17 Burst results for "David Starr"

"david starr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:12 min | 3 weeks ago

"david starr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It was this moment where he did this gesture, and this gesture is what pulled me into his tail. I didn't even know who he was yet, but I heard this anecdote and I know it is almost embarrassingly arcane. Why did this possessed her life for 10 years? Why did you write a book about this guy? But this was the moment. He took The fish off the ground, and he started the practice of tying the label to the fish. Stitching them right into the flash. As if to say nature. No matter what you throw at me, I can own you. And I thought this is such a metaphor for our species and for our need. To know the world and possess it. The refusal to back down from these increasingly clear messages that chaos reigns that we live in a world We cannot control When you learned darker and darker things about how he conducted his life. He had a healed of optimism, which sounds like something great, but when you break it down, he was really good about lying to himself. Yes. A colleague. If he has said, no matter how bad the day he could always be found, Ah, humming a tune a down the arcade. But what is that shield comprised of one of the key ingredients is to believe you're a little better than you actually are. Psychologists have studied this. They call it positive illusions, and it's this idea that if we can lie to ourselves a little bit, you actually see profound benefits in mental health, even in relationships. It's kind of Like a matter of how much delusion and there is clearly a slippery slope. Where you know you do get social punishment for being too deluded about yourself or your abilities. But there is this weird spot. If you lie a little it serves you really well right, But he was making judgments that he wasn't capable of making. And like his mentor, Louis Agassi, He ranked What he found. And like his mentor, he believed bad habits so to speak, could cause species to devolve whether in molluscs or in man. Yes. When Darwin came along David Starr, Jordan did do away with the idea that there was a divine plan. He did let go of God, but he still believed there was a somewhat divine pyre key carved by time. That more quote unquote complex. If such a thing is even measurable meant more evolved meant better as well. Darwin never did that He never ranked species from Complex and closer to God to degenerate, intrinsically evil. Yeah, I mean, Darwin has his sins and he's complicated. But what really shocked me reading on the origin of species. And re reading it and reading it with a pen. Was just how clearly he warns against ranking and he says that hierarchies and even categories at all even edges in nature. And this is what really blew my mind that those Our fabrication of the human mind. They're super imposition. They're a proxy edges. What do you mean by edges that there are not hard lines, even between species. One of the things he really hammers. This gets a little technical, but it's cool. One of the things that taxonomists eh is that two different species can't create fertile offspring. And he just shows time and time again. These examples where actually two different supposed species do create fertile offspring. There aren't the hard lines around species or around genera or going further up the tree file. Um, even that that is a human way of parsing the world to feel safer in it. Darwin's disinclination to put species and boxes and especially to rank them did not communicate to star and a turning point for him was when he went to Aosta Ah Sanctuary City. Even Italy, a place where For centuries the Catholic Church had provided shelter and food to people who had been rejected by their families. Because of their disabilities. You might see beauty in that town. Here's a place where people have safe harbour and are given the tools to flourish or What David saw and he went three times. He called it quote a veritable chamber of horrors. People drooling or coming up to him and begging. And he said, You know, this is a subspecies of man. And this is where the whole human race is going if we don't take action And he becomes one of the earliest embraces of eugenics. He thought that the people of Aosta were literally degenerating into a new species of man. And he Called this process. Animal populism? Yes. That laziness, quote unquote basically the bad habits. The bad behaviors can cause.

David Starr Aosta Louis Agassi Aosta Ah Sanctuary City drooling Jordan Italy Catholic Church
"david starr" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

07:04 min | Last month

"david starr" Discussed on On The Media

"Of life he is a delicious person to write about because. There are things that he does especially when he's a that just make you fall in love with him. When he gets bullied, he starts doing things alone like trying to complete the task of clasping his hands and jump through them so like he's just in we loner. His Puritan parents especially his mother disapproved of his obsessions and his massive collections yet. Sort of woke into the world. He had all these questions about what he saw around him, and so I he started putting names to every star in the sky he moved onto flowers and he started pinning them to the walls and writing their scientific names underneath them making topographical maps of every place around him and at one point his mom just threw them away his entire childhood was bound up in this stuff so much sweaty, sweet careful labor and she just thought this is a waste of time. He should be out on the farm struggling to make ends meet and she told them to quote find something more relevant to do with his time. According to his accounts taxonomy had sort of had its run. Carlin. As the famous forefather's taxonomy had published his system Touro, which was proposed to be this map of all life properly arranged about one hundred years before there was this sense that the world was known we didn't need to look at it anymore his neighbors called him shiftless and a waste of time collectors and got sort of. A bad rap and as he grew older, he still loved doing his brother died when he was pretty young and he had been very close with him and right after that moment, he just goes back to drawing and his journals explode with color these drawing ivy he's drawing carrots he's drawing pine branches like anything he can get his hands on your theory is that he was trying to. Impose order on chaos. Yeah. He talks about this urge even if he can't control the world at least he had naming if he could just order the world, there was some sense of agency I don't WanNa, go overly into like pathologising the very human impulse to collect a no our world. But there are some people who studied obsessive collectors. Often the habit will kick into gear after some sort of major deprivation or tragedy or trauma each acquisition floods you with this sense. Of fantasized omnipotence is how this one Guy Bernard Musson Burger puts it that you can kind of become addicted to in his early twenties. He is the perpetual student. He's also an educator. He learns about a sort of camp for young natural historians an island off of Massachusetts called penalties. Yeah. It's this tiny little horseshoe shaped island an hour's ride away from the coast just horizon on every side of you Louis Agassi the very famous Swiss geologist who by this point is teaching. Harvard decided that the way that Harvard professors were teaching science was all wrong. They wanted their students to learn to memorize beliefs out of books and he thought that beliefs were roadblocks because once you started to believe the beliefs you cease to observe. Yeah you would see stu observe and so he started this camp where he could train the future scientists of America and the right way to do science, which is climbing around in nature getting dirty looking at things through microscopes. And that first summer he put out a call for applications David Starr. Jordan was miserable out at this college in the Midwest. He was advised not to let his students touch microscopes. He was chastised for teaching the Ice Age theory that there had been a time when the earth was covered in ice and Louis Agassi was a guy who discovered it blah blah blah. So he applies to this camp gets in he's one of fifty students, men and women all interested in taxonomy. Spend this blissed out summer. PC's fos. For essence for the first time. He's twenty two years old and it's the first time he sees the ocean. And the impact of Louis Agassi can't be underrated. You wrote about a breakfast. that. He gave it went like this. Said the master to the youth we have come in search of truth trying with uncertain key door by door of mystery, we are reaching through his laws to the garment Tam of cause him the endless. UNB, begun the unnamed. The one as with fingers of the blind, we are groping here to find what the hieroglyphics mean of the unseen in the scene. Agassi literally thought that every single species was a thought of God and that the work of taxonomy was to arrange those thoughts in their proper order and discover the divine plan of. God. And what the Divine Plan meant was this intricate communication of God's values and how to be in the world, and possibly if you read it right the path to further ascension. And so Agassi called the the work of taxonomy missionary work of the highest order. David Bright's about that morning he said it was this transformational moment in his life because suddenly he had a response to all the people who said that his hobby was pointless he traveled the globe to quote discover new species of fish catalogue them name them. Yeah. Starts collecting for the Smithsonian gets promotions. He becomes the President of Indiana University. He'd throw dynamite into the water to unearth fish he would use harpoons like any method he could think of and poison he would in tide pools he came up with this device strychnine, which plays a role later in his story, but we might not get to that the possibility that he murdered the head of Stanford but. Never mind you became enamored with the idea of David Starr Jordan as a symbol of determination in the face of chaos, he lost his collection multiple times over the course of his life especially during the San Francisco earthquake of nineteen o six, it was stored at Stanford, a whole system of order obliterated and he and his team are credited with discovering a fifth of the fish species that were then known. His first collection was struck by lightning and burnt to the ground I. mean it almost feels like a myth key thinks he can order the world chaos says..

