20 Episode results for "David Sort"

How To Start and Grow a Podcast with David Perrell, Jeff Umbro, and Sachit Gupta

Venture Stories

48:01 min | 7 months ago

How To Start and Grow a Podcast with David Perrell, Jeff Umbro, and Sachit Gupta

"Quick message before we start this podcast and how to start and grow your own podcast comes on the day of Ondeck podcast fellowship. So if you're interested in learning how to start or grow a podcast of your own in a community of peers and great guest speakers, professionals who've done it before checkout beyond deck dot Com to learn more. Okay Let's hear from David Suchit and Jeff. Hey everybody. It's co-founder Partner village global eight network driven venture firm, and this is metro stories a podcast covering topics related to. Business with world leading experts. Everybody. Welcome to another episode Adventure Stories Village Global I'm here today joined by three very special guests with David Parral. We've Jeff Umbro we've sought Gupta all of you who made podcasts are in the business of biogas more broadly, and we're here today to talk about why people should have a podcast the how to get off the ground, how to grow it David I wanNA start with you. Now, of course, you're running right of passage and that's your business but you've also run this podcast Northstar few years. Now I've been a big fan of it. Looks like the inspiration based why should people start a podcast would have gotten out of starting your podcast and how do you recommend people will think about it? Yeah. So I started a podcast out of sheer desperation in the least sexy way possible I was interning in New York back when I was a college student and I wanted to go meet all these cool people at look at all these tall buildings that look like they towered up to the heavens they looked like they were so tall, they would crash into the airplane soaring above them and. What meeting meet people night email people it'd be like Hey WanNa have lunch WanNa get coffee no response and I'm like this Hungary eighteen year old guy and I'm like I'm going to try something I'm going to start a podcast. So then I reached out to people's like, Hey, can I interview? You sure here is an entire block of time in the afternoon and rather than going to you for lunch or coffee you can come to my office I will the Corner Office for you and this was before podcasts are really popular and I was just like wait this is a serious competitive advantage. This is something no one else knows about and so that's what I did not. Amazing way to to build a network. What advice would you give to people who feel like it's too intimidating to to send emails to these people or what's the best way to craft it such that they're likely to get a positive response because the people you're interviewing I'm sure also get a bunch of other podcasts requests to. So how do you separate different from the noise? So you want to send a very personalized. Email and you want to do that by not by saying, I have read all your stuff or stuff like that. You want to say something like when I reached out to nick onus who runs Linnea, which is one of the top rated restaurants in the world I said Hey I know that you are an options trader and now you're work in the restaurant industry I would like to talk about the work of Richard. And seem lead who I know that you're really interested in. Also I'm a big golfer just like you and I would like to talk about how you've applied your interest in golf to the restaurant industry. So what I did was went super specific on what I wanted to talk about and it also listened to his other podcasts and I knew that he hadn't spoken about those things before and then also. If, you're just getting started out making an offer to do a little extra hustling. You can say, Hey, I'll do a transcript for you. I'll chop up some of the video so that you can have them on. Youtube, and I'm pretty confident that this is a conversation that will be so good and so true to the ways in which your skilled the things that you want to say to the world that you haven't gotten a chance to say before and I. Will help you spread your message, and if you can do that, you can communicate that you're young and you're hungry and you're curious and do it in a way that is very clearly focused on the other person done in a way that's personal. You'll have tremendous success, SASHA WH, what you had to that you were to some of the biggest names in podcasting that went out to to start start yourself. Yeah. I think one of the things that David mentioned PODCASTING is a way to basically learn about any topic that you walk. And Talk to biggest experts and I think that's one of the reasons why people should start a podcast I think it's interesting also from a marketing perspective Seth Godin has this quote. People. Get writers lock or talking about getting right as luck no-one gets talkers block. And as such an easy way to create content that you can then parlay intellect forms of different content youtube writing all these different things. Were a lot of podcasts starting out I think two things that trip people up most league is one is this idea of people think that they have to find their voice? Before. The start podcasting and like the thing I discovered for myself was you don't start with. And then go podcasting you start podcasting through the process. That's how you discover your voice netting. Another thing that people are really afraid of as their unafraid of starting they're afraid of being seen starting really small. And like one of the things you can do feel like any creature that you admire like go back and look at the early work. Everyone started small like their first have seven user ten to dislike that secures journey that like you grow grow slowly and I think it's important to remember that. Totally, one tip. Give to people as because they feel like they podcast. It's like a lifelong commitment to finish the do spas. Forever's is maybe do a season maybe do ten episodes. It's a season. You see how you enjoy it. If you liked it just just just keep continuing but just add your points. Having podcast has changed my life it's allowed me to you meet so so many great people in the context of a one. Way Conversation when normally that would be a as appropriate in a way that gives them value and is also just allowed me to make so many friends from people who listen to my podcast and really resonate with the types of conversations I have, and when we when we meet the first time, they feel like they know me really well because they've seen me sort of think aloud in a collective process so. Jeff. You on the Glamour, which produces a bunch of gas which services a bunch of PODCAST, which overall by media company, we ucs over the biggest bottlenecks that prevent people from getting started and what advice do you give a yeah I mean I think that question is going to be determined by like WHO's trying to start the podcast you know whether it's an organization and individual somebody's trying to do for fun or if somebody has a greater mission. In Mind but a lot of times people are kind of prevented from starting something because they have these like big broad goals and they don't necessarily know how to reach them. So I think that you should just immediately come up with like, why are you starting to sing and what are you trying to get out of it and then try and work backwards from there. So I think that some of the bottle next year on a tour time resources. Everybody has like kind of a different goal here. You know. I think it's just a matter of figuring out what that is first and then going backwards. David sort of the for people who look like Oh equipment that's intimidating her own editing that's intimidating what serve the bare bones set up. Like how do you think about editing or How do you helped people started? Yeah. What I would focus on is actually one of my biggest regrets of the podcast is not investing in audio equipment earlier people can forget that video. They can't forget that audio and it took me years to learn that lesson and so if I can just convince you here to get audio that is very good you don't need to get the best microphone in the world but get good audio quality do it do it? Do it please do not make the same mistake I did it is might be by biggest regret if my career so far because of all the conversations had. So I interviewed Neil, degrasse Tyson like seventh episode ever okay and I walk into his office and I'm twenty one years old and this day was like nothing I ever expected. I walk in to sit down again hour and a half with arguably the most famous astrophysicists in the world and I had a cheap microphone that I had six feet away. From me. So I had to use the hit the same microphone for both audio tracks. It was humiliating. The podcast did not turn out well at I'm really bummed about it. So so please do yourself a favor and get good audio. Now, if you should optimize their one of the things is that now is a great time to start a podcast because they're so easy to record over zoom and when I was recording, I was like every single one in. New York City. So I'd go around with all. My stuff through New York I had my stuff stolen on the subway and so so stressful cortisol levels would be to the sky all day, and now I'm recording on zoom and it's way more fun. It's way easier. It works just as well. So where you got to optimize on the audio equipment because people cannot put up with that audio, you don't need to be so crazy about driving and taking the subway and walking with tons of equipment to meet people do you outsource the editing or do do? I do outsource the editing we have an insane production system. So I record every episode I fill out a notion page that takes me about thirty minutes, and now we finally figured out a system that from that notion page, we have the podcast edited I I've a whole style guide than it is uploaded on my website. Full transcript created a series of youtube videos. That are created email that does out on Wednesdays about every single episode and we have figured out now how to get the most amount of total content from recording the podcast and then thirty minutes of post production and notion, and I'll be publishing a guide to that entire process open sourcing with temperatures. It's and everything for free just because I want to help people. It. Reforms. Looks like. David. What's your advice on how to think about choosing a niche for your podcast? Go Get a star one. But how do I separate myself from all the podcasts out there? How should you think about how narrow general? Advice there. Yeah. thinking a lot about this. So I think that the niche for a podcast is not quite as important in terms of interests because personality is such a thing like everyone has such a distinct personality and there are so many different hues and shades of podcasts that work. You know you have Rogan who invites people in and you just sort of hangs out with people for a couple hours and people. Love that and then you have other podcasts that I don't know why more people don't do this. Do like a fifteen part podcast. That's just you talking about fifteen things that you believe about the world type it out get a good outline, just go boom boom boom than any job you apply for anyone you meet any sort of background you just say, Hey, here's an hour and a half worth a podcasts and they're. Just, a bunch of short episodes. You can do what you want and I thought that he said a great thing earlier about finding your voice look it's a co-. Dynamic process you start with a personality and your personality builds then your personality builds at and changes your personality and you be into thank. Okay. Who Wanna be but having a niche will develop and I think that it depends on a lot of factors you. Know, they're sort of implicit and explicit Nietzsche's so like an implicit Nisha would be your personality would be a style of asking questions and those work well as more explicit ones there's a podcast called UNITA budget and it is from a company called guess what you need a budget and guess what they talk about budgeting and it's just all the things that you need to know about budgeting the number of ways to succeed. With a podcast is as wide as the number of ways to succeed in life, but only however, you improved at asking questions and questions would have you learned over time about the ASO here's a juicy one eric. So I came up with this last week. So people are very verse to talking about what they do. Well, it is socially not acceptable to say I am extremely good at this and knowing this people give terrible answers when you ask about the things that they do. So for example, Eric if I were to ask you, hey you know how do you? How are you? Learned so much you might. You know you might say something along the lines are recorded podcast something like that. But like I would be very curious. You know like you might say look nobody else does full tweet storms of every single book that they read and like I read on Liberty by John. Stuart Mill and I gave a full tweet storm with my reactions than how it related to Silicon Valley and look I just work harder than most people and like I can say that, but you would never say that on a podcast. So here's those are the answers that you WANNA get. So here's how you game it. So what you gotTa do you gotta ask Super Specific Questions. And what specific questions do is remove the taboo of talking about the ways in which your excellent, and if you can do that, then you end up getting some really good answers. Now there some nuance, the thing, and this is the art of podcasting is asking a specific question that doesn't lead to a dead end, but that actually continues to create momentum and that. Is extremely difficult to. Remember the guy from Alex. Bloomberg he's. He's. Talking favorite question one. Asks questions. A lot of his is the follow up questions and his favorite Paulo was say more about that. As, a solely to your point jeff and also actually David. I think the such a good idea. I would love to see more people do it. If you tweeted a while ago about this idea about internal company PODCASTS, actually irving with it at computers if you've seen more people do it but I I think just such a great opportunity to for companies to tell a story and for people digits easily sort of imbibing on their own time and feel more to it. Yeah I. Don't know why more companies don't do it. I, mean I feel like we're now about to reach some. Kind of phase transition in company communications with remote work, and this seems like a fairly obvious thing to do I don't know what the numbers are of people who work from home listening to podcasts I think that this works exceptionally well for people who commute. Just talking to my friends who actually work at companies there seems to be a tremendous amount of inefficiency and time that just goes into alignment and it's worth thinking about how you can reduce all that effort. One of the best examples of that actually I think Netflix they have the spot called B.. R.. Netflix's which started internal podcast and then they release it to everyone and apparently now it's one of the biggest recruiting towns. So it's also. There's a lot of companies who are helping businesses try and do this You know wonder media network comes to mind their liquor great company out of York, and basically they'll partner with of like big organizations in the work with their specific teams looking for a certain goal whether it's marketing team or like the internal. HR teams or something, and they'll really you know sit down and they both produce things that are quick and dirty like you know here's the information we have to get out to us to our staff. This could be an email, but we want to make it more personable. So we want to put a voice behind it or like this is something a little bit more produced that really is something that's evergreen that we can use our staff for years to come. That tells the company's story, the company ethics, what we really want to get across and I think that a lot more companies are really starting to get more comfortable doing things like this or is in the past. Maybe, they thought of podcasting is like a novelty as opposed to a tool so I think we're GONNA be seeing a lot more of that in the future. Totally. Jeff. What did transition a little bit into how people think about maximizing to launch for for a podcast and then think about how to how to grow it from there they have a concept they've been each they have a few guests. What's the best way to launch a podcast to maximize? Sure so I like to think I mean Eric knows I. Come from the book. Publicity world. So I like to think of a podcast launch. The same way that you would any other media property television show movie book. Personally. I I use a five approaching in the service that we offer at the camera. But we focus on kind of telling the story of what we're trying to get out in the world whether that is through publicity trying to get reviews of the show interviews with the team behind the show getting the show listed in various platforms that are going to say you know science podcasts Best Tech podcast something like that. Or marketing is using your own own internal channels whether that be your web platform and APP email newsletters, social media to tell the story of what you're trying to do in the world, and you can do that through materials that you create internally a Synopsis Document for the show a pitch letter press release. There's a lot of different kind of ways that you can approach that and. You should also be you know as as such in David mentioned before you know you should be looking at kind of creating various forms of content to try and get that message out. It doesn't always have to be just like a text documented. It can be some kind of social media You know property your asset that you're putting out could be visual, could be audio could be taxed. then. In addition, there's cross promotion and retail merchandising. These are honestly two of the most effective ways to get your message out there when you're trying to promote a show. Especially, if you don't really have an existing platform elsewhere because most of the time people you know listening to podcasts or looking at like the discovery sections of stitcher apple or something, they don't have the barrier of having to learn how to listen to a podcast. That's not something that is still. Like totally relevant today, there's over one hundred, million people in America alone that are listening to podcasts at least once a week But there are still a lot of people, two thirds of the country who who don't listen to podcasts and who don't who might not necessarily know how. So you kind of remove one of those barriers to entry. If you're you know advertising the show through an audio, add the guest opportunity through feed drop. Or getting your show featured within these apps where people are already looking. For. Their next podcast and they already know how to listen. There's a lot of different ways to go about doing that which we could get into later if you'd like and then finally you know there's a always paid opportunities basically, if you can't find your way into these platforms organically and if you have the resources, you can buy your way into them so. On a high level, what's going to be the on boarding mechanism for the people who aren't exposed to podcasts? Yet, what do you think is the Best Bang for the buck in terms of getting those people listen to guess how do we expand the by? Yeah that's the million dollar question. Honestly it's funny because you like somebody like luminary who launched last year with the paid podcast subscription model they were buying billboards all over the country and we're actually seeing a lot more people doing stuff like swag or billboards or newspaper ads. Just trying to kind of get the property out there. Obviously there's you know a decade of marketing materials over the that will tell you like what not to do because you can't really track attribution for stuff like this but I think there's just a lot of experimentation that's going on like wander. He is doing stuff all the time where they're throwing listening parties for new launches. So they're actually going and you like filling up like movie theaters with people who put masks on and listen to their new show I think that there's a lot of really clever ways that people are going about it. Such podcasting last year and got to the top of the charts. quickly. What lessons are generalized from your experience. Yeah, totally. So I launched in December and for context. This was completely unexpected, but within thirty days at our height, we were number one, twenty number twenty, five podcast in all of my jeans, and so I looked at like how to really like hacked the growth rate more things we realized was if you look at eighteen the algorithm, it cares more about the rate of growth than actual growth. So if a podcast that is just starting out gets a thousand downloads verses in existing podcast one, hundred thousand downloads gets thousand downloads. The rate of growth for new one is raigmore. So we looked at all these. Different channels like social media, other podcasts, all of this, and really like I think the three things that work is one being Augusta other podcasts to is getting newsletters to promote your podcast. So what are things we found was if someone is promoting your podcasts and social media, it really like it, it's a huge jump for someone to go from there to like a podcasters, the one really do it but if it's the news editor for some reason that works better and the third thing really dislike crushed it on paid media and ended up buying ads on facebook. Or Google we found all of these networks but publishers so like if people like blogs and stuff this or ask for the podcast, the directed them directly to the podcast. And that just crushed it in those. Three main things that were the eighty twenty of growth. What kind of newsletters worked particularly well for you? You you WANNA find newsletters that like already have an audience that is interested in podcasts. Read it very few because we were just starting out. But if I had started with a bigger budget, like I would look like morning brew hot pod or pod or newsletters about podcasts, and really like we're trying to do was create sort of this initial frenzy in story that if we had more resources that could. PARLAYED. INTO PR. You create dislike perception of like large. Yes. That's the the best way to do it is to kind of build up that snowball effect. I love hearing that the how about distribution after you've launched how should people think about growing their podcasts from they sort of use to evaluate that separate in contrast growing a newsletter overtime or or things like that? Yeah. I think one of the things like. Understand is that unless you're an outlier and there are layers most audience growth happens slowly and organically, and so things and and usually what happens is like for most publishers, you find your try a bunch of different things find one or two channels at work, and then like you WanNa do is. Looking for more channels doubled down not awesome, morning. Posted a great tread recently talked about There were literally two parts to channels contribute to growth of morning group and worked for them and they just don at number. One of the mistakes people make is like trying to many things and really WanNa do is like double down on one or two that work and the second thing is figure out a way to monetize as possible because once you start monetize ing, you can take that money and put that back into paid media and really create that were just circle the grows and audience. Yeah I mean, I, think that one of the big pieces that it does help to continue the growth agree with everything such it said but I think that you should be really looking at all kinds of different like the publicity angles of certain topics guests agree to cover down the line presumably the show going to either. Double. Down on the specific topics that are relevant to the listeners or you know they're going to expand and grow. So you always have these opportunities to kind of go back to the the reservoir and the pool we showed that wants to new season that vary slightly changed the topic we were able to get a lot of press that came from that which we were then able to like take to like the APP platforms and say Hey check out what the AV club road near Times wrote about the show like this is something that you can kind of league really use to your advantage beyond that I. Think there's a lot of paid media that if you have the resources to to work with. Really, worth going back to if they were because you know the podcast pie is growing every every day every week every year, and then there's also you just because you were exposed to like you know x number of impressions on a platform doesn't mean that you were exposed to like everybody who's listening. So. I think that you know the same platform might yield different audiences every time you're on their. Little traditions to demonisation Sasha what sort of the levers of modernization and what's your advice in you've worked biggest podcast name this what lessons you happen for the audience? Yes. So there's this whole debate right on twitter about should people dispenser ships or not? I always look at modernization as sort of like two frameworks one is deciding whether you wanna go really high end or low end. There's people who sell like forty nine dollars courses and then there's podcasts that are selling twenty thousand dollar master Martins. Deciding whether you want to charge less or charge more and figure out what's that fastest about two, hundred thousand or a million dollars and be some that you can do sponsorships courses, masterminds retreats consulting in this disorder sort of like. An ability that people look at us like whether your minds having the podcast directly, which is through ads or directly, which is I. Think a good example is two pm where he's parlayed his audience into more high leverage consulting that as much more than a twenty dollars. Jeff. What are your? What's your Sir frameworks with? My decision recommend about. So I. It's funny. I always go back to mark entry since tweets storm from a few years ago where he talks about like the ways you can make money in media in almost all of them apply to podcasting I won't go into all of them because that's a much larger conversation but generally. We look at premium content, selling premium subscriptions to our feeds that are either add freer has bonus content or something like that, which is actually a lot harder to do than. You would think in a lot of people kind of use the whole. If you build it, they will come approach, but that's just not true You know you know with some of your newsletter offerings and stuff, but you really have to entice the audience in give them something of value if they're going to be paying for like a premium feed. With the AD marketplace, it's a really interesting approach because the people who are buying ads on podcasts are really looking at this as as they would like any other math problem order they putting into this and what are they getting out of it? With a lot of our shows were able to get just a couple of advertisers that will continue to renew forever because it works I it's the same. Process that you were talking about like if it works go back to the well and then there's a lot of others who might not get the conversion rate that they were looking for or maybe it was just like a a more timely approach promotion that they were pushing and for whatever reason they don't renew. So it's just like it becomes kind of A. A system where you have to just continuously pitch the product. So everybody's a little bit different is really going to be. Valuable for some people and not for others to try and run that approach. I think a lot of podcasters are coming into this into the marketplace looking to sell ads in and I think that there's just a lot of other ways to go about it. The reason that I got into podcasting initially was because I was working at a book publicity firm. So I started interviewing authors and use that as like a platform to try and bring in new clients and get commissions. So I think that there's a lot of people who can be looking at this as kind of building their own platform for thought leadership, their own platform for for new? Business. In. I just think that there's there's a lot to be said about. Widening the scope of why you would be creating something and and how you're trying to monetize it. How you thought about whether podcast is loss leader restraint sustainable earlier profitable verse. Really. Going all out on it yet been thinking a lot about this. Well, for me right of passage is where almost all of my income comes from and read a passage is a five week course teaching people how to write online. So it is reading instruction paired with audience growth in community, and that has been my focus and I've seen a lot of people join rite of passage about fifteen percent of people joined right of passage because they like the podcast and that's the thing that tipped them over it also appeals to an. Audience that I really like and particular middle aged women who are some of our best students they tend to like the podcast the most. So in order to get more of them in the course, I have continued the podcast but I've thought about other monetization streams. I have gone back and forth on the morality of advertising and just buying attention I i. just there's something about that that really turns me off and that's why I don't think I would sell advertisements but the reason that I would would be that in the trade off between. Assuming that I believe in what I do and I really do is that those advertisements can then fuel the flywheel and contribute better conversations to the world and that that outweighs the downside of advertisements, and then also you're seeing a move towards towards subscriptions and Tim Ferriss launched a subscription very clearly did not do a good job with it and did it in a way that was just removing. ADS and asking for donations and I think that hit a lot of the podcast industry hard. But I think that there's few things more dangerous in life than taking the wrong lessons a postmortem and I worried that that's what we did with podcasts here you've seen people like Peter or Tia and Rhonda Patrick and Sam Harris phenomenally well with the podcast subscription and that's something I've thought about the. Do unrelated questions but look at the past the future besides the Audio David you can go back to your eighteen year old nineteen south your podcast off the ground and give yourself advice as to what you might have done a little bit differently the podcast. What might you tell yourself and then going forward just how do you think about where where you WANNA. Take Northstar you want it to be irving more of say yes. So one of the things that I would remind people's that your podcasts don't exist in isolation. A weird experience when you go on a lot of podcasts at how similar the questions that people ask you are and Is Quite boring actually to be interviewed by a lot of people and it's also just boring to the listener because look it's not even good for the interviewer sucker for anybody because as a guest, you can't really recommend it in full faith and say, Hey, this is the eighth time I've told my life story on a podcast whereas a conversation like this I've never actually. Spoken about what I think about the podcast and public before. So now I can promote this and share it in a way that says, hey, there's a ton of new stuff here. So what I always do is I listen to other podcast that my guests had been on and I say what are the things that I'm interested in that disgust has never spoken about before because Every guest whether it's a youtube video or a podcast is just a google search away and you're just trying to add to the constellation of conversations that person has had and I don't think a lot of podcasters really realize that. One of the greatest. Achievements. was when Tyler Cowen tweeted out a link to it but I did with him and in it, he said all new stuff also said before it obviously tyler is is that a lot of the things? So yeah. That's a great point. Such. Lessons you've learned from your time podcast how you've gotten better as they were question asker. Yeah. Totally. So one of my favorite quotes is from Sally Hogshead, which is different is better than better. So when I for started when I was trying to do was take the styles of all the people that I work with and try and create a stout. So they take some from tens from Jordan's from. What I realize like you have to find your own S- out. So we have a very interesting pre interview process where we asked the guest two questions what are topics they usually talk about, and for example, if you've done other podcasts or speaking what's the eighty twenty where you cover and try and like whatever they talk about their I, talk about that at all because the it's the same thing done all over. The other question asked about is water topics or things that you're interested in that. You feel like you should be asked about that. You haven't gotten a chance to explore in. Usually we'll start the interview with one of those questions because. Right from the start you're telling them this is going to be different. The third thing I started doing it was and we don't tell the guests this will try and finally common friends or people we know and go to them people who've known for a long time and ask what is something that you want to ask him because it takes the context of the relationship the have and the depth of it because in gets deep questions into surface questions. So just sort of like these things like these, we are able to create an interview that's very different from what the guests is already done. So so the because it doesn't Figured out a way to create something that's different into the same thing that guests has been exposed to all over and over again. Yeah. I couldn't agree more. So I just interviewed Clare Lehman Equalit- and what I did was I went back into her old reads profile from two thousand eleven and two thousand thirteen and I saw that she was a big fan of pride and pride and prejudice, and a book called the customer country and their two novels that I thought would be interesting to have a conversation about and so we started talking about that and that then allows a very specific kind of conversation to emerge. Another example is I was out with Tyler Cowen, in New York City. One time and we had just had dinner and we went to go get dessert because I know tyler loves chocolate ice cream. So we were like, yeah, let's go get chocolate ice cream. So then we went and when they had small medium and large and tyler was like, I don't want any of them and the woman who was serving was like what and how it's like we'll do you have a sample size. So Tyler ordered the sample size of ice cream but then he gritted gave a great answer of why he did this only an economist would give that the diminishing marginal returns to ice cream happen very fast and that once you hit two or three bites of ice cream you now. have. The memory of eating ice cream but you're not going to gain weight and you're not GonNa have to sugar that usually eating ice cream allows you to have. So then when you ask a question when you interview, you know that's a personal experience. You know it's super specific story and you know that it's revealing of the person that you're interviewing and if you can create that, then you open up opportunities for conversation that are distinct and that show a person's true south and that's actually the battle of interviewing. We are always trying to hoster and present ourselves usually in authentic ways, and if you can pierce through that wall usually by coming in from the edge, very rarely from asking directly directionally. You begin to open up avenues of conversation that are not only deeper than what you expected, but actually transcend the plane of conversation that they're used to having as well. Totally I love that is the best experience for interviewee going on a podcast is is you do the interview and you learn more about yourself. You learn something about yourself that you didn't fully appreciate and a few people do that different ways like Mark Marian or Tyler Cowen will sort of like tell the person their perception of that person. That's really interesting way to describe myself people described Terry Gross as sort of like going to a therapist or something where this person ask questions that the good way really dig into your soul like, Oh, I didn't even. Think about this is the way which I do what I do, and then you're in the world people find sort of. Similar to what you Dave he'll do research and find the thing that they loved when they were grade or something, and they will be shocked at how they want. I found that out and the to sort of taken back to a place in their in their childhood. All those examples, just illicit amazing interviews because the guest is surprise these famous people go on all the time but some surprises originality novelty. Just let them open up while. Another great thing. I. Love doing is like creating tension and contrast for example, was David and I wanted to ask your journey I could be like, Hey, So tell me about right. You're right right of passage and how did you go from zero to one right or if I want to like get to the hard part also something like so I've seen your journey from going two zero, two one and from outside looking in it seems like everything was really easy and I work is that true or were there. Times. I would really heart and because like you've sort of like created that contrast people in fill out in like no. No, it was not really that easy like and then it gets them more likely talk about the harder times were such as being like a talk about the hard times. One of the other things that I like to focus on and this requires some faith you listen for people's tangents and if someone is going on a tangent, usually you hear that you're like, no, no, no no stop that. But if someone's going on a tangent, there's a reason why there's something about their model of the world that they're trying to get to and part of the art of podcasting is to basically put out your hand as they put out. There's and begin to dance in the rhythm in a tango of what is that Tangent? How does it relate and then gracefully twirl them around through their story and and the music and return to the conversation I love that in. A similar but opposite approach that scene is been somebody's about to kind of pause finished what they're about to say but you can kind of tell the it's either can't answer or they're not quite there yet. Just, don't say anything like don't continue the conversation and eventually you know they'll keep going. That is so true Jeff and what I always grapple with though is that you also want to maintain congress momentum in the podcast and so like the most interesting things in life exists that these paradoxes that when somebody stops talking on a podcast they. Always have something that continue saying and you're right about that. But once you do that too often you then get to a point that is really awkward where there isn't this flow that makes conversation beautiful and that makes it rhythmic and that steers at none expected directions and so both of those things are true and you have to dance between the two edges. Yeah. I and I would I would counter that by saying that's what editing is for. But yes, I think that both approaches work really well, and I love that. It's like the chess game of interviewing, knowing when to move and we're not move exactly. But you just said Russia L- A podcast interview is not a conversation even when it looks a conversation, it is not a conversation you are creating an experience for listener you are trying to educate you might be trying to entertain whatever it is, but you don't show up and sit down like you do with your drinking buddies on Saturday night to add to that the best ones feel like you've done that but there's all of that trip behind that no one sees that's exactly right. That's the art but but like that's what it is right it's like a level of. Unconscious competence where somebody just looks like they've been doing it so many times you know this, what comedy is right like you go. One of the great parts of living living in New York is you get to go see a bunch of comedy skits from people were about to go do their netflix specials. So you'll show up and you know I've had friends see Chris, rock or Something and so Chris Rock shows up and Chris Rock is often terrible absolutely terrible because he's working through sets and it doesn't look refined and stuff but then you rot was Chris. Rock on the NETFLIX's special and it looks like he's giving the comedy stand up for the first time and it's like the eightieth time and that is just like podcasting. It reminds me of my one of. My first interviews, I remember had almond notes would like questions that I was Gonna ask the person in front of me and we started talking and I remember I kept looking at the notes and there was a point where he was giving an answer and look at him look at my notes, look at him and then just close my notebook i. think that's the sort of dance which. Is doing so much prep beforehand they you have this list of questions but then when you start being able to move away from that because you trust in the moment in your co creating with the guest enough you know you'll find what you say next one of my favorite interviews, probably correct Ferguson and use even whenever he came out, he would come up with a stack of cards. And then tear them up to them away, and then that's when you would start interviewing. Dances like debt that dancing like trust in yourself and the guest to co create this moment together. You often hear people talk about how when they first start interviewing podcast or otherwise always show up with a notepad full of questions and I. it becomes like this thing we're in the beginning you're just kind of reading off of the NOTEPAD, but eventually you get more comfortable with yourself and your process so you can get rid of it. But. I think that the part that everybody always forgets and that you just hit on, is that just because you don't bring no pet doesn't mean that you don't have to do the work ahead of time. So totally and I call this episode podcasters on podcasting. Artists interpret whatever quotas I want to close by perhaps asking if you've been requests for for podcasts out there for people who have ideas, I I have a couple one is I wanNA see experts explain niche topics in just very accessible ways for people who who want to get into the experts. One show I really liked that have discovery show called Contra Krugman, which is this economist Bob, Murphy, and this other one Tom Woods they just basically they go into Paul Krugman articles and they talk about why it's wrong. But what points are wrong and? How to make it serve. What's correct their answer responses and that sort of fun. But also very accessible as simple simple take on on on a economics. I was more examples of that and then the other is. podcasting is is voyeuristic right and so I like death sex money people who will get into topics that you want to. Over here you want to be in the room at listened to, but you don't get to have conversations about that or hear them all the time. So the two requests I'm honestly not often behind the mic these days I used to be quite a bit but now more on the production side. I. Get a lot of pitches from the Pug Lamamra every day we get emails about something and more often than not people are like kind of looking for what they can get out of the podcast as opposed to what they can give to the audience and I think that that's the number. One thing that I would like to see changes. You have all this hype out here about. How the podcast industries exploding in what's happening and how much money people are making and how exciting it is but I think that the reason that that's happening in the bones that it's built on because odd. So many people putting so much work that is really beneficial to the listener and I think that you know step one whenever you're gonNA put something out in the world is to figure out like. What am I trying to achieve and what do I want back in and what's the point? What's what's listener going to take away from the show and you I I doubt that any of your listeners? Coming in with the show, just because they want one but you know that's something that I would like to see more of I say make a personal podcast hour and a half fifteen episodes with your worldview. How you work how you think what you believe in? What is your story make every single minute exceptional interesting worth somebody's time and send it to anyone who asked for it. I? Think it'll be an incredible asset for you. In some sense I think I. Still Think we're in the very early days of podcasting and audio medium, and even the most of the show is we see our interview shows there's there's so much left to explore I. got a pitch last week from someone in what they're doing was he was a Broadway theatre actor and obviously with co Ed peers close right. So they're doing is they're creating a podcast which is fifteen to twenty minutes and they've like different actors and all these different things, which is basically almost a Broadway show in a podcast. Now, just heard that I was like this is amazing and there's there's so many ways this medium can be pushed forward. So see people it's more that. Just just early innings. There's so many opportunities for you to have a niche that you're one of the only people in the world who has a podcast on that still. Tremendous. Tremendous. The early I think that's a great place to to wrap my guests have been Jeff Umbro David Parral Sasha Gupta checkout. So conscious creators, checkout David Show Northstar also check out right of passage checkout adjusts company the pod Glamour it follow all these guys on twitter guys. Thank you so much for coming on. It's been great episode. Thanks so much. Thanks Eric. Yeah thank you. Thank you for having us. If you're an early stage entrepreneur, we'd love to hear from you. Check out village global dot.

