5 Burst results for "David Tanis"

"david tanis" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

06:39 min | 5 months ago

"david tanis" Discussed on Unorthodox

"Dorothy kalins is a cookbook writer and the former editor in chief of severe magazine, Leo talked to her about her new book, the kitchen whispers, and what she learned about living, loving, and believing, from watching some of the world's greatest cooks in action. Dorothy kalins, thank you so much for being our guest. I'm very happy to be here. I got to tell you, the kitchen whispers cooking with the wisdom of our friends. I don't remember a book that has left me feeling quite so moved and warm and just cheerful and optimistic about the human condition. How dare you? Yeah, especially in the middle of a pandemic. Right, hope. My task right now is very difficult because the book is so dense with amazing anecdotes and I just feel like sitting everyone down and having you read basically the whole thing. But I want to try and make sense of it in the following way. So I want to start with a confession. I wake up every morning and among the first if not the first thought that I have is, what am I going to cook for dinner? And then I go through my head like where will I go for the ingredients and how I prepare it? And I imagine the process and this is something that I haven't shared with anyone, honestly, because it felt weird. It felt obsessive compulsive and kind of strange. And then I read your book and there it is. I'm doing the same thing. Cooking as thinking theory. Yeah, tell me all about it. Walk me through it. Make me feel better about myself. There are many things that I would like to change about myself and my life, but that particular obsession I have made peace with. I think what it does is it gives a kind of shape to my life. It gives me some confidence that I know where I'm going, okay, I have these meetings. I have this thing, but then I have lunch, and then I have dinner. And I kind of know that those are posts in the ground and that will allow me to carry on. And so let's play a version of inside the actor's studio. Let's call this inside the great cook's studio. Walk us through what a thought process focused on a meal looks like to you. I bought at the farmer's market last week. These adorable little butternut squashes. And they were on my mind yesterday morning when I awoke. And I thought, oh, well, my friend David tanis has a recipe in a couple of New York Times a week ago or two weeks ago for butternut squash pie. Okay, then I think but I'm not a pie baker and I don't make pie crust. But then I remembered that I had in the bottom of my freezer. Frozen pie crust shells. They've probably been there a year. But I said, okay, then I need some green. So we went to the market yesterday. I got some turnips with beautiful greens and I got some radishes with beautiful greens, and I thought, okay, those will be the greens, even though David wanted me to use something a little stronger like kale or collars or something. I thought I'm going to use what I have. And that's what I made last night for dinner and it was and I could carry that with me the whole day and it was a kind of way of providing for the family and doing this. So I guess it's reassurance. You know, innate in this story as in this truly wonderful, wonderful book is the notion that even though this thought process may appear kind of strange and maybe even solipsistic, it is innately connecting you to other people. Here you are. You're not just thinking about the butter squash at a turnip. You're thinking of David tennis, your friend, the great former chef of chef and ease and curdling The New York Times writer. And so much of this book is about how our relationships are shaped by the things we observed others do. So I don't want to spoil the fun there is so much richness in this book and there are so many heroes of mine, including David tennis, including myself, hazan, including Michael solomonov that you bring to wonderful life, but give us a taste and the most bouche, if you will. Of some of these amazing, amazing characters and the very simple yet deeply profound things that they taught you. I have been a magazine editor, my whole professional life, and then after I left newsweek, which was my last magazine post after 9 11 and two wars, I decided to go back to food because I had found the magazine sever. And I found that very nurturing. So what I wound up doing was to produce cookbooks with some wonderful, wonderful people. And I learned from them. I was no fool. I mean, not only was I serving the need of the project that I was working on, but I was learning from them. I mean, just from as basic as when we were doing a book with Michael Anthony, who is the executive chef at gramercy tavern. Michael spread a dish towel on the counter, dampened it a little bit, and then put his cutting board on top of it. I thought, duh. That is such a rewarding thing to learn how to do. And I think in a way, it's almost a little bit like prayer. You make a place a sacred place and you're going to this is intentional. It's not just slapping things together and throwing them in a pot. And the little things you learn are as important as the complicated cooking techniques and it changes and informs your approach to making dinner. Now, so much of this book really revolves around these relationships, which is very evident in the book. These are real intricate relationships that last over decades and decades, it kind of appeared to me, though, as I was reading that, we're moving, I think maybe a way from this. I mean, so much of cooking now either happens online in those videos that you so wonderfully describe in which disembodied hands at triple speed prepare things and or in sort of like impossibly high-tech. Oh, here is the new $4000 gadget that would peel garlic for you faster than anything before. Do you feel that? Do you feel the kind of the winds of time blowing at our next? I absolutely do feel the winds of time. I have a son who's 28 years old, and I have a cookbook library, which much like your library of books goes the whole length of my office, hundreds of books. And if he wants to cook something when he sails through our House,.