Louis Agassi David Starr Jordan Harvard Stanford David Starr Guy Bernard Musson Burger Massachusetts Carlin Midwest San Francisco Indiana University America President David Bright UNB geologist
"david starr" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

07:48 min | Last month

"david starr" Discussed on On The Media

"Lab author of the book why fish don't exist. Her book traces, the history of Jordan and her own obsession with him as a supreme taxonomy. St-. Who sought determinedly to order the natural world at least in part by finding naming its fish and later notoriously by ranking it's people. Lulu Miller was very much in need of some sense of natural order to fend off the sense of chaos in her own life. That's what first drew her to star his unstoppable drive to fend off his own demons by ordering the world even when his own mother of stern and Sturdy Puritan stock demeaned him for it. He is delicious person to write about because there are things that he does especially when he's a kid that just make you fall in love with him. When he gets bullied, he starts doing things alone like trying to a complete the task of clasping his hands and jump through them. So I can just a loner. Puritan parents especially his mother disapproved of his obsessions and his massive collections yet be sort of woke into the world. He had all these questions about what he saw around him, and so I he started putting names to every star in the sky he moved onto flowers and he started pinning them to the walls and writing their scientific names underneath them making topographical maps of every. Place around him and at one point, his mom just threw them away. His entire childhood was bound up in this stuff so much sweaty sweet careful labor and she just thought this is a waste of time. He should be out on the farm they were struggling to make ends meet and she told them to quote find something more relevant to do with his time according to his. Accounts taxonomy had sort of had its run. Carolina's the famous forefather of taxonomy had published his system Natera which was proposed to be this map of all life properly arranged about one hundred years before there was this sense that the world was known, we didn't need to look at it anymore his neighbors called him shiftless and a waste of time collecting and got sort of A. Bad Rap and as he grew older, he still loved doing it. His brother died when he was pretty young and he had been very close with him and right after that moment, he just goes back to drawing and his journals explode with color these drawing ivy drying carrots he's drawing pine branches like anything he can get his hands on your theory is that he was trying to. Impose order on chaos. Yeah. He talks about this urge even if he can't control the world at least he had naming if he could just order the world, there was some sense of agency. I don't WanNa go overly into like pathologising the very human impulse to collect no our world. But there are some people who have studied obsessive collectors. Often the habit will kick into gear after some sort of major deprivation tragedy or trauma each acquisition floods you would. This sense of fantasized omnipotence is how this one Guy Verner Burger puts it that you can kind of become addicted to in his early twenties he is. Perpetual student, he's also an educator he learns about a sort of camp for young natural historians an island off of Massachusetts called penalties yet this tiny little horseshoe-shaped island, an hour's ride away from the coast just horizon on every side of you Louis, Agassi the very famous Swiss geologist who by this teaching at Harvard decided that the way that Harvard professors were teaching science was all wrong. They wanted their students to learn to memorize beliefs out of books and he thought that beliefs were roadblocks because once you started to believe the beliefs you cease to observe. Yeah, you'd see stoops. And so he started this camp where he could train the future scientists of America in the right way to do science, which is climbing around nature getting dirty looking at things through microscopes, and that first summer he put out a call for applications. David Starr Jordan was miserable out at this college in the Midwest he was advised not to let his students touch microscopes. Chastised for teaching the Ice Age. Theory that there had been a time when the earth was covered in ice and Louis Agassi was the guy who discovered it blah blah blah. So he applies to this camp gets in he's one of fifty students, men and women all interested in taxonomy. Spends this blissed out summer. He's foster essence for the first time. He's twenty two years old and it's the first time he sees the ocean. And the impact of Louis Agassi can't be underrated. You wrote about a breakfast benediction that he gave it went like this. Said the master to the youth we have come in search of truth trying with uncertain key door. By door of mystery we are reaching through his laws to the garment hem of cause him the endless unbe gun, the unnamed. Though one as with fingers of the blind, we are groping here to find what the hieroglyphics mean of the unseen in the scene. Agassi literally thought that every single species was a thought of God, and that the work of taxonomy was to arrange those thoughts in their proper order and discover the divine plan of God and what the divine plan. Meant was this intricate communication of God's values and how to be in the world, and possibly if you read it right the path to further ascension. And so Agassi called the the work of taxonomy missionary work of the highest. David writes about that morning he said it was this transformational moment in his life because suddenly he had a response to all the people who said that his hobby was pointless. He traveled the globe to quote discover new species of fish catalogue them name them. Yeah. Starts Collecting for the Smithsonian. He gets promotions. He becomes the president. Of Indiana. University teams he throw dynamite into the water to unearth fish. He would use harpoons like any method he could think of and and poison. He would in tide pools he came up with this device strychnine, which plays a role later in his story, but we might not get to that the possibility that he murdered the head of Stanford. But never mind you became enamored with the idea of David Starr Jordan as a symbol of determination in the face of chaos. He lost his collection multiple times over the course of his life especially during the San Francisco quake of nineteen six, it was stored at Stanford a whole system of order obliterated and he and his team are credited with discovering a fifth of the fish species that were then known. Yeah. This first collection was struck by lightning and burnt to the ground. I mean it almost feels like a myth key thinks he can order the world chaos says. Can.

Louis Agassi David Starr Jordan Lulu Miller Stanford Harvard Guy Verner Burger Carolina Midwest America Massachusetts Indiana San Francisco president geologist
"david starr" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:45 min | Last month

"david starr" Discussed on KGO 810

"The Times reporting. The vote this week followed a push by school and community leaders. David Starr, Jordan was the founding president of Stanford University and an advocate of the racist eugenics movement. The school opened in Ela Ela is Watts area in 1923, and by the 19 forties, The student body was largely black. It is now 82% Latino and 17% Black. As the election draws near, and fears continue about a disputed result. Twitter would like to make sure their platform is spreading the truth. We get more from KGO mark near Corona virus. Misinformation is not the only thing that Twitter is cracking down on as a San Francisco based social media giant, says it will now remove tweets calling for people to interfere with the U. S election process. Twitter also will not allow tweets calling on people to mess with the implementation of election results, including using violence and will also label and restrict tweets that post misinformation. Social media companies are under pressure to combat election related misinformation with particular concerns about violence or pole place. Intimidation. I, mark Nieto Traffic is so rotten on interstate 80 Today, she'll tell us next on KGO. It's time for pumpkin flavors and new fall favorites of Duncan and also some tough decisions. Like Do I Want a signature? Pumpkin spice? I spotted a brand new milk latte, a new child or pumpkin eyes. Coffee. Oh, in the bakery. Do I want a pumpkin? Don't add. There are other people behind you in this drive through. Oh, uh, I'll just take it off. Okay? It's all the cozy you cravat, Duncan, Pumpkin favorites and new fall additions like new creamy without the very old no plot days and the signature Pumpkin Spice Hai slots plus more America runs on Dunkin Patient,.