David sort Jeff New York City Tyler Cowen Jeff Umbro David Parral Youtube Eric Netflix twitter Google Seth Godin WanNa Sasha Gupta David Parral Hungary co-founder Partner village SASHA WH Ondeck Corner Office
Stranger Things Special Part I: David Harbour, Joe Keery and Brett Gelman

Movie Crush

1:06:13 hr | 2 years ago

Stranger Things Special Part I: David Harbour, Joe Keery and Brett Gelman

"Remember when you were a kid and everyone told you your special, they were right. You me and everyone alive on earth today are the most special group of humans who've ever lived. We're the ones who will have to save the human race from extinction I'm stuffy, should knows Josh Clark join me for the end of the world. The ten part podcast series that looks at the existential threats that are coming our way. If you Manitou come together like we never have before, we might just be able to survive the end of the world with Josh Clark coming to the I heart radio app, apple podcasts, Google play music, Spotify, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts and look for hashtag e. o. OT w. Josh Clark on social. Hey, everybody welcome to movie crush Friday interview addition here, pond city market, Atlanta, Georgia, and, oh boy. Oh boy, everybody hang onto your socks. Hang onto your hats. Hang onto your socks. What's expression? Hang onto all your clothing because we have a special two part episode of this week and next week with some of the cast of stranger things. One of my favorite favorite shows, one of the favorite shows of a lot of people and judging by the reaction I got on Facebook when I posted my pick of of myself with the three dudes your about to listen to. I think it's a favorite show a lot of you as well. So I decided to split this up into because it was like two hours long, which is great and, hey, I know all of you could sit and listen to our straight of this, but it was sort of evenly divided between about an hour of just good talking about stranger. Things a little inside scoop there and what it's like working on that show and acting and other movies, and just art and music and stuff like that. And then sort of another hour on their their movie, pick which they all agreed to talk about big night. One of my favorite films, Tony shalhoub, and Stanley Tucci, and Minnie driver and Isabel Rossellini and in home such a great great independent film from the mid nineties. So I decided shop this one into and. Have you guys don't mind? I ended up having Joe carry on and David harbour and that was the initial ask and they showed up with with Gillman with Brett Kelman and said, hey, Gilman's here he decided to come. Is that okay? And I love Brett Gilman. I was like, oh, are you kidding me? This? This is even better. In fact, call up some other cast members and get them down here actually didn't say that, but I should have so ended up getting all three dudes in the studio, and we just had a really great conversation. So without further ado here we are with stranger things, special part one joke Erie, David, harbour, and Brett Gelman on stranger things. Right. We're, we are recording, but I won't, you know. Oh, you're recording. Yeah. But obviously, oh, please don't. Secrets with Brent Kelman insider. The whole thing. I don't know any hit record, but this isn't a Gotcha. Dory. About something you have. Cares. Finally covered. From vodkas. Interesting. I sort of wish people cared what you thought about these, like random people make the world of better place, right? If they were following my moral lead. Who's a good person. Do you think I'm gonna moral person? No, I just don't think that would make the world about place. Statement your very, how do you know, super your lot more sensitive than I imagined. I agree. Do you know what I mean? Like I'm always confused that you have feelings. So when you say he's more sensitive, he's slightly sensitive and you thought he was a monster. I actually think he's just very caring, very caring, emotional, dude. But I thought your comedy like seems to come from like a great place of this place, not caring, what people think maybe undescended wearing, which I like it's a brave place and run, but I wouldn't think but I wouldn't think that you'd have that depth of like sort of insecurity like, oh, did you mean that like those conversations we have occasionally, which are like, right, didn't mean that and it's, you know, it's very refreshing. Very three demand. Yeah. And sometimes not knowing if you're joking, I think, is kind of what it boils down to find. My comedy mention mentioned. That's interesting. I don't find a two dimensional, but I, I do think it's the most interesting when you bring in the ability. She did. I feel like last night as well, but even even with little lines like we did this show last night at dad's garage. Oh, nice. Yeah. And Brad, Scott up with the improv. Did some great stuff. It's like a little thing, but like you're with this girl and she's like, so we've been together for a while and you like, yeah, she's like, I'm happy and you're like, I'm happy to. Otherwise, I would break up. This break up. Yeah. Well, I was nervous because you guys when you're in the bathroom, I told Brett, I'm a big fan. I was like, I think you're one of the great weirdos and comedy. But to me, that's like the highest compliment. And I mean that in that I, I was one of the great heroes. Exactly. Fucking problem. Asshole. Weirdos of drama. I take that as a couple choices that you make are always just fucking having on the floor. I am strained. Yeah, I guess we're all strange isn't strange. You know what I mean? Like anytime you think about your own family, I think you realize that there's no such thing as normal right. When you think about like the world, you'd think like normal, but then when you think about anyone close to your, like we're all strains. Right, but that is something that I want to bring more into all of. Interesting. So you have is, of course, no. I think that there is a time where I was very, like obsessively confrontational. Yeah. And that is kind of a theme, I would say probably old that you know now, and I've been, you know, really trying to show that in my acting work and the characters I play in showing the other side of that comedy's injury, stranger things you think do you think it's hard because. I was told about. Do people think when you get Catholic, put you in a box in terms of like. People to have me scream, but I want it to be seen as more of a gene wilder scream unless, yeah, Sam kennison I guess, scream not that I was ever Sam kennison, but like while there's a great. Yeah, just what I I don't want, you know, you know, I mean, when you're screaming, it's just what's happening in the moment. You're not like saying like, oh, this would be a great part for my classic scream. Say, but I do feel like in general, people put us in boxes and various ways. Right? And then whenever you're allowed to play the opposite of that or outside of that, in general, I'm much better. You know what I mean? It allows you to explore these colors or forces you to like, you know, have to have to be more. And I always think those are my better performance. I, the Murray is very much outside of a box for me and in a pretty profound way in which way we can't. Hold season two to season two. I thought, because he's he's Nick needy. He's doing the right thing. He doesn't resort to making a massive mistake upper, you know, he has a strange way of communicating, and that is a common theme amongst a lot of the roles I play, but he he is going towards success rather than failure and. But then, yeah, like in in lemon. I think there was a that was like the culmination of that type of role for me because there was an insane amount of vulnerability and sadness in that in a way that I wasn't able to do in other characters. Yeah. You had a lot more room in lemon to like you're not giving that kind of space in a lot of the stuff you do. Right. Where you have the whole movie and you have to show this arc that's such. That's so nice to be able to just like have a what is doing a podcast. Yeah. Sorry. Now, this is this is the guest. Exactly what we do. And I've had had the broken lizard guys in here. So I've, I've managed to wrangle six of them. This is this is going great so far. Make sure I think in a lot of like in fleet bag and love. I think in a lot of my roles, I've been able to have that Volna ability. Even if people audience members sometimes don't see it because they're just seeing the actions of the character, but not the. Yeah, I think it's like a success. I did like when people do on a cast, you typecast Yuna part to be able to like give them that flavor. But then also have that little, you know, two or three moments where they see the little. And I think that exactly what you're talking about being able to have just that little these moments of, oh, that guy can also do that like using the thing to be able to show that you can also. Yeah, yeah. I mean, do that. The majority of my film work. I was like the bad guy, the psychotic guys typecast. Yeah, it was the villain. I mean, villain based on like either you know, insecurities or or you know, psychosis or whatever it was. But like Hollywood viewed me as like a dude. You don't root for. Bad guy, and I think that part of the fun thing was like, you know, like I even played this like super crazy, serial killer in this limb niece and movie walk among the tombstones. And you know, part of the fun of that would be infused these guys with some sort of point of view that didn't seem completely psychotic like to infuse them with some Humana, something like understand exactly. Or, you know, they lived a certain life that was freedom, but I think stranger, like like the great thing about a psychotic is they actually do exactly what they wanna do, which we don't really do in our live. Right because you're trying to please people or even just the fact associate yourself as like a son mother or a boyfriend. And so you don't just, you know, say exactly what's on your mind at any given moment because but psychotics actually do that. Right. And children do it too, which is why you tell like no social boundaries. When they're five years old that you can't say, why you so fat or something to tell them like this. Not a nice thing to say shelter. They have no shelter and that. And the interesting thing about the transition from bad guy to like hero with that. It went through like a childish phase. So this this, the freedom of like copper is a bit of a child in the first season, especially like he, he lives a child's life. He has no responsibility. I mean, you're always shirt, untucked, Shariff, weren't squared away. I seen as like pretty. It's exactly what it is. Yeah, and he has no responsibilities and he doesn't give. He doesn't give shit about anybody. So there is a freedom, and then you start to realize that he has this heartened sort of thing. But yeah, it's an interesting thing when people put you in these boxes, I feel like and then like you're, I think you're stepping into a box area for sure. Yeah. See I career wise or on the show. Yeah, I understand. I understand it because like from the outside. When you're watching somebody do something force if you're if you if you're involved in a project and you are trying to think like who could play this, you think of other people who are playing similar roles, right? Obviously, the things are going to send you are going to be. I think that that's kind of where you're against, like your own personal taste, of course, but maybe like your team as well, like like working and pushing you towards understanding what else? Understand what else you can do. So like having people advocating for you that like know that you can do something different and push you in different ways as how much is that is far as working with management teams is like, no, I want to do this type of stuff even if I don't work for the next year and then going lead really rather us work. I mean, I don't think that they're those arch conversations that you see in movies or you think of the cliche in your mind. Never had that arch conversation where it's like, you know, I on my side and I wanna do a play their line. You'll have to move to make money to do this commercial. But I do think that there's just a subtle thing where you know, I think everybody wants to be successful at what they do. So even the idea that I would want explore, something different would be a risk for me. And so I may be looking for reinforcement from the team to go like, this is great. This is closer this move, and I think that everybody tries to because at the end of the day, it's like it's a business or it's like, you know, you're making a widget like the perform like on a macro level, like entertainment is a business. So if you're a really good cog at a really good thing, right. The businesses like you're really good at this cog thing like, why are we fixing it. It's making millions of dollars and thing like, don't you know it's almost like a writer being like, man, I would really love to try, you know doing this and then being able, you're really good, right? Or maybe just stick in that land, sort of your agents job is to get you a job, right? They're gonna try and do that in the most Scher fire way possible. And then it's up to you. They're not going to see you as something that you see yourself when they have not really seen evidence of that. Right. So you have to. I mean, I them myself. Insecurities as well though, like I don't know that I do save to stand up to a group. You'd be like, I wanna do this. You know? Because I like the, I like the support of people to say like, no, this is great. This great for you. Like I don't know that I've had those. I mean, have you had like big rep conversations where you're like disagreements? I have of course, and I've actually fired reps and like left things like that. But in general, I think it's much more it's much more of a holistic thing like the fears and the support are all moving towards a certain thing, which is like, you know, a more of a neat thing and it really requires a lot of energy to stop and go. You know what? Like, I know. Well, I, yeah. I mean for me it was. I, I trained as an actor and then I found myself in New York, and I got caught in the alternative comedy in the improv sketch scene at UCB, the citizens brigade and then with adult swim, and then I and in the whole all comedy community. And so that's what I started to be seen as part of that community because I was, but then you know, once it got wraps and I started going out on dishes, I was like, what I actually trained actor I want do more complex rolls and and not that I, I wanna stop doing this. But in addition, I wanna do you know more complex things you know that that hit a dramatic tones or you know other genres, so like so that was, yeah, there was some leaving of wraps who couldn't understand. I think that the people I'm with now when I started the new relationship with them, I was like, this is why I left, and this is what I need now right there was that conversation, but then it's still like it's still always like a slog. It's kind of forces you to understand a little bit more of what you want though, as well, I think when you're going through that process. Yeah. And then like luck to of like, okay, I mean for me. Yeah. I guess I keep coming back to this thing though. The fear though, too of like giving up like I get confronted with that. Right. Like I'm going into this thing now. Like John Levinson I've written this very comedic sort of thing that we're going to do, and it's like a total departure from like what I do, and I've been getting that way just broad comedy. Yeah, it's kinda python ask, like, you know what I mean? It's it's the conceit is kind of like. These plays that they use the film film and this very narcissistic Orson Welles type figure who is spearheading this effort to do these ridiculous plays on film you so. Style. Like almost it's, you know, we don't wanna do it like that, Chris guess or more. But there is now there is pieces throughout it where I am talking to camera. It's still in development, but I, I am talking like hammer just because it's too fun climbing, but but I'm, I'm, I'm absolutely terrified because, like I mean, you know, I, there's a certain thing where it's like when you start to branch off in those ways you, you really can be bad. You know, you could really fall on your face and be like, okay, you are. You are naturally funny that you're naturally. I really, I mean, the times you're really funny and the show. Yeah, yeah, sure. You know comedy, and you'll commit and you also are raised in the theater. Yeah. The pieces are really just the tone of the piece which you are fully, but I do have. I guess. But I do have those moments where I'm just like, oh man, you got you got this sort of thing. Like just like people are offering you things where you just be the like, you know, detective kind of dramatic dramatic or wherever. And then to actually like take this risk where you could be really bad is like, why am I doing this again? Like, oh, yeah, because I need to. And I think that's the thing. I mean, it does come to that, but I do find that requires a lot more energy than when I didn't have stranger things. Sure why it a lot less energy. So the fact that the show is so beloved as a dual thing where like it's really great. Yeah, a lot of opportunities and also I find myself boxing myself in going like, you know, I don't. I don't know that I need you know, whereas before when I wasn't really known as well, I could make more of a fool of myself and now find that my own ahead more to stake now for sure. Yeah, my head plays tricks won't do you really wanna risk right. So the problem is becomes you become a bit not to say he hasn't done this. I mean, I think that like he's made attempts of this, but you become a bit like, you know, I say, like Tom Cruise in terms of your approach where you're just like, I have to say the hero or my character always has to be smarter faster better. And you know he can be hard situations, right? Apetit good character traits, but he has to appear in a certain way on film. And I, you know, that's like a, it's like a weird. It's a weird mentality for an artist and like, and that to me is the real balanced artists in commercialism is not so much the managers against you. It's more you and the managers against you and the managers getting the team is always with you in a certain way. But I think it really is the struggle about like the business as opposed to you being an artist, let going forward and trying to explore things. What about the duffers where those guys did they give you a lot of leeway in. Ending your character where they had pretty specific things in mind. We're just talking about this the first season. It was like, I think I got one note the tire season, so and I was doing crazy stuff like this stuff. There's like little scenes in there that were written in a certain way that like there's one scene where I come out of the house and Jonathan falls me out in his like I to come with you and I'm like, no, you stay here with your mom like she needs you, and I just get in the car and I remember them and I do the scene come out and John was like, I gonna come with you, and I just like I just hit him like in the state. And I just think that they were like, oh, we thought it was kinda sweet scene, but like this thing and I was again, I think he's a hard guy just got talked about his dead daughter. Like, I think you let things men should be men like, you know, he's the eighties, man. He's like little boys and cry. Like that was one of the things that my grandma said to me southern woman back in the day when I cried when I was five years old boys don't cry, boy, cry. There's something about that. That, of course, we have tremendous judgment about, but back then I sort of liked, I like honoring that. And so their world, these little things which they were confused by, and I think they, but I think they're so good at hiring people who do things better than they do in certain ways, allowing those people to do those things as opposed to feeling like they have to have ownership over everything. I think that's because they're so good at what they do if they don't feel the need to have to get into everybody else's business. That's great. Also they can edit it if they need. Right. That's all experienced season. Changes provide the sort of skeleton and stuff, and then you're able to kind of fill it in with your own and also just justify everything in your own. I think that's the most important thing that it is just like make sense of it in your own way and not necessarily. I mean, the perfuse ambles what you're just talking about, like they saw the scene a certain way, you saw the scene a different way you did it and they're like, oh, that's actually really good, make sense. So and and I think that also allows all the people who are doing it like the actors to be way more invested because it's their own ideas, right? Have their own, you know, skin in the game, and you had one of the coolest success stories in that you were written in so much more heavily in season two, because I think everyone loves your character and it was kind of clear what was going on. So as an actor that's got to be awesome to go in there for sort of a smallish part in like work your way into the lineup of it was, you know, talk about luck. I mean, the first season is just so much based on luck, and then kind of as it was going along feeling like. Yeah, but it's also just like, yeah, it's just very exciting. And you know, it's also just like my first job really, really had another job besides this. So it's, you know, it's also interesting to hear. Talk like, but I know. But I also feel like so envious of having other experiences outside of the show. You know that kinda give you some perspective because then for me and I think it's different like you're grateful for the. No, no. I don't know how to be grateful, and I feel like in some ways, I'm in sort of different box than you guys because you know you've been around and he's worked with other people and been seen in other things for me, it feels like a little bit more like because the duffers have constructed allowed me to be sort of have written it formula little bit. I think it is slightly harder for me and some ways to get myself to motivate myself out of the box and really try to motivate myself until like a difference sort of lens. You. You know. Hey, movie Crushers. 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Subject to credit approval rate includes point, five percent, auto pay discount terms and conditions apply and offers are subject to change with. Notice there's lights, dream dot com. For more information. Yeah, early success is problematic to. I mean, yes, he will like everybody, you know, warns against it. So yeah, but. Doing very grateful that really, that's. You are getting coming into lineup, like the funny thing is about Jo and now we got Gilman over here forcing his way in our party as well through his talent. For you coming in on a season with, like I know how film crews are, and it's like summer camp and family, and it's like establish came in the first day with me. Right? Just the two of us. Yeah, but like right off the bat, my, I just want to hear your experience. Actually, I don't want. I mean, well, first of all, it was really was a dream job. It was a job. I really wanted to get to one. A day. I loved the show. So I immediately called my reps and I was like, you know, if there's anything season to really, you know, really like to get on this show. Wow, that's cool audition for this character. And I went in and like I saw this guy. Another actor I knew like in the waiting room and he was like acting all kooky in the chair. Fucking method it outright get it. I couldn't imagine anybody else neither anybody else in the role side, actually, thank you very much. No, so, but then I got it, which would blew my mind. And then when I got to set, the first interaction was with David and David was so welcoming and excited for me to be there. So, and I was a fan of David from all of his work over the years and including the show he was always an actor. I very much admired so I, if that my first scene partner was like, so there, right? And then and then the duffers were so welcoming. So with that, it made me I, I'm, I'm pretty good at inserting myself in situations. Pretty loud person. Well, coming from where you came from, you kinda have to that a little bit. Yeah, you have to know how to enter. So. I'm pretty good at that. But that being said, it doesn't matter how much I know how to enter if in bold, don't want me to enter. Right. Oh, it I felt very supported and it's great and and and that really helped. And then working and the same thing went with with Charlie and Natalia scenes together, they were so sweet. And by that time you know, you you, it helps to be funny and that gets the crew on yourself. Then yourself and the, I think there's always a thing with the crew that they're wondering, well, which actor are you? Are you the actor who knowledge is that? We're part of this till the actor that thinks it's all about you. You comes steps and I think that, yeah, I think that it part of our job when we get to new job as throughout the job is to be like, this is this is an on samba for and part, you know, and part of the unsolvable is the crew. And that is so so important that is like the founding is when I think about the claim and the money and the attention that we get as opposed to like I team PA who has to be there every day five AM setting up the trailers and leaves the last night. Like, you know, there's so many people that work so much harder than we do not to say. I don't work very hard outside and have lots of homework and lots of things to do, but I dated. There are so many people that worked so hard to make that show that it is at a certain point does get kind of silly and you. I always feel like, man, it's like I'm just like the teen is a little bit of the tip of this massive amount of work that was done underneath and it's like people who will come up and be like, oh my God, I love the show. It's like it's like, I wish that whole adoration could be spread throughout like. I was. I was m this. But I but I. But I did like I did. I didn't think that like I was like I said this online actually really wanted to do this if I want wins didn't matter. But I I wanted to melt. I wanted to melt it down like meltdown the EMMY and just make little pins for people. Out to every crew, but apparently this is hilarious and interesting you right when you if you win award, which I don't remember this because we want aside award. But right, when you get off stage, they make you sign something. You're not read it. You're so excited. We won't. You can't like you can't alter your statue. Can't alter it. You can't touch it. You can't sell it while you can't do anything with it or they'll like sue you. Yeah. So it was like, they're really touchy about you messing. That's great. So. Melted down anyway, even if that was really I because I think there's so like the funny thing about you don't want your. Scillies ones like we have an MTV award movie, but there's still funny that they sit. They sit there like wherever your house a. They become so like non entity anyway, like wear. His. I don't ever really the one that. Modesty about Charlie's are both still in the attic of the place. Stew heavier, fly with you can't take it home. It feels to me is an outsider, like those words are about that night. And then your legacy when you die because you are now right? EMMY award winner and then everything in between. It's like it's on the shelf or whatever. Yeah, I agree. I agree that night is very, very special. It's great. And then and then when you when you have a moving come out, I guess they're like Golden Globe winner, clear foyer. And you're like, oh, it's like saying Surrey and mccown ride title. And then when you die grade in your in your bitch, some webbie's guys. So. Yeah. Sitting out there. Yeah. My award. On them or with. Including basically polish high, come free. Really. Was it was the PD Brock. This was on PBS. Know it's come free guys. That's good. Yeah. Yeah, that is PG. Yeah, I'm not talking about come filled. No, no, I I mean, I yeah. Ever happened? What will that be like? I don't know, never been in that situation. So I will say like, I don't. You know, the whole thing is like, oh nomination. And it is like it's, you know, whatever. I love the nomination. I like, but when you win, it's like, you don't and you don't care when your nominee. It doesn't matter. It's all random who wins, and then you win one, and you're like, feels really nice to go back door. We won that sag award, man like that was like that felt like super fun. And then like you go out the back and like they give you the thing and like at the party's afterwards. Yeah, you're holding it and it's really, it's a nice night. Yeah, it's nice. Yeah, it's so hard. It's so hard. It's like also we've lost so many into the Emmys twice a not won a single one. We were nominated tons of category one a single EMMY. So those nights are always like, especially when they start racking up, like when you lose one and then you lose the next one. Next one best show. Like there's just no way. No way off feels so like, but it also feels like, I guess, you know, kinda like. It's also objective at the end of the day. Subjective subjective. Yeah, it's it's based con kind of opinion about what he's like. Yeah. What I think necessarily is great is so it, although it does mean a bunch and I think I would in this situation I would be, you know, obviously honored, but I think it's also kind of like at the end of the day, it is just, you know, some based on people's opinions. So kind of like Dustin Hoffman, it's, have you ever seen that you ever seen that speech where you like he won best actor for Rainman versus crow. Okay. Okay. He was just like, you know, this is ridiculous to say that I'm a better actor Jack Lemmon. Yeah, it's like it's not like a sport where it's like, you got more pulling. We'll see how that seems like really good cocaine. If I was an adult time. I would ask you for whoever's number. Just like, whoa. And then like Sinatra comes out and like totally like missed a Hoffman. He's any. Really gonna watch. Oh, man. It's not often. I mean. The cocaine takes different, turn, your paranoid that the mob is going to kill you. Crazy stuff then like Brando sent out his native America. Yeah, like person. Sort of used the great that was like that was I thought that was cool because that was like a political statement that was just like write something that was way before Hollywood was even anyway. All anyway, thinking about that. I thought that was pretty pretty pretty bad ass. Well, you had like you had some. Hollywood's always been, you know, there was the blacklist. I mean, the hose always been political, many ways and didn't you have wasn't Hanoi Jane before that. I mean, it wasn't Jane Fonda sort of documentary. No is a good man. So she, yeah, she's amazing. She is. And even if you know, she's amazing. You see this documentary, like man, what a bad s? Yeah, like she'll she gets on the end is talking about her plastic surgery in saying, I wish I would have been braver to have not felt like I needed to do this. And just like that takes a lot of balls to say something like that. You know, when you're legends like that sort of admit that I wish I hadn't had done this and I felt like I sent the wrong message, you know, and the whole Hanoi Jane thing manages its. I did a people still hate it, or I was in newsroom, and I remember at one of the first table rates, she said next to me was like. I was like hygiene, David. Hello? Yeah. My God feel things. She enjoys that feeling. And what she seventy. How old is she? She's she's in their seventies for sure. Yeah, she's amazing. I mean also, I think the single greatest performance. This is not the movie. We're gonna talk about if we ever talk about them, but the single greatest performance men or women on film, I think is her performance include like, I actually think that that performance is so like the dangers, the pitfalls in that performance? Yeah, of her making her a Hooker with a heart of gold is so easy like other actors would take that and like sim sentimentalize it, and she makes her so hard. And also someone who you can't figure out she makes her such an and so hard. Yeah. And like that is what a prostitute is like. They're just so hard. They're not have this like beating heart of gold and so brave, that performances brave, like it is a total. It's the, I think it's the greatest foam performance of all time. Wow. They go. I've said it Jane Fonda. Barbarella is number two. You think it's better than God? I wish I could think is right. Terrible performance. What do I think is the best performance. Right? David sort of set the standard of these are going to be. I would say that it's a tie for me my own personal favorite between zero Mastel June wilder users might to vote. Yeah, I think as an actor, if you look at those performances, those two performances, I am going back and forth between the two allow if that to shot at the beginning of the movie, just that wide shot of a seven or eight minutes shot. Right? Yeah. Just the two of them talking in that room. Yeah, it's incredible. It's insane. Yeah. So that's my favorite. But I mean, I don't know there's just perform and then you in your, there's performances to the child. And like I think my favorite actors and it's all that influenced me the most is kid and most of those people are like white guys. Yeah, but then you get older and you get more sophisticated, you know? Sure, or hopefully you do and you know, you see different types of performances that influence you along the way. So I think it's always like important to continue to be influenced by great performances as well. But like, yeah, you look at like jerk. Geraldine page. We were talking on my -tarian. Oh yes. Seeing per. You don't know this movie. It's a very dark Woody Allen movie. No serious movies. He's heavily influenced by Bergman and stuff. So it was a dramatic parody of Burke in the opinion. No, not a parody, but it's it's like his Bergman too, but it's also him. It's like a really, right. It's why you know, but it's everything his, it's Geraldine page. Who is one of the greatest like actresses of all time again, maybe what will surely page in trip to bountiful. She got the, but she and, oh, she's in that Gene Hackman. Is she in the. Marvin gardens or king of Marvin gardens garden. It's something with she's in the original beguiled. Eastwood I dunno if anything like super popular? Yeah, she's been in, but she, you know, I mean, big stage actress, big. She's just like she's incredible. And this performance interiors is like stunning. It's stunning. It's watching the person who it's like, you don't see the the line at all. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, joke here doing man. Favorite performance, and I don't know. One of, I guess maybe thinking about if I guess thinking about just like actors, maybe like John gazelle, maybe. Yeah, probably totally. I dunno short career short career said that he learned to act from dog day. Yeah, dog isn't it only like four movies is your dog. Yeah, I think there'd be bad guys, like dossier picture. Yep. Yeah. All five, John because films have won best picture. Really, we should factor. I heard that he was in five movies. They all went bust. Godfather one godfather to deer hunter dog day and no idea. Can't remember the other one, the Pink Panther reboot. Yeah. Performance. He will be McGuire. Guy though that I feel like is like maybe not necessarily the shining star. I mean, although he's so strong and all of his movies such like an unsolvable man always delivers such a great convincing, really in a world building. He's such a generous guy, all these other actors that like feel like that is such a great thing. Frago just like like there's three brothers in your the worst one and that character could it your different way. I mean, to give them such a heart in like, you know, you really feeling on deformities on the couch. You know what I mean? That that seems just, yeah, you always got the feeling that he was doing the best he could do wilder and blazing saddles, oh, my sane performance because dad. Really Wonga pleasing settles though it's different than all the other movies because he manages to be in a different movie and the same movie. At the same time, he's playing the drama of that character through most of it and like not really in a movie where everybody else is very much playing the comedy to genius level. I mean, Madeline Kahn. Reggie, the character for that like that. Fully, let's find is that the way these these these actors have transitioned in my mind. Like I started out with gene while when I was like seven, eight, nine, ten in those bad him and Richard Pryor movie. Yeah. Like, do you remember those. Couple murari. Great movie like see, no evil, hear no. I remember the woman in red was one I watched on HBO. Oh, yeah. Denver could not read though he and Grodin have some pretty classic lines. That's another John Khazal who doesn't get the credit. Yeah, getting the can do a whole likes actor. He had cast about midnight run. Yeah. On midnight ride. Just three watched it. So each other scenes, like from it, those are. This. Dramatic reading. Don't get me started in the movie I've ever that's actually the movie that. Right about this deniro movie star. Really. It was considered like this, you know the best actor, but but studios didn't want to see him as a box office draw. Right? Because raging bull in tex- driver. Those weren't huge SCR office. This is the thing you have to remember about raging bull is that Scorsese after we made that movie go into Hollywood parties and people would turn their backs on him or according to easy riders raging Boll. Telling the truth, that's what you know. And I think Scorsese's suback interviews. It was that performance is, you know, you know, it's cliche to say that, but that performances completely insane, which one deniro raging, but midnight taxi driver. It's like a complete shamanistic like transformation entering into another purse. Right. Yeah, I love those stories Jodie Foster as you hear those stories that she knows about that she was really like, Sander Levin. She, I think she was fifteen. Okay. But he would really want to like he just wanted to work before they started shooting, and so he would be like, can we go have lunch? And they would go to a diner and he would just sit there with her and she she would order and whatever and like and he wouldn't eat. He would just sit there with. He wouldn't talk and like they did this for like a month where they would just get together this nine or and then eventually she started just making friends. Everybody the diner, like on. He just wanted to like hang out with like he just wanted to be with her. It was like she said, it was super bizarre. Both saying place the biggest creep in that movie. You know, he's the taxi attell customer talks about like the worst shit or matching. Yeah. How many is that? The only movie he appears. So because he before he puts his first AD in all of his, I worked with his first AD on revolutionary road and his I d I wish I remember forgot you're in that that was great and thanks for that. In the in the movie. He like in casino, he plays the guy who, like, you know, the two guys who are cheating, and then the one guy he breaks his hands guy. No, he walks over to the other guy. He says, you can either take the money and we've cut off. Just leave. I. Oh, that's it. He's just like hit was AD like seat guys. We we gotta go, okay, let's we gotta shoot. Yeah. PAT's she casino that's a performance incredible, but is virtually the same to say, say, you don't care. Imagine you're talking about those two performances or two of the funnest performances? Yeah, that. Yeah, I Hilton here in goodfellas was his pick. We got to dig in the, oh. It's probably top five of mine, definitely top ten that movie that movie's incredible. Hey, can I p? Yes. Here's a, here's a card that will get you back in right. Talk about moving. My neighbor was actually NC's one, Catherine Dyer. Of course. Yes. He lives like three houses up for me. She's nice. She's great and Catherine played the the woman who was like working with Brenner who comes in one of the child services, dark agent while she had a good death. She's great. She's great in it. She's good, super dark. She's not like that. She's really sweet, really kind of bright kind of happy. Yes. She was really talking. Reveal in in the season. One is when she comes over child services than they just shoot him in the head. Yeah, it's a great moment, like working in Atlanta. Yeah, it's okay. I mean, it's not my home shirt, you know, like I miss my home. New York, right? Yeah, I miss my life, but you know, the cruiser amazing here and the people are really nice. Everyone's really chill here. I find it. Well, I mean, I'm used to living in Manhattan. Right? So it's like right in Manhattan. Everybody's so Embiid. Yes. So like like the excellent. Like even like you ask people like, you know where to get a piece of pizza with the best pizza is like everybody's gotta thing and like hearing Atlanta, it's just like people just, it seems like people have days with just like, I don't care like what I will go to the dog park. We never did that. Running around with Chievo. Right. That's funny. So I really liked that about an Lanta. You know, Brett, you live in LA. Yeah, look part. I live in West Hollywood. Yeah, it's and I lived in New York for ten years. I know I dig Atlanta. Yeah. I mean, you know, I'm not here as long as David, but yeah, it's fun to work here and it's cool that it's have you other stuff down here. Yeah, yeah, I have shot other things. I don't remember. Exactly what I mean. It's. Well, can I say that is routine recorded? Yeah, but I can hear shooting. Of course, it's been revealed that you're in season three. It has, I think so. I was gonna, say, talked about it. Okay. Got no, no, no, no, I it's been revealed that you're part of the world. Is there anyone in need to check in with about anything. We should check that that's been revealed, I guess. But I don't know. But you know, it's no. Say what you're doing like it's the same thing flows to Susan Larkin still in the show John and the cops are still in the show, and Murray is a fixture Hawkins Indiana appears in season Charles. Charles crazy connection. John Reynolds, he. He is so good. He's so he, he's good friends with like a all the music is from Chicago that I lived with for a long time, this connection. But yeah, he's a, I guess he lives in New York. He's he's a New York comedy. He lived in Chicago for one time. So funny, man, he's funny. He's funny, he's great on search parties. Yeah. It's Barrington date, Thurston host of spit iheartradio's newest podcast. Twenty-three in me where we explore how understanding your DNA changes, how we think about ourselves and the world around us. We've got the NFL why cliff John, we have so much more in common than you could even imagine you put two kids together. Big on one play. They're going to want to have a good time. They gonna wanna fall in love, have opinions this every kid listen to the full episode of spit with twenty three and me in the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Yeah, but I, I mostly have worked on this year, so I have great time working on this that I associate Atlanta with that. But I, I love a lot of things I have. I went to school in the south. Where'd you go? I went to North Carolina school. The arts, no way. I didn't know that. Yeah, school for Gordon green and Paul Schneider, where they same time period or the film program. I was in drama. Okay. So, but I knew them, I knew them cool. I knew Jodi and Danny and Gordon green Paul. But you know, I'm classically a lot of talent came out of that. That's what's crazy funny that it's like that's the other thing is that I do think that. Do you think comedic actors get, discriminated, love that you have this. You really do have this like thing eating at you a little bit where you'll be. On your shoulder, you feel like we don't view you as you well know it's just the world. Like I think that you have a little bit of a thing where there's insecurity. We feel like we don't give you the respect that we might get. We don't think that you could play coriolanus like you're like, you know, and you're a little bit of noise by that because you've done some comedy that's like off the one that you think I could play Corey. Right? Right. But you do right. I think you're a little long, but the other? Yes. Yes. Play. Could play King John, for example. Richard third, Richard, the third, I'd like to see you. Actually, it'd be really, that's that part should be funny. Yeah. No, I would make them I. I mean, as I do think he should be funny because he's having a lot of fun. Everybody. Trey woman one, right? Like that excitement. Yeah, that's great. No, I well of I'm insecure about everything. So that's that's a trait too that you can take out stuff. You can always take comedy out of stuff. But I think it's far harder to like have somebody who is maybe less experience with comedy, bring comedy. Always admired comedians like actor. Like again, this guy who I knows a complicated guy, but the performance of Ricky surveys in the original six episode. So great is is. Is not only a great comedic performance. It is a great acting performance. There is so much psychology in that performance. There's so much dense psychological work that like it is stunning. That guy's stunning actor also like Robin Williams in good will hunting. I think about like him being super funny also like or wake. Knowing with energy, and he just. Audible on what he was in and awakenings. Yeah. No. I mean, I don't. I think that the people that I work don't have an insecurity about them thinking. I'm taking me seriously, but of course, you know. Yeah. I mean, we all have. It's part of being an actor, I think, is always finding some reason of why people in the business don't take. Try to box you in. I'm very open about that, right. Maybe maybe to open, I don't know, but yeah, no, but I should drop that insecurity. You're totally right. That drop it. I just just pointing it out. I just wanna know it should incorporate it again would in terms of owner ability or in terms of things like one of the actually one of the things in performance that I think is so interesting as I come up against things. We're things will happen in my life like I won't be able to like I'm getting older, right? I'm not able to move exactly the way that I used to be able to move or I'm not able to things like that. And I always think about it initially in terms of acting. Oh, this is going to cut off things that I could do like or like grace elegance, or whatever. And then I'm always like. When I take the mindset of incorporating it as a good thing, we've always and and and using that to expand. I mean, there is like like, I think it's a Strasbourg, quote of like of like, there are no distractions only potential for inspiration. Right? So like even these things where you point out little things or foibles insecurities even things about my own narcissism, arrogance or whatever, like their things to be incorporated and you, of course, things to be discarded and trying to end of or something like that or or even, you know. And the funny thing is like even like whatever in season one and like I had a big neurosis about like a wanted to get in shape for it, you know? And that was like, 'cause all my friends who like have shirtless scenes in TV shows are always like. Shredded always are like, oh, shit, Shirley, I'm gonna get your, no, let's play the character and like, you know, what's fun is like he can be a real human being. And then also he can be insecure about himself being overweight, like as you're shooting like, you can incorporate all of it like you don't have to just make it like, I'm going to show you that I don't care. You can actually care as well, but it. But it's, there's a, there's a feeling of Inc and then there's a feeling of like lying about it. Yeah, that I. Yeah, but I mean long tangent about. I sort of like that quality in new and I think actually comes across as you play. There's this quality. Put all of my insecurities exact everything, and it's always to be used even when you get over something personal, it's still there for you to use, so always connected to it. So no, it should never be looked at as something that like you have to overcome for your art, but sometimes may be in impersonal just for me to be an easier person. Yes. Yes. Joe with music, though the same is true for that. Like I think he's just artists in general, wanna push themselves to do something different. Like there's never been a band that wanted to put out the same record time after time. Sure. Or that's why the, you know the guys go out and do solo records because they want to try something different Cher. Yeah. Like what? What do you feel like musically? How does that relate like not wanting to like repeat yourself, just wanting to do something really different. And yeah, I kind of, I guess, inherent everything, you know, inheriting acting inherited music. Yeah, just wanting to not put the same thing out too. I, but it's probably just for your own self enjoyment too. Because what's the fun of doing something twice, I guess. Right. But it's, I don't know. I think it's really difficult music, especially like rock and roll genre because it's like, you know, we're getting to a point where you know Earl. Early seventies, there were a lot. There was a lot of ground be explored, you know, and there's a lot of new instruments being created and stuff. So there's really new ground to be explored, but in terms of kind of rock and roll right now, it's really super derivative of like things that have already come out. Right. So I find that that's probably the biggest sort of block is the fact that you know it is, I think, statistically may be harder to put something else out. That's different. Totally. But also that could just be me be me. No, I think you're right. I mean, there aren't very many in music, very many waves of like now, if you start a band, people say, well, what do you guys like? You know, like, well, those are the guys that do like the stumps thing. Whereas felt like they were the ones like forging those pads. Yeah, but then they were all being influenced by, you know, old blues and for sure, it's all sort of a cycle, I guess, like maybe the distinction between like Chuck Berry and the Beatles. There's a way bigger difference to me for to that in in my mind with those two, then there is like the Beatles and like tame Impala or something like the right. Do you know what I mean? If you like, maybe it's travelling less or maybe just one step less removed. Me too huge influence for me. Amazing band. Hey, Impala. Impala. Impala could be. I don't think they're right guy. It's it's his own solo project. Got Kevin Parker. It's like, you know, does it all right. Sit on the q. It's like it's like it's like Floyd. Compare something. I think he manages to do his own his own thing. And yeah, stand above apart from the rest. I don't know if I would classify it as rock and roll though. But I mean, maybe if he does then though, than it is, so I don't know you classified as rock and roll. I don't know. I guess maybe at its core and its it's conception, but I, I don't know. It's also different albums album. I would say like the latest album of so much less than where it started off as kind of the psych rock. And now it's almost like a like a. Has like arm be face drums with Qatar, rock sort of built into it, but then also like pop hooks in, you know, psychedelic affects. I'm not as knowledgeable about the is you're just started listening to that. I actually he out over that shit. Yeah, I love. I love a lot of musical innovation happens in this. I mean, I'm a big hip hop fan. That's really where the biggest, that's where the biggest, because if you think about the conception that was so recent that they're still there's, I feel like it's able to go. This is the city that pushes it the most. Well, yeah, and that's why everyone went nuts. When the the Super Bowl is here this year and they announced the act was maroon five. Oh, everyone went beserk. They're like, you're in Atlanta and you're not bringing out, you know. Atri outcast, right? Yeah, sure. Yeah. Yeah, they had so many people choose from, and yeah, people, hey, that's pretty, I would've loved if they brought up and future. Migos. Exactly. Yeah. I'm not up on current hip hop. I was really into it in college. So from like eighty seven to ninety seven ish that was kind of my realm and then dropped off John. Right? No, I love that realm to, yeah, but I don't exclude the realm of today at all. I should get back into it says different, very different. It is. Yeah. All right, everyone. I hope you enjoyed that. You know, I did. I enjoy all these talks, but this one was very special. They had a lot of fun, and those guys were all three just very cool down to earth, humble, humble guys. It seems like they really have a good time working together and have have really made a family. They're here in Atlanta on the stranger things set with the crew in the cast. So it was really, really cool, very, very nice to see. Hope you enjoyed that. We will come back next week with part to when we get into big night, which trust me, you won't be let down with that conversation either. It's very, very good and those guys, all of that movie as much as I do. So hope you Doug this when and we will be back next week with part two. And until then beware the Demi Gorgan. Crush is produced engineered edited and soundtrack by no Brown in Ramsey at how stuff works studios. Pont city market Atlanta, Georgia. My father is Keith hunter, just percent. He's known as the happy face, serial killer. On one side of the coin, he's a loving family, man. And then on the other side of the coin, he is everything that could hurt. He goes from protected a predator. Happy face a new series from house to forks, new episodes out every Friday on apple podcasts or wherever you get podcast.