Dorothy kalins severe magazine David tennis David tanis The New York Times Leo Michael solomonov hazan gramercy tavern newsweek David Michael Anthony Michael
"david tanis" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"david tanis" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Everybody, you are back with you. Eating it up. I'm Cheryl Alters Jameson. Thanks for coming along with us today and we're talking food Adventures with Deborah Madison and her life in vegetables. Her new book is an onion in my pocket. It's a beautiful and charming and frank memoir, and you need it. Go get it, Find it and are collected Works or Garcia Street or order it from wherever you get books, But get it. It's something you should definitely read. And one of the things I want to get in. We're going to go back and talk a little bit more about, you know things like greens and shape a niece. But one of the real points of the book is nourishment. And I want to make sure we have time to talk about that a little bit. Because if he were saying when we're off air, nobody gets to that part because we all run out of time. So I wanted to start our segment. Our last segment with that idea. Can you talk to that a little bit, please for e. I want to try. I've always felt a little uncomfortable with the vegetarian label because I'm not a vegetarian unnecessarily. But I had to find out what really mattered this food and what mattered to me was how food was prepared or shared. And if it came with Plainness with generosity with care with attention. Then I remember those meals and it didn't matter at all. What was on the plane and so the last chapters about that kind of food, and and this just stories about menus and meals I've had Work that really stood out. Uh huh. And you know, I do like that in terms of the spirit of generosity about the food and that we remember moments. I mean, it's yes, it's important. What's on the plate and all of that, all of us who are, you know, so tied to the culinary universe. But it is that spirit and that generosity and all of that that I think, Yeah, that does matter s O much in the end, so I appreciate you. Getting that in in the book and in our talk about it, too. So, um, s o back. We're talking about greens on how you ended up being chef there because that was a project, I guess. Was that the Abbott or you're organizing Committee of the SIM Center. I don't know what they were called. Exactly that decided You should have a restaurant. The Zen center should have a restaurant who decided that there was no organizing committee. But there was a board. Okay. And, uh, I don't know how I'll happened. But I just found myself in that position and and and going to bed every night feeling like I had a mountain on my chest and waking up in the morning. It was still there. Well, not only was the restaurant new I mean and again, this is just so wild to think back at the time. But I mean Fort Mason. I mean, that had been a government entity and all the sudden it became, you know, an area right for private development. And just to put a restaurant in that space because we're talking, You know, they're with a stunning views out over the water and everything. I mean, this was so again visionary. At the time to, you know, put that there and to make a restaurant that was in this beautiful setting, And that was open to everybody to come. But that was being run by the Zen center. It was just really such a unusual idea and something that you know again. She was like, Oh, yeah, of course I would do something like that today, But we're talking, You know, a full generation ago, and it was unusual on s all of sudden. You found yourself. Without a huge having a big, big restaurant. And, uh, yeah, people paying to come this time It was crazy. It was really hard. I mean, I was stuck on the idea of maybe maybe a 10 seat restaurant, tiny little intimate thing. This was huge as you said, And you know the idea that we would chop garlic, you know, by hand or whatever it was Quickly, you know, gone. It wasn't like a 10 Person Cafe or even being in the they represent center with your folks coming in for dinner? No, we had 300. People at a time sometimes come in. In the very beginning. 250 people was usually what we served for lunch. Uh huh. And again, you're bringing in the general public, So I know it was a big concern to you to have, um, you know, something that felt like a satisfactory meal again something at the center of the plate. That was very I added cheese, all kinds of things where it didn't happen to be our wasn't needed, really. And since that I've taken it out, but because I was nervous. I didn't want people to go away hungry. And feeling that they hadn't been fed s. Oh, it was a little bit dicey. You know our first well, you did such a great job of it. And I just remember eating there at the time and just being, you know, blown away by the generosity of the food and the spirit of it and the Oh, the bread you did, like it wasn't the for gossip. Love. Yes. Yeah. And you pull it apart of the table, and, uh, yeah. Careful stuff. Yeah, it was from Yeah, we probably should at least give homage for your time at Chez Panisse. Since that is a legendary restaurant and Alice Waters, obviously a legendary figure in our culinary universe, and she had come to the garden originally, That's how you met her that I'm right. Yeah, she had come to gringo and the Abbot said, Why don't you show her and Lindsey shere around? But I did, And they were kind of mind. Especially Alice was iron. Let us and asking questions. And she was. She really wanted this food that we were growing from the restaurant. And then I started to ask them questions. And And this And finally she said, haven't you ever been, And I said no, I've never been. I never even heard of shape in these Really? I mean, I barely had heard of it. She said. Well, you must come bring a friend and come tomorrow night. So we did. We borrowed a car We went and it was this was the food that I always had wanted Teat. And cook, you know, and I recognized it immediately and and I went to work there. She she invited me to work there and I did for On and off for about 10 years. Oh, and it was again such a seminal time and Alice brought together such an amazing group of people yourself included, But Lindsay shares the pastry chef, and, oh, people that Santa fans know David Tanis and Mark Miller and forced through the kitchen at that time, folks, you just need to read the story..