Twitter Ela Ela Duncan mark Nieto David Starr Stanford University Corona president San Francisco Jordan America U. S The Times
"david starr" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:13 min | Last month

"david starr" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"David Starr. Jordan Hi. Named after a man David Starr, Jordan, who was, I think, the first president of Stanford founding president He also was big into eugenics. This and so it's completely understandable that they would want to, you know, distance themselves from that legacy, However, the word Jordan the Jordan part of his name has its own cultural cachet. Now, with a lot of people who went to that high school, so when they were trying to decide what to do, they said, Well, let's keep Jordan. Yeah, that's still the guy's last name, who basically said Black people are inferior and And we can probably root them out of our society. So the history of eugenics in this country is fascinating. It was actually considered a science. And accepted science in the twenties. And here is a really interesting connection. Nazi Germany. Right, the Nazi concept of inferior races. They had science behind it, and they printed up and, ah, the science and putting that in quotes was based on the American eugenics movement. That's how they were able to prove scientifically that people are inferior other than the great Neri the areas In the meantime, you know Joseph Goebbels was 5 FT. Four underweight, had a club foot And was limping there. There is your Aryan. You're perfect Aryan. Ah, a subject right? There is the example of it's just It's crazy anyways. And you look a eugenics. I mean, there was some very highly placed doctors, very highly regarded doctors. And then I realized that hey, maybe eugenics is not legitimate. Maybe people are not inferior. Well, some are but that has nothing to do with race. Ah, that is more to do with family. Ah, and connections. You may have all right. We're going to. I'm going to leave it at that point, Okay, before I get into trouble. Jennifer, You want to take it from here? Yes, allot. Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer says she knew about the plot to kidnap her for several weeks. In a couple of interviews, the governor said she wasn't able to discuss many details, but said in recent weeks it was brought to my attention. Forecasters are warning Hurricane Delta could be a Category three or two when it makes landfall today on the Gulf Coast and the New York Board of Rabbis. The Pacific Street protests this week against New Corona virus rules have been shameful. Rabbis. They they're asking the ultra religious communities to act responsibly. The Kobe cases don't spiral out of control across the city again. It's a wreck on the Bible, check with the pie in the sky next At a certain point your life, your teeth may literally be falling out. They get loose. You have all kinds of dental problem. Usually it's just purely neglect. And once it starts, you tend not to grab it quickly..

Jordan Governor Gretchen Whitmer David Starr president Nazi Germany Joseph Goebbels New York Board of Rabbis underweight Stanford Kobe Neri Hurricane Delta Jennifer Gulf Coast Michigan
"david starr" Discussed on Young House Love Has A Podcast

Young House Love Has A Podcast

04:56 min | 3 months ago

"david starr" Discussed on Young House Love Has A Podcast

"The base of the deck like the floor of the deck is this like warm would tone and I think it's so pretty to do the black with the warm would tone and the white males I just think it's Like to Pat Yourself on the back of it more about this choice. I'm proud of myself for going outside of my normal comfort zone because normally I would just get like a would table a matching wheelchairs, chairs I'd probably get cushions get wet we wouldn't sit in them but instead we have dinner up on the deck so often and we don't even really have to worry about like if the chairs need to be like tilted to the side to get cushions to drain because it's like not a problem worse they have like a couple of pine needles on them from the pine tree above us and just shake it off and ready to sit down he just shake. And I'm digging this week I guess is for your brain. Your is that tracks all about the budget. The Rain Right I'm really the Scorpio Guy. You're. The lusty one. I'm digging a book read a few weeks ago. It's called why fish don't exist by Lulu Miller. I found out about Lulu Miller from the invisible you podcast on NPR shoes to host it, and then I follow her on twitter and now I've found that she this book and so it is a very strange book to describe. I'll do my best and the title why fished on existence intriguing it is answered in the book I don't want to say much more about why fish don't exist. Oh, I thought you were going to tell people that John told me that sort of the tie in is it not right at the beginning it would be a spoiler note. Unfolds and it also is kind of like a metaphor for lots of things that happened in the book. On a technicality, I'll say as to why fish don't actually exist but the reason why intrigue yes mystery right? No, it's it's more of a biography slash memoir. It's blue. Miller. Is writing a biography about this historical scientific character named David Starr Jordan who basically was a scientist who traveled the world trying to classify all the fish I guess he's like responsible for classifying fifty percent of the fish species in the world you know like doing the taxonomy of them and she just found him to. Be An interesting character and in writing his biography and researching him more. She kind of discovered some interesting things about how she understood herself and the world and our relationship with chaos and all this stuff and so she kinda bounces back and forth between his story and her story, and it's just I don't know it's really beautifully written and someone who like is drawn to science books. It's not really a science book even though that's a thread throughout it it's just I dunno, it's a really. Really enjoyable quick light, but enlightening book to read. So I highly recommend it and I also wanted to say as part of recommending the Book and update to. If you remember way back in the beginning of the year I made a resolution that this was going to be my year of only getting books from the library like I really wanted to cut back on like impulse buying books from Amazon, and so that had great intentions to start but I rec- getting books from the library in. Two Thousand Twenty has been challenging the pandemic in libraries being close for a period and whatnot, and so I kind of had like fall back on my like secondary plan, which was if had to buy a book, I was going to buy a book at an independent bookstore like a local bookstore. So if I'm putting money towards books, I'm actually supporting a local one and obviously that has also been more difficult this year than it might have been because not every local bookstore has a website. And stuff. But I did get pointed to a website called bookshop dot org and the way it works is you can still shot books just like you might have on Amazon and order them and have them shipped to your door, but they give money back to independent bookstores and you can actually look up a specific bookstore and shop through them through the bookshop dot org website. So if your particular bookstore that you like to support doesn't have a website or it's a hard website to order. From. This is a way that you can do that online. If you don't feel comfortable or aren't able to go in person to a bookstore or library right now like obviously doing things in person and having that face to face like you know support the atmosphere of a local bookstore is one of the great things about independent bookstores. But I know we have to make decisions right now about when we're shopping in person these days yes and the really cool thing about it is you can. Just, go on it and not even know a local bookstore, and then you can kind of look one up and just be like boom. That's where I'm gonNA order this from. So instead of like it comes from the warehouse on Amazon you're like ooh I picked the one on the corner near that Delhi I like, and now the next time I'm out at bookstores again, I can check them out in person like it might introduce you to a new local bookstore you didn't even know about. Well, that's been. One of the cool things is because we were introduced to a lot of black owned independent bookstores when we were learning about all those black on businesses back in June and so it's been nice to be able to support those bookstores even if they're not in my neighborhood, I can go search for ones that are completely different state and sort of shop around from different bookstores and support different bookstores that way. Yeah. So bookshop DOT ORG DOT ORG dot com not dot limo. That many dot Ninja I think is one but don't.