David sort Hollywood Atlanta cliff John New York EMMY Brett Gilman Hanoi Jane Josh Clark Brett Joe better place Facebook Murray Gordon green Brett Gelman Catherine Dyer Brent Kelman
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45:02 min | 11 months ago

Local Hour: David Samson On MLB vs MLBPA

"So Garcia if you like me you love a good stat but there's one stat you probably don't know your vehicle's battery charge that's why advance auto parts has free vehicle battery testing and installation with no appointment. Needed BATTERY SORTED. Just seventy ninety nine. They also have curbside pickup on any order. Enter the Code Dan. Twenty when you buy online to save twenty percent on your order adventure auto at advance auto parts and participating carquest locations. See Store for details. The Dan lebatardshow woods to podcasts is presented by Iino the capital one assistant. What's in your wallet? Thank you everybody for the positive feedback on the last few episodes that we've done with David Saints and I like to take credit for it but this is really been all David. The host of nothing personal. There's nothing that says. He has to be totally honest with me. I don't really know why he he's this honest but man do. I appreciate it. David thank you million times over. That story about the bus obviously got a lot of a publicity around social media channels kind of went viral and it was a great story man. You've been amazing. Thank you but why would you wanNA guest ever? Who's not honest? Doesn't that defeat the purpose of a conversation really honesty? There's not a lot you. I've had conversations with Dan where he's like. Why would this person lie to me? And I'm like to curry favor. Not Know why people lie like people. Sometimes lying is awesome. Don't you know suits but you? I mean is sometimes it's not flattering. The truth that you tell and sometimes it's very difficult for you for example. The Larry Bind Fest. Jeffrey Loria dynamic. You didn't have to have to answer that question honestly but she did. I mean just speechless. It was dramatic content. I just think it's important that what what you do and what I do on nothing personal. The whole point is to give people an inside look and there's such a shroud of mystery over what we do both in the media and in the sports world in the Front Office on the field in the media and there's so many people who just want to know it's not that they're going to judge which sometimes they do negatively or positively but information to me content is king and why not just give people what they want the kinks said it right. Give the people what they want. Love the reference that's enough of a victory lap because this is a an episode that I've been looking forward to a Montreal Expos episode. We will get to that. But there's some major developments on the MLB front What do you make of the latest proposal? That has some of the game's richest players. Earning contracts that Alfredo Amezaga tried out onto the field for. What can you tell us about the latest proposal is this just posturing or is there now? A legitimate chance. That baseball won't return. This is just a Gauche eating right now. The players made a proposal that said the players have to take pay cuts. The owner said if we're going to play baseball the employees have to pay cuts. I think it may have happened at your network where some of the top executives had to take pay but still put out the normal amount of content that they were doing. Is that not right in. Some respects like Stugatz. Dan Le Talk the whole laboratory enterprises putting out more content than normal but with when while being asked to take a pay cut so with the players got in the beginning in March. Was that if they play half the season they get half of their salary. That's not a pay cut. And now what the owners are saying is well if we're only gonNA play eighty one hundred games. Here's the different levels. And now things have just gone bat crazy and the reason is that Scott. Boris has gotten his players. Like Max Scherzer to send out tweets which of course Max. Scherzer didn't right. He's getting credit for writing this tweets. And I'll bet you dollars to donuts. Came right from Boris. And it simply says we shouldn't even respond to what the owners offered. Which by the way you have to collectively bargain in good faith. You have to do responses encounters. So of course the unions going to counter. Boris is just such a blowhard that he has his players. Doing this in. It's creating more problems than it is solving David. What do you think happens to Scott? Boris is commission. Because I had this question off air or one of these conversations does he still get the percentage on the contract? He negotiated or does he have to also take a reduction in pay if Mike Trout to end the likes of Mike. Trotter are making less than six million dollars. I feel like the light bulb just went off in your head. Of course. That's why Boris doesn't want anyone to get pay cuts because when you sign a player like he signed garrick cold that with the Yankees and let's say it's three hundred million just for easy. Let's say takes five percent. Which does that's fifteen million dollars. The Boers makes off that. He's not getting that in year one. He gets five percent of each year's salary. So if Garrick Oh was supposed to make thirty five million dollars this year and instead makes five million dollars. That's thirty million dollars less. That's a million and a half dollars out of Scott. Boris his pocket. Of course he is an interested party. So that that's what happens with his commissions he doesn't waver by the way from his five percent never. How do you think this ends? It ends the way. Most things do with tears in her journey. Sorry that's from Shakespeare in love. No I just did that. But that's the first time someone asked a question. Exactly how does this end? It ends with an agreement. I don't know that it ends with baseball. Because they're still the health issue so there's still the pandemic that has to be figured out and whether any team sports can come back because baseball the deadline. And here's a little news for all of us. Don't worry about June first or June fourth or June tenth to have an agreement. This is normal back and forth. The real deadline is August. I for season to start notch July fourth. So there's a lot of built in cushion and I think that it ends with hopefully baseball being played but I'm worried about the health side than the economic side. Yeah you've maintained that ever since we've started talking about what the plan is. You've hammered testing testing testing health and safety of the players and all involved. And I don't really know as more and more places to reopen. We haven't hit that second wave yet. There are some encouraging signs from surprising. I for one. I'm surprised what's happening. In states like Georgia where cases either go flat or down when they were pretty brazen about how quickly they were reopening so we keep learning more and more and as we see other leagues like the Bundesliga in Germany granted. Not Apples to apples return with a level of success. You get hopeful that this could be something that could be done with the players health in mind. Maybe not at the front of everybody's mind which I'm sure is your objection but it does seem like this is something that is at least possible which is not something that looked at all possible back in. April. I'm hoping so but at the end of the day there's factors that we just don't control and where baseball is different than basketball. Where they're talking about going into a bubble disneyworld in doing just the playoffs or hockey doing their twenty four team playoffs but going to two different areas. You can't do that in baseball that whole Arizona plan. I don't know if you remember that it was like a year ago that they came up with having everybody just go to Arizona. You can't stay in one place for six months do a season. It's just never going to happen that way. So baseball's the toughest position 'cause their season hasn't started whereas whereas basketball and hockey obviously can go right to the playoffs in everyone will be okay with that sort of playing tournament type thing. You can't do that in baseball we're already starting to see what's leaking out of some of the NBA players with this Orlando Plan. Wide World of Sports Complex. Look I'm a Disney employee? I love all Disney properties. But I don't think any of those resorts are really made for you to stay there for months at a time you could go a little. Stir crazy if you're saying. The Wild World of sports for more than two weeks players are already starting to leak out like this is not exactly boozy so they just talked about yesterday and this was so funny. To me that they're now negotiating. How many family members can actually come with the players which by the way fifty percent of the players want no family members to very it right then when the families do come? If there's little kids I want you to picture a little kid staying like at a Disney resort but not able to go to the park. How exactly annoying will that kid be to the father to the player to the parents when he sees like Mickey out the window and there's nothing he could do about going to play with? Mickey I just can't even imagine it. Yeah you've essentially turn the the most magical place on earth to Kasumi Saint Cloud and I don't know I don't. I don't know of Chris. Paul and his family are going to be big in that. But but we'll see okay. Let's get into the Montreal Expos. How did Jeffrey Loria become owner of the Montreal? Expos and what year about was this so he started looking at. Here's a little known story that that actually is never. I'm pretty sure I've never actually mentioned this. But you just reminded me of something from the beginning Jeffrey Loria. He's going to be angry 'cause he actually told me never to talk about this. Whatever I'm not it's fine in Greib. I'm sorry like does Jeffrey Loria know what you're doing. Have you heard from Jeffrey Loria? So He's a big fan of nothing personal and he is aware that I come on the show from time to time because he still has sources. So there's still people who call him and say did you hear David say this or did you hear David say that many many years ago he had an opportunity to buy into the New York Yankees. That was the beginning of his life and I was a little boy at the time and he called me into his office one day and he said how would you like to own the New York F. in Yankees and I was a kid and I was? What do you mean like as an owner? So you're saying I can meet Don Mattingly irony of ironies and he said yes. It didn't happen. The deal didn't happen for many reasons but it came very very close very very close so years later. One thousand nine hundred nine. I get a call out of nowhere that Geoffrey called and said I WANNA by the Montreal Expos and I knew that they had been for sale because Charles Bronfman was the owner of the expos and then he got out in the main guy was a guy named Claude Brochu. Who is a pretty famous sky up in Montreal? So I said I'll be happy to help you. And I helped him with the transaction with one banker and one lawyer and me Jeffrey. We're the only four people who worked on this transaction and getting the Expos was the most complicated difficult delight ever seen. Even though at that time I was only thirty one years old but the problem is no one in Canada. Wanted us because we were the Americans? We were the Jewish Americans and that was an issue. Believe it or not lots of ANTI-SEMITISM UP IN MONTREAL ONCE. We got the team lots of if you go in. Look there lots of newspaper cartoons with big noses and all sorts of horrible stuff. That happened once. We were up there but we were the last possible choice to buy team for Major League Baseball and for the owners of the expos literally. Last the first time we met with Bud Selig was at a hotel lobby in New York. Me and Jeffrey went to see bud. Selig the Commissioner of Baseball. And he said you really WanNa buy the expos. This is what you want in Jeffrey. Said I WANNA buy team. And of course I'd prefer the Yankees or the mets are team in New York but the expos are for sales. So that's the deal that we're willing to do and but said well you know it's not going to be easy up there. They can't get a stadium. You're going to have to get a stadium and they don't draw very well. You really going to have to figure out a lot of stuff and Jeffrey sort of looked at me. And I looked at him and said fine. We'll do it. Jeffrey put in twelve million dollars to buy the Montreal. Expos twelve million that's it it's unreal because the current owner of the expos who ended up staying in his partners. Were the richest guys in Montreal. The Stephen Bronfman this playboy this rich son of Charles Bronfman. He couldn't come up with twelve million dollars to keep laurean stamps. Not a Montreal. Who are you guys bidding against? That's the joke of it. That's why it was twelve million dollars. Nobody because we knew by going to Montreal and doing due diligence. There wasn't one of these rich Montreal. Limited partners wanted to step up and be the general partner not one of them and so they totally screwed as I mean. Greatest buying because through several other transactions that twelve million dollar investment essentially became two billion dollars. It's a it's a hell of a an our ally that you've got there but it was a bit of a Red Flag to you and Jeffrey because if these wealthy people from Montreal are thinking that it's worth twelve million dollars that has a signal that there are some major issues with his franchise yet. Ego doesn't see red flags so that was never in our mind. My mind is we'd moved to Montreal and we get a TV deal. We would get a ballpark built. And we would increase the value of the expos exponentially the remember contraction hadn't started yet we contract. We didn't know anything about contraction. We thought it could work in Montreal. It's very close to New York. Jeffrey could fly back and forth. This is pre nine eleven where you can get to a plane five minutes before it's leaving. I commuted for my two and a half years. I lived in a hotel room. Twenty five twelve in the intercontinental is where I live the entire time. Never bought a house never bought an apartment. I had room service every day and my biggest deal is that I got them to give me free pay per view because that was before certain free things on the Internet. David Samson you scoundrel so so David Samson is now doing day to day operations you guys have the expos. Let's fast forward the time. Line a little bit too. This is your baby now and you start seeing all these problems firsthand. Tvd All not in great shape. This is your first experience. I imagine negotiating TV rights deal. You're doing it in an important country so I imagine there's all sorts of political dynamics with TV but also getting a stadium right in a foreign language. Keep IT in mind every memo that we wrote had to be in both French and English the rules and Quebecer that has to be in both languages every sign every everything so the first big meeting we had was with their sports network called. Raiso FOR OUR DS is what it was called and our TV money back then was butkus. It was crap and we wanted to bring in more revenue because Geoffrey wanted to get more players. That's why one of the first things we did. Is We signed Graham Lloyd? That horrible contract amount for a decky Araba which was a horrible trade man when I names. It's when I realized that we were going to become the Yankees north so I always heard and makes sense. How excited Jeffrey was to to have a small piece of the Yankees? I always heard Jeffrey. Loria was a huge Yankee Fan. That's true right. It's yeah it's a dream come true right because it reminds. Everybody loves baseball because he reminds you of your father so his father took him to his first ever game and he watched all these great old Yankees. He saw them all in person. You get this sort of James Earl Jones feeling your heart and when you make enough money in your life very successful art dealer you say I want to own a team being be a part of that exclusive club because I could never be a player so now how about being an owner. The old story right about the worst day a little Jewish boys life is when he realizes it'll be easier to become an owner of a team that a player on a team and I had that epiphany very young because I was always small but some people have later in life so we go to a meeting with rds. And I knew he had a problem. And I actually spoke called Jeffrey after this meeting. Because he wasn't a part of it and I also called Bob you pay. We had to get a TV deal. We go into the meeting and it was a man named Jerry FRAPP. I'll never forget this meeting this big strapping. Tv Executive. I'm going in. He's an older he was older in. Just had this or of Gravitas and I go in there with my briefcase thinking I've got content for you in you better pay. We're going to need serious money and back then remember. The exchange rate was terrible so I wanted American dollars Canadian dollars five minutes into the meeting. He said you know David just so you know we would rather show curling on our ds than your baseball team. That was his opening negotiating stance. And I called baseball because I assumed they were kidding. It turns out he was dead serious. It would rape better you hundred percent curling Canada rates better than baseball back then. Montreal was a disaster. No one came to games. They'd come to opening day and they never come again. There was no corporate sponsorship. We played in this old facility called Olympic Stadium which was Fun To to be a part of but it was old and decrepit and crappy. There was no radio deal. We had an English radio deal nonexistent so we put David Hornell Hall of fame broadcaster. He carried around a briefcase with him. Doing Internet only radio back in the day before it even started. He had a carries on briefcase. And do it all and we're mortified. Because he was such a famous great broadcaster. It was just a horrible situation. Tried to get public financing so I met with people both in the province of Quebec and also Ottawa. Just everywhere trying to get all this money. And meanwhile these famous limited partners didn't do squat. They were they were so involved in the community. They wouldn't help. They wouldn't do a thing. All they did was complain all right so I think we have a pretty good idea of your stadium situation the TV in already from a business standpoint. This does not look sustainable. What can you tell me about the actual team on the field front office through some of the incredible assets that you had you had a lot of really good young talent on that team so I remember the first time we met. The players was in October of ninety nine. While at the deal didn't close to ninety nine. But seelig let us me and Jeffrey Goto Philadelphia and meet with the Expos because the expos were involved in this crazy ownership situation where they really had no owner they had no GM. They didn't know Dave Dombrowski had left for he was gone from from Montreal. Had Gone to Florida. Any less was leaving Florida actually to go to Detroit after that. But they just had jim beatty was the GM no one knew. Could they take on money? Could they have players so we went in October and met the players? The first time ever met athletes was in a ballroom and now looking back on my career. I realize why they were so grumpy. They got off team plane and they were asked to go to a mandatory meeting to meet a bunch of suits. Which as I think about of course the players didn't WanNa do it so we stood there in front of the players and he said Hi. I'm Jeffrey and I want to buy this team. And we're GONNA build this into a champion and just keep going throughout the season because it was the end of the season and starting next year. It's a whole new game and it really wasn't. I mean we brought in a couple of guys and we had Vladimir Guerrero. Who didn't know what we were talking about during the idea that time. They didn't speak English we had. I'd just interesting guys. The managers fleet bad Lou. Who was this crusty grumpy angry guy and he had just had enough of the ownership situation so from the minute we came in and met with him. We said we're going to keep him and he would be the manager at that time. We didn't know that we'd end up firing so many managers. You just don't know what you're going to be like as an owner or a president until you do it. Yeah asleep at blue. Who's just angry all the time? Because he was just. He was burnt out seed. Go Talk to him and I was new so I would talk to him after a game when something would happen and we lose. I'd ask him a question and I was. I was new in young and I admitted. I changed over the years but his response to be so disrespectful. Like I'm sleepy illu. You're asking me why I made this pitching change. I made it because I wanted to make it. You sit up there and watch. That's what he would say a lot. You sit and watch. I managed so I learned early on that. That's not how I would wanNA manager to be. That's not exactly team building and more importantly. I think Jeffrey learned that. That's not always likes to manager to be okay. So how quickly into your time at Montreal do you guys start exploring other options like relocation possibly selling what is the first thing that comes up when you realize. We might have made a mistake here. Have you read the lawsuit? Is that why you're asking that question that I actually need to ask you this right now? You just make that question while we're talking so you have no prepared questions. You didn't do any research on any of the washes. Just what I remember about about the expos. So do you remember the whole Rico? Lawsuit? No Oh my God. I was sued for violating the Rico. Statutes people thought that I was like in the Mafia that we had this whole conspiracy. We were sued Mike by the limited partners in Montreal. Me Jeffrey Bud Seelig Bob do pay for conspiring criminally with the Mafia which I found. I went to Montreal for the first time about two years ago and I had no idea how deep the mafia ties are in that city. It is a big organized crime city. So you got tied up in a Rico Case Rico case so my first thought when we got served this Rico case and they did it with a big press conference this is after we had we had said we were moving to Florida and we took these Canadian limited partners with us to Florida. That's a whole long story but these guys owned a company called Montreal Expos LP. They were limited partners and one day. We sent him a letter. Saying we'd like to inform you the name of your company that you have a stake in is now called the Florida Marlins. Lp's they had no say we had taken over a majority of the team so we all the voting rights of the limited partners. We didn't have one thing that they needed to know about. So they just got a letter saying hey you know. We're giving you your season tickets except there now in pro player so let me know if you wanna come and they were furious so they soothe all of us under Rico Statutes and it became this big deal Gordon. I'm reading. I'm reading an article right now. That says the allegation was that this was a well thought out to your plot to undermine the organization so you can move the team at a Canada and you were sued by your minority partners. Who you just told. Hey your company's name is changing. So what's funny is you ask the question you said Wendy. Do you know that was the entire lawsuit in a nutshell? The entire lawsuit was and I was on the stand. I was the principal witness because I was involved in all of it. Jeffrey took the stand and just said I don't recall. I don't recall I don't recall I don't recall love baseball and I don't recall which that's his job saying. I guess amazing optics by the way by doing that on the stand. It's what it is right and it happens to be true. Plausible deniability is one of the great legal principles of all time by so thankfully. I've never had to to learn that from personal experience. But I'll take it word for it but you've never been sued. No no I mean God. You haven't lived then well. Well let's wait till we put this podcasts out and I'll get back to you as I'm reading more and more of these details so on the the major point of the case was. When did you know that it wasn't going to work in Montreal because we believe in alleging that you came to Montreal knowing it wasn't GonNa work you had this whole Machiavelli plan to sell the expos by the Marlins or just get contract the team or move the team? So when did you know and then all of a sudden you asked me that question so I figured that was a total setup. And you're trying to get me to lie to you. Given what my testimony was all right. Well do you remember your testimony going into one of your scrapbooks? If you want to refresh? That's that is a library. Get the testimony right. It's it's IT'S. It's bigger than Warren Peace and the lawyer by the way who is always. Who did my examination might cross examination. Was a guy named Jeffrey Kessler. Whose a union off job of a lawyer very popular except he was simply horrible. Miss Case Mr Samson is it not true they you knew from the beginning that you were going to screw over these man. No answer because when you're being cross examined you don't talk a lot like you just answer the question. Yes or no. Could you please give us more detail? When you knew it wasn't GonNa work and so I would go in and explain all the different meetings I had and all the things I did. Well there's a TV exact told me that. He'd rather err curling and that was confirmed by People Major League baseball so it was probably then that the gears started talking. I'm the record when we talked about public financing. Will you had a press conference announcing that? You had a location for the new ballpark in Montreal. Yes we did do an entire press conference and yes. We put on a show for everyone because we had no financing done. What we thought was if we put enough pressure on the public in Montreal. By showing. Where the BALLPARK would be. We had designs made. We had meetings. We thought that that would get the public to pay up. But we were very clear if the public's not going to pay for this ballpark the economics don't work and if we're not going to get some sort of currency equalization from baseball. None of it's going to work but you don't know that going in your hope for the best but it's not like we didn't have a pre-nup so that's what I would say to you now. I didn't know when we started that. It wasn't GonNa work but I certainly knew that it was going to be an uphill battle and I knew that not one of these Canadians. Who Sued us? Not One of them wanted to step up and take the reins so I had a pretty good idea but it wasn't for lack of trying. It was for lack of succeeding that we move the team at. Don't take this the wrong way but it seems as though at every turn that you actually get a team. You're certainly not the first choice. Major League Baseball they have a preference and the preference says sell the team to local businessmen and in Montreal and in Florida. Just nobody stepped up to the plate. Yeah I'd say only not I we. It's not that we were the last of the first choice. We were always the only choice at right. That that's the word I would use. So yes bud. Ceiling did not want to have the expos saw the from his friend. Charles Bronfman down to Jeffrey Loria and then it cost one of bud. Selig's biggest regrets. Is that Rico. Where he was named Stephen Bronfman Charles's son was one of the people who is suing US and Charles. Bud ended up in a fight in their friendship. Got ruined over it. They ended up making up years and years. Later and Stephen Bronfman because Charles Bronfman tell Steven what to do. It's not that Stevens said. I'm going to sue Jeffrey and David. For Rico and Bud Charles knew this was happening. I'm still struggling to find out what the end game was of this lawsuit. There seem to be much of it. I'm reading direct quote from your guys. As attorney their cases as thin as ice. It does seem like a PR stunt mostly. This was all to cover themselves for letting eighteen leave Montreal and go to Florida and having their team Solta ball and eventually move to Washington. This was all about their standing in the community and them not wanting to take any blame because they just to make cut to the chase. They lost the lawsuit completely. They didn't win one motion. They didn't win one objection. They didn't win. There wasn't one part of it that they won but we had a fight in it took years to do and the arbitration hearing that ended up happening which lasted for weeks and weeks happened after the world series and it was one of the great pieces of testimony. Were I got to say that? We offered Marlins World Series rings to these Canadian partners and every single one of them took. That's that is an amazing amazing detail. I've always been curious how difficult it must be for franchises operating in Canada in the NBA. The Toronto Raptors just WanNa Championship Are there any sort of accelerations to for instance? I always figured it was different for you. Know Derek jeeter flying into Canada to play the expos than it would be for me to fly into Canada. Justice Seem Montreal. What sort of logistical hurdles are there? Just operating this team where every team that comes outside of the the the Blue Jays is from a foreign country it back in the day. We have Phil Customs Forms. Every time we came home from a road trip us every time we left for a road trip and came into the states. So there were you go through customs both ways and that was just part of it and so what the traveling secretary would have to do for the expos. It actually would have to fill it out and then we'd have to have each player sign accustomed form the remember the old paper customs forms. There's no global entry there was nothing But the biggest business issue in the raptors have this now their revenues in Canadian dollars in their expenses are in US dollars because the players for the raptors are not paid in Canadian dollars they paid in US dollars. Which is why you have currency issues. That are very very significant when there's an issue between the Canadian and US dollar. All right. I I still think that. There's a lot of meat on the bone for the expo so we may extend this episode into two because we covered some about your transition in the John Henry episode. But I I want to stay on some of the issues so you already know quickly off the bat that this is going to be very difficult. What is the first option for? David Samson and Jeffrey Loria. I think the first option was already a me rephrase. The first option was definitely saying Montreal. But you quickly realize. That's going to be problematic relocation selling it back to Major League baseball what what is your ideal scenario. What would have made the most money? The fastest was to move the team. We wanted to move it to the New York New Jersey area to be a third team in Newark New Jersey or we weep and we felt felt like we could get the votes from everyone but the Yankees and the mets and we also wanted to move the team into the Washington area or we looked at Charlotte because if we could negotiate a small relocation fee and get a ballpark built in those areas which we felt we could that would be the fastest way to get the asset higher than it was so the first call was to relocate but we couldn't get the votes and it became clear that we would not be allowed as new owners. What happened was the other owners in baseball. Just met US. And they said we can't allow and a guy to come in for twelve million dollars a year later all of a sudden relocated team to a great market that we can hold out for expansion and then get one point one that expansion money so I tried to get votes as a new guy in baseball and I could not get votes for relocation I had no traction all bud had said no way so I tried to go around bud and go to different owners and presidents and see if we could get any relocation traction and I knew immediately. It wasn't going to happen so then we switched over to selling the. That's where the idea came from. The we talked about last week of getting rid of the expos. Just buying another team okay. So I had no idea that Major League baseball entertain this third team in the New York idea. You're looking New York New Jersey. What Trenton did you did? How does one put out? Feelers de reach out to local government officials because I imagine public financing is a large part of all this so the first thing before you even get public finances you have to see whether or not you have the votes so we always did things in order and in Baseball. Counting to twenty three. Which is a concept you and I've talked about and I talk about it. Nothing personal the time and I know that there was so much animosity toward the Yankees back in those days. Actually these days to they do that just exists. They were the big bad yankees and that such a big market that there really should be a thirteen there. By the way the current Tampa Bay rays if you asked to Sternberg under oath the owner of the raise what he'd like to do with the Tampa Bay rays he would like to move. It's The New York New Jersey area. You'll never admit it to you. But he and I have talked about it and I know it for an absolute fact that a third team up there would do way better than a team in Tampa or saint. Pete which is why. There's no new ballpark there. Can we say here for a second because I gotta figure I always find it? Bizarre when expansion teams start in big time cities like an Mls New York City AFC pops up and that's more even intensely Geo targeted like okay. But they play in New Jersey. This is truly the Bronx is team. I get all that but in that area. You're either a mets fan or a Yankees Fan. There are people still trying to figure it out in your main demo for season ticket base. I don't know who I'm going to root for how do you? How do you crack that? Yeah remember though in baseball. The key is your local broadcast deal. That is way more important than even gate so the broadcast deal that you would get up like an area. No not at all. I'm just I'm just telling the listeners is that that is not even a factor is whether or not anyone will actually be a fan of my team. I don't care I just have to have a TV deal ballpark and the rest takes care of itself. Man It's so weird that that it's it's that cut and dry like people need programming for their network and if we start winning people will become fans because that's how this thing works. How did work in one thousand nine hundred six with the panthers? I mean but there wasn't a competing team down here but it was big but no one had any interest in hockey until it all of a sudden came. It wasn't a big sports. That's easier to explain because there's no other team can you imagine if there was an NHL team already in south Florida and then thirty years later another team comes down. Never mind the fact that we can barely support one football and Mike. What if a second? What if a second football team were in Miami? And unlike the dolphins who haven't won since I moved down here maybe one playoff game since Oh to have. They won one game since I moved here. I think that maybe it maybe one. So what if a new another football team were here and it was like the Golden Knights in the NHL where their first year? They made it. I think they made it to the Stanley Cup in their first year. What if they that team a new football team down in Miami? Where the dolphins have a stranglehold made it to the playoffs and had a playoff run. Would people be going to those games? I think with it depends on the marketing plan and who they target. Because I think most Miami Dolphins fans are really actually up in in Broward and in West Palm. It's more of a white fan base. Really so it depends the Tri County area is so large that if you specifically target one of those counties and say hey this is your team. The stadium is in your county. I think it could work. Especially if it's a golden knights scenario after there's a whole generation of dolphins fans that only know this franchise joke despite the fact that they're one of the great crown jewels of the NFL people literally born who were going to college. Now you're one hundred percent right. They had thousand year. December thirtieth two thousand was the last Dolphins playoff victory. That means that since I moved to Miami in two thousand and two the dolphins have not WanNa that and by the way people born in two thousand. They are now in college or now. They're home actually because of quarantine but they're out of the house in theory so that is that you're right. That's an entire generation of people that the dolphins are just not as successful on field team. But we're we're looking when you talk about a third team in New York New Jersey. You're talking about sort of northern the northern area where people choose between the red sox and the Yankees. The mets really were not an impact. I was never really worried about the mets. Because their fan base is much for. Long island-based Your Long Island and Queens right right whereas the Yankees are more on the Jersey side. If you will so you go a little north of the Yankees and you've got red sox fans then blend into around Hartford Connecticut into Yankees fans but if you plop yourself somewhere in the middle there and you have a winning team you have a huge broadcast deal because you have so many subscribers and there's so many the demographic is so great that it is a gold mine I mean you look at i. It's funny you don't look at it as like they have to baseball teams. There you look at. It is like they have like four regional sports networks over there because every professional sports league has just about franchises. Sometimes three when you include New Jersey that they had the nets and the devils so every market has pretty much more regional sports networks than they even have teams and they're looking to fill out content. So that's the first thing that you're looking at. That's quite interesting. Did you ever have any public? You down here where you wearing a cowboy hat when you were owning the Montreal Expos to leverage other cities and hold over the threat of relocation so it never got that that far to go north to be thirteen because we met so much resistance which. I thought that it wouldn't happen. I thought people would want it sort of bring the Yankees off their pedestal. But I think that other owners got scared that if we allowed a team to encroach upon an existing geographical region. Hey today it's him. Tomorrow could be me so I could never get enough momentum for that. But in terms of relocating expos we never did a public. The only thing publicly did with these press conferences in French and English was saying. Listen No new stadium. The team will not be here has nothing to do with. Lauria or Sampson. Frankly we were the violin players on the titanic. It was going down long before we got there but people have revisionist use of that but we didn't threaten the way we did in Miami. Miami was a total threat. Hey we're going to relocate you. Better get a ballpark for us. In Montreal was far more dire which was listen. There's no shot here and you know it from previous owners all right quick question before we get into your review and we wrap up. This week's episode when exploring other relocation options was another city in Canada. Ever in the equation. Absolutely absolutely not okay. I'll weather placing candidate ever all right. Host of nothing personal with David Samson every week he comes on this local our podcast and it gives us a review. You really have to I in the chamber because we didn't do one last week. So have that. What are you reviewing for us? This Week David Samson. So I'm doing this in very much more detail and nothing personal. I think tomorrow but I have to bring up a show to all the audience because I'm obsessed with it. It's on my mind. I watched an entire series in one five hour stretch. I didn't move and it's a show called Dave's Oh I love that show. Oh my God I heard was told by someone who I have. Great recruit ability with in terms of tastes. He said. Just watch Dave. I said what's it about. Just Watch Dave so I got Hulu and watch Dave. It is worth the price of Hulu. It is about eight Jewish rapper. He's a white Jewish rapper. Whose name is little dicky. By the way watch the entire series and I didn't know that that was a real person. It's a real person. It's a real rapper. That has real salt. I know idea. I thought that he was just a funny Seinfeld. Like sort of Larry. David sort of neurotic guy. Who is a great actor? I knew that he wrote the show he produced the show. I didn't realize that it's all his guys. And it's all real. It is brilliant. He's brilliant. It's hysterical some of the scenes in some of the episodes when you put a hole in a picnic table. That's IT I. It's one of the funniest things I've ever seen. This series opens with him trying to explain deformity to a doctor and he goes through this entire thing. The opening shot. You don't know the character you don't know anything. I was hooked from the first three minutes. If you've got five extra hours which in quarantine just start. You won't stop. Dave is maybe the best series I've seen boy in a very very long time. Everyone that's actually given David Shot. It has nothing but the best things to say about it. And I'm right there with you. In the Seinfeld curb your enthusiasm comparisons are so dead on its so observational at has the same pace to it. The fact that they're leaning into real life characters the way that Seinfeld curb does yeah I. It's a dead on comparison and and dickey is an unbelievable talent. And He's armed with the support of some of the most powerful people in Hollywood in the music industry because scooter. Braun has an executive producer credit on this. And that's how you get. Cameos of Courtney Kardashian that just pop in there that's how it's music career really got off the ground because the as music video called. Get that money. Mark Cuban and Tom Petty Show Up. And there's video and you're like how is this guy that I'm just hearing about getting all these amazing cameos because he assigned to scoot run. So did you know about him as a rapper before you decided to watch the show? Yeah I've known about Little Dicky for I WANNA say four years and yet you still weren't interested in the show until someone tells you to watch it. I guess I had preconceived notions about the show and I just wanted to get like good reviews and people word of mouth got to me and enough people kept hammering me with with Dave. You know what a commitment is. Start a new show and I burn through it in two days. It was incredible by the way. It's a perfect way to end this. Because you just said something that many people thank and they realized how silly it is that you had this preconceived notion of something and therefore you weren't willing to give it a try and then you give it a try and you say why did I think anything possibly could be negative about it yet. The next time you go right back to the same preconceived notions. Yes and you'd think I learned my lessons because a lot of people have preconceived notions about David Johnson. Former MARLINS team president hosts have nothing personal but joins us on the local hour and the episodes are better than you can ever imagine. David thank you so much I wanNA talk to. Have you seen uncut gems on Netflix? Course I saw that last night. Let's all right. Let's do a little bit real quick because I got to get the national show going here in a bid uncut gems. The pacing of this movie gave me anxiety. It's an anxiety inducing movie right number one takeaway is Kevin. Garnett can actually act which. I was impressed with number. Two Adam Sandler is an actor. That is much deeper than happy. Gilmore and Billy Madison He. This movie deserves an Oscar nomination. The anxiety with the score and the dialogue and the script makes it so. I didn't know how would end and we're indefinitely. I guess we could spoil it. It's been out. Don't spoil it because it just hit Netflix's it's number one on Netflix. So people are finding this movie. Now I know I. I wanted to wait till it was actually on Netflix. Because I knew it was going to be on Netflix. In May so I waited. It's well worth so we won't spoil it except to say it's a troubling movie and obviously gambling in sports it's very pertinent today and this movie dives into it in a way that you will not soon forget absolutely and another cameo cagey is not just the only person that plays himself the weekend actually plays himself in this movie and has a couple of good scenes too. So checkout uncut gems. Maybe we can talk about it a little bit more. As more and more people see this will continue talking about the Montreal. Expos and the expos are very passionate topic for a lot of Fans that actually loved that team so if you have questions about the Montreal Expos hit me up on twitter at Michael Ryan Ruis. We Will Grill David same for the second consecutive week on the Montreal Expos and then we'll move on to our next topic. I'm thinking Jack mckeon for next episode. That's just centered around one topic. I told you that. Toilet Story of Jack mckeon. Yeah it's a great teaser. For episode two weeks from now David Samson hosted nothing personal. Make sure to check out his podcast. Be Back with you next week on Thursday with another episode on the Montreal Expos. Thank you so much David.