Zen center Alice Cheryl Alters Jameson Deborah Madison Fort Mason SIM Center Alice Waters Teat Chez Panisse Lindsey shere Abbot Lindsay Santa Mark Miller David Tanis
"david tanis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:56 min | 1 year ago

"david tanis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Recipes and stories so funny. How did you want to balance your writing about Alice Waters. That is your mom and her beautiful hands. And then the Alice waters. We all know I think the first thing to say is that the book is really not, You know, expository. It wasn't this wasn't my sort of take down or like pulling back the curtain and some violent way. I just I don't have that story to tell. You know, I actually think we have a success Story of the mother daughter duo in terms of how much we really love and respect one another. This was but I still felt like there were things, of course, is her only daughter and only child that I could illuminate about this otherwise very public persona. Um And I do say in the book that I think that there's plenty of parity between who she is in the public and who she is a two home, But I also felt it was important to around that out. You know that there is that she has a wonderful sense of humor. I mean, we crack up We've been sheltering in place together for the last year and a half months, which is the longest we've worked together, You know, probably in like 20 years. But it's you know, it's um it's been I mean of devastating that his time has been and I'm very, very hard for my mom going through the closure of shape, knees and all kinds of things like we just there's been so much humor and joy and our times together and I I think that comes across and the way I try to describe, you know the bigger picture of the relationship. Let's bring it to the moment for for a moment, because obviously we're all under stress, especially folks who are in the food industry and restaurant. Business. How is the pandemic affecting shipping niece and the local farms that supply your restaurant? Alice? No, The pharmacy hurts so valuable right now, and it's Going to take everything, too. Really support them and and encourage them to flourish over kind of dudes. This Farm to table movement. And so we felt like the most vital thing we could do Woz bring food from the various forms but our main farm Accepting him Now, Mama, we make boxes of vegetables. We had a cute little almost shape and he's um All right. That's what really valuable and then we had a very good luck. You have A friend who have given us a kind of a bridge load and till we got the small business loan And I think We're work good for this period of time, and we're trying to keep everybody together so that when we do open, we can do it very quickly. And that's been our main concern. Is a step We're taking care of each other. I vote sort of shaping me since that big old family. Of family pennies, and it Z feeling that kind of Love and care for For everybody. My guests are Fanny singer and Alice Waters. We're talking about Fanny's new book, Always Home, a daughter's recipes and stories. And this is a great story, Fanny, you dedicated chapter to the lunchbox. Uh, you're right. There was a point. Your school lunches went from being Maura. Less normal. Peanut butter and banana sandwiches. Salary, an almond butter dotted with raisins ants on a log. What amounted to a completely bonkers act of culinary prowess. What's an example? Well, I just I can't tell you the exact date, so they exactly year but I just remember there being that's real pivot to away from the old paper bag and into this land of You know, compartments, separate compartments and ice. You know, an actual silverware napkins, and I think it was around when I started. It was like a late middle school right before high school. When I started to get these very it is much more elaborate Concoctions and Um, you know, I think In retrospect, it probably was around the time that my parents were separating when I was a young team. My mom just really devoted herself to this act and also because it just wasn't a good alternative. You know, for me at school on because she wanted to make sure I had delicious beautiful things and One thing that I always remember is that the vinaigrette was in a separate small jar so that the salad was prematurely dressed, because, of course, then the salad would will. So there were always little steps and things that had to be done. Which we also talk about being a kind of hangover. The Montessori teacher training that my mom had, which was to encourage kids actually do the things for themselves. So They're being a kind of Almost ritual to experience actually meant that I was really engaged with lunch, and all of my friends would clamber over and Come asking me for a little bites of my strawberry fruit salad or garlic bread or whatever it was. I would be remiss to say were notorious. Oh, I would be remiss if I didn't mention that There are recipes in this book is well, How did you decide Alice where there's a recipe that you said to your daughter? You know what I You have to be. This has to be in the book. This must be in the book. I really feel strongly about this. You know, she choose all of these recipes. Um Herself without without any counsel position with me, but they turn out to be well of our favorite. Family recipes. And so I'm just delighted that they're all collected. They're together and they're from all different people to our friends. Everybody. Everybody from David Tanis to know of Courage, Emporia and then chef and cookbook writer just from Lulu. Pero Richard on Lee. Well, if our favorites and, uh it's zip it Really, um You have everything that I would have wanted in there. I have to mention the photos in this book. Always home. They're really lovely. Who is the photographer? And what kind of conversations did you have a creatively about? The look in the field and the emotions you wanted to evoke with these photos. Yeah. So from the very beginning, I knew that the book couldn't have sort of scrapbook. Vintage archival, That is, I just felt like the wrong Way to illustrate something that I was writing, you know, age or project that began in my early thirties, and, um, just, you know, feeling like that. For the fir book much further down the line, you know, and I wanted there to be more of a kind of atmosphere of the relationship illustrated in the photos and not for them to feel. Directly illustrative of certain recipes, or what have you? It just I I also needed was never going to be really a conventional cookbook. And so I felt like the photography couldn't Um, couldn't conform to that. Handed cookbook vernacular, either. So I, uh, emboldened myself with a couple of Negroni's Veer Kuroda and New York and wrote an email to you, Bridget like home. Who is such an extraordinary and very well known photographer who Is known mostly for her extraordinary portraiture, Black and white. I mean images of people like Meryl Street, then Frances McDormand and has four She's worked on many films that with Scorsese and all the great And I thought it was a real long shot. But I knew as she's a family friend, and I do, um Of her more casual photography that she would create and populate instagram with and I was intrigued by that vision. So I wrote her and Uh, I was so thrilled to hear her right back and say we send you look, I found it sounds like a lovely project, and then conversations began on. She traveled actually with us. Come to France to take the photos bad, mostly illustrate domain Topi, which is Miss Winery in the south of France. That was a very seminal place for my mom and her Have younger years at the beginning of shaping these where she forged a relationship.

Alice Waters Alice Fanny France Frances McDormand instagram Veer Kuroda Woz Maura Miss Winery Scorsese David Tanis Bridget Pero Richard New York writer Emporia Lee
"david tanis" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