Lulu Miller Amazon DOT David Starr Jordan twitter NPR John scientist Delhi
"david starr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:57 min | 5 months ago

"david starr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And kill your dog and rest your bike. Will decay your most precious memories. Topple your favorite cities wrecked any sanctuary you can ever build. It's not if it's when chaos is the only sure thing in this world. The master that rules us all. My scientist father taught me early that there is no escaping the second law of thermodynamics. Entropy is only growing. It can never be diminished. No matter what we do A smart human accept this truth. A smart human does not try to fight it. But one spring day in 1906 tall American man with a walrus moustache dared to challenge Our master. Okay. I'm Janet, you moron. This is radio lab. And that was Lula Miller, former radio lab. ER, co founder of the five cast invisibility, a And now Author. Reading from her brand new book, Why Fish don't exist and we Talk about You're both doing Okay, Lulu. I love this book. Few weeks ago, I called her up to talk about it. It's funny and it's poignant and it's personal and it's Historical and it's philosophical, and it's also like kind of weirdly resonant with this moment we're in Right now, in a way that is Ma'am. Anything maybe I want to ask you about so yeah, it is. I mean, it is about like the book is I feel like self conscious being like it is. It is timely for our times because of it's right there. But it really is like deeply about How to move forward when everything just gets so. Messed up impossibly by the world. And so the superstructure of the whole book is that you're telling the story. So all of these kind of questions get filtered through this one guy. Aziz. You tell the story of a guy named David Starr, Jordan. So who is he? So he is a kind of obscure naturalist and ideologist. So he specialized in fish and his from the 18 hundreds and and then his life crossed into a little bit into the 20th century, And he's an American. I grew up in New York and was in Indiana for awhile and then ended up as actually the first president of Stanford. He Counts himself as having discovered he and his team, having discovered a full fifth of fish known to humans in his day, so over 2000 fish like time minutes in most people's life to discover most scientists, life to discover one species is huge. How did you get interested in him? He was basically this offhand anecdote on a tour that I was getting of the California Academy of Sciences, the science museum, and there was just this detail. About after the 1906 earthquake. Thousands of the fish the jar's broken the fish were separated and the person in charge of that collection instead of just giving up. He invented this technique of tying a label to a fish. So tying the name to the flesh. And in that moment, I thought, what a foolish human like. This is. His day job. He's a taxonomists. His job is to order the unknown. And so, he said. So here he goes for 30 years to produce to do catching fish, naming them putting them in jars. Stocking 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd and then boom. An earthquake comes And destroys it and separates the names from the fish. And to me, there's something there's a message in that, like the message I read in that is in a world ruled by chaos. Any pursuit of order is inherently doomed. And then, like years later, When I had a gun and messed up a lot of things in my life and was just in a place where I felt really lonely and unsure of the path ahead like literally that Guy re surfaced in me like I was like, who was Oh, my gosh, I'm like that guy with the needle and my being cookie. Me specifically, I was thinking about, you know, I was had had left radio lab. You know, when I was trying to write fiction and That wasn't going so hot and like I was I had screwed up this relationship that I loved. And I was trying to get him back by pining and by reaching out to him, and by being patient and years and years were going by. And I just I wondered like him. I just leaving myself into riel, humiliation and danger. And I think I am. But then every now and then I'd wonder about that guy would be like, Well, maybe this is the path he is. Maybe you just have to go through doubt to accomplish something. And maybe that guy wasn't a full Maybe actually, Things ended up okay for him. What happened to him? And that's what started What I thought was enough day and then and then kind of spiraled into this whole book Because then it just went somewhere wavy on my need for Moral instruction. Well, Yeah, perfect sense. Yeah, It's like a the your tour was a seed planted that only bloomed when you found yourself in that same darkness. Totally. I just wanted to read him like a parable. Gotcha. And so in the book, you track his life through all of these ups and downs, and I wanted to give a sketch of that parable of his life without giving too much away. Yeah, David start. Jordan was born at the darkest time of the year, which is perhaps why he became so preoccupied with stars while husking corn on autumn evenings, he writes, I became curious as to the names and significance of the celestial bodies. He could not just enjoy their twinkling. He found them a mess he needed. Ordered known when he was about eight years old. He got his hands on an atlas. Gastronomical charts and began comparing what he saw on the page to what he saw above his head. A night By night, he went creeping out of the house, attempting to learn the name of every star. And according to him, it took him only five years to ring order to the entire night sky as a reward. He chose star that's his middle name and wore it probably for the rest of his life. Having mastered the celestial David Starr, Jordan turned to the terrestrial. On his way home from school. He began to ever so occasionally pluck a velvety blue pom pom or silken orange star from the grass. Some he'd sniff and let it fall to the ground, but occasionally one with linger and his fingers and make it back to his bedroom, where it would lie on his bed and taunt him with its mysterious arrangement of petals. He's the sweet, nerdy boy who loves stars, and then he loves flowers, and eventually he loves fish. And no one cares that his mom throws away his early maps and like he can't get a girl and you can't get a job and he's just like, but I.

David Starr Jordan scientist Lula Miller California Academy of Sciences New York science museum Janet co founder Indiana Stanford president
"david starr" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