Montreal baseball David sort New York Yankees Jeffrey Montreal Expos Jeffrey Loria David Samson Canada Jeffrey Bud Seelig Bob BALLPARK mets New York Dave Dombrowski Florida New Jersey Mike Trout Boris president
123. Celebrity

The Allusionist

32:45 min | 6 months ago

123. Celebrity

"This is the lesions in which I Helen Zeman by languages certificate showing that it is the owner of a plot of land on the main. Then I'm surprised when language is able to secure planning permission to build a four bedroom house on it. In today's show terrifying beasts and some words that we all know what a surprise need of define. Albany. illusionist is supported by progressive. Progressive has you covered when it comes to car insurance starting with building savings like discounts for being safe driver you can also save when you start your quote online. All have multiple vehicles on your policy in fact, drivers who switch and save with Progressive Save Seven, hundred, ninety, six dollars on average started quote online and seal the discounts for yourself. Visit Progressive Dot com today national average annual car insurance savings by new customer surveyed who saved with progressive in two thousand nineteen. Discounts vary not available in all states and situations. The illusionist is sponsored by bombast makers of the most comfortable salts in the history of feet the weather where I am taking a turn for the Jillian dump. But no my extremities with my bombast socks which keep my feet cozy and fit cotton or snug but breathable. Marino and whenever any of us buys a pair of socks another Paris donated to someone in need. Thanks to Bloomberg's customers so far they have been able to donate more than thirty, four, million pairs of socks. So give a pair when you bar path and get twenty percents off your first purchase at Bomba's dot com slash allusion Est. That's below M B. I s dot com slash illusionist for twenty percent off your first purchase bombast dot com slash elision Est.. On with the show. Language facility. So confused and so muddle the word celebrity itself has ancient roots in some ways it comes from senator meaning on or well known not an ancient Roman words, but it didn't have that kind of meaning that we think of it now and the strange thing is that a celebrity in the Medieval world up until the fifteen hundreds was a solemn occasion. So A. Parade or coronation would be a celebrity and then in the sixteen hundreds and early seventeen hundreds, the meaning change it becomes to be well known. So a celebrity didn't exist yet. You couldn't be as liberty, but you could have celebrity. So you could have a reputation of being well known, and so it's not until the eighteen forties that we actually get people being cooled celebrities. Favorite has Greg Jenner is back and he's written very entertaining new book dead famous an unexpected history of celebrity from Bronze Age to Silverscreen. It's a great. This might sound like a silly question. But what is celebrity celebrity is very broad encompasses all sorts of of different levels of talent and skill. Just take a moment to try to define celebrity gone do it. It's not a synonym for a famous person subset of fame even though he wrote the book on, it certainly wasn't easy for Greg to define this to eight. Months to come up with my own definition, and that's not to say that no one in history tried before. Of course, they have people have been trying to define it for long time for many decades. But the truth is when I was doing the early research I was reading around renewal does sociology and all the scholarship and nobody agreed just wasn't a consensus on what celebrity is I think it requires five boxes to be ticked. Box Number. One is you have to have unique charisma or unique personality something distinctively U. And I'm assuming we're talking about you helen you are. I'm GonNa make you a celebrity in this case study. I'm sure that's believable. The second thing is your name needs to be disseminated widely. So that strangers who you are. So that is a strange thing in itself but people who do not know who you are need to know who you, and there's kind of inherent paradox in that. But that's what celebrity is is when people in the street who you've never met come up to you and go oh, another, you are going to take a selfie. The third thing is the you need. The involvement of the mass media and said, that is essentially newspapers in the eighteenth century certainly and then of course, later on, you get the birth of reproduction imagery photography radio. Telegraphy. Later on film television, the Internet that kind of stuff social media the celebrity can exist in multiple places at once said, they are reproduced and they are disseminated through these large. To eligible infrastructure. Fourth point is a really crucial one. You have to have a fascination with the private life of the individual. The celebrity is not just someone that you recognize the TV 'cause that can be renown renounce different renown is respect all notoriety that is positive or negative, but comes about from your work from your career from what you've achieved, but it may not have any kind of personal zing to it. Renown might well be that. You can kinda go in a we all know who Bill Gates's. We will know in the UK we know who David at Brisk David Sort of the greatest most beloved person in the UK. But he's not celebrity because we don't anything that's private life within anything about his family where he holidays will car he drives you know we've never seen him in a bikini. There's no fascination with his personal private life. What we care about is his work. So that's renown not celebrity. So the fourth checkpoint is you've got to have a either love or a curiosity for the personal and we treat celebrities, human boxes we talk about them as if they are. So Porpoise, if they're scripted reality as if they're not real people at all, but someone is pulling strings and writing their storylines form so that fourth point is really crucial and the fifth point is the most important of all probably, and that is an economic marketplace at to their fame so. It's not enough to be famous and to be able to make money by selling books or charging people money to come and see you in concert. That's great. That's lovely. But celebrity for me is when other people can make money from your fame. So when there's a parasitic economy attached to it, so celebrity generates capital generates money and profit for an industry, a celebrity industry the is there hovering by the? Sides covering will be stars and making money from them with all without their permission so that Paparazzi that's editors and journalists. that's t shirt designers and bloggers anyone who is running a business or making money off someone else's stardom. So you need those five boxes to be ticked to be a celebrity in my book I think and if you don't take those boxes, you noticed celebrity. So I'm pretty ruthless. Hank Green the author podcast video maker and educator has his own way of framing celebrity. There are two qualities that we think are one thing and one is the number of people who know who you are and the other is the sort of level of devotion or attention or excitement. They have about you and those things can be completely separated from each other where a cult leader has a very small number of people but a very high level of enthusiasm. And whereas like David, shower has a very high level of people but a very low level of enthusiasm. Ouch. I'm sure there are. Some high-quality Shwim fans out there. But the first person that came to mind I was thinking of like. The Health Secretary or something Yes. I couldn't tell you who that is either. Yeah. I was trying to summon the name and I st- incapable which I guess demonstrates who point actually. It's not always name recognition people know the names of people who they care about Lindsay, Weber and bobby finger host, the podcast who weekly, which broadly classifies a celebrity house a who all of them. If you listen to a podcast are hog as you think where're them's to you or whatever but that's not eight fully and so there's lots of different categories that kind of make up these designations and you can't fall in. The trap of just knowing you someone is and being like well then they're they're a WHO or their them or whatever. So there are no absolutes no not even in our category system who in them is a very simplified way of categorizing celebrity if the person on the magazine that makes you say who an a persona magazine that makes you say them. Yeah. That's exactly it and it's kind of just like your own. Personal categorization of celebrities based on the knowledge that you have the more and more that we study who's in them's the more specific it gets. But what we're trying to do is to simplify to over simplify the way that we talk about celebrities. This is difficult because your who might be someone else's them or another country's them of them in a very specific field of them on a specific platform, a generational them in. A way, the such, a strict binary and exclusive binary can be limiting. But then when you talk to people who are in very specific communities like Oh, this person's gay them. Oh. This is a sports that when you open it up to the different communities and how passionate like the individual communities can get about the WHO them status of X. Celebrity. It just makes it more fun to talk about like even though it's limiting. Because it's limiting get really passionate about it and they get really decisive and it's it's a more fun conversation because it's just too like the moment you open it up two more categories like That's not fun anymore the longer we do this, the more the WHO them thing breaks down, but that's almost kind of the beauty of it all. Because it's something that is so. Almost strict and yet we've learned by doing this for however. So many episodes that there's so much nuance to it and there's so much based on like how you grew up where you grew up what you were exposed to whatever. But I think what's great about talking about who them then you get the people saying like in my family, this person is a them and that is the conversations that we are. Dying to have by ultimately reducing the celebrities to the categories, the WHO them terminology is. So specific to the day that you use the WHO them terminology. Yes. Our show is only accurate on its date you know like when we say so and so was a who were them we mean it on the day of recording and maybe only then right and while it's true that some people will be who's them's for. Months. If not years if not decades, we can only speak to that on the day we record because all these things are so fleeting and their ever changing, and then you can talk about what happens when somebody goes from WHO to them, or them to who, and what that means and what you have to do to achieve that switch, and how do you go from being them to being a WHO Time time and just the generation that wants cared about you has moved on maybe they stopped caring about celebrity culture in general we find or the TV show that you once were on has been canceled off the air for a long amount of time. Sometimes them's become who's because the character that was so iconic that they played no longer has the influence that it once did you know that's the difference but For some people, some names will always be them's, and that's the thing that we always run into when we're saying like Oh this person's irrelevant because now to ano has been off the air for ten years but. Someone that is their childhood crush. They will always remember who Brian Austin Green is. You know that's what I'm talking about but it's like with the audience Fernando to anno- was no longer near the dominant voice in culture than those people started slipping and I don't think it's instant. But right now like Brian Austin Green is a WHO Brian Onscreen was them. In Nineteen, ninety, four you know it's it's generational it's time. But in in that way, certain people can sustain their them done. If they're continually, you know in movies and TV shows or in the tabloids like Angelina. Jolie barely acts but she remains of them because people won't stop talking about her. There's still a tabloid economy based on talking about her so. Angelina Jolie takes not one of the celebrity criteria Greg listed earlier. In fact, she fulfills all five but Angelina Jolie is a celebrity and she's famous whilst the Distinction Greg. So fame is like celebrity without the capitalism. So it predates limite the celebrity for me is an economic capitalistic system that kicks in in the seventeen hundreds and the two are very closely. Linked, but then not the same thing fame is is entirely in someone else's is so like the famous person does not get to define, it is entirely in the eye of the beholder and that nothing else is like we say that beauty is in the eye of the one doing the beholding but that is to some extent not true. There is some objective. Of, beauty but fame really is an every single person's mind except the person who is famous like I can't judge my own fame because I don't know what you know when you look at me I don't know if someone's looking at me if they're staring at me because I went to high school with them because they know me from the coffee shop because they've been watching my youtube videos for ten years or because they think I'm cute like I've no idea which of those things it is or do they just stare? Yeah. Well, you've got like ketchup on your face. Exactly. So if we look back at classical sources where we get fame from what does it mean what? What's the origin point? The Greeks had a goddess could fame P. H.. E. M. A. and she is a winged beautiful goddess with trumpet. She pumps a trumpet and that is your name. Being. Sung into the heavens through the trumpet. So it's a nice thing is good. You get fame and it means going to here by. But when you get to the Romans and we get one of the most famous room writers Virgil, in his Aeneid, he talks about farmer FA. Where we get a word fame from cannot derives from the verb fiery meaning to speak or gossip about someone. And virgils farmer is not a beautiful goddess with wings and a popping trumpet. She's basically Godzilla. She's a terrifying massive monster who stalks the land and she's covered with is and is and tongues. And she grows in scale. The More People Are Gossiping about you. So the more you're being chatted about or gossiped about the larger this monster becomes until she's vanishing into the clouds and she never sleeps and she hunts you down. And virtues version of fame is predatory. It's terrifying. It's this enormous force of nature that comes for you and there's nothing you can do about it. Do you think this was a tactic to keep people subdued so that they were submissive well, that's an interesting idea is an ancient fame could be both glorious and positive or negative, and pernicious, and out of your hands it could. Come for you like a wolf in the night. Almost Pharma is the as the goddess from where we get the word fame gives us a really interesting insight into the fact that celebrity is based on fame in some ways and celebrity also has this conflicted janus-faced positive negative side to it. You've kind of got a really weird tension, the heart of fame and celebrity in A. Fame could be negative and positive the positives adulation money free stuff negatives. Godzilla creature and bad fame. They also had words like playoffs. The Greek word Klaus meaning kind of glory. But widely glory the could also be negative C- could have bad clairol's you could have bad fame. We might therefore kind of say, Oh, you mean infamy. And unfortunately. No. I don't mean for me because the Romans didn't have the word infamy as we. Use It. Now they had insomnia. But their version of Informa- was a sociological category for someone outside of the protection of the law or someone low status. So gladiator or criminal had in common, which means essentially that they were undignified. But it wasn't a consensus of. Gossip wasn't bad fame. It was an illegal legal assistant essentially in Pharma in ancient Rome meant a loss of status and rights no more voting or taking public office perhaps being exiled. Also the accompanying reputational damage was a sort of bad fame. The word infamy took a while to arrive in English in nearly fourteen hundred and one hundred years later on, you get the word notoriety coming in to mean a negative thing up to that point notoriety was a positive thing. Or a neutral thing it comes from the Latin notice meaning of note, someone of note, which could be a good thing or bad thing. and. It's in fifteen, forty, nine, I think we get the book of common prayer in England King Edward the sixth who is the son of Henry the eighth. Issues a Protestant Book of common prayer and as a line, they're saying such persons as when the Torius sinners. And the word notorious there is not meant to be negative. It's a neutral word in the Toria. Sinners in the same way that notable sinners. But the fact that sin is comes after it then has a huge influence not loaded because this is the book of common prayer because so many people reading get such an influential text. Notorious then start to be picked up as inherently negative, but it's not meant to be negative up to that point. Can you both famous and infamous? I feel like, yes, I think. So but I wonder whether you have to be one and then the other like the infamous what leads to the fame like if you're famous person who then murdered someone would you be both? Kind of Know Oh interesting. Yeah. So OJ Simpson isn't really. Infamous because he's not famous, he wasn't originally famous for being bad. He just turned out bad complicated. Isn't it? It is and You might have a politician but Nixon yeah, I, think at this point Nixon is infamous. Maybe count BIF-. Well, he's famous to takes space on our brains. We gossip about him well, meanwhile to achieve fame by Infamy Greg General Physi- warning from history. So here, stratas is the most famous case study Hick he's a bad boy is very naughty as he is. Someone. Who Burns down one of the seven wonders of the world, the attempt of emphasis and he does so because he wants to be famous but he has no talent. I guess I'll destroy something that people like an people will know who I am. So he runs down temple everyone is outraged 'cause they are, and they capture him and they torture him and they try and find out why? Why? Why would you do this Straw and he was like well, I, want to be famous kind of ahead of his time. Well, that's the interesting thing actually. Nelson. Could Stratas Syndrome. So restricted syndrome is sometimes used by psychologist. I think is sometimes used in terrorism studies to talk about the dangerous potential of what happens when rolling news gets excited about in a school shootings or horrific events that go out on TV and and they start putting up all the The manifestos the shooter is written and they start putting up photos of the shooter. And for those people who are will commit these horrible crimes. They can sometimes get a thrill out of this. Sometimes that's motivating thing that inspires them to do a crime gives them pleasure to know that they are being talked about Mrs Court Harris Straw, to syndrome named after Heroes Stratus, who two, thousand, five, hundred years ago burned down a beautiful thing so that he could be famous and his punishment was to be made at Oss said to have his class scrubbed away. He was to be removed from the annals of history and this is a sort of idea that we get from the Romans as well with the I'm not co Memorial. I. Which is the idea that you will be struck from the history books. You will you or your sculptors will be smashed down. All evidence that you ever existed will be removed. A class is a punishment to remove someone's fame to take away their reputation. But of course, here are stratus we know his nine. So it didn't work his crime was so horrific that even though the punishment was that he would be deliberately forgotten from history clearly, people were so outraged that they still had to write his name down is still had to say this guy restores his burnt down the temple, and so his name has carried on the winds of history. You know the Boston's go to wikipedia page he you know he he wins. That's historian writer and broadcaster Greg Jenna. You can hear him on the podcast you're dead to me and you can read his new book dead famous the unexpected history of celebrity from. Bronze. Age To silverscreen. You also heard from Lindsey, Weber and Bobby Finger of the podcast who weekly and from green maker of podcasts videos books. So many things his new novel. Foolish Endeavor is out now and coming up in today's many luge. Greg explains why famous people are called stars? Why would we compliment someone by comparing them to a huge all of plasma very far away. Oh. This is sponsored by squarespace your one stop shop for designing and running a cool website. You can get all of Bula business done in that one place from picking a template him features to setting up a store and buying domain who fact when I mentioned squashed by St before a few weeks ago I cited a hypothetical website clanging and screaming dot com and one plucky listener named Timothy has since made clanging and Screaming Dot, com a reality vice quest based. He do need clips of clinging screaming Timothy's assaulted clanging and screaming DOT COM. It's so easy to setups quispe site. You can do it as a little joke after hearing something on a podcast head to squarespace dot com slash illusion for free trial, and when you're ready to launch us the offer code allusion to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain. Special. Thanks to progressive the sponsoring my shirt. They. Asked if I could share a story about a time when life didn't go as planned well, I have a lot of small scars on my hands most see cooking injuries like knife slippages or grow burns or hot oil spots or the White Ridge by NOCCO. From dribbler sugar with which has cemented the GINGERBREAD HOUSE I don't mind them whenever I noticed them. I think that was a stupid mistake. You shouldn't have done that at made it through six gingerbread houses uninjured only to get overconfident on the seventh and final house out. But my most significant scar wasn't mistake. It's a big diagonal slash on my neck, the length of my longest finger quite dramatic looking. A few months ago is buying apples in a supermarket, the catch up to me, and then looked at me is widening head tensing words on spooling from her mouth before she can trap them. You've got A. You've got A. Crash. Is, if. Do as if all my way around the supermarket got into a skirmish with a pirate I. The last package of toilet paper. The truth is alas. Boring and content note gross a couple of years ago. My neck suddenly filled with pus. What's called a retro fringe abscess don't get one I recommend them. They're quite dangerous. Also pass is the world least glamorous substance I sat in hospital for three and a half weeks while the boss ebbed out through drains installed in my leg and people kept saying Oh it must've been awful but it wasn't really because I didn't have any choice about it. I received an unwelcome medical supplies and just had to get through it and telling myself it was awful would've made it more awful and as it Turned out I survived intact with a cool scar as a souvenir. So I'm lucky ready when I look at the score now unlike the gingerbread one, I don't think while you really messed up, they're getting that retro fringe abscess. I just remember that you can't control everything life will throw surprises and now you've got to live and you can't be prepared for every eventuality. You can set your mind at ease with a bit of planning. It's good to have a partner who is at their best. When we're at almost progressive can protect your car home or rental from damages you just can't see coming. VISIT PROGRESSIVE DOT COM to learn more about adding a little piece of mind at a rate that words being. So just thinking about why celebrities ical stars and I can think of various fairly simple reasons why but I wonder whether partly it's also just the Gods are associated with the heavens and that's a good bit of marketing. Well, it is the stardom things really fascinating. The Word Star it tended to be usually described as a something that the film industry had invented but actually it isn't it goes back to the world of theatre two hundred years ago really in the romantic period and so stardom is linked to the heavens. You're right it against there is a certain religious element net, but actually it was more to do with the fact that merely eighteen hundreds there is the rise in meteorological science and there are two really prominent comments in the early eighteen hundreds. That S- I've written about in the newspapers are things one, eighteen eleven, one and eighteen. Nineteen and the idea of someone being a kind of eternal being of being better greater, more powerful, almost celestial in their power. That's a slightly older idea actually said, Geoffrey chaucer in the thirty, nine hundred and so on. Used this beautiful words Stella, fight someone turned into a star which I think is wonderful and that is self is actually a much older because it goes way back to Ovid and his metamorphosis and I'm talking about Julius, Caesar being turned into a Bright Star because sees had been murdered and soon after the had been a comment in the sky and they had named that comic after Julius, Caesar, so Julius Caesar Go. Far So often said all right. We'll. We'll put out in the poetry and then along comes Geoffrey chaucer centuries later, and he's like Yep steph either human turned into a star and then by the eighteen hundreds you then get people saying well, look we've looked at the heavens and we can understand the weather shlaim we know what's going on with comments and it's very Exciting and these these things are beautiful and eternal gorgeous and rare and precious, and we think that they are a bit like the superstars on the stage. So you get people Edmund Kean Lord Byron who are stars and there aren't many of them. You know a star is incredibly rare incredibly difficult to achieve that status even though there's loads of them in the sky that's. That's the joke. Isn't it? Because actually? Yeah, they're billions of stars in the sky. But in the romantic period, star is incredibly rare. So Byron described as a portent I think it is. I. Think his girlfriend describes him as a human portent potent doesn't seem like a compliment. Well. Was a bit of Douche so. He was. He was sexy and thrilling, but he was also probably GonNa say some controversial stuff and. He's GonNa Break Your Heart. So yeah, I think Paulson is probably quite good. I think it's still hits the nail on the head. Someone, who's a bit of a do but that compelling probably has. A medieval English word meaning divine gift derived from the carresses in Greek mythology goddesses of charm and creativity amongst other virtues also popularly depicted as the three graces. Now, charisma is another one of those words that is hard to define but we know it. When we see it, there have been various attempts to try and put that into other words. So the x factor, the phrase, the x factor. Comes from this article written in nineteen thirty three. If I remember rightly, but it was written by film journalist Could Hillary Lynn and they said well, look, we can't really explain why fans go absolutely ape shit excited when celebrity turns up and we're GONNA why says but clearly it's happening there's something powerful about them. We don't know what it is we'll have to call it x because it's an unknown algebraic equation x factor comes from that article because it's someone going something weird is happening. We don't know what it is and we don't think it's God we don't think it's charisma. Because maybe you know we're a secular society now, but there's something strange happening. We'll have to call it x said this. There are a lot of attempts through the ages to explain why is this happening? Why are people screaming? And the other one is A. which is a lovely word. Is Such A, it's just fun to say and it's sort of automatic grunt. And and you get in the nineteen thirties and these days is the kind of car journalists says about you know some new sports got real. Nine hundred eighty nine and Sheridan was voted Hollywood's most own fish girl what a compliment isn't it and is such a word on fish Marilyn Monroe in nine hundred, forty, one forty was Marilyn Monroe. She's still norma. Jane. But serve she was voted the most fish of high high school classmates so. Is a bit more gendered think probably more associated with women. x-factor factor. Charisma sparkle. There's an awful lot of language associated with the problematic vagueness of why some people more attractive than others. It's funny. These terms it X. Factor X. genesee choir They show that we're not good at putting this quality words at all. No. The looseness is part of Radio Topa from PR x a collection of excellent class. An you show has just landed. It's called appearances and it's by Sharon machine whose award winning work. You may already have heard on the heart. The parents is is a beautiful inventive show playing at the edges of fiction immorality exploring what it is to be a first generation Iranian American. We all the family expectations and cultural pressures that person might not want to have to deal with as they navigate their own desire to have family and make art and live a weird life. Listen to appearances on your pot up of choice and Mermaid Policy Dot Org. Slash appearances. Your randomly select word from the dictionary today is. Skimming ten. Historical a procession intended to ridicule and make an example of a nagging wife or an unfaithful husband. The two genders. Origin Seventeenth. Century perhaps from skimming Ladle USA thrashing instrument during the procession. Skimming ten. Try using it in an email today. This episode was produced by me. Helen's men. The music is by Martineau strict of Pale bird music dot com. Needs Composing Dunphy or Pocus High Him. You can find me at illusionist show on twitter facebook and Instagram I've got some updates about the show on the way. So follow to keep fully informed and for every episode to be looseness and additional information about each topic and transcripts and the full dictionary entries Volda randomly selected today visit Sherry's forever home be illusionist dot Org. Radio.

