brothers from California and twenty one United Nations staffers who were on their way to an environmental conference. What is left unsaid in a lot of the coverage is that pilots from third world countries. Increasingly lack the hours in the air than American pilots have. The Ethiopian air co-pilot only had two hundred hours of flight time, which is absurd. When you think about the flight time that American pilots have thousands of hours before taking over a plane. We in this country tend to have a fairly direct link between pilots in the air force going into commercial aviation and being well paid to fly you across the country and around the world. Boeing came out with the seven thirty seven max eight and one of the things they did is David Thornton commercial pilot rights at the resurgent dot com. My site actually put this up earlier today, you can go to the research it and find the story the engines on the Boeing seven thirty seven max eight are pushed forward slightly but enough to affect the aero-dynamics a little differently from your standard seven. Remember, the seven thirty sevens popular plane in the world. Almost every airliner in the in the world has seven thirty sevens. Not all of them have the the eight max, however in the past with Boeing jets when you stall a plane, he when you stole the plane, you take off if the plane's nose is too high. It interrupts the airflow over the wings and the plane dips and Kim crash and Boeing has a computer program that if the plane gets if the nose gets too, high the computer program takes over and dips the plane to prevent a stall and all the other Boeing planes, including all the other versions of the seven thirty seven. If you maneuver the stick on the plane, it turns off that computer program Boeing decided to do something different with the Maxine and one of the reasons that decided to do something with the Maxine that was different. They went from moving the stick to pushing a button you push button to turn it off. And the reason they did that is because of the decline of qualified pilots round the world. Third world countries. They wanted to make it as easy as possible for someone with minimal experience to be able to fly a plane because this is the reality in third world countries. Now, there are plenty of countries in the world whose airlines aren't even qualified to fly into the United States. There's an Indonesian airliner, for example, that's not allowed to fly to the United States because the FAA will certify that. They're pilots are safe. There are more and more airlines like this around the world where there's a shortage of qualified pilot. So basically, they they hire bus drivers to fly planes in Boeing and Airbus need to make it as easy as possible to fly those planes. One of the hard parts of flying the planes take off and landing and one of the hard parts of that is stalling the plane the noses up too high the plane could crash in. So Boeing has made it very easy for the plane's computers to take over to prevent a stall. American pilots tend to instinctively know what to do. They're not gonna stall the plane. The problem here is that Boeing handled. It's the situation rather era gli minor stating from this Dave Thornton piece in from reading other pieces is that when Boeing decided to change the seven thirty seven four Matt from moving the stick on the plane to turn off the stall control computer to push the button, they never actually put that in the training manual. You'll let me say that again every other Seventy-seven out there, you move the stick to turn off the stall of computer system, and with this when you push a button, but they forgot to put it in the training manual, American pilots tend to be trained so much go through so many flight simulation programs. They know to turn off the button instead of handle the stick on the seventy seventy next. That's why the FAA is not saying ground all these planes because it's a matter of remembering to push the button instead of handling the stick. But other pilots around the world, the FAA. Vouch for them. And clearly there who aren't getting the training simulator time, they need to be able to know that this is a problem. So the grounding the planes and Boeing's going to have to go back there make it more more clarified. There's also a suggestion coming out this afternoon that maybe just maybe the Boeing computer program is overcompensating more than it should that in and of itself as a problem. The reason the FA though is not grounding seventy seven eight max planes of this country is that pilots in this country overwhelmingly coming out of the air force or overwhelmingly trained in simulators overwhelmingly have flight time in simulators before getting on any one of these planes as a result. They know even if it's not in the manual that on this version plan, you push the button and other parts of the world that's not happening. So they're grounding the planes, but while there may have been pilot error this Boeing also made a big mistake. Apparently when it didn't put notice in the training manual that they were changing the format for deactivated the Saul program, and that's gonna come back to haunt him. I

Boeing FAA bribery United States Amazon president California university of southern Califor US Eric Jack ruby WSB Dave Thornton John Kennedy Saul Connecticut Leo Riyaz
"david thornton" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"david thornton" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"I have a clock to pay for my own money. Come you next door? Don't give me the money for the Clapham, put you in jail. Like the federal government did still does. You can think of this as you take on on their on. What are you know? Nothing's going to change. Doesn't mean we don't throw it right in their face. David Thornton yours forever. Archive their own dot com. We will do something about. Academics. Character building leadership and preparation for God directed life are key components of the curriculum Livingston Christian schools in Brighton LCS students. Learn more than just academics. They are taught that to succeed in the world. They need to respect adults and their peers, and to take responsibility for what they say and do have Christian students. Not only learn what God has done for them. But also how they need to represent God in and out of school from elementary through high school L CS students are encouraged daily in their spiritual growth through chapel services bible classes and lunchtime bible studies each fall Livingston Christian high school students enjoy a spiritual retreat and each time. The young.