10:06 min | 7 months ago

"david starr" Discussed on Radiolab

"Hundreds of them nearly a thousand their holy name tags had scattered all over the lab floor. In just a few seconds genesis had been reversed. His meticulously named fish had become a mass of the unknown again and it wasn't just the earthquake like shortly before that his beloved daughter Barbara had died a little bit before that his wife had died. His first collection of fish actually got struck by lightning and burnt to the ground. Oh yeah so. This guy's life was just uncannily plagued by chaos and he never seemed phase like he just always kept going and that was what really drew me in about him because when I think about the chaos that rules us as always been really hard for me. And you're you're sort of introduced to this idea When you're little kid comes from your dad right. Yeah what was it that he would would tell you when you were young about chaos and nothing in our place in the order things I mean he just jumped really quickly to everything is meaningless like the minute we could understand words just like nothing means nothing and you'll soon be dead like everything was elector on our place in the world and how small it was and how insignificant we were and how there's no plan and there's No God and there's no magic and there's no destiny and there's not even cosmic justice really like try to be a decent human for sure that matters because because nothing matters actually how we treat each other is all that matters and I think he's a very joyful and he's a scientist and he's a very joyful funny life loving person And so I think as a little kid I made the calculation. Like okay if you believe these things you turn joyful like that like okay that he got that way and so then I would believe all the things but then slowly I'd be like Oh why am I so sad you know like or you know and I think it was this weird. Yeah so it was this weird. You know there's the carpet an there's like there is such a bright side to that stuff you know like if nothing matters. Go taste life and go be courageous. Do the thing that might fail because it doesn't matter. And but what do you do when that thought turns dark or when you're having a hard day thought really makes it worse. I think it's I don't know I found myself. I thought about the people in my life. I mean no radio lab with the history that it has had you know we. We've talked to Hook God. Millions of scientists and there are there is a particular cast of mind. That is exactly as you describe your dad. And also David Starr Jordan this kind of relentless optimist. Almost like somebody who embraces the meaninglessness of the world like an exuberant atheist? In a way. Like there's no meaning holy and isn't it marvellous? Let's hardy yeah. Let's just harder than exuberant. And I I hear you asking the question. Okay agree with you but I can't quite get to the phrase and isn't it marvellous? I can't quite get there. How do I get there like you enquiring that about David Starr Jordan through the book? Like how are you that way you are in the face of all of this chaos total that is so well put? Yeah like I hear you I hear you and then how do I get there and maybe I don't you know poor David Jordan sort of who? I just like through my just existential angst onto but I think I thought he might be. He might have an answer to like. How do you manufacture that that ability to go on on a dark day if you don't believe in anything in Lulu does sort of find an answer for what propelled David Starr Jordan? But it turns out that thing that belief also led him down a really dark path. And we'll go down that path with Lulu after the break. Hey this is florian calling from Linz in Austria. Radio lab is supported in part by the Alfred P Sloan Foundation enhancing public understanding of science and technology in the modern world one for mission about Sloan at www dot. Sloan Dot Org. Jad this is radio lab we have been talking to Lulu Miller about her new book. Y Fish don't exist which is about the chaos and meaningless -ness of the universe and particularly about a guy a scientist named David Starr Jordan who was plagued by that chaos but somehow found a way to push through it all. Yeah and I think the way that he figured out you know. The way that he kept going a key part was that he found purpose in ordering things. He thought that he was solving divine. Plan this hierarchy nature laid out by God and he would eventually you come to believe in Darwinism. Let go of that idea. But he still thought he was. Uncovering a sacred hierarchy. He just believed that this ordering of the natural world had purpose and that alone bullied him through really hard times but like that very belief in an order is also what started to make. Things really turned for him and we actually touched on this part of David Starr Jordan story in an episode that we did over the summer called unfit so here we go so this I guess so. This whole thing begins with a guy and his name is mark bold it is the story of the Supreme Court Case Buck v Bell which made it legal to sterilize people based on eugenics that is the idea that some categories of humans should not exist. Destroy goes into the history of that idea and also the very troubling ways. It is still with us today and David Starr Jordan at a certain point. Quick spoiler alert. If you haven't read the book yet he makes an appearance. So my dude was like one of the earliest loudest most powerful proponents of eugenics. You can see like in the late eighteen hundreds which is decades. Before most American EUGENICIST got the fever. He's slipping it into his courses at Stanford so he's like telling smart him. All these ideas that poverty is linked to the blood and can be exterminated trot these ideas out in front of like hundreds of politicians. And he says you know this is a matter of life and death for the nation and he said the hume the the republic will endure only as long as the human harvest is good. That's a horrible. And he wrote this book he called. He wrote a book called the Human Harvest. Holding it right here and in horrible title. It's it's and it's it's it's horrible inside. He tells to scare people he tells people about this town in Italy called Aosta which for about thirteen hundred. Years was this sort of refuge for people with disabilities or deformities. People send them there in the Church would take care of them and then they can often get married and they work the fields and have families in their helped by the church and some people see that as this beautiful tale of like helping societies role in her bowl and he went there and he wrote about it as a veritable chamber of horrors basically he says he describes the people living there and say they have less decency than the pig and he he like says that it's a different. It's a subspecies of human. And he says this is where you know. America's going to be going if we don't take action. Oh so your guy who sort of seemed to be like a guide for you at a meaninglessness All of a sudden you discover. He's a eugenicist. How did you have that sit with you? Oh I mean it was just utter revolt in like wanted to just throw my arms off him and then I felt a little laws but I think I started to try to really understand like what went so wrong here and after looking at tons of his stuff I actually think the sin wasn't so much the desire to find order in nature. I think it was his certainty. Like things really began to turn for the worse when he just white knuckled his beliefs that the categories between people are fixed and real and immutable and so like at the end of the book. The thing I really come away with is a real wariness of the categories around us. I think you know that's why I titled the Book The Way I did. Why fish don't exist I know it's kind of an obnoxious or maybe seemingly like the like urinating no and what. It's just yeah I think it could be. I don't know but yeah. I don't think it will spoil anything if I asked this question. But let's explain the title. Why don't fish exist? Like what does that mean even mean? Yeah Yeah I think the best way to do it as just to say okay. So like picture a Osaman and a lung fish which looks like a very fishy fish. Kind of big guest right. Yeah and then picture.

David Starr Jordan scientist David Jordan Alfred P Sloan Foundation Barbara Lulu Miller Stanford hardy Sloan fever Austria Aosta florian America Supreme Court Linz Italy Buck Bell
"david starr" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

02:15 min | 7 months ago

"david starr" Discussed on Radiolab

"Just I wondered like am I just leading myself into real humiliation and danger and I think I am but then every now and then. I'd wonder about that guy. I'd be like well. Maybe this is the path. Maybe you just have to go through doubt to accomplish something and maybe that guy wasn't a full maybe actually things ended up okay for him. What happened to him? And that's what started. What I thought was an essay and then and then kind of spiraled into this whole book because then it just went somewhere way beyond my need for moral instruction. Wow yeah that's perfect sense. Yeah it's like Y- The your tour was a seed planted. That only bloomed. When you found yourself in that same darkness total just wanted to read him like a parable. Gotcha and so in the book you track his life through all of these ups and downs and I wonder if you can give a sketch of that parable of his life without giving too much away. Yeah David Starr. Jordan was born at the darkest time of the year which is perhaps why he became so preoccupied with the stars while husking corn on autumn evenings. He writes I became curious as to the names and significance of the celestial bodies. He could not just enjoy their twinkling. He found them a mess. He needed ordered known when he was about eight years old. He got his hands on an atlas of Astronomical Charts and began comparing what he saw on the page to what he saw of his head night by night he went creeping out of the house attempting to learn the name of every star and according to him it took him only five years to ring order to the entire night sky as a reward he chose star as his middle name and wore it proudly for the rest of his life having mastered the Celestial Deal David Starr Jordan turned to the terrestrial on his way home from school he began to ever so occasionally pluck a velvety blue pom pom or Silken orange star from the grass. Some he'd sniff and let fall to the ground but occasionally one would linger in his fingers and make it back to his bedroom where it would lie on his bed and taunt him with mysterious of pedals..

David Starr Jordan David Starr Astronomical Charts
"david starr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:46 min | 7 months ago