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S9 Ep 10: Emily Maitlis

Table Manners with Jessie Ware

55:19 min | 1 year ago

S9 Ep 10: Emily Maitlis

"Hello and welcome to take mattis. I'm Jessie ware. And I'm here with my mother Lenny. Mom How is that does sound. I can easily do. You certainly don't sound like the person that's going to be on next. You are so excited about this person. She's been at the top of every wishlist that you've had in the posterior up the talk because she is and she's actually Dr. Alex is favourite doctrine. It's who did two shifts on intensive care the last two days quite heartbreaking really. Maybe we should dial 'em in he'd love him he's like I mean the boy is quite unsocial. We all know this but he's moved out as ever knows he's been socially isolating since I since he was born. Yeah but I mean you know. It's desperate times when he's asking SAM TO GET A. Ps Two I know on the has cooked a lot. Some has a he's cooked to law and there's a lot of stuff in Tupperware for him but you know what actually that brings me to say a big shout to the mindful chef who giving an inch workers thirty percent off all their deliveries and they sent over to Alex which was really kind and that Britain. Oh Darling I've got to say thank you to Mirabeau. I am in heaven. It is my cocktail every evening. Now I have a Mirabeau Rosa. Gin and some slim nine tonic. I feel like I'm in the Carlyle Hotel in New York sipping a cocktail because Moser out the window. Now Darlie I think Mirabeau Rosa Jin is the way to go. Its just so delicious. I didn't even know that they did rose age. But it's fabulous. I didn't know that Jin could be rose neither to die but Tis and you just get little into pink in your blass. I wanted to. It's hard we usually together. What you've been eating this week mom whilst I've been away from me well I've always cooked when I've been on my own. Anyway Savvy Really. Wow So last night. I had roast chicken with Roasted cauliflower and a baked potato some sweetcorn and then today. I've had delicious lentil and tomato soup and I'm trying to not use my tinned tomatoes because that clearly at a premium along with flour who knew that flowers going for fifty pounds a kilo on E. Bay fifty pounds a kilo. You cannot I flower in the shots because people are trying to make bread. Do you WANNA know why I've been obsessing about what I'm going to make my own Tacos at the weekend how I bought a Taco. Press thing and my stylist now. She went full Mexican at the weekend and it looked insanely good. So I'm going to do a Mexican Dinner Party with my mates at the weekend and also shout to Lord Jackson who did Taco Tuesday. Apparently it was like the day of the Toco and she did her own homemade tacos. And she's been doing this. Brilliant thing who are making a male of it where she makes everyone like lay the table and show her what they're eating so they can make an effort in the evenings so we don't just feel like we're kind of surviving on cereal and lentil so But yeah she did attack Tuesday so yeah. I've bought like that lime and salt thing around. The Rim of Margaret Never made a mockery to malign Kotei to go. I got this mango and Passion Fruit. Puree star from H F. Thank you Marco. And I'M GONNA Make Passion Fruit Margaritas at the weekend fabulous. Could you get me some cranberry juice? Darling fear Cozma because I will never ever guessing online order again. I have my order that I have been in for four weeks and I will never get another mind order again. I think all these amazing local deliveries are doing such amazing jobs. They're fine except for kind of groceries like Tin Tomato Mama's people doing grocery ones too. Okay I'll have another girl like h I mean that's like gourmet deliciousness. Hq High Quality Foods. Based I think he's based in Tolls Home Marco and he's just sent me a bloody sirloin steak. Salami that I've Chiro Beautiful Pecora no cheese the puree like if you want to feel like it's a bit fancy schmancy can go and get some bits from you've got to watch your savings go. I mean. Don't wash my waist. That's what I mean. I love the obeys client of love that my records going to be out Wasserman lockdown. Because I could just eat the whole time. Did you see that thing? That's going round. It said wanted to know how to stop eating during quarantine. Put on your swimsuit. Not Your Pajamas. Oh so emily meatless is August. Today I'm so excited. I bet she's got some stories to. Oh my God absolutely I mean this is a lunch time table manners that we're doing and it's actually kind of teeth thirty so I've eaten so may have a cup of tea with her instead but I'm sure we can ask her what she's eating for dinner tonight. She's one of the most which is internationally acclaimed journalist. You would probably seen her interviewing recently. Prince Andrew just covered the elections the American elections. She's very dogged interviewer. Who doesn't let things slip a nice Jewish girl absolutely always got a great blow dry to got a great blow dry fabulous style. Shoe has really interesting. Emily meatless coming up on table minds. Special Circumstances Emily meatless. Thank you so much for doing well. My absolute pleasure. How are you? I'm I'm very well I because it's become such a loaded? It's become such a loaded question that hasn't it because I feel really well in myself and yet I sort of. I'm really conscious that every day. Your really around people who aren't and might not be and it might be you tomorrow. Your family. So how can such a simple question becomes so loaded? Yeah how's work is it. Just wild work is is complicated and invigorating and hard and worrying and a bit of a lifesaver. Actually as well at the moment. It's all those things. 'cause we're obviously social distancing so we don't have many people in the office. I go later a lot of my writing from home now so tend to get all my scripts done and has no reason to progress to date not walks into the office. Nobody tries to show you a subject. Maybe you know. All all the gossips gone. So you just have to sit there and write and read and do that stuff and then I get into work but six thirty and we turn the whole show upside down normally and tron workout. What the story is. And we've moved studios we've moved times and we've lost hair and makeup so it's sort of. There's a pioneer spirit. I suppose which is weirdly quite healthy. Yes hair makeup. It's funny that isn't it because I guess yeah it kind of feels like the least important thing now but obviously you want to make. I mean as I've made an effort. Fee TODAY EMANATE. This is my postnatal is beautiful grow out of place it's Greece. It's about five days greasy. I know I should be washing washing enough. But I'm not going out the house kind of sounds like Dope Ryan. Anyway I usually we would host you at my mom's house we would have loved to have served your. Nice probably Jewish dinner. I'm however this is how we'll we'll have to do it but I just wanted to. Have you had you lunch? What have you had what you having for dinner? Greek Salad for lunch. I love a Greek Salads. Yeah sort of I bring back you the sort of the oceans and the sunshine with me and I just think actually if you keep having a Greek salad the whole time then your you. You're always sort of not far from lapping waves. And that sort of freshness and lemon juice an herbs and parsley so that's my sort of Goto. That's my goatee lunch muscle to cheer up lunch. And I gave my kids my pastor. I'd made pastor yesterday for them. You made you made. I Made I made a and one of them just picked up a club and said does this have bones in it. As she explained it was just like a particularly glue p sort of pastor attachment that. I hadn't quite finessed and so it was quite weird because I never see. The child literally sort of scattered it surpassed to the edge as if he was going to joke on it. So the person who didn't go down a storm today but yeah but we'll try game for supper. How many children do you have? Two Boys Two boys. And how old are they? They are fifteen and thirteen CEO. Home schooling them. Oh God I'm doing nothing of the sort I mean luckily I'm working so the eldest has just had his GCC's cancelled and obviously we all sent out that letter yesterday from number ten saying after much consideration we've decided to reinstall the CFC's you got the letters just like their way shut up their way. You're late but he is incredibly happy not to be doing his Z's and the little ones thirteen and actually is still is quite good. He's sort of you know watching the science programs and doing stuff online. And he's had so teaching right up till these holidays so you know it's great. I just love. I love it when this online thing actually works and school is going on. And I haven't I've no. I've just been a terrible parent Run off to work or doing work on. My husband has done really brilliant projects actually getting out Old World War. Two letters from his great uncles and trying to map the battles that the uncles had and sharing those with the boys and trying to give them a sense of you know pass times different battles in sort of exceptional times and so. He's he's done brilliantly. Actually and that's what that's so. It's not really him schooling. But it's like surcharge to sort of delve into family and and stuff that you wouldn't normally have a chance to do. I guess you have. You found that you've been doing lots of kind of baking like you know making the Pasta. Is that usual thing in your household or is it kind of special circumstances? You know you got to try things out. I love trying things out and I love cooking. I've definitely noticed that I've got more sort of physical with my cooking. I whether it's because you know you're only allowed one exercise a day so I think I now take it out on the in the kitchen. So I the bread-making is about sort of pounding and mixing and Bashing Up Bananas Banana Bread and rolling out pastor. I think it sort of become a sort of turned into something which is not just culinary it sort of. It's sort of about exhausting yourself as well and kind of like let's let's mix expound let's and. I don't normally do as much of that stuff so I wonder if that's related to feeling so of contained in the house. Yeah I think it mom said just before you came on the apparently flowers going for fifty quid on Ebay. It's unbelievable yeah. And I'm really sort of conscious of that actually because everyone's had the same sort of yearning all sort of impulse and I've got friends at work who it's black market. Bartering that you know. Alka view of got the flour. But I haven't got the cost. Sugar could you bring in the eggs so everyone sort of trying to find the ways to bake? Now it's it's really it's really funny. Actually it's really. It's really funny until until it's not because because it gets worse do you have. An online delivery slot. Are you lucky enough to have always had worked? You know what I haven't done. I'm I'm lucky enough to live in so central town so we can get to supermarkets and asked local supermarkets have been absolutely brilliant and really calm and the hasn't been panic buying and so I think we're we're we're lucky on that. I haven't done any online delivery for about a month and I got my first slot today how I literally well. It was resolved. They they messaged me and I think this is my theory. Is that if you don't try and get one then. They think they've lost you. Do you know in that way. If you're loyal and never really pays all. Yes but if they think that you're not being loyal than the like Oh maybe she's left us. Maybe she's gone someone else and so they message me and said we are offering it. We've got some slots through which light one which is really bizarre. So then I had to get. I call my husband then. I got my sister for that. I got my mon right. What do we need what we need? It was like council. It's like it's like the elders of the village all meeting to decide what we need it and then my boys came up from the bedroom and went. Oh what have you got? Have you got your source Chris Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah? Maltese as all the things that boughten. Yeah exactly and then it was quite funny because I just sent a message suddenly realize when I was coming back from work last night it was like the most exciting day of the year and I was like bright early beds. Everyone one more sleep till the delivery boy that we're all over the delivery so that was quite quite exciting. Everything came and you do you sort of. Yeah you have these sort of moments of of just feels utter luxury you know. Got some sort of more. Bread mix flour and granulated sugar and just sort of different times isn't it? I mean what we say. As soon as the shopping comes in eat everything and you say look if you eat it all now. You have anything left for tomorrow. The Worcestershire Sauce. Chris will be gone. I've literally hidden all the goodies. You've got to be careful when this goes out Destroyed judge rebel here. This basically. There's a toy chest of things that they should have cleared out years ago because they're too old for it and I figured so my husband figured actually if you put the stuff in the toy chest. They'll never look because they probably play with toys anymore and so we've literally to count all the toys at the toy chest and we've put any chocolate bar biscuit crisp and he snack sh in there and yeah. So it's it's literally in plain view but they'll never actually open up. Look that's amazing. Let's see Hong loss. We'll we'll use celebrate Passover normally if we're we're here we all go to my sister's and she does the most amazing Passover. I is going to be hard. I think we'll probably good an authority. I think we'll probably try and do something online. Yeah we are too my sis. I I mean my boys don't know the service as as well so I find it quite hard to do it. My husband is not Jewish. So it wouldn't be a natural thing for us to do as a sort of foursome ticket. It's much more a wider family thing. But yeah I mean I remember Passover nights for me used to be the kind of the terror of my childhood because they were just like so lower house. They always ended in a row. Everyone was stunned. The wine was always on the tapes. That meant but you know it was like it was like the if you did. Somebody did somebody so super from like my grandfather. There was there was so much grace before meals. And thank and Blah Blah and most fit. We didn't really understand this kids. And then you start. Eighty eleven o'clock and everyone was like you know going up the walls by then and so. My sister has sort of distilled into something. Really kid friendly really fun. You know everyone can ask. Questions can have a good old debate and Turkey is amazing so yeah well sort of will will miss that. But I think we'll have to find a way seeing song about goats did you. Did you have a Bat Mitzvah? I did yeah I did. Oh Yo you better Jewish girl the May then well. What was your party like I want to know because we had David Schwimmer on? And he told us about his He had a magic party and for his Bar Mitzvah and had like why. I'm always interested with how what people did as party favors. So did you have a big Bat Mitzvah? No no there were six of us which is really nice. It was my classroom when we were you know. Sort of seven or eight. I guess we all budgets for together and we had in the annex of the of the hater. You know the sort of where we used to have our Sunday school and so we just had a disco. We have discussed so. We had the big posh lunch in the synagogue. And I don't remember that being much fun for anyone if I really honesty knows just like something that the grownups you have to do or do whatever was fine and then we had. We had discussed the evening. And I remember exactly what I will. I what did you. I wore this a readdress with sort of gold. Hello Moods economists. Say Hi look. Is it a red dress with gold leaf and a very thin little belt on it his moods? Can you say Oh gorgeous dog? What is it a whipped hair? Oh a whippet is a slightly passive aggressive worker to the moment. He's fine anyway. Yes so it was a I wouldn't say my bar Mitzvah was a seminal moment. Really in terms of of either entertainment and parties or in terms of change but I'm glad I did it was it was a good thing to do. I was Bat Mitzvah with them. A bonnets mom no way so. Isn't it funny? I think the thing I I remember having to read a piece from Ruth in Hebrew and thinking that I'd always found languages quite easy you know I'd learn European. I've done French and Spanish. And then having to learn this one power gov off by heart in Hebrew was just like the hardest thing I found it incredibly hard. Didn't understand why 'cause I always thought I had a good memory I could do the pres- I could read an yet. That for me was was a real test of character. Like Oh my God. You've got to stand in front of Brazilian people and do and do a piece of in Hebrew. I was terrified. So yeah it was funny did you. You were born in Canada. Yes yeah yeah. How long did you live there for till I was too so? I don't have a huge claim on sort of cultural life as a Canadian but I do. I've the possible and my boys have possible and my son wants to study in Canada now. So I'm really pleased. Actually yeah slicing to have SA- growing up. What was dinner like at Your House with your family? We did you sit around the table. What kind of memorable meal that. Your family cooked My mom was increase. Is I mean very much? Still incredibly adventurous. Very much ahead of the curve But she would. Always do she would practice things relentlessly. So you'd end up like she had one phase. I remember this really clearly wishes trying Indian cookery and she made Gulab Germany. This very sticky Indian sweet so and she just count on making them making them and make them like perfecting them until. We're all just kind of going. Mom please like no more. We're GONNA throw up. We can't have any more but she's she's amazing. I remember when we had neighbors moving it. And funny enough late in the seventy s and she took around big lasagna to the neighbors they never seen one before. Such a sort of new thing to have this baked pastor. And it was sort of can you? Can you even imagine the sort of pre pastor days of Britain? But it was like that and so she was sort of she was she was a real sort of Elizabeth. David Sort of person you know. Mediterranean love flavors loved herbs. Grew luggage you know. Introduce me to love it. Which is still one of my most favorite herbs. And he can't be. You can hardly find anywhere incredibly inventive and yes. I mean stories where we all get all all sorts of inspiration from really. She's just she's a very natural kirk. She's she's what I call a rescuer and she's taught us all to be rescuers. You'll know what I mean by that in the sense that you you look at something. It's gone really wrong. And you just and you sort of know how to magic it into something slightly different but reinvented give it sort of CPR. And so she's really good at she's really good at that I remember growing up her making sort of fresh pesto and grinding. You know the puzzle down and all that and Making stuff that now doesn't seem that wild or that sort of new at the time was really was really sort of exotic icebergs. Yes it was it not. Did you do Friday night? Dinners not particularly no. I used to play in an orchestra. Sheffield Orchestra. So I was out on Friday nights in my orchestra. My parents weren't particularly religious about Friday nights Because we were all sort of you know three sisters all afternoon. Different things in different places as funny enough. Now it's great because I work Monday. Tuesday Wednesdays on Newsnight and semi Friday nights are nilly kind of always at home and so now we like the candles and the boys get it and it's really lovely so that sort of that sort of come a bit later in a funny way we did. We did Friday nights. I mean it's always been a sort of as good as you can supposed to an imperative when I was growing up. It's like if we remember if there ever wounds around we do it but it wasn't a sort of Dick dictators. Both us the truth. Yeah so how did journalism come about for you you know? When did you feel like you want? I mean it sounds like you. I mean I know you speak about ten different languages. You are younger and you know you you. You're you're an achiever like you know when did you? When did you decide that? Journalism was the route that you wanted to take. I didn't I absolutely didn't find enough. I remember choosing English to study on. Everyone Sergei are you going to be you know you can be an English teacher journalist and I was like absolutely not absolutely not I didn't i. I was not very interested in the idea at all and I think it was. Only when I I went to work in Hong Kong completely sort of arbitrarily and I didn't really know what to do. You know that's the truth. I didn't really know what to do or didn't really none of my friends into acting. I knew I wasn't a good enough actor. Didn't want to go down. The directing didn't want do sort of stage in Libya the suitcase and so I sort of went off to Hong Kong. It was meant to be for six weeks and then I ended up staying for six years and it just happened to be a really interesting time of turmoil politically and the friends that I made there. Were just talking about the stuff the whole time they were talking about China and they were about democracy and they were talking about the rule of law and they talk about what happened in one thousand nine seven and I absolutely. I think if I had gone somewhere else on that day in that year two different country or go to different time I would be doing something entirely different now. I just think it was. It was honestly random but it's caught my imagination and I went and applied for job. Does local radio station which has lately quivalent of of radio four so done in the sort of British model then and I was terrible. I was I was terrible. Terrible radio journalist and I didn't understand how the news worked. And I I honestly I just remembered sort of all my pieces started today Blah Blah Blah Blah and the sort of head of knees ago. Emily you don't need to put today. It is today on the bulletin says obviously today and just like really simple things and I'd get sent off to sort of go and follow Chris Patten. Who's the governor? The governor Hong Kong Chris Patten would be going off to open a new shopping center in. Monaco can all be about you know The wonderful business will blah blah blah blah blah. And they come back and I submit a piece and they'd go. What was he peace? And I go the shopping center. Highlights some of the finest architecture and steel glass. R- going up one hundred and forty meters. And they go wait. Where's the clip about the Human Rights Commission? And I'd say what an Neko you will fall in Chris Patten so he said something about the Human Rights Commission or said something about the Chinese prisoners where he said something about the you the move of the joint declaration lovable and I just. I'd completely miss that. I didn't really understand journalism work so in a way I think it's made me much more appreciative of missed. I understand how easily mistakes sort of happened in my trade and I sort of think I learnt in a really practical way it was never theoretical. Go meet your mistakes. Run off to the LOO burst into tears. Kind of wash up. Come out and start all over again in a in a way it was. It was quite painful. But I'm so pleased I did really basically some really stupid. I was really student. No one knows. How do you prep? And maybe this is a kind of sheep question. But for say that Prince Andrew Interview which was just. It was flawless. How hard is it to not lose your cool because you all as cool as a cucumber so there are moments where you come off one of those which is so high energy and you almost want crime the Lou after that because it's the pressure in the stress or or maybe just live for. It is thrilling. I mean I think I am quite adrenaline driven. I've I've realized that and I'm I'm sort of fascinated by adrenaline widely. That was what I said to him when he said. Oh it must tell you about why didn't switch because of the adrenaline now. It's like I'm fascinated by adrenaline. Then he told me all about the the no sweating they but but it's true. I thought I hated it and now I've actually just to recognize that it's very much a part of what I do and what I need and I know I sort of need my high is and then I also know. I've got to expect my lows and so there is sort of crashes but all that is done off you know away from the cameras away from the interview. I try not to bring that into the work and I think the when you ask about agitation. I didn't I didn't feel that at all actually in that interview. I I kept thinking. What on Earth am I doing here? Really? He didn't have to do this interview. He was incredibly candidate. He was really open. I didn't I didn't think it all. Oh what frustrating thing to say just thought. What an extraordinary thing to say. I mean every everything literally everything that came. His mouth was just sort of extraordinary. You know as a journalist trying to piece the the story together and I think funny enough. I think it was slightly channeling Kate Fleming. You know I didn't have an there wasn't I mean I mean in terms of I didn't mean in terms of like you know. Oh He's a crop blow. I don't mean that at all I just mean there's something so calmly forensic about the way she does it. It's just it's really unemotional. Calm really quiets Egypt. Sort of know. She's done all her homework you know. She's done a homework. And that was the thing I I wanted. I would have shown myself up if I'd got the dates wrong if I've got the names wrong if I'd said something that he had to massively contradict because I I you know mix things up so that was all it was for me. It was like let me understand this. And if x happened then did why happened after that and then why did said happens. It was it was sort of it was just. It was just a question really of trying to make sure that we had undestood the full narrative that that he was able to tell us and my biggest worry in that was like if I have forgotten something only God. I'm going to beat myself up and I actually said to and my producers like if I forget to ask about you know whatever it wants the picture just like jump. Just just tell me just jump in. Just tell me. Don't let me walk out. That room haven't forgotten to us of things that I wanted to and also I think I've learned that you just. This sounds really weird but the thing you always think as a journalist you're like oh I don't want to be rude and I don't want to overstep and I don't want to come across as rude hepler you know. That's not what we're about you don't want to do that. But actually there's a calmness that comes over you and you put on the mantle of being a journalist and you kind of go. I'm not being emily now. I'm not we're not in a party. I'm actually just doing my job. I'm doing my job which allows me to ask you the things that we or the public need to find out and once you kind of have that cover it. Sounds really weird. It's like your it's your own. Pp your protective clothing is. I'm a journalist that gives me the role in which to ask you the things I've got to ask. I didn't mean that lightly at eight minutes. I don't mean to be like that. But you know what I mean. Sort of like is your protective covering to sort of to get you through something. Which would be awkward if it was just like going to somebody's house for a cup of tea so when he saying these extraordinary things you just in your mind just kind of dancing and saying thank you thank you thank you because it was just kind of jaw dropping stuff that he was saying you are just you just. Don't want to drop the ball so you're not. You're not doing anything you're just saying have I. Did I follow up right? Did I get the right tone? Did I ask the right follow? Did I get the date right? You don't do any of thought dancing actually in in the interview. Because it's like yourself piloting a plane until until the plane has kind of landed. You're constantly saying how you're checking your gauges you're checking your your speed and your fuel and all the rest of it you just trying to trying to keep that thing on the right path and make sure that you're not going to my main worry. Weirdly is not what he says the interviewee wherever they want. That's that's that's the deal in the interview. That's absolutely the deal but the thing that worries me is if I've got the tone wrong if I've forgotten the question if I've screwed up the dates so Y- sounds very self-centered but it's more that your kind of going. Am I still on the right track care? Did I sound too angry? Did I interrupt and one? I shouldn't have did. I lose something or did I misunderstand. I remember happening in an interfered with Emma Thompson. Full enough a around the Harvey Weinstein thing and gave me this really interesting line about misogyny and she was talking about Weinstein and then she spread it out and she said something really subtle which was like well you know. Obviously it's not just Weinstein. It's it's it's lots of different ways in you. Look who's at the top of the chain and our response to them and she was talking about the US president. And I. I didn't pick up on it and so I sort of came away from that interview thinking. Oh my God. I was an idiot. I was fascinated by what she was saying. You know but then you're you go away and you separate yourself because you haven't quite heard the thing that could pivot into something else so I think that's the yeah. That was more what I was doing so feeling in that. Yeah you don't attend the daily briefings do you or do you get same people on later on. Newsnight. Oh you mean the the covert ones now. Yes no we only get. We're allowed to some one person from the organization. So I think lure ICK is Laura Kuenssberg BBC all. Yeah Him who's all health editor so we watch them which I make sense of them. They're quite frustrating things. But we yet we do our own programs later with with guests so when when someone asks one of the government representatives when a weekend get testing and they say oh we've increased it by. It's going to be hundreds of thousands or ten thousand and you absolutely no. That's not the case. And they kind of you can tell when someone isn't quite being candid frank because they bumble I noticed they kind of just. Don't speak and then you get some response like well we've increased enormously but it's just not true but if they were sitting with you. I imagine that you'd be more dog it and you'd be able to keep them but apparently at the moment you're only allowed to ask one question. You're not allowed to follow up question. I think the SKYPE era has been so brilliant in many ways for allowing us to creep into people's homes. Get guess we wouldn't otherwise. The audience has been sort of more forgiving. If that but the truth is that unless you're actually opposite somebody in the same room able to catch there. I understand their body language. You're never going to do the same kind of interview and those briefings really frustrating. Because now of course the journalists come through skype they get one question. They're not allowed to follow up and one of the most frustrating things is when it's not even like they say we've increased it by X. And you know that's not true. I it's something even more fundamental than that. It's for example when you say. Why aren't we doing as much testing you know? Why haven't we got our testing up to the numbers of the Sun? Is that you wanted to meet. And they'll pivot slightly and they'll do this diversion. I'll say well let me tell you why testing is important. And then the spill comes out. And you feel it so patronizing actually is the word because you feel like saying. I know why testings important. I wouldn't have asked about testing if I hadn't realized it was important. It's like somebody saying it's like if I said why are the numbers of unemployed so high and you turn around and said the reason. It's really important that we have more people in work is because people have to earn a living and they also have to feel a self of self esteem and under. I know that I know whiting's important I know why unemployment's bad I know all these things don't don't treat me as if I'm sort of filibuster almost a totally different response to the question and actually I think. Journalists in this era are quite forgiving. And by that I mean we had a Swedish Policy expert on Newsnight last night and he was fascinating because Sweden going down a completely different trajectory that during the her there and we asked him My colleague Gabriel Gatehouse was interviewing him and he said how do you know this is GonNa work and the guy just said of course we. Don't you know it's a massive? Plunge is a plunge into the dark. We've done the research. We think this is what we need for our country this time but of course we don't know there is no guarantee and actually if somebody says that to you the your human being. I get this. Nobody's come across. Cova BEF- cove nineteen before nobody. Nobody's got the answer. Nobody's got the vaccine. We're all in the dark and we. We really want you to do the best. I think that is the thing fundamentally we we want sounds really obvious to spelling out but we want the government to succeed. We want this policy to succeed. We want lives to be saved but I think if people were honest about the things. They don't quite understand honest about the sources or they'd say we were doing this but now we're doing this and actually we haven't. We've left it too late to be able to get hold of the vast numbers of ex. I think at least you'd kind of go okay. Well that was candid. We understand it but when you're having stuff repeated back to you which is kind of truism. I mean let one of the things they've been saying. Is You know when you say well. When are we going to get the the blood test vaccine they beginning? Well you know a bad test is worse than no test and everyone's been repeating it and you're like well. I know that that's like saying you know. When am I going to get my call you know and the Gower saying well? You wouldn't want to car with no wheels would you? And you're like no no I wouldn't. I know that you know. I know I don't want a bad test just like I know I don't want to ventilator. That doesn't work. That shouldn't be part of the equation and yet we sort of getting these slightly. What's the word so peripheral answers to completely different things that we have an ost and you can't come back and I think that is in danger of of losing people you know when they talk about ramping up ramping up Ramp Yup? Everyone's out of sort of cabdriver. But from what last night if anyone else says ramping up. I'm literally GonNa you know. I'm just going to bolt ramp the but you know. Don't treat people as fools. I think because it's particular time like this trying desperately hard to make sense of what's going on. We all really want the policy that all governments and other governments to be the right ones. But but if we're asking the questions that don't make us make us feel like. We're we're being malicious because we're asking questions and don't make us feel that you know we don't deserve to be to just be be given the chance to actually find out what was going on. Also what's going on? It's important I want to know because Newsnight overseas quite night How does how does that kind of work with eating? You know. It's like showtime and I wonder whether it's similar kind of how singers or performers before they go on like mom mom told me something. Yeah Ludovic Kennedy. Apparently he used to present a kind of the the one before Newsnight and he used only lamb chops before he went on air. That's the story. I was told that before he went on. He just had this plate of lamb chops with nothing else. I love So do you eat. Lamb chops I lamb actually know. I`Ma something Terry haven't worked out. What is probably I? Don't really try not to eat. Lamb all cow or beef or things. Remind me of my dog. I mean it sounds weird but it's just I mean it's completely utterly random. I used to fish. I eat chicken. Just don't really care as much about chickens but that is the truth anyway. What would be equivalent of the lamb chop The Greek Salad is my is my lunch lamb chop I suppose evening I I eat early. So that's my thing I eat at sort of Kitty teatime when working be probably for the same reason. You just don't want to go on air feeding full and sort of heavy so I tend to eat sort of six thirty or seven Channel Four News on then that sort of it but the worst thing about Newsnight is that we have this counter called the I top counter which stands for in the usual place and everyone leaves stuff or brings in home. Baking cookies. Chris Oh sweet yeah exactly. So it's I mean it's it's obviously it's a little more tricky in these corona days because you sort of slightly conscious of of whose touch watt and all the rest of it leaving so flying around but normally we have the item counter and that's where is like a little watering hole with all the all. The gazelles one of us. Gazelle Gazelle. We'll go and and sort of chat and munch and natter shero baking so last supper starter main parading and drink of choice Can I start with a drinker choice? Yeah Yeah Dirty Book Komotini with three olives. Three dollars always so my God. You're my kind of women. Are I love a dirty Komotini So that will be might dying drink. Choice starter I want to say Linguini with Chile. Maybe I just love a play of Linguini. Wrongly Gorgeous I Love Globe artichoke so I sort of put that somewhere. Maybe we'll have to make that my starter with an amazing vinaigrette. Antipasta sorted yes. I mean funny enough. Yeah I probably eat more like that. what would be my main course. There's a really lovely delia recipe. Actually which is chicken thighs. Slow COOKS IN SHERRY AND SHERRY. Vinegar show was from the Sun. I just the something about it and particularly funny enough when I was when I was on maternity. Leave when my boys little the something very very sort of reassuring about just chicken falls off the bone really slow cooked really delicious amazing flavors and then you put a little bit of chrome fresh in the source in Whiskey. It up with target delicious. So yeah maybe something like that and somewhere. I'd have to get it just like bread. Freshly baked bread unsalted butter and strawberry jam. 'cause I think for about a decade of my life. I didn't really bread and now I'm just kind of going. What was I doing? I should've eaten. I should have had that just for every treat the just the best thing ever on. So yeah so that would be it. Putting I didn't like puddings. Actually I don't really like puddings cheeseboat then Italian. Maybe SORTA talion cheese and then I wouldn't mind like a little salted caramel. You know bull thing what they called a truffle a truffle. They go truffle. But I don't like in fact I I will say I hate puddings I didn't like some puddings I hate anything sort of fruit and chocolate and glue and S- So I feel like you are really into Italian. So is there a particular Italian in London that you do? I'm the opposite node. You know. I hate Italian food. That's not really fun thing. I did. Tell him for two tool I think. Italians hugely overrated. It's not funny is hugely overrated. I would say my favorite food is Vietnamese. But but you see. I wouldn't cook this. My favorite food is Vietnamese. I Love I love. Chili's I love prunes. I love Chinese. I would yeah I would say I would say if I had to choose my cuisines. I'd Save Vietnamese Chinese Thai Japanese above anything six years in Hong Kong. Yeah Yeah I go for flavor over everything but weirdly the things I like eating and the things I enjoy cooking tend to be slightly different. Does that make sense? Yeah yeah sort of one is a relaxing of process. Isn't it and the other is like oh I just want. I just want this amazing. Like cafe lime leaves or lemon zest or coriander seeds. All just the the the amazing amazing flavors are what I would look for in sort of tastes I think. Do you have good table manners? Do you think I'm very insistent on Napkins account bear a table that's laid without Napkins? That's my thing. I don't like people starting before. Other people have sat down and I don't people leaving before other people have finished and we have a joke. That's really worn thin in the family and it all started with that. Michael McIntyre sketch where he talked about kids putting things in the zone instead of the dishwasher. And so we all share. You know when when somebody makes a move to put their dirty dishes like near the sink or or near the dishwasher but not in and he goes. That's the zone it not the zone. Do in the dishwasher so my kids are really furious that we ever listened to that because now my husband nine scream at them. That's zone zone. You have to put it in the dishwasher so I think I'll let people clearing up after themselves surprisingly when when you finish news. Not a you hungry if you've if it's all going well there's loads of adrenaline going around to think. God I need a big drink or I'm going to have A. I do need a drink. Yeah so so what happens is I come back? And the dog greets me with what I quickly discover is cupboard love and the tail is wagging wagging wagging and then I go. Yes and I'm telling you all about the day. And then he just leads me to the fridge and stands at the fridge and demands sort of cheese or Manchego or whatever he sort of got his eye on and so basically. The dog needs a treat. I have a little glass of vodka or a gloss of Rosa. And that's my source of calming down. Is everybody else in bed by that time? He a funny enough. My son often comes his bedroom. Says he comes up and has little chat with me which is sweet So he'll he stays at Wasilla 'cause obviously he's a teenager So he quite often sort of when it's not school as it is now in a school holidays. He comes up and has little chance at the end of the day. Which I love because it's a human face and how I mean it's my son. How do you watch in the evening? When you have a loss of Rosa George Crap. Telly or place in the sun or something just to relax. No I don't I deal with correspondence if we've had it from the program you know either people saying Nice things or people saying You know critical things or people asking us about stuff that we did do or didn't do so I tend to sort of just go through and I. That's all part of the kind of like you know just sort of finish off the day. Thank you for writing. Let me explain Blah Blah Blah Blah so to that. I talked to my colleagues. Actually we still sort of I tend to just you know we get home. And then we have a chat about what worked and what didn't but a funny chat not a kind of like meeting a kind of like. Oh my God was a catastrophe. When x happened in it we SORTA and because everyone because they're obviously in the same boat issue so there are all sorts of trying to wind down at the same time. And I sort of got this weird thing I play makes me sound so sad. I try and guess what the first three words of the midnight news will be. So I sort of. I always literally. It's you've got to get the exact three. Where's the exact formulation and it tells you whether something's happened so it's either something that they've picked up from the program or else something that you don't know about in which case it's really exciting to your o a news or else it's something that's been running all day and so you sort of know it so that is really sad but that is what I do I go. What would it be? What will it be annoyed for the belongs and I guess the the three words? I feel like that could really am pretty easy at the moment. Yeah I guess they were because the government has all the former home secretary all the pro. It's a name you gotta get the name and the formulation right and you're gonNA. Ooh I mean we know it's going to be about corona but that's what he's going to be very specific to exactly you're just playing this on your own with the DOC. G have friends to do it with just me. Just my love this emily. Thank you so much for doing their absolute pleasure having for dinner tonight. Oh haven't got that for. Actually I'm going to do. I love cooking with vegetables so I'm probably going to do something like I'm very into Anna Jones at the moment. Oh things I love antigens. I love everything about Sort of the MECER marinated aubergine. I tend to cook. Probably do something like steak for my boys. Because I'm home tonight. And there's one steak in the fridge which they can share and then I will do a whole host of little sort of Anna Jones's salads. I've got all my fresh herbs so on the day that the fresher what all I know it all do. I'm gains to the sounds really weird but it works. I nicked it from a restaurant in Washington. Dc which is one of my favorite places and IT IS INAKI. Mushrooms like wild exotic mushrooms which you pan fry in soy and two different types of vinegars. I just sort of make it up a bit and garlic and then you have a on fresh herbs and solid asparagus. And then this is the weird thing. This is what the restaurant is. You put alleged you very thin taleggio on top and it's everything you think doesn't go 'cause like who would put taleggio entirely and cheese on top of like Japanese mushrooms in a source. I can't explain why that works but it just does it. Sensational sounds so. I think now you remind me. I think I might have to go to that because I've just got my my new load of mushrooms. I may copier but I'm going to have it with chestnuts. Because that's what I've got my makeup and get a copy or got chestnut mushrooms and pechory. Carino I can make it. Kind of work may be totally. It has to be slightly pickering. It doesn't melt in the same way it has to be slightly sort of melted back. But it's just it's got the dressings really like I can't explain why that works as I say I just. I tasted at this Japanese place. It was sort of Japanese. E One of those sort of Jackie's of of you know F- usually things where they do lovely things with tuna talk and all that stuff and yeah am micra herbs and really lovely leaves. I'm dressing SNOB. So I think it all comes down to your vinaigrette dressing and just getting the right balance. The that's what I'm GONNA do. What's the ultimate last question? I promise ultimate Emily meatless vinegar at now. I need to know well. There isn't an ultimate. What's when the everyone can do? I'll give you a give you a weird one right. Have you ever done Auto Langi One? Okay here here's a weird one the auto zone where you grill peaches you cut peaches in half and you grill them says char-grilled beautiful to look at and then the dressing for that. You have a little bit of Serrano liebst that and then Abaza lease and then the dressing for that is very very sparingly. Orange Flower water a little bit of Maple Syrup Olive Oil and again very sparingly balsamic and it it does it it just shoots flavors through. The roof is amazing. More Mazer is really good. We do have griddle peaches in our cookbook. Emily Oh my goodness okay. We Rosemary Really Nice with rose. Shut very nice if we need to send you the cookbook of that so I will wear it daily. We'll send it to you definitely dumbing. I can't even more impressed than I thought I would ever be because she is completely most commanding female. She's a real food is while the. I'm GonNa try that mushroom thing tonight. What a Foodie. I think sums. This is this is what kroner covert nineteen. Looks like? We've got. Emily meatless for an hour. My husband's got two kids in the other room once called milk bottle and he's doing a session on the phone and not keeping it down so not no. I better go. But what an absolute pleasure to have. Emily meatless on she was wonderful. Wow yeah she's very impressive and brilliant and oversee good chef to obviously. She's like good everything isn't she? Yeah eighteen languages probably Mandarin. No she definitely does mander mom. Oh my God yes. She's one of them she's amazing. Yep She's like a silent assassin isn't gene. Imagine the good news night sitting with her vodka. Love it a new. I like that woman and then. She says that she likes my favorite cocktail. What a women. Emily maintenace is book. Airhead is out now. She's no add. Thank you so much for listening to table manners special circumstances thank you to Emily Maitland's for giving us the time to speak when she obviously is working very very hard at the moment. And it's a pleasure bringing this to you during lockdown at. Please forgive the noises my husband during PD session in the background. All my son hanging on having thank you for listening stay safe. The music you've heard on table manners is by Peter. Duffy and Pete Fraser Table. Manners is produced by Alice Williams.

Emily Maitland Newsnight David Sort Hong Kong Chris Patten Hong Kong Prince Andrew Anna Jones Britain Mirabeau Rosa Jin Jessie ware Toco Tupperware Carlyle Hotel Mirabeau Rosa Dr. Alex Chris Blah Mirabeau New York Chiro Beautiful Pecora
Postgame Show: 40th Anniversary or Scoops?

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

10:22 min | 3 months ago

Postgame Show: 40th Anniversary or Scoops?

"I just wanted to call them. At cody What i think might be whether it's his best back in my day or not doesn't really matter but it certainly the most amount of workers put it thing. Well he actually tried greg. It was very exciting to see you try. That was clearly. You made an effort. You were legitimately shamed. Evidently we look the relationship between cody. And i want to explain this to the entirety of the audience because there are many many times i fall on the wrong side of mean with gregg and greg while not a very good friend in many instances is actually someone who loves me dearly and Is one of my best friends in the world so when we're doing the show together i'm often You know. I'm often legitimately frustrated by him but he also knows because he's one of the funniest people i've ever known he also knows that. The larry david sort of arguing on behalf of ridiculous things even though it's really him because it's not actually a bit. He argues on behalf of ridiculous things. It's a great frustration. He's awful this way. Chris you hate him for it. Your own father your. His wife hates this about him. But you'll legitimately botched something this weekend for me like you'll legitimately botched a we're in the middle of our free agency. We have a new ceo. Everyone's on the ride with us. And you again. I called you in the middle of things in order to get some help from you. Want something because you always want the scoop and to give you the scoop and everything fell apart from this. It's like i was trying to give you something and the response was among the beach. Can i give it to someone else. Yeah pretty much It was a big anniversary for my wife. And i and you know the opportunity to have the scoop on this just came at the worst possible time and i really regret it to Turn it down and handed off. And i'm so sorry that became a problem for you and that's the truth will where. Where was that apology before when we were talking about it would have been nice. I mean i. How many times can i say. I'm sorry. i mean you know. I said i. I'm jay. I had no idea at the time that i figured the news is gonna break today. Whether it's my byline on it or somebody else's it doesn't matter i legitimately didn't know that it was going to create a problem between you and your new You know partner. Ceo the the most powerful man. Well this is the other thing. I didn't feel like greg cody. I don't think the greg cody actually knew. I don't think he thought it was the news. He wanted a name. He more instantaneously recognize as opposed to the story that it was going to be which is one of the most powerful executives in sports. I don't think actually. Greg cody thought. It was very newsworthy. Mean in terms of executives at. I feel like that names instantly. Recognisable did he. Wants you to hire dan marino. Greg i feel like do i have this wrong greg. Do i have this wrong. When i was calling you to give you the story day. I got very few. I got the very strong feeling on the phone. That's it. Oh i'm not gonna ruin my anniversary for that. That's that's stories not big enough. That's a shit story. No no. I didn't mean to give you that impression chris. Why are you shaking your head. Yes chris you were there. I call was on a conversation with him afterwards where he kinda was like. Look this is not dan leaving. Espn this is not dan saying where they're going and kind of got that from greg. No and that's exactly what i was about to say in the spirit of transparency. Takes all my time off. You take a shot of tequila. If i'm speaking with my journalism hat on it's not as big a news as you and espn having your Amicable or ugly divorced depending on one's point of view. And i don't think as big news to your audience to your army of fans as when you finally reveal where you're going to turn up next. Does that mean. I don't think it's big news. It is big news. It's two giants in sports media getting the other former company. But you know. I hope on some level and maybe valerie had to talk with you and convinced you. I hope on some level you realize that a major anniversary with my wife was also big deal. I understand where. I understand where it's coming from. This is one of those things that we're talking about beforehand. Though now that we have the result you totally undersold that was picked up by every media reported. There is now. That's not your beep. But in terms of the dan le batard show them hiring an instantly recognisable. Ceo that used to be with espn and splitting time between this and zone. That is a massive medicine story and you would have had people with massive media following huge twitter followings. Read tweeting you. So i think you unders exp- underestimated it just exposure standpoint. It could be mike but at the same time. Though it is. I've seen the numbers on the tweets. It's not it could be. The people that wrote. The stories got massive interact. Greg is being very clear about the scoop he wants. He wants the scoop of where we're going next. He does not want the scoop of who the new. Ceo is if you could only choose one scoop. That's the scoop giuseppe. You're not getting that one either by the way effort to try to kind of unify things. I just want to congratulate you on your fortieth wedding anniversary. Because i was thinking about it. I'm gonna be seventy three when it's my fortieth wedding anniversary assuming i lived to be seventy three years old so not everybody gets there. So congratulations on a hell of an accomplishment grade chief. Eight massive achievement. It was. it was a big deal. Hold on though. I'd actually like to find a tipping point on this greg marino. Hold on a second ed. I'd like to find an actual tipping point on this. So let me say that. I'm going to give you a scoop. That's going to get your beloved clicks. Exactly where you want them. What is the story. I had to be calling you with in order to get you to let go of all that romance in your heart because you love your bride of forty years and wander away towards the clicks. What would the phone call had to be for you to summon your son with computer a bringing out here is if you couldn't write this into your phone or something or go to an internet cafe or something explained to me what the story needed to be You know maybe the next step. Maybe the dan lebatardshow beginning march third or whatever. The date is is going to be on this platform with her blink blink or if the story had been means to god's breaking up still got the ownership is over. That might have done it. You know it's interesting on the great cody. Show podcast on the stugatz podcast pottery. I interviewed to gods. And i asked him about that. I said you know you're free. Agent would if somebody comes to you or are you gonna leave this family. And he answered i did i answered no unless they give me the sunday night. Football booth. that is you gotta tell me. Gotta tune in to find out what i said. That's how you drive the clicks. Oh you're right all right. Scrap that you gotta tune in to the latest edition of stupidity to find out how i answered. Oh can you. Please explain as our mike i don't want to. We're going to end for the day here in a second. This thing is revving awfully fast. And it's a little bit careening and out of control. I'm hoping the aforementioned skipper. I'm hoping to have a conversation with him here. It's point that we will release at this week. That will explain more of what's going on here. Which was supposed to be coordinated with greg. Cody scoop that. He failed to execute as part of this and just really botched with just general journalism incompetence because he doesn't actually understand the story that this is because it's bigger our show becoming a conglomerate. Greg is a is a bigger story it's going to become a conglomerate when some partner emerges because we're in the middle of a pirate radio phase and i have explained all of this to you and directly to our audience but you told me to call berry jackson like i was. We were headed toward that conversation. And you weren't impressed enough with the skipper news for me to be able to explain to you. Some of what we've got lined up that i'm now going to do on my podcast. Not your podcast not stupidity. We're gonna do it over here and you blew your opportunity there because of your laziness we're going to do it on south beach sessions. That's fine and it wasn't. I do want to make clear. Wasn't laziness priorities. Except if i called you with a bigger story. That's true if i there. There were exceptions. I would have made. Yes priorities out the window. That's breaking up. Would've ruined your fortieth anniversary. That's yeah. I love card all all insulted and hurt. Because i didn't deem his you know skipper marriage to be your marriage. I'm trying to give a happy. Marriage emerge for forty more years until one hundred and four years. Old gregg real quick. What's the toughest year of marriage. Is that the first or the forty. I would say just about everything. In between the you know the first you are almost literally on your honeymoon and when you get beyond forty minutes all gravy. I mean you've been there done that there's more pressure. Kids are grown. You know they gotta thing so you turn down the scoop. I'm sure your wife was just moved by that. And i'm curious you know later after dinner in the hotel room that go doing that chris. Wise should stop doing that. Chris i do not like this evolution of the show so but stuff you can tell her. I mean chris. I was wondering why still be having sex at that But i don't know why i'm interested in it. I could talk to you in back channel versus your mom get back.

greg cody greg cody Greg cody larry david dan le batard Greg espn gregg dan chris dan marino greg marino dan lebatardshow jay Chris Espn valerie mike giants
Love Psalms: Psalm 40 - A Prayer