Livingston Christian high scho David Thornton federal government Clapham Brighton
"david thornton" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

08:00 min | 3 years ago

"david thornton" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Thomas Jefferson birthday, and there are also many states fourteen of them that don't even observe president's day. But it got me thinking about the proper etiquette for flags and and torn flags and how the flags are dirty, and we've got some gifts to give away. But before we get back to the phones. Jeff tell me about a flag life expectancy. Well, the flag industry and the US government did a study, and they found the average life expectancy of a cotton or nylon flag. When flown sunrise to sunset, but not during periods of implement whether or not high winds or hail or anything was about ninety days. Wow. Only three months and if flown twenty four hours a day it could last only one fourth that time period so three to four weeks. Now, most people will find that very surprising and say, that's I thought flags lasted a lot longer. Well, there's different materials, and I find those those estimates conservative here in Colorado after doing this for about Twenty-three years. I've found that the average life expectancy of nylon flag. Or a polyester flag nylon flag first of all to be about five to six months on average. And that's one flown twenty four hours a day. And that can vary based on high winds, we get winds seventy eighty miles an hour or more and that can affect the flag life expectancy. And there's a two ply heavy duty polyester flag that's gonna last even longer than that. Twice the life expectancy of a of a nylon flag. So six to nine months, maybe interested so many things affect the the life expectancy the flag, mostly wind pollution ultraviolet light at this altitude. So we get so much more sunlight in UV at this altitude. So it's gonna fade the flags more flags that are closer to I seventy you're twenty-five. We're going to get a lot more pollution and stuff trapped in the fabric. So that's going to affect how they look and. It depends. You you've gotta like down on Havana, you got a couple of car dealerships with a hundred hundred and twenty foot flagpoles. Yeah. Those flags are thirty by sixty feet eighteen hundred square feet, and they're above everything above the buildings trees, and they're going to catch everything. So their life expectancy may be different. They and they certainly will get tattered a lot sooner than other flags that may be in front of your house. Do they are you allowed to clean a flag? Absolute right, clean. It. You can put it in the washing machine. Oh, you can't don't use a chlorine bleach liquid chlorine bleach. A color safely is fine. People have taken their flags to dry cleaners. Some have been known to do it for free. I'll be darned back to the phones we go. And we say, hi, hi, David Thornton. Dave. Thanks for holding your on eight fifty. I mean, you're on KOA. Hey, guys, are you doing this afternoon work? Great. Yeah. I was calling to they wanted to know the proper height on a flight Kuala when you bring it down to half mast 'cause I sometimes feed a flag so low it's almost hitting the top of cars that are parked underneath it. Well, half-staff is half staff. Vets. It's an approximate. You know, you've got to stand back and look at us some people may lower the flag a little bit too much or too little. So they got to get that. Right. Thanks for the call. Dave. Michael Bennett, you're on KOA. What's up? I had a quick question for you. So my brother got killed in Afghanistan in two thousand seven. They subsequently named the firebase after him and then subsequently after that three years later, they closed the base down. I am in possession of the last US flag flown over that firebase. And if it hangs in my office at work, and I do bring it home on flag day, and I fly it I've gotten some pushback or. Implacable flying dirty flag, I refuse to wash. Now flag. Do the significance of to me. Personally. Need to get a new flag or am. I okay flying that flag. Well, I think it's really important that you have that the flag in your possession. And and the significance of it means more to you. And I wouldn't I wouldn't throw that flag way. I wouldn't I wouldn't. I suppose you can try to get it dry cleaned a little bit if you want. But if you feel that the flag is is too fragile. Then I would just leave it as I think I think what he's asking is because his brother was killed there. And because that was the last flag ever at that base. He never wants to clean it touch it or whatever I guess question is should he go out and get another flag to hang at his office or to have it flag day and just keep this one in his house. What do you think I think that's a great idea? And where would he get one of those flags, Jeff? Well, you can call us. Mountain play. Let me ask you something. Michael. Are you Araki's nuggets avalanche fan? None of the above. None of the above. How about a flat? Oh, you know, what you don't even have to buy a flat. I got a flag set for you brand new. Okay. I got a brand new flag for you. I'm gonna put you on hold. You got a brand new flag? Come and I appreciate that. But I I just have to say I'm gonna Pittsburgh boy that was born raised. So well this is an American