"david starr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Thank you the rain and on we go ten times uncertainty we often look for a role model someone who can lead us to the right answer or at least possibly lead by example which she had a particularly rough patch Lou Miller look for the life of David Starr Johnson a turn of the century American scientist who discovered thousands of fish became the first president of Stanford University and a man weathered many personal losses but if you try to glean meaning and insight from his life and work she found out the truth was much more complicated her book why fish don't exist a story of love loss and the order of life is part memoir part biography with a science history and philosophical exploration as well Lou Lou is a contributing editor and co founder of the NPR program Invisibilia and before that she was part of team radio lab at W. NYC Lulu Miller welcome to all of it it is so great to be here thank you for having me how did you first come upon the life in the work of David Starr Jordan I was totally accidental there was a little you have to go on a tour of the science museum out in San Francisco the California academy of sciences where it was mentioned that after the night you know six earthquake nearly all the fish specimen were destroyed and somebody somebody in charge of them came up with the ingenious idea of selling labels to the fish themselves so that should another earthquake ever come chaos would not would not interfere with humans order and I thought that was such a funny expression of like human stubbornness to believe that that that we could out smart care itself and for many years but I just kind of chuckled at that hi and then yeah the cures years and years later he kind of came back to the question of I wonder what would happen to someone so so brazen and and sure of themselves in the face of of chaos so it was just an accident and and didn't ever know where it's going to take me you read about it it's the writing on that is so great you right hundreds of jar shattered against the floor his fish specimens were mutilated by broken glass and falling shells but worst of all were the names those carefully placed ten tags have launched all over the ground in some terrible active genesis in reversed his thousands of meticulously name Fisher transformed back into a heaping mass of the unknown so that's how it started for you once she went and her whole writing process and as you researched him and you you sort of research your own brain in your own life what was it about that moment that you think launch this book for you you know it was seeing it was starting to see that there are with a human face to so many different choices in a moment of destruction and kind of the question driving it for me was what do we do do do we inhabit some degree of potentially foolish optimism even if we're given all the evidence that we have no chance that we keep failing that we keep being wrecked by these huge forces of of nature and chaos or do we need to look really humbly and look that look are doing drugs in the face and is that how we March forward with the dignity and and make headway Anna and it really helped her plaque that was kind of the question that that that drove me and then and then life being what it is casting what it was that the answers I got were at the point that we're sort of complex that that wasn't the thing I think I was really investigating as I fell down the rabbit hole of his life my guess is Lou Miller the name of the book is fish don't exist a story of love loss and order of life and there's early in the book we learn a story about you when your dad which once I heard us like I understand why she's thinking these big thought at seven years old you ask your father with the meaning of life is do you remember what prompted you to reduce that and sure we told you so I think it was honestly a mix of things I think I remember these these commercials in the nineteen eighties by the church of latter day saints whether it be like a little family mishap or cute and what happened and then at the end it would take join the church and discover the purpose of life and I started to think the purpose of life the meaning of life with the fortune that if you ask the right person would just be back out and reveal to you it would all make sense I think I think television like influence my brain to believe there was a one line answer to that question and then there was just some early morning with my dad we were looking we were kind of bird watching looking at the horizon in Cape Cod and it was something about the question of what happened where static water that started under thing big questions in my brain and I ask what is the meaning of life and needs a took a big pause and then joyfully said nothing the whole rant about how there's no meaning how we mattered less to the planet than even an ant because at least answer aerate the soil do something useful and there you know will soon be gone and we were we were brought here accidentally and and there's no point and have a good day it was just yeah it was very declarative leaving leaving not much room for for mystery or ambiguity beyond that in his mind so that yeah I think that's a very fair to say that shaped me in a in a certain way how did that change the way started making decisions for yourself I mean I think that you just I think it haunted everything and sometimes it is really beautiful like if if I was gonna do something that was scary like you know now I'm thinking about radio lab because of that introduction but like right demo of basically an intern request a gay love letter you know this show I had no training I heard that back in two thousand five just toss it into the universe and see what happened or something you know like if someone or take a risk it's not flying with it doesn't matter thank you for your courage I can fill your sales it can if used everything with carpet yet but I think it it also really influenced me on Harding is where the world is being cruel to me here to my sister or you know just seeing cruelty and meaninglessness when you're in pain and when you don't have hope can obviously really deflate you further and so then it kind of it would it started to just ignite the question in my mind of like well why stay if there's no point in you feel bad at living in the world feels cool so I think it is on Sunday the give me courage and on Sundays it really it really left me kind of weak you can about your teenage years being difficult and that and you you considered ending your life first of all why why did you want to write about that yeah I you know I I started the story thinking I was writing about a weird scientist and didn't see that this was going to fall into the book but with you know kind of the help for pressure of my editor who after the first draft why do you care about this guy so much white hair I finally started to go deep and pretty quickly got to that point because I think what I was looking to the science David Starr Jordan and was how did he get it optimism on dark days in the reason I wanted that question was because I didn't know how to I was hitting a point where I didn't know how to find it for myself and so when I finally went there you know my editor wow this like this snap it into place wires hooks up with him and I think if you feel safe let's work together to slowly safely like put this in a way you're comfortable with and then many years honestly this is a long journey like many years into incurring with the words of the amount I just let some of that in there anyway you know it's like it's weird to be talking about it with you right now because it it is something I've kept guarded and and certainly that big like constructed a lot of my personality in an attempt to hide but I ever to you know try to do that when I was in high school but I've also been telling emotional stories for fifteen years as a journalist and I know how much people can heal for sharing so there was just a giant you know let's just do it why not let's just put this out there it's not it's not the worst thing you know so it's out there so there goes my guess is Lou Miller the name of her book is fish don't exist a story of love loss and order of life so you've mentioned that this you had some contents interest in David Starr Jordans life story you wondered you right I wondered if he had stumbled across some tricks and prescription for hope and uncaring world perhaps you crack something essential about how to have hope in a world of no promises how to carry forward in the darkest days and how to have faith without capital F. face up did you did you stumble across any answers or any tricks the daily star journal had in his back to him yeah I I mean I think has been his biggest trick it with a healthy dose of self delusion which is often heard by the psychologist to be called positive illusions so like a little dash of a of a rosy view of the world in your abilities can really help I mean he writes very explicitly about always having what he called the shield of optimism which was so sick that people would comment on it and other people right like no matter how bad the days you could always be found quote a humming the tune that that'll be arcade like he's he's somebody and he put it very explicitly he does not concentrate on his failures he doesn't study that you know he for someone who studies the world so closely he was that passionate successful naturalist who discovered hundreds of new species of fish he's a very close look but he doesn't look at his failures he doesn't look it is rejected he doesn't look at his loss and I think that there real insight there I mean I would hope that all of us interested in being mildly human souls will examine our our failures and our and our methods but I think the local there is something to learn from him in in maybe not giving it so much time look and then keep moving forward and I think that that is a hero I think that colleges have now studied this for like fifty years very rigorously and there is a strange alchemy of delusion where you have a slight illusion of grandeur in your head and it translates to a reality if granted the stuff a little bit of a sunny attitude helps you a you know an assertive underneath so the attitude of yourself can help you get healthier get more jobs do better relationship that has real life the fact that there is I think there is something to learn from him and and I do think about him in this moment like he there's a darker side to him too but wow did he respond well to chaos like you just moved to the next thing so so I've been thinking about him a lot lately I was gonna ask about that the some of the darker things because people who are like that you have that the rest of us have to deal with them I know you know there's a cost to it it's a it's a two other people and you know I wonder about because some of his methods for finding and capturing the Fisher kind of disturbing a little bit and my gosh yeah genius but the starving absolutely yeah yeah he I mean I think this is like it's it's the thing with with ingenuity and creativity as it matters how you use it and he just he used that to accomplish any and he wanted and I don't think he fought very much about other people and what he did because he he eventually would become a very passionate defender of eugenics and he thought that that this was a good idea that you could in theory green certain types out of the human race he wanted to do that because he thought he was helping you know saving society or from suffering in crime and he was horribly misguided not only in his science but in his in his beliefs about who who makes a good society and it's just a yeah I just think about you know this this idea about human stubbornness and persistence can allow us to accomplish such unthinkable thing.

David Starr Johnson Lou Miller
"david starr" Discussed on RAGE Works Network-All Shows

RAGE Works Network-All Shows

13:08 min | 1 year ago

"david starr" Discussed on RAGE Works Network-All Shows

"Got him <hes>. We watch indy wrestling. I gotta say honestly as much shit. If people beginning joey journal say that this past week i'd beyond wrestling americana anna his sixty minute match with david starr was actually really good. People are gonna match much parade. Yeah i am not going to i can't take it away from he actually did really good david star so so dad great fucking match people given that most praise so typically had <hes> that match definitely go yeah all right. Let's do what we we watched. Wrestling is represented by nobody. No so we started off monday night raw with the twenty four hour championship giving getting a pretty prestigious opening video was that i mean i think so. They basically saying like fuck. Fuck this. It should <hes> so we are choosing carmella versus <hes> drake maverick and rename new jon moxley theme eighty w good look actually like to shoot in a lot. Actually we watch wrestling.

david starr Wrestling jon moxley joey journal twenty four hour sixty minute eighty w
"david starr" Discussed on AppleInsider Podcast

AppleInsider Podcast

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"david starr" Discussed on AppleInsider Podcast