How to Study the Bible

21:02 min | 2 months ago

Love Psalms: Psalm 40 - A Prayer

"Have you ever wondered if you are praying effectively. Have you wondered if god. Actually here's your prayers and does anything about them. Have you wondered what you can ask. And expect of your relationship with god through prayer today. We're going to take a look. At what the honest prayer of david found in psalm. Forty can teach us about our own honest fares. Welcome to how to stay the bible. My name is nicole eunice. I am so glad to be on this journey with you as we open up a piece of scripture. We look at it together using the alive framework which is just four basic questions that were asking of the text and we ta take away what god has for us each every day and today we're going to be looking in the series called love. Psalms what does it mean to. Really pray honestly to god. So as i always do. I'm going to start by reading the psalm for you. This one is a bit longer so we're actually going to take a little bit of a different approach as we spend the next fifteen minutes looking at the psalm. So i'm going to read through it but just know that a moment i'm gonna break it into some different pieces that we can take a closer look so psalm. Forty here we go. I waited patiently for the lord. He turned to me and heard my cry. He lifted me out of the slimy pitch out of the mud. And mire he set my feet on a rock and gave me a firm place to stand. He put a new song in my mouth. A hymn of praise to our god many will see and fear the lord and put their trust in him. Blessed is the one who trusts in the lord who does not look to the proud to those turn aside to false gods many lord. My god are the wonders you have done. The things you planned for us none can compare with you. Were either speak and tell of your deeds. They would be too many to declare sacrifice an offering. You did not desire but my ears you have opened burnt offerings and sin offerings. You did not require. Then i said here i am. I have come. It is written about me in the squirrel desire to do your will my god. He law is within my heart. I proclaim your saving acts in the great assembly. I do not seal my lips. Lord as you know i do not hide your righteousness in my heart. I speak of your faithfulness and your saving help. I do not conceal your love and your faithfulness from the great assembly. Do not withhold your mercy from me lord may your love and faithfulness always protect me for troubles without number surround me. My sins have overtaken me. And i cannot see. They are more than the hairs of my head and my heart fails within me. Be pleased to save me. Lord come quickly lord to help me may all who want to take my life be put to shame and confusion may all who desire my ruin be turned back in disgrace. May those who say to me. A ha ha be appalled at their own shame but may all who seek you. Rejoice and be glad in you. May those who long for your saving help always say the lord is great but as for me i am poor and needy may the lord think of me. You are my help. And my deliverer. You are my god. Do not delay. I love this psalm. I've read it over and over again. But even as i hear it allowed i'm reminded again of how incredible it is that we hear in this. Like when we think about what the psalm says. We hear really very confident Sort of declaration of who. God is a very confident declaration of what god has done for david but in reality in verse twelve. We understand the situation. And the circumstances that david is is in verse. Twelve says for troubles without number surround me my sense of retaken me i cannot see it almost is surprising because the level of confidence that that david is pouring out for the first eleven verses do not at all betray the fact that he's actually in a really hard place and i don't want to get ahead of myself but we've got a turn back to that when we get to question for. What does this mean for me but before we do that. I just want to back up and talk a little bit about what we're seeing here. And what do you do when you've got a big chunk of scripture that you're looking at like this when we're looking at nineteen verses at a time we can't possibly dig into every nuance although there are so many treasures to discover so sometimes when i'm reading a big piece of scripture like this what do instead is actually try to leave myself like a little outline if i was just gonna say like. What's the trajectory of this passage. Like what are the main things that are going on. And so this would be my big outline for this verse or this Chapter i would say the first five verses is just praise got david just remembering who got has been for him and then the next few verses from six to ten are really. Who david wants to be like. This is when he's kind of declaring all these things to be true when he says sacrificing offering. You do not desire. I said here i am. I said i proclaim your saving acts. I don't see on my lips. I don't hide my righteousness. He's kind of claiming all these things that he wants to be. And then in eleven and twelve we get into his petition like his ask of god. He's asking for god's mercy and then in fourteen through seventeen. He's making a choice right he's saying. Hey this is what. I'm going to believe to be true. May who stand against me be turned away. He's got the sort of confident sort of declaration that he's making about what he wants from god and in verse seventeen he acknowledges the truth of his own condition and he asks god to save him he says in verse seventeen i am poor and needy may the lord think of me. You are my help and my deliverer. You are my god. Do not delay. We get this sort of sense where we're david's going and you might outlined the solemn different way but if you're in your quiet time and you're trying to think about like how do i understand what's happening here. One of the ways to do so is to kind of put those. There's big chapters into this one chapter. What is really happening here. And what stands out to you. What are you pay attention to about. What david is doing in the song if you look at the verb. You're gonna see that. David is waiting on god. David is crying out to god. It actually says that he's crying. It says that david is praising god. He says you've put a new song in my mouth. I david is declaring the truth of what he knows to be true of himself in his heart and what he knows to be true of god. We know that. David is speaking of god's love. He's speaking of public lena. Life and we know that. David's asking he's asking god to do something so before we get ahead of ourselves about what this means for us. We can slow down and say okay. We're reading an honest prayer and in this honest prayer. There's confidence about who got is remembering a what god has done. There's calling on. God god for specific things and we can begin to formulate our own understanding of what it means to be in a loving relationship with god where we have the confidence and the clarity to ask and to show up with god a certain way and i think that david kind of gives us that formula of what that certain way can look like and it's not it's not a formula in the sense of. It's gotta be this way or no other way. So maybe it's a little bit of a picture or rhythm or a framework that we can sort of cling to and ask ourselves. Do i show up for god that way. Like can i imagine showing up for god in prayer that way. We have no shortage of bad news. These days always happy. When i come across something that can lift me up inspire me. That's why i want to tell you about faithful faithful. Is the faith center at for christian inspiration with sermons. Classes exclusive daily devotional prayers from the world's most renowned christian leaders. Here from stephen verdict stadia robertson. Rich wilkerson brian. houston chris. Hodges judah smith and many more inspired leaders whenever and wherever you want when you hop on faithful you'll be asked how much time you have and whether it's a few minutes or an hour. There's a prayer a sermon or a lesson on your chosen subject. Ready to uplift you and it's all easy to find and free of ads every day. There's a way for you to enhance your connection to god and faithful is here to serve right now. Try faithful for free download faithful from your app store and you can start listening in minutes. Keep debate with faithful. The second question that we ask in the alive method is. What's the back story. Is there anything that we want to know about this song before we get started and we do that by reading our study notes checking out what's been left here for us and one of them is so obvious but we like. We often skip over. It in the psalms is that it says that this psalm forty is for the choir director so we understand that this song was actually meant to be song and it was meant to be sung in a group. But what's interesting about this psalm. That feels like a very personal prayer yet. This personal prayer we know was applied publicly. What an interesting thing to know that. Even though it has personal tones it's also meant to be used for a group. Another little note from the back story is that we've got a verse within this psalm. That actually calls forward and we see it again in. Hebrews ten one of the ways that we know that is by looking at our cross-references which will tell us where else this this content these words or even the full verse might show up in scripture and the place that shows up for us is in hebrews ten which is fascinating because it allows us to sort of reframe what this psalm might be about beyond what it meant in the moment that it was written and and actually says in hebrews ten verse five therefore when christ came into the world he said sacrifice and offering you did not desire but a body you prepared for me with burnt offerings and sin offerings. You are not pleased. And i said here i am. It is written about me in the scroll i have come to do. Your will my god so one of the things that we wanna know wherever will reading in scripture is that the big story of scripture always points back to jesus it always points back to jesus and his work. Jesus christ is the central figure of our faith his life his death his resurrection believe and we're able to interpret the rest of scripture through that reality but i just love when this happens when a song that was written by david to be sung in the old testament that david wrote probably thinking it was just about himself is actually re purposed for use by jesus christ that a even in the words it was inspired to mean more than what it even meant in the time that it was written and surely david didn't fully understand what all that would mean. But if you've ever just you've come across a piece of art or even this is sort of a simple analogy but if you think about certain songs that never seems to get old like their timeless you hear the song. It was written thirty years ago. Maybe it was a beatles song or it was a. I don't know michael jackson's are some song. Where you hear it and you think this could have been written today and it would be just as powerful today as what it was written thirty years ago. That's fascinating sometimes. There is art or illumination. That i think is just a pale picture of the truth of the inspiration of god's word that god's word in the moment that was it was written can be inspire all of its inspired but that it can mean so much more than even what the original writer might have known it was intended to mean and when we look at the back story and we understand well. This solemn isn't just about this moments not just about personal prayer but it's also pointing to our savior jesus christ pointing ahead to the book of hebrews where we hear these same words repeated. This is such a powerful moment of like. oh yes. This is a big learning that we want to pick up another thing. We might wanna look at that. We we kind of get this cross-references right at the end in verse. Seventeen when david sort of ends this by saying i am poor and needy and that reminds me of beatitudes in matthew five. Six and seven is giving a sermon on the mount. And he the sermon. Same blessed are the poor now. Obviously this has to be about more than the money in your bank account. Because david was not just poor in finances he was poor in spirit in this in this psalm. He's clearly poor in spirit. He's not poor and provisioned and when we hear him talk about this idea being poor in spirit poor and needy can mean more than our financial provisions and when jesus says blessed are the poor in spirit. It's this idea that we have come to the end of our self that we're able to acknowledge our deep need for a love and a power that is far beyond our own strength and that when jesus says blessed are you when you are poor in spirit here we see this beautiful connection to these words from the psalm that are then repeated by our lord jesus christ and connected to our own experience of what it means to actually come to the end of ourselves and to petition god to meet us with his mercy. I have so many more things that could say about the backstory. But we're going to stop there because this is short podcast so the third question is what does that mean. What are the principles contained within this song. I mean the first and easiest one to grasp as we do have a framework for what it looks. Like to come to god in an honest and i think particularly one thing that might be missing from prayer life is what these first eleven verses sort of represent which is remembering who god is and what he's done and calling on the promises of god with confidence even when we are in a place of trouble and i don't know about you but when i'm in a place of trouble my instinctual response is not to praise god for what he's already done to lay out my troubles to him and i want to rehearse my worries and i want to rehash my frustrations but my framework is not let me start from a place of remembering what god has already done. And then calling on the promises of god but that is the framework that we see here. I think one of the principles that we might be able to write down that we can grab from psalm. Forty is that to praise is to remember to praise. God is to remember to actually call back remember how the psalm opens. David is saying. I waited patiently for lord. He turned to me and heard my cry. He lifted me up. David is saying. I may be in trouble now but i've been in trouble before and god met me in that trouble. God lifted me from that trouble. He's like rehearsing trust in his mind. As the opening to his prayer is to rehearse the truth of who god is so. That's one principle that i believe we can pull from us. The second is this and this is kind of theory that we can work with like. Is this true. Do we see this backed up and other places in scripture and. Here's a working theory that i have from psalm. Forty that the attitude of the heart is more important than any other offering so we see when it when there's david saying like burnt offerings. You do not require sacrifices. You do not require that's repeated again in hebrews and i began to look around a little bit and do some cross-referencing i love to use bible. Study tools dot com. And i'll just sort of type in some words and look for some other places that a memory of a scripture that i remember jesus saying it was actually for matthew fifteen and it says fifteen eight. These people honor me with their lips but their hurts our our from me and that phrase their hearts are far from me is actually repeated. Back in the prophet isaiah. Back in the old testament. Isaiah twenty nine thirteen. The lord says these people come near to me with their mouth and honor me with their lips but their hearts far from me. Their worship of me is based on merely human rules that they have been taught so i think a principle that we could apply a working principle that we see in other places scripture that jesus himself repeats is that the attitude of our heart is more important than any other offering that we could bring got. So what does this mean for me. I think we have confidence. In prayer in the framework that is provided in psalm. Forty that we remember who got us that we praise god for who he is that we recall promises and things that we know to be true about god and then we ask then we repeat and were honest about where we really are and we ask god with humility to show up in our life. What a powerful thing to take with us is e even right now as you're listening to this podcast as you're thinking about your worries about your frustrations about the places that you feel stock or or limited that god's given us a framework and that framework starts with like majority praising and remembering i think that one of the ways that we begin to really trust god is by praising and remembering even we're in trouble that there's a trust that we are cultivating with god that he is at work that he has not forgotten us that he is close when we choose to praise and remember who he is when we choose to call on his promises. I it's not that we can't show up honestly because david clearly shows up honestly in this verse in this chapter but we do know is that we can show up honestly and we can choose to praise god we can show up with our hurt and we can choose to praise guide. We can show up just like hitting the wall and asking god to show us his mercy. But we don't have to keep our heads hung down in shame. We can claim the promises of god and who he is. And what a powerful framework for the way that we pray. So i ask you today. Which of these aspects of prayer do you want to commit to today. Maybe you practice it all day. Do you want to practice remembering what god has already done for you. In very specific ways. Do you want a practice. Praising god for huey s do you want to practice recruit recalling the promises that you know to be true about god or do you want a practice asking with humility for the thing that you actually need the way that you need god to show you mercy and show up in your life because all of those aspects are open to you today as you ask that question. What does this mean for me. Thanks for coming as we explored some forty together. We're going to continue our journey through love songs. We're going to be in psalm. One oh three next week. I'm so excited about it. Can't wait to see you guys. Thanks for listening to how to study. The bible with nicole eunice a production of life audio dot com and the salem web network. This episode was produced by kelli givens and our executive producer steven mcgarvy and edited by steven. Sanders enjoyed what you heard today. We'd love for you to head over to your favorite podcast app and leave us a review. It really does help. People find us to learn more about nicole. you can check out our website at nicole. Unis dot com her book on how to study. The bible is called help. My bible is alive and you can find a link to that. Plus a linked to nicole site in today's show nuts.

david nicole eunice David stadia robertson Rich wilkerson Hodges judah smith Lord confusion jesus app store stephen houston brian matthew fifteen chris michael jackson huey kelli givens steven mcgarvy Sanders
Local Business Utilising Facebook Lead Generation Ads

Herd Marketing Podcasts

21:45 min | Last week

Local Business Utilising Facebook Lead Generation Ads

"Hello hello welcome to the had mocked. podcast it's been a little while with corona virus and different things so It's great to be back in the studio sit tight. We are over in liverpool with johnny johnny vagas from inspire home solutions. Janis a client of ours on them. Yeah so we're over here on a charter catch up on. We're going to cover who number topics that they were going to look at the janis companies. New company inspire. I'll tell you a little bit more about that shortly. We'll look at some facebook ads. google ads. We're gonna talk a little bit about how how that works. Johnny on how generate leads so before we before we dive into that. Let's land a little bit more about johnny so over you johnny faraway. Okay cool so. I'm my name's jonathan is. I have a company with a business partner. David david ential Inspired solutions and we all a home improvements as specialist are we specialize in pro predominantly spray coating of property and we cover everything from upc spraying to kitchen. Spraying am roof. Coatings is wild coatings and on yasser we look at transport transforming homes. I think i'll i'll tagline covers elving inspirational ideas to transform the home. That's pretty much the gist of who the company. And i've got a few years probably ten years now experience in the home improvement industry and in different positions different. You know different things. You know his the industry so we've got to the stage now we're aligned with the with dave business partner and things are going quite well a couple of months now so those those Those points you just made that about the up spray and what is it. The east bay is it just does when those sort of what what is it. The silver pre- pretty much anything on the exterior of fuel. You property this plastic so we can we can obviously that the windows dole's we can deface. Shes sophists guttering at any ariana. Clotting anthony plastic rally. Okay and see. I've seen some of those pictures. I've seen some of the sodium salts and they look they don't really need it completely sort of transforms the overall look at home What what sort of benefits not. So obviously the immediate obvious benefit is the aesthetics and so p people in this day and age looking for it's a modernized the home to change those white win those two obviously anthracite grabbing the most popular cola and it's real modernisation and obviously be. Pvc plastics over. Time will bleach by the sun. And so obviously what bringing those plastic spot for life regenerate in the cola and obviously you know just making them look considerably bethlehem modernizing the property. So that the real benefit so that the products that we ought to use a bonding products and the long lasting as long as you were prepared the win. There's properly prepare the plastics play. And and you know what you do you paint so you have the right paints and then obviously it will cost the same month a time as any plastic key. Pvc product will do outside so yeah good good shelf-life fifteen years plus Going to be saying flaking peeling obviously just fade like eddie plastic. What they're outside over a period of time but yeah. It's really really good really smart. Yeah here. I've seen the end results and they do do professional thought anthracite gray. Think you you said this is Certainly popular caller in vogue at the moment. Sadly is certainly as a yeah. We're waiting for their for the next popular to call us. Come along buffing. It's been the laugh at loss of five five years. It's a really strong. I am i right in. Thinking is all the. Do you do internal work on on kitchens as well. Yeah yeah yeah so. It's obviously it's it's almost like similac wins the work so we we obviously are a whether driven with the upc outside so we thought it'd be wise to make sure we had a product we could we could deliver. You know when when the weather was bought starts whether the kitchen coaching idea came came in So yeah you you can almost take any kitchen Units on kitchen caucuses and transform them as well and very similar idea in process is all about preparation. It's about prep in them. Decreasing the kitchen rubin style and then it's a case of professionally spray coasts in them and so predominantly. That's what we all professional spray coaches. And but we we do everything on sites It's obviously cost effective and considerably cheaper than what it would beat the to replace kitchen On the again you've probably seen some of the. The results of the kitchens can change any standard kitchen into something. That's really modern. We can spread tiles as well. We actually work in partnership with a couple of his over companies. You wack top down workshops wrap ups where you're actually rapping over the old words with a hard wearing plastic and whatever color would to decide to do so and along with flooring company we work alongside and also a company we work alongside to do gloss splash box and much. Geog lazing solutions that show over the washroom in an wallace. Say and so we work in partnership with them in. I just did not finish in such the kitchens. I'm sure there'd be we their name into this. let's go. I know i've i've seen i've seen some of the of pictures of. Yeah yeah yeah before. Before and after is if you're if you like and so moving on ever-so-slightly onto so of How you how you so your clients. You do some some great posted on facebook and are we saw it. Look after your you pay what you saw. Look off the daily post. Any a lot of before after pecks on which i'll try and include if you if you view in this video on youtube i'll i'll try and drop in some pictures in the oblong obstacle deacon so you can see the before and after his it's great to say it really does transform the complete lack of ardor the the outside of the house or the the inside of the house. So how how did how did you get into this. Well walk into the before and after photographs. Or into the into the village. Of what what was your. What was your entry point into the into the industry into the industry. A number of sales roles my crowns completely different a wet and you know hospice policy for a number of years until stumbled into into a sales role of at the end of a project of running mariam bar and stumbled into a sales job as a sales rep failed sales role selling different home improvement products. And it did for a number years and so klein free. The ranks of you know from manages to sales manager. It's a sales director and through some success lonzo not so successful companies and yet felt. It was the time to to really go about loan. David my core business pilot a web four may with the previous company. We've known each of a fee as an both a lots birth naritra very well very fun to school together and we've both been on a similar path and you know the david sort of said this time as as a sales rep himself. I felt it was time for us to do our own. It's whacking really really well so yet. Not all of my background. And how i got into home improvements and and obviously yeah with with this now we out our skills and quality easy nodes a lot of people he won't wear during marian so that's great considering we just saw and obviously with the the the facebook side of things and you know the performer. Enough does a crucial Sold anybody wants to say he you before you during or after We we do our best for them. We try and make sure what poston daily moment because they don't go those those before. And after noah when we when we built you up sites we we put in the We some pictures on that off before and after on on the homepage. And i think we spoke about sort of integrating and instagram feed. Because you use use both. I'm facebook both post. And i'm for the outs as well mono they face get you a lot of interaction. You got a lot of questions. You got sort of feedback as well on it. Which is which is great and looking looking at the at the facebook ads on the facebook side of things. What you find what what. What's your sort of main goal from the facebook. Godsiff out makes sense. So i think it's all about trust building with with the adverts themselves i think you can you can run a paid oliver and then have a page that a couple of stunt you're not gonna get a consistent quality lead it does you'll. You'll get leads and you build quality entrust you have to have a page. Which is active. You have to have a page which is responsive and on a thing. We let not very quickly the. If you don't have then you can have produced yourself equality late. It's gonna be someone who has a slight interest but then as locked on facebook page or and can't see the reality can't see you know you have completed work you have consistency on you know we try and post as much as possible about the stories of the guys spraying live on not day or you know some pitchers them doing something on that day. Just so you. You clients can actually see alive. And builds trump's not trust his is what builds equality and lead. I think for fanatseh really important. Yeah definitely i know beat before we call in on way over here about rails on about saw short videos and things and i think So following on from what you know what you were saying. It's crucial that you have those Those live images that saw show. I also live videos that show what you do in the the sort of the prop wack 'cause i only know your industry through so of working with people. You can appreciate the amount of time that goes in exactly on a catch and you've got sir mascot opposite for moscow yet preparation you can have the best paint product in the wild and you don't prep it correctly. It's not gonna be the results that you want and preparations obsolete power amounts of the success of what we do so you know. I think it's time wise eighty percent. Prep twenty percent spraying and so yeah. The processes is cleaning degreasing rubbing down with an abrasive and on the mosquito process and protecting the rest of the kitchen hispanic kitchen or even win those on site. You don't wanna be making a massive the the walls in the kitchen. I'm having said redecorates organic overspreads. Usa moscow ops essential and we the paints that we use our you know if you do overspreads. Not coming off yes. You're only rarely got one opportunity to get it right and same with you. Know you don't want to spray someone's when those sprang all over the hebron you run the paints everywhere in the heavens to redecorate so you know. We want to get it right time. So preparations you know paramount's who actually lasting and you know being a quality products the money is to come definitely definitely. I think. I think by show in those videos. People appreciate the so of amount of affect the imprinted to even start and where does involve with with home improvements. And it's it's quite a dynamic. Embodiments isn't it. It's that there's a lot going on the storage leave caught year you work and all the rest of it but at the core of a year in someone else's house while you and to some extent year things are outside your control. So it's yeah i didn't. Did they win those those videos and show in the picture her importance and hang out loud ties and quite nicely to the aims and objectives from the facebook ads. The we sort of manage them room for you now. I know we run the lead generation. And we've on some brand awareness odds torching on what you say earlier about sort of built in and build in So of a consistent approach to to your facebook post. I think the brand awareness of correlates quite well with that yeah and in terms of any potential new customers that the might come across your through through facebook. Get to see that these guys do post regular. They've got regular where they've got new jobs combination in the song about regulating. Those belt thought trust and the man on top of that as well. You've got the ability to use those images. Those pictures those rails in the generation odds which which we done on a no. I know we are conversations before on the phone and it's always makes me laugh because we we go through obviously the rails and we talk about. Don't when we lock me sell will use this pet. You don't use this fifth year. What what sort of communicate and over what pictures to us. Sometimes we might say for sake four pictures and what we think's going to be the best performing picture from the business. It's always always a different wall. So he's the ugly isn't it wasn't to say hey. The ugliest pitcher always be. We've got who video odds before you know like you say. Yeah and what they've ones stream across the yeah the they never seemed to work. It's always just a singular picture on its own that seems to do the job done. Simplicity and today it's cutting someone's attention once and they don't really pay attention and click not say now. It's true that when i'm talking open to clients. It's film stopping. Moments is what you're looking for. I think carousel outs half half the place. But i think it's more for product ladder ecommerce sometimes because you have a different sort of product that might be a june per ora car the jeans what whatever say say you're selling clothes it might whack in not respect bull products for something as big broaders home improvements. It's quite it's quite wise to solve. Yeah focus on not singular patent. It depends on the product. Doesn't we've had discussions as well. And obviously if you're in an industry that's you know saturated with with people trying to put adverts out there on facebook and can be a little bit more difficult. You have to be a small obviously in our industry with the the. Pvc although there is a lot of people doing it. There's many people doing it. Why the furring advocates on facebook and instagramat excetera. We're unique in a way that we we know the cost per lead i. M kitchens is very very good. The cost bellied for for when there's a slightly higher because it's probably a little more competitive so yeah help you see what you're going to be smart without knowing that and keep changing. And that's the best i think is well taught jim what you say in your cost plead. I think at this does a toss up as well as incentives of what the client might wants. the may be way off re-spraying versus new win those exactly on so. I think i do think you you might pay slightly more for windows. Say because of the right word that you might pay more for your windows leads because the the the general cost windows as need anyway generally more more expensive. And then i think you you've got what sort of the client may be. Maybe thinking. Shall we just do this or shall we replace and move in parts so looking looking ahead of moving on slightly. What's watcher what she plans. Offer for the rest of this year so plum for share obviously the stage now where we we've launched. We will very successfully on. We've we've built a a nice decent orderbook On the planet just to consolidate honest you know. Still in the midst of global pandemic. Hopefully that will be over with sooner over the light at but we we're going to be cautious and just be make sure where we can you know produce quality by the end of the day. We don't wanna be in a position where say on seeing much work and not being able to produce quality consistently so it's a case of being you know cautious and moving forward in the right think the way we're gonna move forward and the in till the end of this year next year obviously depending on how well this goes it will be to to add more teams to slowly grow the business not subic so just to a reasonable size. And but yeah. It's all about passing all and that making sure you've got the right people in the right place to job so you know we going to make sure we find these people in the know rush today renna think to again focus on the customers and the quality of what we did. Y- i know at at the moment through the dog and through the arts and different things you predominantly so of where all liverpool so of north wales based so perhaps in in what you say. Next year you may look further failed in and expand that sort of a absolutely yeah. It's it's probably just a little bit wider into the northwest and cover not so variable you know of of of companies of wet for in the past few voter worldwide. That superiors actually really do that. The the nice close to harum dealing with local people Quite nice and too recently. You know with the size that we all say. Yeah we'll start with auden and see how far we got river. Yes whereas that's one of the y'all the facebook cards and even even google. Yeah yeah we all get so all specific areas and post codes and so really nail down to get you. The best results at the sorts costs rock musician. Which is what we're after. I think it is one thing that might be wet saying why why we're on. This is an cords end of this pandemic that we've been in for a while but you guys are covert safe in the installations as well and i think it's worth of yes. I absolutely the cave. The kitchens especially when we are in in a home sophomore. We have to be cautious and the whole kitchen areas actually tented off so we actually used she thinks to dole's altay covert aruba so the guys are in the room while the what atkins actually separate call from the rest of the harem. Customer doesn't want to be anywhere near us anyway when we spraying. Yeah prepping because the dust involved call ceres and so we try and oversee shall sells off. The guy's run seeing with and gloves and oversee cleaning down saf cetera. When they leave we want it to be clean. Get january when we leave. Obviously where we're looking for all of before and the shots and but yet cave safe insoles a very important. So what we're there and saving the kitchens again it just it's all about percents off stop protests and the client and then to the dike but we definitely do provide dot dot curve safe install. Yeah i just want to talk. Because it selfishly. Yeah yeah you will. You got questions through on sono great. So look ahead. Now what is What's what's the plan in terms of products. You're going to continue to focus on kitchens on windows or yeah obviously kitchens and when there's been our call the teams that we have now stopped what they specialize in and i have experience in nova products. The we may or may not jump. Jump into and you know you re curtains. You wilkins are awesome. Fantastic products out that but but of a mayan failed of an industry. Because i had a bit of a solid history roof. Everything's exaggerate. They're awesome fantastic products and from the likes of profile. And who really good and so you know. There's some be interested in in in garing soon. Future up in a gun. It's timing can making sure it's the right time to do. So when we we we do have a couple of clients asking is already to do that. And we will put them in the right place to make sure that they to the right people to do top thought were completes it so yeah then yeah states. That's what we do best at the moment. Yeah yeah for sure for sure definitely definitely i think i think we're we're heading towards the the the end of what we're looking for here today and santa time so novak's great it's great on the show and it's it's it's been too long since we've lost recorded bought if you haven't already on you don't said forget to hit the subscribe button below. Subscribe to our youtube channel. If you're listening on youtube on also subscribe to our podcast. We're going to try and put more regular contents outs. Over the next months and years. I had bought say yeah. This is mark from hedmark at the material studios in liverpool. Would johnny johnny vagas from his home solutions signing off. Thanks guys cheers.

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An Email Account is Born

Rework

16:47 min | 10 months ago

An Email Account is Born

"In a world. Must Finish her kids. Must Book vacation. Welcome to rework a podcast. Babies camp about the better way to work and run your business I'm waylon walk and I'm Shawn Miller. We're doing an ongoing series about hey. Base camps new email service and today's episode is about a project that was indispensable, but not super flashy, the kind of thing that would be easy to overlook if you're GONNA. Hey, dot, com, and look at the screen shots. We use to show what the service looks like. And how it works, you'll see correspondence like a note from a child's classroom teacher or A. A request to electrically sign a document. Someone had to write all those emails and put them into a fully featured demo account that people at these cam could use from market, a customer support and a whole host of situations where you just can't be showing off real emails. We call this project. See data, and you know what I action was the one who had to put this together for base camp three. You had to write like one hundred liked. Do's and fake messages and comments and stuff page isn't pages of chat transcripts. Back. Files to be shared in a realistic way. It is so much work. Creating Seadeta for hey was similar to what I was doing in base camp three, but email is a little bit different. Every e mail had to be completely plausible, and it had to be a variety of different scenarios. And that task this time around fell to our colleague Brisa who lives in Austin, Texas and she works in customer support, which if you haven't heard the show before, it's a team that we call team Omg. So here is wayland conversation with Marissa about how she created this fictional email world. My Name's nurse. I am a principal support member on team Omg at base camp. Do you remember your first email account? It was my parents and they had like a main account, and then my sister and I had a counselor that so that would be the first one. Do my email addresses Marissa, JPs dot net I. Think Maybe netscape ended up buying that company, so then I don't know. How did you get involved in the seed data project? Can you just start at the beginning and talk about how you were asked to do this? It was actually mentioned to me, I by Kristen who our head of support. She had mentioned that Jason wanted to get somebody on the data project. And she threw my name out there and then I, just talked with Jason about it at that time about what he was looking for. How did Jason Explain the project to you so Jason? Was You know getting? Tired the right word or maybe just didn't. He doesn't want to show his personal data, forgiving his own demos to people, which is totally understandable I mean email is can be quite person also when you're wanting to give most people, you might not WanNa. Show your personal emails. So he explained to me and to flora who is on the programming side at that time that he was wanting to create some sort of automatic demo where he could log in and automatically have a whole email account populated. That looked like it was from a normal person that he could show off specific scenarios of. Hey, so was this something you had experience with before I know that on the support team. Everyone has a lot of different demo intest basecamp accounts because. Because, they're constantly needing to try stuff and see how workflows are for different customers when they write in with questions. Is that related? Did it feel kind of like an extension of some of the things that are already doing customer support not really to be honest. We definitely do have a bunch of Demo counts for base camp, which is a lot different than than hey, and I was definitely very involved in you know the beginning of basecamp classes and setting up. Personal Demos for for customers of Basecamp, but hey is kind of quite different, and we never have really had an actual demo account so then. How did you start organizing the work? It seems so daunting to set up what looks like a fully up and running normal person's email account. Honestly, it was a little daunting at first because I didn't know quite where I wanted to start mainly I took a peek at the scenarios that I was given and looked through my own. Own personal email box bugged my family out certain emails that they might have in their box and then just started writing a few of the scenarios, and then magically. I don't know how it happened. Really it. All kinds of started flowing in it became just kind of second nature for me to start writing these emails back and forth, imagining what type of scenario somebody might have, but I just started going through the scenarios that were requested, and then it was like Bam. It took me about two weeks probably to create all the content. But I'd say there's probably a hundred emails there. Yeah, it was really important for it to look like a full account. Not just something we you know through a few emails in to show off examples. We really wanted it to look real and to make it. Look real we just. We needed a lot of email in there. Because that's that's what it is. And what were the scenarios that Jason Gave You you know. How do you merge emails in? Hey, showing off how we can use the note feature in certain scenarios, showing off clips, being able to have five or six emails a show off the reply and focus. Feature along with the set-aside feature uploading a bunch of emails that have file so there is a fully fleshed out file section showing how the screener worked so creating specific type of emails that you might see for the very first time in decide to allow the screen into hey or screen out. What were some of the scenarios that you created like specific scenario? Can you share any of your favorites out will? It was very easy for me to create any. Any that had to deal with my dog. My dog is Benny so if you see references into Benny, those are actual emails grooming appointments that appointment, in Roy says for him photos from his groomer of what he looks like in in the Basque getting groomed I-, also was able to create a thread that's called the Rancho poquito thread, which is an actual property in Austin that I was looking to rent out at one time for my birthday party where I. I had questions going back and forth with the woman that owned the property. It's really neat, little ranch property, so that was fun. I tried to take some sort of real life scenarios, and then some that I had that I knew nothing about another one that I knew nothing about was one for a roof leak at like a vacation property that you might own, and that was used for a scenario to kind of show that that's important you need. Need to keep track of this thread, so you'd like to receive push notifications. Another son little example was lucky strike contract for our support team to go bowling at one point, but it was a great example of when you have a docu sign thread, and you need to complete the contract, and then like a few hours later you receive another email. It's like hey, you completed it. You can merge those together so there. All kinds of really fun things. That were half personal has made up. Did you get some interesting contributions from friends and family? Too? When you brought injure net, and asked for incoming emails or four words are kind of tried to like. Build it out via your network Yeah I was actually really lucky. My sister had recently purchased a house in Austin and had done a bunch of work on it so contract work that. That you see in the account making a kitchen bench or requesting information on like painting or putting new floors in those ideas kind of all came from her because she had recent quotes from contractors, and of course, all kinds of names and things have been changed. Things have been rewritten. All of those kinds of examples came from her. My Mom's a realtor in the area, so she often had. had emails. That would look sort of Spanish. So those were good examples to add into spam. I mean everything in the actual. Hasty Demo is real and it looks like you can reply to it and everything works as it should. I got really great examples from my family. Actually so, what is the name on the account? Like who is this person who is getting their kitchen redone and And trying to book space for a birthday party and has a cute dog in Imbeni. Like who is this person? Her name is Julie Young whenever I would need to give out a fake name for anything. I would always use Juli- Julia System name that I like I've always liked it and Giuliani is actually my mom's mom's name who passed away kind of when I was little so. His grandmother's name. Russell, young, who is also contact in the account, is my grandfather's name. Use both of their names as kind of the main people in the account. Did you have some fun with like coming up with other names and stuff like that I did? There are a couple of things I don't know if people will ever notice in there, but one of the context is Fitzgerald Grant, and that comes from scandal for any scandal. Fans that are out there I love fits. That's where that came from There's also a contact named Radley main. That's a combination of Bradley Cooper and Jackson Main. From a star is born there so little. Chat out there. Another look at you. And then the other teams are occasionally. I would just ask in our team. OMG, campfire, like hey, Gimme a cool first name Gimme a call last name, and then I would just kind of merge those together. One of them, a friend's name Jazzman is my my friend. Yeah, they're just kind of random on there. But the first two I mentioned are like the ones that are kind of like cameos. Did you start to imagine a whole life for Giuliani? That even existed outside of these emails. You're crafting Oh. Yeah, absolutely like she has two kids, cooper and Stella like their references to their golf lessons in their. Their swim lessons in all of those things. And she lives in Austin and You know they have a second home in South Padre which is the Gulf coast here so yeah I absolutely did, and they absolutely were doing kitchen renovation. All of these friends. They recently took a trip to by. They're doing cool construction. They're. They're having a nice pool with a Cabana area setup and does so yes. Thriving all the things all the things I wanted my quarantine life. How old are their kids? Their kids are kind of modeled around the same age as one of my niece and nephews, which is like ten in eight. Eleven and nine somewhere around there, some of the pictures of the files that are in the account or actual pictures that I took. There's one picture of them in there where you can't see their faces or anything like that, but especial picture from a trip. My sister's kids are very active kids. So that was another thing that was easy for me to create an account things that kids would be doing like. Different types of lessons may be golf lessons. Letters from their teachers quite a bit of home schooling, so I could get cool little. Little attachments of work that they might need to do or things like that, and then for the screener. What are the kinds of scenarios you came up with for folks sending Julie emails that she might want to screen out so jason was kind of specific on now as he wanted to. Look for I think there's a total of five emails in there and three of them that he would say no to and two of them that he would keep so the three of them that he wanted the say no to needed to be. Maybe kind of business. But not like Spanish all the way so the ones. That I created from there were a company who was emailing her about perhaps having an interest in a timeshare opportunity. Another one is an email that's coming from a salon that Julie could go to mentioning what products are now offering. The, too that he keeps one of them is actually from a teacher who is talking about getting together for a parent teacher conference. He keeps that one and then the other one is actually a good example of an e Vite I actually went ahead and created fake invitation to somebody's birthday party, so it's from a fact that Julie knows, but the email itself comes in from says something like you know Robin invites you to. To Jack's eighth birthday party or something like that keeps that one so that you know we'll know about the party, so then you were writing, and then you would pass off the emails you created to Flora and was it Jay Z, a designer at base camp who would then be in charge of like wiring it all up, so jay was originally on the project, but then I think he got called on to do something else. Else, so it was really just flora and myself who were working on it, so at the beginning I started creating a bunch of content in just like another fake account, also so that I could see kind of similarly to Jason how things would kind of lay out and what an email would look like, and and things of that sort flora and David actually built a really cool demo count that resets itself as often as you wish. Wish and by resetting basically incinerates all of the information inside the account, and then reload it all. It's really nifty, and that's exactly how Jason wanted it to work. So that every time he would log in and give a demo. All the dates look fresh. All the e mails looked fresh. They worked a lot of magic behind the scenes to create an account that looks like it starts over basically anytime. You press the reset button. And that totally works so if you want to reply to an email, you apply to any email. If you want to create a new clip, you can do that if you want to create a new label on, you can do that. All of it Kinda works from place of magic. Thoughts would tell Laura. This is magic. It's happened, said. I did learn at the end how to use hub to upload some files and to place the order of emails at will come in at so it's great now that myself or the support team. Maybe down the road we'll be able to create more demo accounts like this for hey, maybe specific industry related types basically the way that David and flora built. It is that I can actually just go right into get hub upload files at information that I need there and then. Then David sort of reviews it, and then gets it right in to the demo account, so it's it's nice that it's hands on now to, and it sounds like this is going to be such an important tool for support as you start answering questions from hey, customers right like you personally are so intimately familiar with the product now, but you also know that you have the ability to go in and create some scenarios. If you need to do that, yeah the support. Support Team is really excited because we haven't really had like one demo account that we mainly all us well for basecamp. Let's say you know. We kind of all. Go to our own test accounts like you mentioned early on, and maybe send screen shots or videos to people but now we all have access to this special. Hey, demo account, and then it's going to be much better for us to show a customer things in there instead of perhaps showing. Showing our own emails. You know where we might have personal information that we might want to share now that this is a more or less wrapped up kind of the bulk of it. Do you find yourself still thinking about Juliane? Oh, I totally do I totally do and there've been a couple of times where I thought. Oh, I shouldn't have had it like this sort of an example to or I wonder like. Did she get her kitchen bench like put in like? Is Not completed yet. And did Russell and Julie make it to their AIRBNB and Miami. I mean I don't know. And if she ends up needing to sue the kitchen bench maker for breach of contract, that's like a whole chain of. Yeah that's it that's that might be a different account. I don't know it's just. Rework is produced by Waylon long and me Sean. Music for the show is by Clip Lavar. You can find show notes and transcripts UP AT REWORK DOT S. And to learn more about. Hey. Put a hey dot com.