flag. And I think Pennsylvania is now in the union. So you're gonna be okay hold on. And don't don't leave. We've got an American flag. Let's see if we can get one more in before the top of the hour. Let's say hi to Michael in little ten year on KOA. Lou great to hear you again on the radio. Well question for Jeff. Is using the flag officer clothing is that ideal is that allow to have it even on napkins for fourth of July party? Are you allowed to have that? Well, the the US flag code is very specific about that. And the flag. The American flag should not be used as an article of clothing. Here's the difference articles of clothing napkins things of that nature stuff. That comes out around Memorial Day, fourth of July, that's red white and blue that's got stars and stripes on it. That's not the American flag. That's a combination of stars and stripes. So there's no disrespect intended there. And you're okay. But if you get an American made flag, and it's got fifty stars. And it's intended to be flown out in front of your home. This is the place you see it usually see an Olympic athlete after they win a gold medal. They wrap themselves in the American flag. They're not supposed to be doing that. It's not supposed to be intended. It as an article of clothing. Okay. Makes sense. Hey, how about you? Are you a nuggets avalanche Iraqis fan? Rocky fan. All right. Hold on. You've got Rockies flag coming. Listen. I appreciate you coming on. Jeff. I think this was great. We're gonna do this. Another time. And. Let's see. I was just thinking guy. We still got Mike Klis at five. Oh five. Yeah. Do you wanna know what we'll leave that? And so do is. I'll thank you very much for coming. I'm gonna keep those two flags. We'll give those out, ladies and gentlemen. Rocky Mountain flag dot com. Rocky Mountain flag company, Jeff Tomsic. And if you have any more questions feel free to give him a call. We're going to take a quick time out Cory Lopez at the top of the hour. Mike Klis at five oh five. You're listening to the fifty thousand water KOA.

Jeff Tomsic US Michael Bennett Dave Rocky Mountain Mike Klis Colorado Thomas Jefferson Cory Lopez president gold medal Pittsburgh David Thornton Havana Afghanistan Araki Lou
"david thornton" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

16:58 min | 3 years ago

"david thornton" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Funding comes from your time in Chicago, southern Illinois university sketch writing and performing came into play in college. But but you were writing sketches in elementary school. Weren't you? Yeah. Well, mostly I started in junior high at Jefferson junior high school in Naperville, and I had a couple of teachers there who encouraged me to write sketch comedy pizzas that were informational as part of my projects in believe that was seventh grade. And that was really the start for me, those teachers I wrote five four or five sketches over the course of a year, and we performed them to the class laughs. Yeah. And we've got some great grades. They got a lot of encouragement from the teachers for that. There's no doubt that that was a an important thing for me that made me feel like. Which was a skill. I might it took a long time for me when you live in Chicago when you live in Naperville, you live in the outskirts of a bigger city, you know, the idea of show business is so far away from where you. It took me a long long time to just imagine that I could actually legitimate for me to try and even being in the burbs. You listen to Chicago radio growing up here. Who were your influences who are some of the guys you listen to growing up? Well, look, Steve absolutely number one influence for me in if you're talking Chicago radio, I think I related to his anarchic sense of humor is cynicism and his. Sarcasm which weirdly, Steve is from California. But very Chicago. I mean, there's a reason he'd been the air and Chicago for most of his career in Chicago. Yeah. There's a very Chicago point of view on the world, which is you know, skeptical and. Very down to earth. And maybe even at times a little mean. But always too good. Yeah. I agree with you. Down on the floor full of themselves. How man we had? We had so many radio greats here in Chicago as well. What about those like I can't ask a question on a station with WGN without Bob bell bell played bozo. When I was a kid and even through my teen years, he was one of the most naturally funny. I'd put him next to Bill Murray as. The funniest Chicago ever. Yeah. They're both naturally easily without trying. So like, a belief funny and. Yeah. I mean, that's just to be envied. And and treasure the point of view of bell. And that he had in the same. Of course, I love Bill Murray. Yeah. I've heard you do a little Bob elbows before you're you're damn close. Man. It's almost like yours right there. It was a little guy. Yeah. It is true. But you know, what was he was? He was entertaining kids, but he was entertaining every adult in that room, right? Any adult watching without being remotely scatalogical remotely? Yeah. He was you were just it was his point of view. And it was his. Good natured. You know, kind of ironic dance. He he was a genius. And I I sure wish he'd done some sketch comedy or any kind of adults had performance. Comedy. I don't know what his story was