08:56 min | 1 year ago

"david tanis" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Cheryl Alters Jameson. Thanks for spending part of your Saturday afternoon with us. And today the US includes Daniel Alvarez was a chef from here in the states. But she's in Australia these days, and she works for the restaurant called Friends. He's executive chef, and she has a brand new book. Always add lemon. Dan you Congratulations on the book. This is your first book, right? Yes, it is. It's so exciting. Thank you so much Great. Well, even before we get into the book, what led you into the world of food? You grew up in a food loving family. I mentioned. That's right. Yeah, you know, but no one working professionally in kitchen, So I think that was a bit of Ah. A jump for me. I think it was just one of those things that I was constantly thinking about. I had a desk job for a little while and I was constantly dreaming up what I was going to cook over the weekend or any time off on by that led me to Enroll myself in culinary school, which I did in Florida. And then from there, I moved to California. So I got an internship with the French laundry, which was super exciting. That was my dad's restaurant job, Terry. I mean the start. Yeah. French laundry, You know, travel, including at the top. Yeah, I think I was. I was really scared then, and I probably had every reason to be, and I didn't even know it. Um, And then, after that, I works at a few other, You know, really beautiful restaurants in San Francisco on then, ultimately, in the US that my last stop was shaping knees and I spent four years there and I just loved it. Well, I just can't do better than being in Berkeley at Chez Panisse, Alice Waters that seminal restaurant and and I did love that it was David Tanis, who was the chef at the time. The executive chef Of working for analysts at the time that you went to work there because he had a very storied career here in the Santa Fe area, and lots of people know his name from his time here before, you know, went on to say ponies and Paris and back and forth between those two on New York now, yes, right. And he writes his column for The New York Times. And Yes, so anyway, he's a good one to have had in the kitchen with you. You have a story about my only in your book that I thought was, Yeah. David That told you could you pass that on to people? Yeah, well, it was one of like the first house. Um, you know, too, that I had to make in the kitchen and everyone has kind of subtle, little different ways of how they make aioli. But David was really staunch that you know, I only is garlic, oil, salt and nothing else. So you know, you actually don't have a little bit of lemon into that. I mean, sometimes I do now. Don't tell him but he really wanted it to be just its purest form. And what you're using Good olive oil like we did in the restaurant. That was perfect. And it made me realize. Like you really don't need to add anything else s O. That was one of the first lessons that I learned from David. Keep it simple. Keep it simple. That's his mom's ever so, yeah, and foreign I only you want to use a really kind of a mellow olive oil. Not one it has. Yeah. You tell that she knows that Pip peppering nous, right? Nothing too peppery. Nothing that like hits you in the back of this throat too much, but something kind of fruity her milder around her. But it just makes the most delicious thing. And one of the things I love to do is in the summer time to make a really just gorgeous credit Tate parade with annihilate like that, And it's just stunning. That sounds so good. Yeah, I've already ready for summer to come back. It will be nice to have high. I know you didn't finish is something I know you're just going into it that so That's right about it. Being a completely different time Was it when you first moved to Australia to have things like you know, having you're not celebrating an American Thanksgiving in your restaurant? Probably. But you may still yourself with friends or something. But that and all that to be mid summer instead. Of winter. It's so weird. I think that's probably one of the things that makes live. I mean, I love