Jason Austin Julie Young Giuliani Russell Bradley Cooper Shawn Miller Marissa principal Texas netscape David Kristen WanNa Benny Waylon long Brisa Jay Z
Steelers Touchdown Under, Part 2: The Steelers 2020 opponents are jagging themselves

Behind the Steel Curtain

33:08 min | 5 months ago

Steelers Touchdown Under, Part 2: The Steelers 2020 opponents are jagging themselves

"Today answers matter more than ever before. That's why ibm is helping. Businesses manage customer. Questions with watson assistant. It's conversational ai. Designed to work for any industry. Let's put smart to work visit. Ibm dot com slash watson assistant and went back on steelers touch down. Now i'm not payroll and i'm joined by mark. Host mark davison knock. That was a big pot one. You're ready pot sui preview this week's game certainly but it's still bloody hot. He's gone off. This is everyone around the world. This is what happens in his trial lawyer around this time like you know everyone always says the me. How do you have christmas when at summer would just do it like we have barbecues and we and we have A hand maybe chicken and stuff like that. But it's just hot from now narrow onto christmas when you get all snyder common in It's just really hot and like an alawite from sydney and long the beaches. Like i said it's hot until about three full in a massive storm comes through which is awesome. Like where i live. Now i can. I can actually hear the beach at night when a slate which bet to ks away. Unless i'm hearing things in my head but who knows it's awesome tones steers get. Make the suit on crazies. Like far out like non an island. We're version in the jags or tonight coma long well in mark it's actually percent humidity. Mail our concern over that fifteen twenty percent since we started recording and on occasion feel the sweat seals fans out there all over the world siemian Pots restricted because sits on the trumpets. Have we get a lot of humidity in some site. Quite fitting that really. I guess the white florida woods as well for these rates. Game jackson live it definitely going the humidity here's recite. It's about eighty five thousand hunt. You know fifty six percent humidity Feel like it's getting pretty muggy and his not says where austin for cool stole that his crossley thousand nine throughout the podcast the best Hot like when it's like yo- one hundred august like near that area you may not work daily. Be the diameter few skewness. And then you get out yet. The jumping econ sate belts like red. Hot you've tried austere rules right. Red hot you have drawn high win. The seat belt is on fire and like. It's just like ozzy thing we have to do like these a mock weird couple hours ago for you on the podcast. My fiancee. she works the woman from wiles. she put a hand on the steering modes like driving She literally said that. She's like sergeant. Should siphon my colleague Deal with hot staring. Oil and sushi liked came charlotte. Exactly that night like getting that without you. Just deal with it but as like super hot in have to draw cog fuming. You're gonna sit there and be like i'm gonna white for the steering rule. Calm down you get in their hands abandon and then you see builds burn. You like okay here. We are what it is yet. That's it no one else is blending red hot steals in twenty. Twenty these scan against jacksonville. Jaya's again let's go space tied jacksonville. Jaguars alana night right now. We chill earlier in the shower around the title of this late shirt which is really around. How the steals appointments this year tend to be fully Trap seals capitalizing on. When you look at john lewis this season. Fillings will wanna traps purely when you look at that one eight record. I mean haven't had to play is quite interesting when i started against the director because that played some radi average teams that a couple of days games like today by the calls. The titans of Off team cults onto daddy though. They lost to the dolphins back three before. The dolphins went on mates who on wilson cincinnati bengals. That was twice nounce. Texans there will sewage detroit. Lions was to charges Animals to green bay off loss weight animals. Full points the jacksonville. Jaguars going into lots of different shops ready. Say his views cheekily capitalize on average best jackson. Just turning up to say that so much gone. How about this like. This is a very similar game two loss weight with them. Cincinnati bengals quarterback. We've got We'll he's nine. Jake lurton six round draft pick. Yes the applying harm in in. Jags him in davao But the steelers fans down there terrible tale comes up. I don't maybe the ravens again on different opinion but this game yet again. I just don't see jake. Luton luton lutton scoring points. Like let's be honest like what. How many talk about how he points do you think. He has in him against stevens Touchdowns mass max. Max is the max is sealing off okay. That's pretty hard. She on to think maybe just the one. Maybe not pretty just use. He's saying to wanted earnings go to see how he can orchestra this offense with low young players. He has a good running game with the russians for show. Rookie plan fantastically tested easy. He's a that for right football and doing what rookie running back stugz can do which four five yards carrying. Do big pies and that might be the k. Debate the steelers and have a chance. But i don't see how luton has different days for the offense and how he's going to project himself a win like a miracle. I think for him to outperform the steelers defense like that. That still is front. Now being non around the nfl's that told me about us has such a great impact on on the quarterback. They really have to bring up some game plan where they beat them every quarter not just the first half because the steel figure it out. They'll come back with. They will come back. So there's a reason that their tonight and i'll be very shocked a similar thing as lawsuit. I don't think his game chuck in a team like four and five something like that like the base. H does bizarre horrible. So if they were to get you the jags You know we know who they are. Not investing is jack steals mar native. Lots to that soon. Yeah they'll be negative negative press on every every back where they want. Just can't say we kind of those nine. Now they use james robinson really interesting because he's like undrafted user but it's an interesting one reasons number one. He's rushed for society number two touchdowns rush the but he's rushed for one hundred. Thirty odds more yet. Senator touchdowns given an like this potential injuries for like the top offensive lineman. Aaron jacksonville given the steals need to get off. Author lost weight improvement. The rush defense correct. These would be the way to do it against a undrafted rookie running back. You're absolutely we could stack that box soon. Degrade and absolutely put him under pressure npr into to have vs he's one foia vinnie's gonna smash him. I always thinking the players like football town and stuff like that. But you gotta think like what. They're thinking their heads like vinnie. Loves to hit people and he wants to show he's forced on a better than you robinson. That's correct robinson. I wanna all. I'm gonna smash put a hand. The hat i wanted to take control of this defense. And you're not gonna move the football and once it happens can luton director football around getting kaethe Downs which jibaro couldn't do last week. And how does that talking secondary few weeks ago and then we'll zero thirteen times. They couldn't convert a third down. So this'll be a very similar game. Unless i think the crag injured off the jags a super up like dallas. That was giving a saas until till the end. Gilbert was like came in and i way. So they've gotta come following. I think to be up. seven seven. Put pressure on an k. Down and do some spectacular things to make us question out -bility because we know what we're gonna do want to stop the run force him to pass pick him off. That's the guy thing. Yeah it's it's about the crushable thinking about the. Jags swayed on something. A little bit with you. About off. Air jackson right. I wonder how local what they spending me she. Because i find the jags this thing city my head of the jags louis teams where the crock for a couple of years. Or is it a hardy. Well mark. Jackie is struggle struggle for a couple of years and dropped a bunch of young guys zine which they then they're challenger for conflict years zone sentencing where they might deal was pay and they go to these cycle again. And we've seen that issue with those gawk Pariahs campbell those couple of other players while or in a couple of is. What i thought was quite interesting. He said i wondered sort of at one night you've got to be doing pretty poli in number given positional errors sir. How to look at what was spending in terms of the salary cap which is often when you go through this in any of the fans up david sort of read a couple of the articles that are published hot. That will publish parts of the season. That i wrote a monster. Cannella did we're going to be interested in salary. So i don't know look and the jackie was a twenty five million dollars. I'm gonna cap. She quadrant on its steals county. That seeks the jagger's suspending on offense justin garbage sixty million and just did at about sixty five and a half newman defense and about six special. Tim steel is spending about eighteen million on offense and who've anointed six million on defense. And i think you're capable of four awesome things tonight so when i van will did the positional sending. Nfl houses ma. Certain thirty second in quarterback spending on quarterbacks issue which makes sense but the twenty eight among position twenty seventeen the wide receiver position. I in china musician and eighteenth Arline difficult to hide on many noble when that leaves the thirty me. Nfl the spending on a halt on the defensive side it twenty eight interior defensive on twenty nine the edge russia's eleven to the linebackers which is pretty much made up by miles. Jack is not having brad. Susan folding thirty musician. Eight saying that the quarterback position again laden them thirtieth the nfl. Monday nights it's no wonder that the team one is not a positional group. Units offering was rookie quarterback's with he's on day of young guys on the defense. Not cheat said developing actually take game position on the shop. Or here's a question. Foia net and i think you might have answered this and we did a little bit cycle. Why into the bengals loss wag. The what what. Other jaguar waiting for that will this money like in the caught wind games. this year. She won at a big free agent. Signing will someone who can lay claim. victories Some sort of positive. What are they waiting for. While yoga's good of month bit have at this. We talked about a couple of plays it. A last is what the dead right. Susan's money carrying against the cap applies ink falls is costing them ninety million sheer leonard Six men kelvin. Smeets costume five point six million. Aj boy as person foreign mockus lays colston's ran off moment. Moscow darus darris costin's campbell's palestinians off. And that's everyone million but is a bunch little quizzical eighteen reading at so. They pretty much forced to have a year off because they have to play on the box. That what you're saying to a degree. But that equally like i think that clearing out and looking at what the next sits of egypt free agency and equally wants and next year is the salary cap texas caught and then brought a bunch of keys. They've got the money then to acquire public sch- right on the either presumed. Wanna go that because he wants to go to wing saying what is often right by her. Could see bug doing things down in do vale for show. He believes Can you can work around that outside models. Jack got shoot There than in while you're next to quite quite Chase on james josh allen unity like hey starts to look like it does right foot baden is recognition anyway. Takes up that one spot as edge. Defend on you've got josh. Allen is that Rookie this year. Rookie loss g lawson's sick. Nearly yes so in like we bought another applies even tae takes a few years and this is like fans you gotta realize that base close take two three or four years to develop what the jaguars did was give him one year two years and then ship them away but put the money. They got the money to pay back. Let's say that doesn't race on in dallas and on being a little bit cheeky. but there is a. There is an element to hear some signed the jacksonville having a bit of opportunity for the same and equally if the steelers punish them this school board that we should rallies we should say what you're saying if they were to ducts going away in in cowboy territory and he's still got to figure out his left leg from his role Similar the moment. that's the that's the that's an injury is saw. that's pretty bad. Yeah but what what dike went down to do val like yeah. That's a that's a. You might get me thinking about a sam down like what if what if the jets One saying that. There's this indecent plays on the jags and and the plane was older than what we think they are. And i know like lost weight Bengals had aaron prison. Amy synagogue in steals digging win but like the reality is. The jackson was lost two games by a total of less than six points. They won in week one by three points and wait cheered by three months like they know not losing by nasu schools. Can we talk about have bag. Green bay played them at the guy. That's pretty bad. Come on man that game with roaches in his iron stadium with no fans civic called. No the covid stuff but they. He didn't play a good game vs jaguars. All the great advice went to be grimy tame and like beaten by hundred but they just didn't play good football knock knock. It's a k. His aaron rodgers rescues on when. Ben mc arts verges a quarterback with pizza. Get it revenue up. I'm revenue up bit series. Pregnant dislikes gang here your side seals plies in your reckon again it was settled for a couple of showers are quite bull. Yeah this is the midseason Foam where we say always playing with today's loss week. He's gonna break a big on certain big ben's on testing by been working together side while raising economy. so we got this waco A rushing today those even the juggling assault a live chat in one of the just say that he might be able to throw poss- hypo a starting price on good football like a lot of the Rookie receivers all because getting into what ten weeks. Eleven weeks now so much so much. A coach cesare to the full I see him leading up and i see him. Doing some great things would not be shocked. Wouldn't shock me if clip ahead eighty yards hundred yards. Today's Winning by a lot lighter the appeal of the sector. I don't say nece. Secondary is gone into the iras. Dawn clio judiciousness juju smith schuster and john. Jay johnson led aligned james washington during the next couple of houses from his. Name's really Austin he joins us ladies are. Cj henderson really well drafted rookie On who'd also ahead try land in the everyone else's quite no-name so the style. I i just see that. Steelers rod racing his running random. That's a great point. I wanted to to alert. Not even mole. Because i was gonna ask you this question in my notes of all knights of gme terrible handwriting. Who scares you on the defense to stay fellows like closely. Who scares you yet. And that's that's an interesting point. Throw the savvy. Moaners strands in the. Nfl don't think it's going to be out of gaza susan's drown. Plays on the on. The jacksonville team. Think is album say scheduling work. Because aren't really safe. Died bit surprised. Quieting chase on maximum quantity. I think he's having. Its offseason them in adjustment. One lots Means nfl. the deep unlike awarded that still faced in my opinion. I what's from inside linebacker position we lost jackson. You've got george schubert and got Connell corrupt who is a bit of a favor. For bottoms of misalignment steals could have acquired heating white inside and outside. So you know. We talked a little bit about josh allen. Their defensive position in what have him. I think he's pairing between miles. Jack joe schubert heard was cleveland system In cleveland just know that since quality would inside linebacker that could creative headaches seals which until later in public beta medication and get through it. But you've got a decent wine back in kobe teaching in the middle abbatoir. Joel malls jackie. play outside as well. Marcia quarterback engineer well to be with saul or rainy better place than what steals my stopped since flash pies either in the wrong wall in the house and that sort of short whilst away half the bayonne on game when it comes off as to the audience we're gonna be This one has to start writing some halls that allowed the running backs to gone sites. The nanny artem associates about being scary. But i do think that they will. Zeal is under the pressure overseas. Montek to find their faith in lay modern against cincinnati. Bengals loss is fought with differences in records. Do you know the only thing that scares me. A alpi coaling verani land because that will give the jaguars is an idea to be right into to capitalize on that first second and third drive though she drives that we just do screens off applies to like. What are we doing other than that. Yeah and i think it goes back to their sanctions before like chance would guarding. Shoot up bensman now equally. When i look at the teams like jacksonville. Jaguars face if you look at one st. Who's doing from our rush defense earlier. Season lost game site. James robinson has not necessarily running. His rush. Defense is students of crime or a defense. That's getting heaton. So damn hough. Each is reality. Realities did like the best rushing out. Stan can against the titans which is still quite well against inner and then against the charges. It conduct struggled united in the loss to weights running from hungary yards. I would expect the steelers on invite to have says my bulb skills rush defense system whole jacksonville. Jaguars to on that. Eighty rush rushing money on eighty the hold onto it. Do you care to make that lower and more interesting because my bulk prediction is a very on this week. Dance down series four on the season for each. It'd be concerned with art fair enough because you have been gender is going to get back there and knocking back five yards anyway. So give you point for that. 'cause i wanna say the owners say the happening anyway. Are we going to mind this week as well. Yeah okay so. I'm thinking this week is the wake that jake luton and the offense somehow the steelers get a safety yet. We haven't had one for a long time. They get backed up Mistakes happen with your rush defense there on that on the back foot. Get a safety. Changes changes the momentum. And yeah. I would just like to say that happened. Just put a bit of pressure on Afraid to a points maybe right around the back out after that but yeah i wanna say a safety happened yet. We've only had one season sir. Fos a really anyone when they want. And that was jerry. Jarrett what okay. What game against brokers honestly can't remember Yes think matters. Why freeze it's getting. It's getting really sticky by mike asleep changes. Yes i think. I think it was against size against the denver. Broncos probably in post in hayden slack channel that along the yet but we'll mock as ways was like the slim this line of journal shows. We like to see different people. seen slanging Spend slings the rock way. Like to swim those in slang. What's your sign for this way. What thought to go. Yom jaguars About you know several different names. And i'm trying to think how we would put the jaguars quarterback with all the slang nine luggage falls. Wannabes might soul and something like that or if we watching on thinking the way we would say luton would be united. Jackie boy lutes. That's him with jackie. Boy what's loads dylan. That bit of slang on it. And i still want to see. Jackie boy hit the dirt and we get tj full saxo yet monkeys monkeys day in duval a really hard time. Nice marceline slang for this week. That law that law bala a is like someone that works odd. That are these. One divisions auburn Someone that's always gory become hot. She i think only describing the jacksonville jaguars weight whether it's the youth across oil departments lack of spins now dead cap money spent some great names seeing on people. Well at one eight you settling that one that one bunch of battles that's in this length of this way develop battlers do outlays. That's that's a good one because that's what they feigns the shamsi jacksonville jaguars fans there are some dot. Yeah every every day every game you gotta show up. Nfl is And i'm sure the teams on sunday price on that team. Yeah the deployment hod but they went win. I don't think they'll win now while his right mock are just not lie you at nielsen. Slang was against the broncos derek. What safety yeah there. You go a actually forgotten about that. So special teams defense non thinking on defense on thinking that jake Jacobite alerts will make a mistake. Goal the running game somehow stuff. Too much pressure on. It'll be a safety. They're gonna come through that on and off the tj. What doesn't say yeah. Yeah that's no one ever further from distribute and get defensive touchdown. You wanna take a out of tatum safety. That's pretty cool. If only get both lines you donald. It's definitely give it's going to be so exciting to watch and we've just got to keep down sedmak something that you like to do. Each rate that we get a bit of a loft that is you. Try and put me off with something. Funny lewis as you can't say these message rain on his face. Our question for this lake and this is the. This is the hard question of the week with talk question. Who has a better move dot an insurer or the one that i'm rockin right now i got sides. You're the matinee. It's just so like a john eighteen days as well. Yeah but what. The listeners concept. Because we're not i platform on my after sharing photo much widows handles app not have enabled. Say the It's pretty solid. But there's a point where inbetween like the top part of the show and the bottom is a like a a gap and it goes blonde for a little bit bit luck. The old hogan coherent similar hatch. Yeah so it's definitely coming in. But i've sort loss week so it was a look like but i think you still need to maybe clean. I don the so. It's i'm gonna do that even with mentioned like he was odd. Never don't think he's going to be a breakout. Stop so much hot behind him. Yeah and then. The jaguars haven't even gotten him. So yeah it's going to be a different game if jacobite alerts can have a guy. I'll be very short. Where he know what i select. Hotline had that rushing touchdown in debut. Game nam for the stock. And he's not that quarterback. The reality is a six round rookie quarterback going against then rosas bigger step. It's the truth things you know like i said in the stop show. He's he's versing. Big ben which hot enough and he's in the late defense. It's very hard very hard. This is crazy. Ruin your pretty as usually. We put off predictions of the staff article. You can find that on behind the curtain dot com but mark gives him in some way you feel be rock points margin difference between this might the point not only the point one hundred and will be above twenty twenty and connie gives why but yet it's a the jaguars gonna come fall and they've got to have ownership for that. Same i think at the home ground is is big these. Nfl grinds and they just want with still nation down in jacksonville. County down there. There's such a member saying on facebook. Got a big parties down there They always bring their again for those guys that feels like harm game and this is one. Let's game. I think will will play normal football monte little bit struggle to stop but big ben comment and swing. Yeah we'll take care of this guy. I don't see them. Losing docu completely agree. We'll be twenty plus originally you before we for up. I haven't twin boss. Alex oneplus do the jaguars yes will again. This is lots of checking off the monster. dot com. county is really happy. The whispers not can get some craig's to what i'd love saying. I love scene all the different opinions. And actually how how rotten and say how teams that's great. That's one of the ones. I love to to share and lookout for. Show me to made so. There's a couple of really cool articles coming out of the next couple of days so state you know listeners. That wraps up this week's episode of steelers to pot Steals touchdown as always thank you so much for listening to us way. While coming to you live we recall not friday night so she becomes you record in the future out of america. You are Settings forty now is joining you with all the different things you might be doing on a saturday with Traveling to and fro an event to work with doing star family house so you might be at the gym when they were in. Jim whatever it is. We do really appreciate titans. Short gray shuttle love was saying some of the different chats as well and some of the other pod costa's having say look really think that but as always if struggling to get clock for this week's game. He's against the one in at jacksonville jackets. Just name your pittsburgh steelers could happen and all there is so much content from this week. Breakouts last week's game it's previewing swayed. That's rhetorician is that to. The steel is history. This shows flagstone. With headings Starting could stanford by often win the super bowl. Run that until it all now. Your enemies jeffrey. Vending michael beck preview shows jeff hallman. Brian's guys thanks garfield The ing pretty short with that in cages. That's good. I've been listening to that whilst couple of weights cheekily religiously not spain ruin awesome for mates Go back was new. Shows the missed out on caught one back and get potline. Listen using bengals. Bit of peter discussion about with steel steelers being so the covered car yet. Thanks so much for listening closet out. The storm's common. Hey regard steelers die steelers.

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Joanna Griffiths: CEO of knix

FashionTalks

26:43 min | 1 year ago

Joanna Griffiths: CEO of knix

"I everyone and welcome to fashion. Talks the podcast about observing the world through the lens of fashion. I am your host. Donna Bishop and I am here with Joanna Griffiths the CEO of Nick. Swear and in just six years. You have built Canada's sixth largest fastest growing I should say company and item of Knicks is sold every ten seconds or less. Like congratulations on all of your success. What I find and thank you so much for being here on the podcast course? Thanks for having me so weird like to start. Is You've been quite candid about like when you started knicks. You weren't setting out to start. Arctic fashion brands. You weren't studying out. Started Technology brand yet here. You are with the fashion technology brand. What inspired the product? Because I imagine you wanted wanted to start a product based business that was part of the journey. Yeah absolutely I think when I started Nix. The idea ways to create life changing aging products. And so maybe that's why I never really made the connection to fashion or not technology. It was two thousand and eleven two thousand twelve it. It's like the era of APPs. Everything was like Uber for Laundry Uber for your dishes. Yeah Uber Era of everything and I was like I wanna make nick leak proof underwear and a really was driven by consumer needs and the consumer pain point and the fact that one in three women can leak when they are pregnant or pregnancy cirilli inspired by new MOMS as well as the eighty percent. Senate women that can leak during the periods so really set out. I wouldn't say more than anything to create a company that was really driven around. Improving women's lives lives and I think that fashion like all the categories and adjacent products. We've created since the technology have all really really evolved as part of that service and purpose which is like what to help women improve their lives. Something that you've been quite candidate boat. Not Because I'm sure people ask you all the time you know. What are your topic pieces of advice for starting you know how did you how did you do it? And you're very candidate saying it's actually not that complicated. I worked hard at things got really hard I worked and then I just didn't quit and I kept working i. I think that's such such profound things to share because we often confuse simple and easy as meaning the same things and what you're saying certainly simple and it was not an easy road by any means and I'd love to I'd love for you to share a couple of the stories about just some of the ways that you you really like drilled down to create your product. Can you tell us vote when you were asking your friends to wear depends sure. Yeah Yeah Yeah. That was a fun one so when I was doing my. MBA was working on the entire time. And I was in this really interesting. Class called identifying new business opportunities and so through that class actually is where we came up with the name for Knicks and made a lot of great progress but one one of the kind of courses or the challenges that we had to do as part of that class was to get was start testing out a product testing out of business idea And so I was one of the few physical product and I was like testing this concept of underwear so to do it. I got about twenty of my I female friends each year. Basically every single leak proof product that was on the market. Oh the glamour. Very glamorous it gets better. I wish it just ended did there. It didn't end there do they. Were pads and depends and basically anything that I could find. It was a pretty horrific stories of products that they were wearing industries. Come a long way since then. And then I gave them capsules with pre measured amounts of water and I would text them during class breaks. They'd have to go to the bathroom. Pour out the water onto the week for product act and then text me back how they were feeling like physically and emotionally. And it's and I think at first the first one everyone wrote we back by. I like this third break in the day. Just text me if you like I swear on this maybe I fucking hate you in all the world for you to make up for this I do. I feel I feel soaking wet. And they have to go to my finance class mail and like why am I doing doing this for you but it was. It was a fun day for in really valuable. Research came out of that rate like emotional impact act of this very real situation. That women are in exactly exactly and I think the pointed at class in something that's so applicable for all of us is that you don't I'm happy to have a huge research facility or a huge lab to go and get customer feedback you actually can do really scrappy tests. And that's all that that was it was like a scrappy. Detest will and I also love how you've talked about that you don't need to invent the wheel every time you are quite open about how you've looked to other categories gory seemingly unrelated for best in class technologies. which is how you came about talking to? People who were cyclists. Were to France. Tell us that that Yeah so in the early days I used to sell a lot of wholesale and we go to different trade shows to sell our products and one of the trade shows that we would go to is the leaving kind of outdoor trio called outdoor retailer and they had a huge sourcing component at that show which I loved kind of wander around and get to be inspired hired by the footwear industry. The outdoor industry like all of these categories that we're really using fabrics to do very cool things and so so through that basically ended up talking to a group that makes most of the Olympic Olympic outdoor gear for Italian company but there the Italian teams and then they also produce the the raincoats riders in the Tour de France and so we ended up partnering Myfm to make our waterproof membrane for are leak free products. What was the reaction Lake is? You're talking to some of these suppliers explaining that in fact no. You weren't looking for high performance athletic raincoats. were making proof on the women in Canada jammed up normally. They think I'm totally crazy. And that's kind of been a common thread. I'd say through throughout time once yes and I love actually love that like. I don't know if you've seen a nike commercial with Serena Williams. Were she's talking about how people are saying when you try and do something bald. You're a woman you're called it crazy so I get called crazy all the time and I might be a little think all entrepreneurs are that over in the beginning. That was really hard because you have no. You have no market proof. You know you don't have a lot to kind of show show as this is GonNa work over time when you get that response to the next question that they often ask because like we'll how many yards you need or like how. How many pairs are you talking about producing and once the numbers get big then? It doesn't matter what you're trying to make. Nobody cares Jamie and like I could be like I want to take that waterproof membrane game and wrap cars and they would say yes if the volume speaking after talking about being bowled I think in 'cause you're often called a disruptor an innovator and and fostering a sense of innovation I think is something that Nicks has done really well both from an internal attornal culture point of view but in just from disrupting a category that had been stagnant for so long part of that boldness. This has been pivoting. The business like you've talked about when you decided to go completely out of the wholesale business and go back go direct to consumer. What what was that? How was that decision made? And what did it feel like to make that kind that bold shift. Yeah I think as they look back over the last the six years that was probably the biggest the most impactful choice I've made was decided not to pursue wholesale anymore and at the time it was really scary because over over seventy percent of our revenue came from wholesale partners so I looked like cut cut sacred cow or making big decisions decisions. Yeah but there is A. We're really struggling with the brand message that we were putting through our own channels and the experience that people were having in stores and a lot of that came to do with the fact that are the majority of our partners weren't interested in carrying our whole size range because because they didn't feel like their customer wise necessarily assize extra-large or double xl or even in some cases the size large and so we ended up with this really kind of challenging brand experience for our customers where they would drive around from store to store to store. They get turned away because they didn't carry their size and in going and trying to find our product is designed to make their lives better they would have a really crappy day and so that was the catalyst that made us pull out and then a lot of it often comes back to that idea of keeping things simple. We were doing so many things and I don't. I don't believe we were doing a single one of them very well and I have a lot of friends. They've run fashion companies that have tremendous wholesale partnerships. The truth is is that an intimate. You're an accessory category. You're never like the thing you know. It's just so interesting because if you if you're brown your panties are fitting well like you feel awkward all day. Yeah no it's true. It's true I think I think we're starting to see the importance importance of it. Now as preferences are changing and the way we're dressing is changing and all of those things but we just we weren't in in a position to be able to work with our partners to say please carry. This is our please carry this whole range or please. Somebody pulled out of everything and just sold online now. Today it's been three years of that today or we're just starting to complicate things. Yeah yeah a little bit more and so. I'm really excited that we're doing this nationwide Nordstrom partnership so we're in all of the Canadian nordstroms with the biggest activation being here at the Eden Center. And that's through till the end of twenty nine thousand nine hundred is yeah. Yeah so that'll be. My next stop is going to check it out. Because I haven't had the chance to do that Ed. And then we've also recently opened widen retail store in Vancouver with Toronto store opening on Thursday. So this this is our month of like to retail stores nationwide partnerships that. We're starting to get a little bit more complex things going on Xtra. Glad you're are here. The Bra is also one of the items that has gone through many many iterations with you. What's it like to decide to stop? Stop a certain category of design because the Knicks Bra has gone through many iterations. Since you started. Yeah I think that our job. Innovators it's to constantly watch and see how people are responding to the products. That were making. I think our first Bra was truly revolutionary within the wireless category and we still carry To kind of versions of but we recently cut we one of our top performing skews news. I know but he knew why it's because we know where the servants heading and we're seeing feedback and we launched the new product called the wing woman. which is our first? Kind of seamless. CONTOUR wire free bra. We just knew that it was gonNA outperforming cannibalize the sales of the other product act and so sometimes I think it's our job is as brand and leaders and to to kind of know when to to hang your hat on certain things. Is that a thing kind of cutting into the cover and close the door and yeah. That's also trusting trusting your gut instincts and. I think it's often take it for granted that that again is something that is easy. When I think it's a muscle that you have to develop develop just like anything else for sure? Yeah you have to get comfortable making those uncomfortable decisions and then over time CBA they go okay sometimes horribly wrong but you realise that that everything's still ends up being okay. Even when things go very badly is that when you bust out your failure champagne. Oh Yeah love to do that but to do that. It was really hard when I was pregnant. Actually because I make a lot of mistakes that I couldn't have failures champagne so I love you talk about that a bit. How Champagne is something that we tend to celebrate big accomplishments with and you use it to celebrate failures failures failures are learning and failures are growth? Learning learning is not a noun lessons. Yeah yeah no exactly. I think that what I've seen over the course it building next you actually can can gain a lot more from a failure or setback than you can from a win. And that's very weird to say out loud. Paid if you learn like if you actually take a minute to pause and to learn from it and so that's something that my husband David I tend to do is when there's it's a really big mistake. We have a nice bottle of champagne and we just kind of outline like. How did this happened? And how are we never going to try to make sure it doesn't happen again. You talk a lot about the importance of purpose with what you do has an. I've noticed just that the mission statement of Nixes actually evolve over time and you've got a beautiful one. Currently abode empowering women to be unapologetically. Free has your purpose. Evolved as Knicks has evolved. What's that relationship like? Yeah I think that you you know. We always knew. He wanted to have a positive impact on women's lives. And we wanted to do that to your product in through brand so the product is these technical intimates intimates that are designed with our bodies in mind and they make every day better. The brand really started rooting rooted in body. Positively and. I think what's happened is is that as a matter. We're constantly looking at what's going on in society. And how do we how do we be at the forefront of new conversations and so that's where I think about. It's been almost two years since we've been working on that ironically enough and I think I think the the main driver of that is that used to be about body positivity and now I think more and more in general enroll in the culture. It's about holistic wellness and being comfortable with who you are and partner that pertains to how you feel about yourself and your body but part of it. Also pertains tasted mental health and bigger bigger topics. That were now tackling as brand like fertility in postpartum and loss and mental health. And so that's through. That transition is coming is coming from. And can you talk a little bit about the relationship between fertility and all the things that you've been working on with Knicks and the life after birth project because this is another. I think it's so interesting that when you started knicks you were not necessarily your core customer talked openly about like new moms know tend to be you know people who benefit the most from prove underwear and whatnot and now you are your core customer. Exactly yeah so fertility piece came from basically understanding who are core audiences and we sell the women of all ages with our team. Mind we start as early as ten eleven but I had a miscarriage about a year and a half ago. I guess your ago and really understood in that moment. That fertility is such a huge topic that affects all women whether not raven totally conscious of it. So we're constantly making being trade offs in our head around career family partners identity and so much of that is rooted infertility because so much of the female identity is tied. Hi To motherhood and that being our purpose which it isn't only fertility is from the beginning of menstruating. Yeah exactly so. It's this really beautiful kind of common thread As it pertains to our products and the the people that we serve serve and then the life after birth project was really an evolution of that where it was my maternity leave project so I have a six month old now and you know I'm constantly looking at images that I'm being served online and really felt like within the maternity post-partum space that there is just so much of the wrong messages being sent about you know your body bouncing back and getting back to where you were and I was getting lots of ads for like AAC Diet programs and Fleming products and they know they know it's it's a real insecurity ad will my life the same. Well how could it possibly be the same. You've done this amazing thing. Yeah exactly exactly actly. In so through that. We launched the life after birth project. We actually tied into the our maternity and postpartum collection which took place in August. But it's really taken a life of its own this project you've taken it to New York. TORONTO WE'RE GOING TO LA ON IT LAUNCHES IN LA on Thursday. Yeah Yeah and the features over at this point. I think we're at seven hundred fifty women in and people's post-partum experiences and really shares each of their stories and I think it's an exercise in storytelling which I'm just such a fan of that through shared experiences and really using our voices we can find community and we can change the conversation and and the conversation that we want to have their is to acknowledge women in general and say we see you and in every story is valid. And the idea that you are once you are postpartum your forever postpartum and so this concept that you're gonNA bounceback or go back to the person that you were before is in. Isn't that relevant. And it's actually clean not fair because what we should be focusing on is coming out stronger and more whole and moving forward moving forward exactly exactly which I think is Meghan markle. I think has been an amazing champion as well as a new mom and so anytime it like the royals are onto something. I'm like there's something here go navy that gets awesome when in the after birth project you do have some women with significant platforms. Amy Schumer Humor Christy Turlington whenever someone with a spotlight on their lives put themselves forward for an issue. Can't help it increase the conversation. Absolutely I yeah I think in that particular project we were just so fortunate that almost every person that we reached out to to be a part of it said yes and I think that that just shows how keen people aren't to talk about this which is really exciting will and I don't think it is. It might not have been intentional but to me it makes exp perfect sense that an intimate company would be comfortable having these very intimate and important conversations. Like to me. It just makes sense that that would be baked into what everything everything that you've been doing. I'm so glad that I remember David. Sort of came in to pitch the concept to the team and I was only I was not very I was only like a couple of days or a week. post-partum or something and they thought I was completely Offer of the charts in terms of like he wanted to what you WANNA show these kinds of fixtures bad. I don't know who else would be able to do it so I love how with everything that Nicks is doing you. Yourself have been very transparent about what the journeys been like for you. As well and for entrepreneurs resilience often comes up as like one of the most important things to foster and it seems to me that that is again one of those kind of like. It's it's like trying to catch water. Like how do you build resilience so that when things are tough you can double down and be like like. Is it just something that comes from from inside you. Is that something that you're careful to surround yourself with people with or is it Donna. I don't know I mean I think it's I think it's like building a callous to be honest like I when I when I look at things now they get thrown me almost every single day and compare who I am today with who I was six years ago like six years ago. If any one of the things would happen it would be completely debilitating. It's not debilitating. Thank you and then I think just over time you to learn okay. This this is a setback. But it's it's not going to be the end of this company and over time. Its Muscle on a strength that you develop and I. I don't know if I think I don't know if anyone's born with it like I honestly think you just have to kind of be taken down repeatedly to just oft get comfortable bouncing back up and you mentioned something I think is really important. which is separating like your worth from what's happening with and I think it's really difficult for entrepreneurs sometimes because those two things like who we are and our company can become so intertwined but it's only really through separating them that you can build that resilience? Yeah I think so and I mean for me I especially in the early days. I wasn't the greatest at asking for things for myself or are fighting for myself and so that's why next really became such a mission led organization is because I felt very comfortable advocating for things when it when it was for a larger mission or purpose and so that was a technique that I adopted really early on to kind of get me out of bed in the days. When I just didn't WANNA get out of bed because those days happen even still you know and the truth is that as a leader eater like you always have to get out of bed and not only? Do you have to get a bad but you have to have a smile on your face and you know like you set the tone for everyone who works with you and so oh that's my little like life tip if I had to give to other entrepreneurs and founders defined emission or cause to align in your brand with because number one. Don't make you more resilient than you could ever be on your own and then secondly it'll just resulted in more companies within this country tree creating larger social impacting good. And I think it's a win win. I can't wait to continue to watch the world domination of of Nick's what do you think is on the horizon for the intimates category. I think you're going to continue to see a lot of disruption You know it's a category that has been dominated by some pretty big players historically where large-scale distribution was was really important portent and now I think with ecommerce it's one of the categories that is honestly becoming the most disruptive even as other new brands in in other areas of fashion struggle. Intimate seems to be the standout so I I think we'll see more of that. I think we'll see more body inclusivity across Brian's and Yeah I. I hope that we lead the charge. I think you are to win a thank you so much for being here today. Thanks for having me. People can follow along at Knicks. Yep on your channels and they can follow you as well a big thank you to Kaffa producing partner with fashioned talks. You can learn more about Catha at C. A. The F. A. W. A. R. D. S.. Thank you to Cadillac Fairview and the Eaton Centre for hosting US Today. I'm Donna Bishop. You can follow me at. This is Donna D. and until next time time this is fashion talks. Thanks so much for being here. Thanks for having me.