always be curious about what kind of guy he actually was. And and what he has to in life because the my point of view, he could have been anything could have been a movie star. And you know, you never know with the Chicago in weather, you know, some sometimes people make the choice to just go. Yeah. That's okay. I like living in Chicago. And I like being around my kids and raising my family and being being a dad, and I don't need to spend my whole life. Forgive over my whole life to some career. And and I I really yeah. I love bell. And if only I could be touched by some of the natural humor of of those great chicagoland's that would be the gifts of all time and two great ones, you mentioned there and Monty python was a big influence for you too. Channel eleven they played it on channel eleven channel eleven plate. I mean was like my guiding light really, it was I mean, the smartness of it the absurdity of it the silliness of it adults doing material that was that Chile was like spoke to me spoke to my heart and made me happy and a deep deep way. But also channel eleven played other British show me like the goodies. And. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And I don't know who played Marty Feldman's comedy machine. I think that was on network, but that was similar thank guys help with that. I believe and and so they're British comedy that came through channel eleven. Really got into my head the to Ronnie's watch the to Ronnie's. Young and they played it there. And channel eleven so you know, that really got into my head and and helped me develop the voice that I had in comedy. So you have all that. And all that influence that you grew up with then you're at second city. You're you're studying with del close. You meet Robert smuggled there, then you start writing for Saturday Night Live. I mean, this is the pattern the journey of your career is always amazing to me. It's a weird journey. You know, look for all that, you know, I. The whole scene in Chicago is different than it is now there were fewer classes and second city really only have these they they weren't very structured classes. So I actually took place at a place called the players workshop of second city, which had a more structured program that took about a year and a half to complete and and felt like it really got you somewhere and. David Thornton that ravaged cycle there. But I also did comedy at southern Illinois university with my friend, Tim Thomas. I did a show called the prime time special. We have a lot of fun. I did a show that was kind of like mister show, which I later did on HBO, which kind of a semi themed sketch show, we love nothing short of brilliant. Thank you. Thanks. I I I had such freedom at mister show HBO. Let us do whatever we wanted. And they actually actually truly didn't care if anybody watched as long as people felt they should while they created a ruckus, we'll think about made. Yeah, I'm sorry. But think about this. So when the Cher show went on the air compared to today, you said there was there was limited places that do a lot of stuff. There was limited networks are that would even air something like this that was ground breaking in and of itself being on HBO. Oh, absolutely. There were not many alternate. Places to do a show to do an original show. We will we were very lucky the right executives at the right time. And to some extent HBO was not yet fashionable, and that's that can be a very good thing. Because until they had the sopranos and sex in the city, right? They didn't have success that they were trying to duplicate they weren't. There was nothing to duplicate. They didn't have any success. So we were we came in and a quarter of the market and got the just do our things for years. I was geeking out watching some of the shows pre-tape column show is probably still my favorite. It's still my favorite some great catches. I mean, really the thing that drove me in writing. And creating that show was was great schedule work. I love Bob and Ray, and of course, now typed on and I loved Peter Cook and Dudley Moore and their work. I just love great sketches. And to me, Mr. show when we did it, right? We did number one. We did a couple really great sketches like the audition pre-tape pollen show young people in their companions the story of Everest lie detector. The. Commercials of the future was another great one change for a dollar was another favorite. Yeah. A lot of solid sketches with great ideas, well-executed beginning middle and end and a kind of. The leaning too much on. The moment. Just just you could do them now. And you'd get the same laughs, you know, you'd get just as good a reaction from an audience. I think I think the the burgundy loaf is a great one restaurant. It's so fancy that. It doesn't have toilets. It is. Classic. But now here you are an HBO, and they're kind of giving you the freedom to do what you want. Did you ever you know, when you sat down with with with David cross? Did you ever have an argument over sketch in the writer's room about the content of the joke or the sketch itself? I mean or did did everything kind of. Yeah. We the arguments were this HBO gave his total cedar. They asked us to cut one line, which is so awful and crew that I can't even say it to you on the radio. I know what it is. You'd have to bleep it