"You don't get updates nicely so so then they'd have to make their own compiled updates throws p initially there. They're all kinds of that have to make own updates and then not spread them out to the phones, just to get the same sort of experience. The real Andre is get by say. Yes. Yes. Absolutely. But it is a difficult thing to it's under dig and. It. Yeah. It's problematic. Now. Today, I was in a meeting, but they have bigger problems. Right. Because arm is also working with them. So I gotta I gotta figure out how to get there. Checking in every phone, they're gonna have to figure out how to get modems because Qualcomm oh, maybe get Intel not. Okay. Or. Yeah. Similar properly Moore even but yes to. Yeah. So, so this is a big. I mean, does it spell the end of why you're the perception? I was long mates. Big mic and the number of times, people actually directed a comment to the phones because they said China was listing through. Was fest, but it was actually quite remarkably repetitive throughout the day perception. Is that the? Could you about them? Those andrea. They went to Hawaii uses ideas. Phones just white to but. I say should. I did it very amusingly but. One of those the first time funny, second time, not so much these people first second, maybe full to, I'm funny. But this always diminishing returns. Yes. Out of the end of the listening to us here. So. Now. It's just you me and twenty thousand Kura closest rentals just the three of us, isn't it? I'm very happy. There's three of us just I, I feel sorry for her way if they all doing. Well, they are of than this is good this being stopped, but he who knows what Scientology politics at I find it disturbing. The company convey dismembered like this remotely, it was Mike. What if somebody might do true? Very true. Now, there we talked in the past about how rural telecoms us while way too eager to power. They're, they're totally s. Looking to hear some of? Yes. Yeah. Well photo phone is launching five using gear. So there is a proposed US Senate Bill that would set aside seven hundred million dollars to rural telecoms in or tell the help them void while gear basically subsidizing the purchase of competed competitive said, they're competitive competing products. If you a hallway customer of that scale is just how I. Yeah. I mean, it's it's price a lot like we were talking about that Jim survey. Right. You know windows users would love to afford MAC, but, but can't well rural telecoms aren't exactly rolling in who they buy, if jumps of them, who would they say they would rather be buying. Question. It's a very good question. I mean, you'd think it'd be things like Cisco and, and Qualcomm stuff. The Senate Bill hasn't specified that because. Well, the, the Bill is not law. It's not regulation yet. It's just the proposal spent. Speaking of, of security, and flaws, and, and exposing user information, right? A scary discovered a flaw in Instagram's website. At least it isn't Facebook. I couldn't resist Instagram property of Facebook. So in a surprise move, let's go room with left user, contact information, exposed for months. Said millions my fish aggressive. Sunsets have exposed to Acas the world over. Right. So David Starr, more steer data scientist and business all discovered earlier this year in issue with Instagram's website in which source code for some user profiles, contained private contact information. That's not made available on public facing pages. So he showed archive version of Instagram.

telecoms Instagram Qualcomm Senate Facebook David Starr Andre thousand Kura Intel Hawaii US Moore China Scientology Jim survey Mike scientist Cisco
"david starr" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"david starr" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

"Well, he has played poorly this year, but I feel I've seen a body of work up to this point where I tell you this. I'd rather have him. I think Brandon Ingram. Really? I'd rather have Brown than Ingram and not. So sure why people are still wild about Ingram. I mean the thing with Ingram is that he's the primary bowl handler. Right. So he has more like maybe star potential than Jaylen Brown does. Jaylen brown. Jaylen Brown's better complementary piece. Yeah. But I don't know if I want Brandon Ingram to be my primary volume. That's that is the ultimate question. Like, he can do it. But I don't think that's what I want out of him. But no, I'm not. I don't I I don't have anything bad to say about any of the Lakers young players. I don't know how many of them are all-stars though. Because right now, the one that looks most like closest to becoming an all stars. Kuzma, right. As a Lakers fan. I'm like really hoping that the pelicans don't hear this podcast because I do not want people to know that Brandon Ingram isn't could not be that number one option. He's he's really good. He could be he could be a top op. He could be the best player in the championship team. I'll see what he could. He really he really could not coups though, Cosmas. You know, he's he's not not as guy you wanna vote your team round to sell. They'll have lots of pissed off and stuff. Oh, they do. Now. Here's the question. Would you give up Tatum and Brown for Anthony Davis? I would. Yeah. I mean, I looked up eighties twenty-five, man. Yeah. He's twenty five. I mean, he's like right in the prime like approaching the prime. He isn't even reached the ceiling. None of the names that we have mentioned is young guys. None of us think they'll get close to being as good as Anthony Davis. Not even close by do you? Jason Tatum will be a top-five NBA player. I mean in my lake own small amount of analysis that is insignificant. I do not think so I think he's really good. I think he's ultimately going to be really good. But I don't know if I see dude that's going to be a top five player. I don't I don't I don't see that out of any of these thing is it's like how many of them are you willing to give up and where this would get fascinating. If this goes all the way to July, which will no they can't trade Anthony Davis during the season if this gift to July, and it turns into a bidding war, then it just becomes about who's going to blink. As though the pelicans will back when they were the Hornets were in a very similar situation. Obviously with Chris Paul in two thousand twelve. They didn't really have any leverage though. Chris Paul made it clear where it was that. He was that he wanted to go. And then from there Trey was made and then the trae was canceled. You remember that gate? Let's not speak anymore about this. Feelings are still very Chris Paul to the Lakers and David Starr said that that wasn't going to happen. Then he wound to go into the clippers. Yeah. Yeah. I remember. Okay. Okay. Just wasn't sure. Yeah. It wasn't. It wasn't like it was it was big for a little while. But it's not like people still talk about it or anything. Remember that what what Chris bond traders? Of. But yeah, they that's what they but the truth is they wound up with a trade. They made somebody look up. It'd be like this is inappropriate. You can't do. This fantasy Commissioner jump did said the jury was lopsided. Avenue. Davis can put the pelicans in a very similar situation..

Brandon Ingram Hornets Anthony Davis Jaylen Brown Lakers Chris Paul Jason Tatum Chris bond Kuzma Commissioner David Starr Cosmas clippers Trey
"david starr" Discussed on In The Draft Show - NASCAR Talk

In The Draft Show - NASCAR Talk

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"david starr" Discussed on In The Draft Show - NASCAR Talk

"That's where I remember you from. We've talked about liveries before like team liver. Do you think that drivers like the number should go with the drivers post to the team? In other sports. Do we like in Formula one all of the drivers pick their number? And Ryan if they switch teams there number goes with them. Okay. Yeah. But I think that that much like everything else in Europe. It's all about the big business owner in America. And then they go ahead, and they get I think I think it should be more SaaS with the team. Because when I think when I think number six, do you think you think rows, do you think Mark Martin who do you think he think grouch with that? I'd say all right. What about seventeen Matt Kenseth Ricky Stenhouse? I think row on that one. Yeah. I guess. So I mean, the number three, obviously, that's that seniors number right? We SEC. That's the case where you'd say driver. I would say, but the the you retire that number. Well, then that's really up to Richard shelters, and obviously he didn't want to I guess, but I think I think it's easier for all right? Perfect point number four who do you associate that with? Yeah. I guess as Kevin Harvick in that one. See I say Ernie Irvan right on for the more McClure car very fair. That's very fair. I mean, who do you socio it the driver the number two? Do you societas with Penske rusty Wallace? Brad Kazlauskiene, man. See I think rusty when I think that number, but I guess I should think Penske really I think Kurt Busch. So. But I mean, I think it has to be a team thing. I think it has to be these are the numbers, you guys get a lot in you. And and and the drivers have to change. Yeah. And you know, the thing that the example I use with Formula one where they'll pick their numbers. And then they keep them in that sport drivers move around a lot less frequently than they move. I mean a NASCAR you'd have to like oh bike racing. For instance. If the driver if the number one with the driver, they'd have to have two different numbers two different weeks could be the ninety seven necessarily because maybe David Starr has one number. And then maybe, you know, drew Barrymore whoever they've gotten the car this week has another number ten ten or berry hander burial. Yes. Yes. Yes. He's gonna get disrespecting the track. There's no need for him on this show. Who do you think would be faster in the bike racing car this weekend, Tanner, Berryhill or drew Barrymore? Is I think it's a push..