living down here, but it's one of the things that really pulls at your heartstrings because they just giving is such a beautiful family event, you know, and everyone has their own traditions. And we always didn't really beautiful Thanksgiving and unfortunately here, it always falls on a Friday because it's Thursday in the U. S, and I usually don't celebrate it. On Christmas in the summertime is odd, although I did grow up in Florida, so it was always quite summary there. That is different. Yes. Where Palm trees and all of that for Christmas, right? You have some experience with that. All right, Well, OK, tell us about Fred's a little bit. Yes, So for we opened about four years ago, and I was brought over to run the kitchen there and design the restaurant, So we have this crazy kitchen that's literally in the middle of the dining room. Um, big, wood burning fireplace and a wood burning oven. So it's all very theatrical, but we're cooking really simple food. My goal was always to have Um, you know, break down the literal and figurative wall so that people could see the food as it was being made. We don't do anything too tricky and and this is Hopefully, the cooking that you'll see in the book as well. It's all straightforward, fresh flavors about heightening ingredients. We don't try to do anything. All that Known to the two ingredients. You know, we take a lot of care to source really beautiful ingredients from small local farms, not area, and we just want to prepare them simply and to make sure that you get That's something to this just on your plate. Lovely, like Sydney is such a great restaurant city. It's been some years since I've been over there. Now. I guess it's has probably been 15 years at this point time is flying. But oh my goodness. The restaurant business of the foods and the emphasis on seafood and only I love too and since right Strong Asian influence. And so much of the food. Oh, just so many interesting things about it loved eating through there. And, of course, then you have all that great wine that's coming from. Yeah. Lots of video, Barossa Valley and a lot of other places, you know? Yeah, it was a fun thing to visit. So what led you to decide to write a book? You young thing? My no. Well, you know, I think, um, I have so many lessons that I picked up along the way. And I think I wanted to find a space in the book for, um you know, the cook that was feeling like they were ready to do. A bit more in the kitchen, like there's super simple recipes in the book that are straightforward and easy to follow. And then there's also recipes that I think could really speak to people that love being in the kitchen. I really want to spend more time developing their skills a little bit, and perhaps trying something a little different on guys just wanted to share a few of those lessons, not least of all, which is to always add lemon, which is what one of my tips around just bringing for freshness. Food. Oh, well. I loved that that that is the title of the book, And it's subtitled Recipes. You want to cook and food You want Todt and really liked your your emphasis on? Yeah, these air simple things, but they they're for people who want to spend time in the kitchen and I get so sick and tired of so many books of act like We want to get you in and out of there as fast as possible. You know, we know that that Z It is incredibly enjoyable and it's tactical. That's sensible, and it's just downright fun. And I love people. Well, I 100% agree with that. So you get it all right, well, Daniel Alvarez is a chef who was born in Miami. She's my guest today as she is coming to us from Sydney, Australia, where she is the Chef executive chef of Fred's Restaurant. We're talking again about her new book, Her first book, It's a beauty called, Always Add Lemon. You can get it here in the States now and anywhere that fine books are sold. Anyway. We are, let's see, gonna be talking more about the recipes in here and what makes the book unique in just a second. You're listening to talk. 12 60. Katie RC. Where? Santa Fes news talk leader. He can always find us at 12 16 103.7 as well as podcast and live streamed at Santa calm..