out. It was you know, but we like being provocative and edgy. Yeah. But we always ask ourselves. Who are we actually making fun of with the sketch? So we were playing somebody who is mentally dim. We would ask ourselves. Yeah. But we don't want to actually make fun of people who have mental issues. That's how funny and it's not okay. So is are we sure that because we don't want to do that. So oftentimes, you know, when you do comedy, you do stuff that you talk about sex may be or you talk about challenging things that provoke people that that already get them sitting on the edge of their seat, which can turn into a laugh, if you break it the right way, if you turn it the right way. But you have to ask yourself whose who's being torn down with us and make sure it's somebody or something that maybe deserves it and not somebody who doesn't deserve it. And and then we get a lot of stuff that was kind of. But I don't know. Wasn't really. Critical of anything. It was just pointing out. I think that people are strange creatures. I mean, we did the the black black clan leader in our first season. And. It's really funny. You know, he's talking about the new KKK, and it's not about race anymore and all these hobbies. Right. Right. You you can't help. But laugh at how stupid and silly. It is, but you also kind of go why is this funny? What is this about you know, and you can't really put your finger on it? It's just fun to take something and turn it that way. And and at the same time, there's something that almost makes you go. I actually think that could happen. And and we're so we're so worried about political correctness these days, we just need to laugh and do's, and what this is the type of stuff that we need. I think just just to make people laugh this is it's all a joke. It's all for fun. And and and I think we've lost. I think the one thing that irks me is that the piece that is upsetting you. Advertised as comedy is is clearly setup as comedy if it takes place in a comedy club in a comedy theatrical show, if a stand up comedian is doing a stage, then you I. You have to. You have to recognize that everyone has there's a basic agreement that this is not then except as a provoker of laughter. It doesn't make you laugh all then they failed. Yeah. Polemic? It's not a person lecturing, you know. The difficult part is when you get into things like Twitter, I think really kind of people did things on Twitter. Four they figured out. What Twitter meant to everyone else? They send people they said, oh the form for my jokes. And that had not been established yet. And in the end, that's not what Twitter is I think a lot of comedians in particular thought, oh what a perfect. It's just a stage for my comedy jokes. Right. But the thing is that that isn't what had been established yet about what Twitter was and and so I think now we're finally after all the years getting closer to what Twitter is to other people. And that's what defines it, you know. But at the same time, I don't think it's fair to have a person go in a comedy club and see a comedian and a comedian does provocative material, and then walk out and treat it like they went and saw a political speech. Yeah. Then they're walking in there. Wasn't right. Yeah. Then their attention walking in. There wasn't rag. If you were if you were going there to laugh, then you're in the wrong place. Right. Right. And and and you cannot let you cannot laugh that's for sure that's up to you. And and if a comedian is not making people laugh than he's failing. So if he's doing all kinds of rude, crude stuff and saying nasty things and you're not laughing. Well, he's the loser in that inner change you can't take what set in there and walk out. Go. This person believes that they spoke to me about it. They said that's what they believed comedy is a way of being honest, but it's a roundabout way of being honest. And if you really want to tell people what you think we'll go ahead and write an essay and put it in the paper, and there's a million places for that as well. Inform different. So anyway, I think it's been hard for everyone in the audience sometimes to figure out, and we have these like entirely new platforms. And we just haven't sorted out yet. What what we're doing on them yet? So we're all agreed is happening there. Yeah. I hit. I hear comedians and writers and actors say all the time how much mister show was an influence on their careers. I think that's pretty cool. I think it's super cool. I'm very proud of influencing people, and I hope that what they took some it is that. We'd really cared about doing it. Well, doing the mechanics of this sketch right more than more than we cared about. Same or? Anything? We we were like nerdy gets writers. That's what we were. And and to a weird extent. I think it's one of the reasons we inspired a lot. And then I think people like he had peel took what we did. And they made it more popular than we made it because they're just I mean in particular, Keegan Michael key is one of the most likeable human beings walking the planet him and Tom Hanks, and you know, what I mean..

Chicago HBO Twitter Bob bell southern Illinois university Naperville Steve Jefferson junior high school Chile Bill Murray WGN Marty Feldman California David cross Ronnie chicagoland Tom Hanks David Thornton writer