Barrymore Penske Mark Martin Ernie Irvan rusty Wallace Kevin Harvick Matt Kenseth Kurt Busch Europe David Starr business owner Brad Kazlauskiene Ryan Ricky Stenhouse NASCAR Richard McClure America
"david starr" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"david starr" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"If I don't if that conversation doesn't have happened. I don't do. Black magic episode doesn't turn me down. I don't crazy love. So that's the way that's the way life is. I mean, you know. It's about preparation. It's not only about having the right mentor is about being the best possibles duty. Have you? I mean, we should full disclosure. Adam is when you're good friends. I love had him and I love David too. But. At Adam to death. Now, an incredibly powerful person who runs a league that has never been doing better ever at any. Unbelievable respect for him. So younger guys worked as behind of. I have great great respect for David Starr, both of them and the league or instrumental in mean being allowed to make this film and many many people Donnie Walsh. I mean, the people that open doors for me, Bob, Ryan, you I mean there they're just. You know, Jack, Ramsay son and doll Shays is on. And you know, and John Thomson. I mean, just you know, really, I find out about the game that there is this the commonality is not only global, but it's within this is a shared love, you know. And I I say this that that I I'm not sure about this. But long form documentary film making now. Why does it have to be linear? Why is it have to be quite a logical? Why does it have to be viewed as a history? I did I didn't do that. You know, it's short stories. So someone could come up that's inherently smarter than me and do the same type of take our music or in comedy on the theater or on dance the same way. If I opened his film James Naismith, I'm snoring. But he comes up in the fourth scene in the third story. PJ Carlesimo is getting soaked by spree. Well. I chose to do it that way right to do with that way. Yeah. I brought a Badham because you know, he's on a really good run right now. But you've known him for a lot of years. Is there an embarrassing store? You can tell us about them. Funny story is there some. Working some sort of Corky. Something. Still come on. I'm going to tell you that one of his key got laid at my wedding. That's all I'm gonna say. That's far as I'm going. Okay. They what was your favorite Bill? Simmons performance in your documentary. I went third person there. What's the what's the scene for fans of this podcast? What's the key out of all these ones that I'm in what what's the one? You. You should tell people go watch him in this one. He's really he's really bringing it. Right. I mean, everyone knows we're only kidding out in the movie, right? They don't. You know, there are a couple of people, I wouldn't agree, and I'm still pissed at you for not agreeing to being, you know, had their you. I'm still mad. This movie. Okay. I'm not sure if it's my favorite, but I do the scene on the on the first lottery. Yeah. And which is a really funny scene. You know, and I love that one. And you're of course, like, you know, you're you're you know, you call it the greatest magic trick you've ever seen. Don't know if we could ever be repeated in terms of the envelope wasn't my favorite line, my favorite line from you was when when it turned up the Knicks, and I come to you when you say the Knicks got him. Anyway, plenty that's the Knicks is they've been terrible forever. Eat the guy termi out of that was Bill. Russell bill. Russell was like these guys. The Knicks are always ofo. Of course, we're going to give you any credit. I realize this conversation's completely about you. As much as I hate to give you any credit. You have very astute at certain points, and actually especially when LeBron comes to Miami the first time, and that's what people don't understand you hit it on the head. I mean, you you you I think you call the dueling banjos is my possession. Lebron his mind for Wade. And they don't win that year. That's the element the missing element of championship team. Is you know chemistry is a word, but what is chemistry really mean? It means. You have a leader that defines the correct roles and everyone buys into them. That's what it means. It wasn't until Wade got a little going a got her people don't realize that Wade..

Knicks Russell bill Adam PJ Carlesimo David Starr Wade James Naismith Donnie Walsh LeBron John Thomson Simmons Miami Jack Bob Shays Ryan Ramsay
"david starr" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"david starr" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Indiana university and stanford university actually have a long historical tie david starr jordan the seventh president of indiana university in eighteen ninety one km west to become stamford's very first president ninety six years later tom early then the dean of the stanford law school came east to become the fifteenth president of indiana university so for me it is very meaningful and a great honor to be here today to celebrate this commencement with you the root of the word commence has a latin origin meaning to begin or to initiate now many of you probably think of this day as the ending of your time at the university and the parents in the audience will be happy to know that it is the end of tuition it is also however the beginning of the rest of your life and is on that that i would like to offer my thoughts i believe deeply in the transformative power of education it can truly change lives not only the life of the individual student but all the lives that graduate eventually touches and not just in the few years after you graduate but in the decades ahead when your life's work maybe something you never contemplated for that to happen you must first find your passion and make that your life's work i was fortunate to discover that i loved computing early on i lift program just for the sheer fun of it i love my courses in graduate school from theory to practice and i found that i was good at computer science which certainly helps it's hard to have the passion for something you're not good at golf may be being the prime exception in the vast majority of highly accomplished people i have known from political leaders to nobel prize winners from educators to ceo's their passion for their chosen pursuit and their success in that pursuit have been closely linked the courage to pursue my passion and chase my dreams with the encouragement of teachers and colleagues and mentors shaped my life at several crucial junctions in the early nineteen eighties when i began my research at stanford we undertook a research project that resulted in the development of a new microprocessor as mentioned earlier it was the one of the.

president indiana university stamford stanford law school ceo stanford david starr tom nobel prize eighteen ninety one km ninety six years
"david starr" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"david starr" Discussed on WRVA

"Field his lead now one point six seconds over john hundred check steve it's been interesting to note that up until this race whole custer had only led five laps this season right now he's been in front of all fifteen tonight i know when he came off from such a strong wind on homestead miami speedway no they had high hopes for a start to the season but right now he has maybe catching up on that lost time if you will he has opened up a big advantage it was one point such the last it's one point eight now so cole custer really has that ford mustang wound up here in the early going one point eight seconds again for cole custer custer rolls off from number two right now clean salome but alex out the front windshield there's going to be some lap traffic coming up for customer anywhere from six to seven cars person will be timmy hill some twenty or so colleagues just in front of the race leader and that's going to be some had traffic that the leader is going to have to work through right now single wilder going double wide and cole custer starting to pick up and lay down and catch the tail end of the field turned number two cold custer made that twenty car lake deficit from the back of the field down to about five now that's how fast call customer risk those backmarkers are side by side right in front of him indeed and he has caught the tail end of that field the first car that it catches timmy health now they get into single file formation custer dives to the inside shorts to work is way through that latte traffic caution is on the speedway david starr has stalled on the speedway and that will put us under the caution flag for the first time tonight we told you that mike harmon has had trouble morgan shepherd has had challenges and now it's david starr who car whose car come coast to a halt just off turn to and onto the back straight away at nascar we're switching to more green solutions and biofuel like sonoko greed fifteen so that we can set off or i'm sorry we can offset.

john cole custer mustang alex david starr mike harmon morgan shepherd nascar steve it miami ford eight seconds six seconds