executive Australia David That Daniel Alvarez US Florida Sydney David Cheryl Alters Jameson Fred's Restaurant Dan first house California Santa Fes San Francisco The New York Times Berkeley Terry
"david tanis" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"david tanis" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Plain sight inside the Vargas center. Or mentioned the Santa Fe School of Cooking before, But let's just try to be creative about things we can pick up toe help some of our other folks here in town over the holidays when we need gifts. And just one other thing. You know a lot of announcements today. Gotta get to Danielle here in a minute. One other thing, you know that our state's museum are states are States museums. I'll get that out right yet have had a rough go through the pandemic and after being opened briefly at the later part of the summer and early fall Have all had to shut down once again, and to help out the museum of International Folk Art, which is something that I'm a member of and tried to help a different times, Google World of Treasures and Museum of International Folk art. They're doing a fabulous auction just a little bit later this month, and you can sign up now for it. Just you know, Google for the details. One of the reasons I wanted to mention this is because one of the auction items is a barbecue dinner with me. You can you can bid on me for this one signing here. Yeah, Anyway, I hope you'll check that out and again, you can just Google world of treasures. That's the name of the auction and Museum of international folk art in Santa Fe, and you'll get all the details. Okay, That's lots of info. So I think it's time now that we need to talk to Danielle. Hey, Low fire here, are you I'm great. Okay, I should give Danielle just a little bit more of an introduction, and she was born to a food loving human family in Miami. The lure of a kitchen took her to California to work with some America's finest restaurants of initially at the French laundry and later shape a niece. And as I understand you worked with David Tanis, there who used to be a hint. Hired me. Yes, yes, That's right, right? No, I remember that about him. Yeah, well, Daniel moved to Sydney, Australia, and 2016 when she was asked to head up the kitchen. Of a strikingly beautiful restaurant called Fred's, which was new at the time, and she and the restaurant one faster claim and continue to be ranked among the very best in Australia. Ad always add. Lemon is her very first book. Hi, Danielle. Hello. Hello. What an introduction. Thank you. Great. Well, I've spent so much time introducing things. I'm gonna have to take our first break and then we'll come back and get it yet. So everybody you are listening to heating it up. I'm Cheryl Alters. Jameson. This is top 12. 61 037 Katie RC were always podcast. I call that our second helpings as well as live streamed. Santa fe dot com. Hey, we'll be right back..

Danielle Santa Fe School of Cooking Treasures and Museum of Intern Google museum of International Folk A David Tanis Santa Fe Museum of international Vargas center Australia Katie RC Jameson Miami Sydney Daniel America California Fred