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Bytemarks Caf: A Political Look Ahead

Bytemarks Cafe

28:52 min | 5 months ago

Bytemarks Caf: A Political Look Ahead

"It's november four twenty twenty and welcome to the new reality addition of bite marks cafe where we serve universe by today's science technology and innovation. I'm bert lum i up. We'll have michelle cheung from true initiative. And she here to tell us about a gartner webinar coming up called pragmatic infrastructure and plowed strategy. And then we'll be joined by christina khuda from transformed hawaii goven david muir shiro from hawaii. Kids can and we'll talk about tech civic engagement and of course the preparation for the next legislative session first up. I wanna look michelle cheung from true initiative and tell us a little bit of both gartner webinar. This coming up and wokingham michelle to mark's cafe. Thank you thanks for having me. Well first. i'll start with true at for those of you. That don't know. Choose a nonprofit with a mission of creating enable jobs and we do this by celebrating these option of technology and innovation so we share a lot of the different solutions that innovative company Put out there in hopes that it'll for that energy and excitement to do it in your own organization. So the event that we have coming up is on thursday november twelfth at ten. am And we are going to hear from gartner. Analysts needs david capuccio. Who's going to talk about the emerging trends in cloud infrastructure and cloud technologies. And so so michelle. It'd be what would you said was very important. It's the adoption the adoption of some of these technologies and. It's kinda really geared for companies here in a way to get more familiar with some of these new technologies and really t tell us a little bit about the premise behind. What true is trying to do. I mean you know. Obviously you want to get them to adopt these these technologies but for what reason. Yeah so a lot of emerging technologies out there are common on the mainland and for some reason they're slower to take hold in hawaii We just want to use this technology to improve efficiencies and productivity take advantage of the computing power. that's now available in the cloud So there are a lot of organizations you guys know. Aws microsoft of those spends tons on security and developing their product degrades to see some of the hawaii organisation leverage it so one of the examples that i have is Email the we used to have an exchange server on premise exchange server and with that comes additional cost. You have to host it yes. Has somebody maintain it. You have to have somebody watches security and the list goes on but now there are cloud based solutions that can handle some of this infrastructure for you where you don't have to and then your people can actually focus on the core competency so it's a redirection of your resources not only to do maintenance but actually focus on things that will give your organization of competitive advantage. And you'll do you think that the pre pandemic was if people were accustomed to doing it one way and it wasn't necessarily broken. There was no real strong desire to to change and and sort of post pandemic are realizing the sort of the critical nature of of infrastructure Do you think there's a more compelling now than than the prior to the pandemic. I think so. I think that's the pandemic has accelerated the as option and the transformation To transformation of a lot of organizations because people need to do it so some of the organizations that had invested in let's say digitizing their processes or doing e-signature or Having a remote workforce or having solutions for that have had an easier time during the pandemic to handle the needs of the employees staff and the consumers and now i think it's a great time to continue that trend To to look at ways and organization can take advantage of the technologies out there and so he had a really rapid pace so hottest. I mean i've had you on the show and Oftentimes it's about these webinars that are becoming available and has has I guess your assessment of how how the introduction to some of these technologies being is being received from the companies that participate. I mean. are you feeling like they're they're kind of Getting it or is there. More need for Education and and you know nudging them along you know. I learned something from data housing partner recently and that there is different ways That innovation is catalyzed. Different ways that people find innovations One is based on internal needs. So i know. I'm going to have remote staff so i have to innovate by providing them with virtual desktop. Let's say none of it is from near so maybe it's your competitors or your consumers that are asking for different delivery methods and then the last one is from afar which is what does we try to showcase companies that have. This is problems with the hope that it would Inspire other organizations to adopted. Some people are moving ahead. So i think after served code webinar and through a few more discussions other organizations are opting tools like parody So i'm seeing. It doesn't feel like it's a fast enough pace. Don't know all the organizations that are that are you know transitioning and you've had you've had You said you have served go on. You've talked about the use of a and didn't you also have salesforce do Like a webinars. Well yes absolutely. Salesforce actually has started to see a really strong foothold in hawaii. Both in the government and the private sector So that is one that is taking whole. I think that are challenges. That come with it. But i think that organizations are leveraging the power of elsewhere so that's great if people want to sign up for. This is happening on thursday november twelve at ten. Am work and they go to sign up. And i think it's it's a free right so it's a great to up at Our website it's www that itchy dot org slash true And you can see the registration for the events that are upcoming as well as recaps of the other ones in case you wanted to learn about imperative or another solution that we've shared in the past And of course the the gardiner guys are really experts in the field. So i think it would be very very Knowledgeable a webinar. So i've always enjoyed the the gartner presentation so thanks shelf joining us and we'll take a short break in return. We'll be joined by christina khuda from transform hoy goven david miyashiro from the can and of course we'll talk about coming up the next legislative session. Thanks a lot and this is bite. Marks cafe support for bite. Marks cafe comes from the hp our local talk show fund which helps hawaii. Public radio's grow locally. Produced talk shows mahalo to contributors. The koala hotel resort and pecat pacific center for advanced technology training. Welcome back to bite marks cafe. Of course. I am thrilled to have christine sokota from transform away gove and david miyashiro from kids can't here to talk about civic tech citizen engagement of and of course the volving tech landscape and i wanna welcome you both to bite marks cafe a our abor nice to be here now chris i i had you on not too long ago in fact i think it was like maybe a couple of weeks ago talking about the Hoya annual co challenge which is which is currently underway. But i thought it'd be good to have you and david onto taco a bit more about what your respective organizations do because i think you both have You sort of both head up some key. Organizations that are quite the influential in how who e kind of evolves into the twenty first century. And maybe i'll give you both of your chance to share a little bit about What you folks do so christine wanted. Tell us a little bit more about the transfer of hawaii. Gov sure i'd be happy to transform hawaii government. Ghg for short is a nonprofit organization that is dedicated to advocating for the modernization of government services. And the reason. That's why the reason why that's important is so that our community has access to the services that they need when and where they need it and and david sort version. We'll we'll give you a chance to get into specifics around what it is. You're you're advocating. For and and david tell us a little bit about the hawaii kids. Can you know. I'm a friend of the show. So it's great to be back. But we're an organization a nonprofit organization that focuses on education advocacy specifically in the k. Twelve around but really looking at how can we make aways education system most equitable and they most innovation in the world. And i think we have all the ingredients do that here And we're really excited about a lot of Collaboration brophy scene and Happier and then david. You have very involved with obviously the k. Through twelve education. And be you know. You were very instrumental instrumental in helping pass legislation for computer science In education and and that was done maybe what a couple a couple three years ago. I mean how have you seen the the progress of of that legislation. And how how has it taken root in our education system. Yeah then really inspiring actually I will. I'll give a shout out to Truck win at. Uh is crd g. Who did a really great landscape reports Looking at the last three years in terms of computer science education and overall It's been a pretty dramatic growth and especially at the high school level We've seen a lot more. High schools offer computer science courses which is really exciting. And i think for those of us who look at the big picture you know. This is really opportunity to change the trajectory of the state. Make sure that for our kids growing up. Today they had the opportunity to create the future oriented skills. Not just tomorrow. But if today right and i think we're on a really nice pass do that. Well you know. I sense that you know we were all looking at The need to change that trajectory even before the pandemic But even now as we are in the midst of it doesn't it feel like it's even more important now than it was before because you know if we are going to be able to compete you know with the with the rest of the world in this sort of digital economy Doesn't it behoove us to be much more proactive in in laying the foundation for students. To you know kinda be prepared to to compete in in this sort of twenty first century technology arena. And you know. I think what you think about. What does it mean to be digitally literate in two thousand and twenty. It's more than just sitting down and being coder. Nobody has not everybody. Has to be a coder in a hoodie. it's really just understanding. You know all the different options that being Digitally literate and having access to a device. An internet can be and and can bring in. So i think that's where you're going to see really the inequities as you know. There have been a wide range of folks who have careers or they can work. Remotely work online You know work through cloud based systems like aws and then those folks who can't really really struggling financially and so you know. I think we if people talk about its future. Proofing the state right we. We don't know what the next crisis is going to be. If there's covert twenty two out there But we can at least the proactive and ensuring that our kids are prepared for whatever does happen And chris the Work that you do with the transplant. Hoyt government and and the systems that you have can keep an eye on in terms of modernisation. How has your work kind of transformed in this. Sort of pandemic Era and is it be. Has it become more I guess more. I know that prior to par to Twenty twenty some efforts around getting You know access to more data getting getting government to be more Tuned into things like a chief data officer and of course now during the pandemic i mean i hear everybody talking about being more being more informed by data so how does how is the work that you do really try to help push that That as an initiative. I guess how does how does your efforts Trying to make sure that that the that gets subtraction. Thank you and as you know is a big advocate of digital government and you know if the government has the technology that it needs to support the services that it provides to the community in a way that is effective Transparent and responsive. Then i think we we really have Very high performing state and so with the pandemic has really shown is it has shown where some of the deficiencies are quite frankly within the state government system. And it's been widely reported for example that the unemployment insurance application and the state's accounting parts of the state's counting infrastructure are reside on forty year old mainframe computers and while that's that's you know decades old. It's not really a false. Because i think what the government does it projects that that really are focused on services to the public and perhaps the government can do a better job at really investing in itself and investing in infrastructure. In order to be more resilient. And so i think the pandemic has really brought that to light and with people's direct experiences in the community of accessing. The unemployment insurance application are accessing medicaid apply for medicaid services. Applying for you know getting there Your birth certificates and decifit kits online. You know digital access has become much more intimate and so we are. We are big advocates of that. So chris i mean one of the challenges that i think as advocates for sort of this transformation. Both you and david. We're already aware of the budget Limitations that the state has and with modernisation. It's gonna cost you know it's going to cost something i mean is there. Is there strategies that you have in mind that would try to Ensure that it still happens in spite of the sort of the budget limitations. I mean you're right are there are significant budget limitations And i think they're going to get worse before they get better but within that there are opportunities for partnerships between government and non-government. And we're seeing that more and more as the state government towards the cares act funding Really tries to reset some of the programs that the the government provides to the community so partnerships. I think are absolutely critical for our whole community to really you know become more resilient him out of the pandemic and when we look towards the twenty twenty one legislative session. You know a lot of a lot of what i hear in this community are really around. getty trying to ride the wave of increase citizen in engagement that we're seeing in the election to really participate within the legislature so online access to you know to testimony you know online real time access to participate in you know in hearing listen to the hearings and testify. Those things become more and more important now especially since People may not have the opportunity to travel from neighboring islands. To you know to walk who during the legislative session The other thing that we're really looking at is there were. There was a couple of years ago. A big focus on data integrity data governance data access and it is hard to extract meaningful data also very old systems. That don't talk to each other. And so i think members of the community are also looking at A chief data officer and perhaps the data task force that can really bring together the different departments and community to talk about Ways that data could be shared more in a secured way but shared more across the system to address the more systemic problems that we're facing so i really. Those are released some some of the opportunities that i see when i do wanna do want to get into a little bit about how you will approach that you know given the twenty twenty one session. That's coming up. And and and david i also ask you about what you see on that You know not too far horizon. And some of the things that you would like to Maybe get legislators to to consider so what we want to do is hold. That thought. we'll be right back. After this short break to continue a conversation with christine sukuzi from transfer moi gov or government and of course david mea shearim from hawaii kids. Can this is bite. Marks cafe support for bite marks. Cafe comes from the hp our local talk show fund which helps hawaii public radio sustain and grow its locally produced talk shows mahalo to contributors a cocky health lucchino initiative and the hub co working hawaii. Welcome back this is bite marks cafe burt lum and if you're just joining us we're talking to christine ikuta from transform roy government and david miyashiro from hawaii. Kids can and right before the break we were talking about Some of the things that that christine and transform hoi government are really kind of considering and and getting prepared for in terms of You know initiatives in the next legislative session. And i want to also give david kind of share with us. What are your thoughts on on this upcoming session. And you know we've just come out of an election. And i think there's some new legislators on the scene but and you folks you're both are very very experienced that Working with with legislators david in terms of You know what you see in the next session. I mean what would what would you like to see. Achieve is it is it. A question of appropriation is the question of getting more sort of Legislation in place. I mean what what you folks in your attention on. I know. Chris had so many great points but something she said really the got me. Which is you know. It's not just going to be one silver bullet. It's really this collaboration across sectors. That's gonna get us through this like this. This is gonna be a hard hard year financially reninstate. However you know i've been You know just stole overwhelmed by seeing how crisis has brought us together in a lot of ways as community and you see that public private you know Kind of set of partners working together to figure out really tricky pollution and even federally right thinking about the bright spot. The hawaii we just invested thirty million dollars in digital equity that includes computers tablet hotspot rank that thirty eight million dollars would not have been invested. Otherwise the how do we build on that as not respond to an emergency but as an opportunity for all kids who now have access to that technology right and have access to essentially different kinds of learning that they never would have had before you know the example like i give you know now that we've all had eight month's crash course in distance learning can be really creative. What if the kid from. Hana wants to enroll any school enrolling class at mckinley high school because they don't have teacher there in their school right now. We're all on the same page so let's really take advantage of that and for family. Let's help families get more involved and kids. Learning you know parents. I distance learning has not been fun for a lot of parents but it in some way never been more involved in their kids education learning than they have been in the last eight right. The we're looking at things like in december for computer science education week having family coating night where families can actually sit together. You know for elementary kids and their parents to see. Also this is what it looks like. This is just you know. Get games for a kid. But they're actually learning really great skill. Oh and by the way. We're going to connect you with employers. Who can show you how. Those skills translates to real quality. Future-oriented jobs now. That's great david. So are you referring to Event coming up. I mean What is it that you can help do to help the parents. The kids are understand the new normal that they are now living in. I mean Some of the ideas that you just shared. I mean i think are are great What are what are you. Are you going to be focusing on on in terms of advocacy. Is it going to be legislation. Or are you putting on events i mean. What's what's kind of the focus of your attention. My perks has always been all of the above. You know that's why gotta be a holistic the holistic. you're missing something. But you know in terms of events like december seven through the thirteenth is computer science education. Week it's the national celebration We're working with a number of partners They'll pretty preliminary but field offer a wide range of virtual experiences for family including discussions with industry professionals all the way to family coding nights. I think that's going to be so much fun And then turns of legislation working with our partners to talk about companies that we see right the pook that are out there. Like i said we've had a huge increases high school and high school students gaining access computer science but there are a lot elementary middle schools. That are still you know not quite fair. So really focusing the younger ages and looking at while we made on have a lot of state funds to access maybe there are ways we can leverage public private grant programs for work based learning so that if a kid is interested in the program within a they've got the technology at home now because of that thirty million dollar investment that they can access those ai courses no matter who rents it right if it's ibm amazon cetera. So really making sure that geography no longer is a barrier for any of our kids. I think that's really exciting. No that's great and you know be sure to remind me of the december seventh event because i will probably have you back on as a as a news and can announced that the event because it sounds exciting so so christine you know you mentioned get a governance. The data taskforce is the idea of Chief data officer. I know the chief data officer got past. But i don't think there were any appropriations For that what is what is your focus going to be. You know coming up for the next session. Are you going to try to get that in in some form of legislation or you know something called the it up steering committee. I mean is it going to be through that through that group. I mean how are you going to make this get some traction and actually make it You know make it sustain into twenty twenty one twenty two but that's a good question for it and it was a couple of years ago that the chief data officer and get a task force. Bill got really good support in that legislative session and it went all the way to Joint conference and then it died there and so it did not pass and i actually remember no one of the state leader saying during this pandemic boy. I wish we had the chief data officer we we really and you know this person can solve all problems but you know there should be. It would be very helpful if there was someone in the state that was on point for ensuring that data access Is is one of the state's top priorities because you can't manage what you can't measure and you can't make informed decisions without without data and so those those are actually become very very critical and it is important to understand why didn't pass. Maybe chief data officer sounds very similar to chief information officer and The nuances and the value of the video wasn't communicated well enough but now again kind of the pandemic experience and the ability to get the right data at the right time within the state and from perhaps healthcare community to manage contact tracing and make informed people. Realtime about everything that's going on. You know real time data becomes very important and it. Is you know everyone's cooley. on us. Participate and engage in that. And so i don't know where the best spot is for the the chief data officer data tasks course it definitely we you know. In upcoming months or two we will be having more conversations with the community and with the state as far as what makes the most sense Because we just want to set this up for success. So chris if people want to get more familiar and involved with the transfer maury government work. Indigo thank you. They can go to our website which is transformed hawaii gov dot org and of course with david. Sherwin highway kids can. That's the hallway kids dot org. And i'll put that up on our show notes for later on this evening. Christine sokaia is the executive director of transfer who a government and david. Miyashiro is the executive director of what you kids can. And of course. I wanna thank you both for joining us today and thank you for listening to bite mark cafe. Join us next week when we'll delve deeper into the hawaii career pathways initiative. If you miss any part of this addition you can find a podcast of tonight. Show on bite marks cafe dot org. If you have any comments or suggestions feel free to email me at bite marks. F g mail dot com. You can also find me on twitter. I met bite. Marks are engineer. Is david chong you can catch us on. Hp are one every wednesday or anytime the hp are f. i tunes google play and stitcher. You stay safe and you stay awesome. We'll see you next week on. Another addition of bite marks cafe.

hawaii michelle cheung Marks cafe david miyashiro christina khuda david bert lum david muir shiro wokingham michelle mark's cafe david capuccio gartner hoy goven christine sokota mahalo chris Hoyt government forty year christine three years
Georgia Runoffs: One Seat to Control the Senate

Start Here

30:53 min | 3 months ago

Georgia Runoffs: One Seat to Control the Senate

"It's wednesday january. Sixth and november wasn't a fluke. We start here born to the senate work. All georgia georgia has now delivered one seat to the democrats and it might just give them full control of the senate as well. Is georgia now. Purple state is that a real swing state is even little bit bloop. Did this just redefine. America's political landscape ballots are still coming in. We will tell you what we know and what we're waiting on. Meanwhile today's the day congress stands up to say american elections work. That's not what's about to happen. Though what is going to happen here. Today will not change the outcome of the election but it will be a show for an audience of one however mike pence has told president trump. This is not about to go the way you think and prosecutors. Say shooting amanda. The back was not a criminal offense. He believes jacob blake had a knife in his hand. And was resisting arrest. Why windows are boarded up. Again in kenosha wisconsin from abc news. This is start here brad. Milkey when the smoke cleared from the two thousand twenty election the storylines seemed clear. Joe biden and managed to harness a huge turnout for decisive victory but in congress it was far from united. Democrats now barely had a lead in the house and republicans would hold the senate barring a miracle in to georgia runoffs after all turnouts never the same for a runoff election right. You're really gonna hype people up that much twice. Will yesterday. democrats got their answer. And the ballots came pouring in. It is now past seven o'clock on the east coast and the polls have closed in the off. That will decide the balance of power in washington. The top line numbers. You start the night going. Wow the democrats are doing pretty well with thirty one percent of the vote in office actually outperforming joe biden in cobb county. Jon ossoff was leading. Senator david purdue. Reverend raphael warnock was leading senator. Kelly leffler by even more then. This big batch of votes came from rural areas. Suddenly the republicans had taken the lead. Just as you were speaking with the race changed again. Now we have senator purdue up by three thousand votes. His just focused on all that you would have with lash blue mirage red mirage. But if you were looking at these specific batches of results and you compare them to the presidential election. A surprising consistent trend was emerging here in county after county. The democrats were doing even better than joe biden happening right before we came on the air. Abc news now projecting that democrat raphael. Warnock will win his race. Yeah the several thousand vote lead over. Gop senator kelly leffler in two races. You would expect to be identical. We have two different updates for you this morning. Abc news kidnap project. That reverend raphael warnock will win his race. He will be the next senator from georgia for at least the next two years but remember. Democrats need to enroll jon. Ossoff has grabbed a lead. We have not projected that race not yet. So let's dig into this with. Abc news political director recline and perry bacon junior a senior writer with our partners at five. Thirty eight rick. You're still on the set where we were doing. Live coverage last night. Why would we project warnock and not ossoff. What are you guys seeing. Well in the case of walk he's got numerical advantage. He's actually leading and so georgia. I am honored by the that you have shown in me. And i promise you this tonight i am going to the senate to work for all of georgia and it gives me jon. Ossoff is just razor thin but there's more than enough vote out there in in predominantly democratic areas That's what democrats are looking at right now that race me be in a recount. Maybe a little more likely than the other race of but as as that vote comes in. We've just we've just seen better and better numbers for the democrat and this may have all of them. We're looking at one point. Two four four million votes which was more than we anticipated. Actually we were looking at today. That's election day votes. It's clear that the turnout was through the roof and it actually happened in both parties. Donald trump was good for public turnout. He's probably good once again for democratic turnout and it was an open question. As to whether voters who elected joe biden would also try to deliver him a senate. We saw a lot of ticket splitters in this state and many other states. Republicans always have advantages in these runoffs particularly in a state. Like georgia of the conventional wisdom coming in is that they look pretty good. Well no not the first time. But i was this time he thought about what are not even turn out. Well yeah. I wondered if my vote really matters but there seem to have been a little bit more backlash than republicans might have might have intended out of this and it's also possible that a few republican state home knowing that the president been railing against election fraud. Hey perry bacon junior. Does that mean what are people voting for one guy and not the other like i would assume you. Just vote for two ds or for to ours right. So how is warnock outperforming. Not just jon ossoff. But even even joe biden so in terms of looks like warnock going to do a little bit better than ossoff in terms of the margin you can. You can come with a lot of things but one thing we know from a lot of research is that people who are elected incumbents do better than people who were appointed to their seats. I thank you from the bottom line heart. We got lots of things to go out but we have some work to do here. This is a game of inches. We're going to win this election. We're going to say contrary. It looks like david perdue is probably a little bit more popular than kelly leffler. That's my guess is the way producing a little bit better. In terms of joe biden versus the democrats. There was a big. You know. I i think rick is right. We probably gonna learn the to. Some voters were turned up at his last couple months of trump's behavior and his contesting election. I also think that we don't know is there was there were there. Were tens of thousands of people who did not vote in the initial election. I have more friends than i've ever had in my in my life. Man my voting career which hasn't been that long outvoting. I mean really. So so when do you think is the democrats in georgia focused on getting swing but they also have made a big push at turning out people in the atlanta area. Finding wounded bone the original election turning out people of color particularly people age. Forty so a lot of the things kinda stacey abrams and other people in democratic politics involved in trying to change georgia in like a ten year period by really trying to organize and push out people in the atlanta area vote. It appears that put them over the top in this race in perry. You're also just a student of political parties in general so i mean when you look at these razor thin margins but regardless of who wins. What did this might mean for. Republicans this is i mean. The republican party generally wins elections in the south particularly in georgia in an election. I sort of assumed okay. Biden is a particular kind of democrat. He appeals the black voters. He also appeals to older white voters. He appeals them. Swing voters so maybe it's just a one off and the republicans are still strong in georgian a win most racist unfortunately too many folks in our party over the last two months of talking about misinformation election fraud and creating a distraction. We've been out worked out focused but it might still be the case but the republicans appear to have lost to ruffea war. Not in jon ossoff. Who neither who has looked at anything before so. This is not like being defeated by joe by a pretty talented politician who's won a lot of race. I think win or lose here. This is a pivot point for the republican party. Now you gotta look at your republican party. Get me thinking. Oh georgia is really wasn't aberration. This is real georgia's swing state. We have to fight for georgia. Does georgia go the way of virginia or states that you know flip to the democrats and never really flipped back. I'm not predicting them something. You gotta think of the republican party looking at this result. Is georgia nail purple state. Is it a real swing. State isn't even a little bit blue. Okay well so. I assume democrats georgia are just thrilled but democrats in washington. Does this matter if they don't get to fifty because rick put me in washington. What is the difference between forty nine democratic votes in the senate and fifty were all of a sudden kamla harris's like breaking ties for significant to swing the senate but it's also not like joe biden would get to ram through every bill that he likes right. Yeah you know before covered washington. Politics is the forty nine hundred fifty who cares. it's enormous. It changes everything everything from where your offices are. And how much staff you get up to. Who has subpoena power as committee. Chairman of the most important thing is who controls the senate calendar we will be able to pass two thousand dollars stimulus checks for the people next week when we win these races in georgia. Chuck schumer could control instead of mitch. Mcconnell means you can guarantee of vote on anyone. Joe biden is going to appoint to a judgeship to a to a cabinet appointment any piece of legislation. You can't guarantee what the vote result will be. But you can at least bring it to the floor mitch. Mcconnell so mitch. Mcconnell hasn't been two thousand dollar check to even go to vote because that's a vote that could make republicans look bad like you don't want to vote against that. We'll suddenly you have to vote for or against that that's right. It's the difference between having to cut deals and scrape for everything to get mitch mcconnell in in your good graces on something of versus just saying. Hey chuck can you do this for us so it is enormously consequential for the first two years of the president elect by a first term to have control of the house and the senate it means. He has so much more power and sweets to get his appointments through and to just start to enact an agenda perry bacon junior. Did joe mansion like the moderate democrats almost conservative democrat from west virginia. Did he just become the most powerful person in washington. He gets to decide whether bills go through. Perhaps you know. I don't think it'll be just joe manchin. But i'm guessing it'll be some combination of joe mansion and cinema on the in the democratic caucus and maybe lisa murkowski mitt romney susan collins. And the republican. I think you're going to have this centrist block of in within the two parties that'll be able to dictate a lot right so just so everyone still on the same page. Wore not is in. we have projected. He will win that race. Jon ossoff and david purdue are still very close but the remaining vote almost all from the atlanta area. It would be really tough for a republican. Somehow come back from that. But we're still potential account territory so perry bacon junior rick klein there on the set. Thank you so much guys thank you. Thank you next up on start here. Whoever won their new colleagues bockel on their hands. We will take you act day in washington after the break if the liberal democrats take the senate and the white house and then i take it this white house. We're going to fight like hell. I'll tell you is these votes. Get counted in georgia. All the candidates involved there essentially if said these results can be trusted but in washington later. Today you've got to have more than one hundred elected. Lawmakers say american election results cannot be trusted. They will have no proof. Most them just claim victory in november elections themselves but they will essentially be asking on the record to cast the votes of an election of side. That georgia sounded like a wild ride. It is about to be a chaotic day in washington with ramifications that could linger for years. Let's go to abc's chief. White house correspondent jonathan. Karl and our senior congressional correspondent. Mary bruce and mary let's start with you. What is the plan on the floor of congress today. Well the plan is that normally. This is something that is basically routine right. Congress certifying the results of the electoral college. Mr president of the objection isn't writing signed by a member of the house of representatives. But not yet by member united states that case. The objection cannot be entertained. Now you're going to see instead. What is likely to be a very long drawn out process and one that is unprecedented an award. Thank senator josh hawley. ted cruz. All of the senators have stepped up to fight. I think you have to take a step back and realize no sitting. President has tried to hang onto power like this by challenging the electoral college and has instead of a routine process become a loyalty test to president trump on january sixth. I will object to the electoral college so instead of going ahead and certifying the results of the electoral college. You're going to see thirteen. Republican senators at least and more than one hundred house representatives all planning to object to the result objecting to the will of the people in the trump campaign tried to go to court to say hold on hold on and the court. Throw him without even hearing the substance mississippi. Didn't take that that case either. So we don't have the court stepping into resolve it and that's why i think congress has a responsibility. We have an independent obligation to the constitution. What is going to happen here. Today will not change the outcome of the election but it will be a show for a for an audience of one and it is something that republican leader mitch. Mcconnell has urged republicans not to do. But what you will see is them. Stand up and object formerly to. We believe at least three states that we know of arizona georgia and pennsylvania and republicans contest the results in those states. Even though as you say the courts have not found repeatedly not found any evidence of widespread voter fraud but the president is demanding this insisting that won even though we know he did not and now those most loyal to him in congress are backing up the president. I want to assure you. I share the concerns of millions of americans about voting irregularities. I promise you come this wednesday. We'll have our day in congress. We'll hear the jets. And of course brad in really bizarre twist to all of this overseeing all of this is the vice. President are great vice. President comes through forest. He's a great guy plus if he doesn't come through. I won't like quite as much now. Mike is a great guy. It's let's talk about the white house with jonathan karl because john. We heard president trump pressure. A georgia official to overturn election. Results did that in private and it was news. He's basically pressuring his vice president to do the same thing right just to say like no no. Actually these are the election results but he just doing that to them in public. He sure is. I think we. I think it's important to point out that although you have this crazy situation where you have over a hundred. Republicans in the house expected to come forward and make these objections joined by thirteen senators. Republican senators difficult. I this this is divided. The republican party in a way in which few things in my experience covering washington ever divided Either party many of us had hoped. The presidential election would yield different results but our system of government has processes to determine who will be sworn in on january the twentieth mitch mcconnell. Who is the republican leader in the senate the next to donald trump the most powerful republican in washington has said not only. Did he opposes this. But this vote against an effort to challenge. The election results will be the most important vote of his career. Senator mitt romney of utah writing in a statement. I could have never imagined seeing these things in the greatest democracy in the world has ambition so eclipse principal on here. Because i stand with president. Donald trump is for the vice president. He's going to be presiding over all of this and donald trump believes somehow that this is Means that that he has a chance to rules if he were the presiding judge. of course. he's not. He's it's a ceremonial role. Masters faker for the vice president. And the united states senate he basically has the gavel from script. There's literally provided a by the parliamentarian. The senate house of representatives are meeting in joint session to verify the certificates and count the votes of the electors of the several states and he has no power to actually a rule himself but donald trump in some of his More hardcore allies believed that the vice president on his own can decide that certain batches of electors from certain states are not accepted and won't be recognized. I've had conversations with people very close to the vice president although he has not spoken publicly on this to respond to trump on this. I my understanding. Is that vice. President pence will play it straight and he is going to make The president of the united states of very angry okay. So that's interesting that that vice president pence is personally planning on not following the script that the president wants him to follow but mary could he do that like yesterday. In pennsylvania we saw republicans in their state house literally refuse to seat a democratic winner. We cannot swear anybody in until the gentleman for the forty fifth district ruled themselves on the rostrum national. These results had been certified by the state. Republicans refuse to acknowledge. The results were like shouting matches on the floor. Get super ugly. Not seen certified a gentleman who's done qualified through the court system recognized customs. Pennsylvania zest those rooms. What prevents that kind of chaos from happening here. If the vice president did say no these are the electors. I decided that look. The constitution is very clear in the role of congress here while some republicans believe that it should be up to congress and not the electoral college and not the will of the voters to determine who is the next president. Just like every state would say no. That's not your role. It is simply the fact that it doesn't seem likely that republicans are going to have the numbers to actually overturn the results of this election. That as as john mentions is because of mitch mcconnell. He has made very clear. Look he is in charge of the senate and he does not think that this is the right course of action. He is adamant in that and it is why it has created such a giant division within the republican party. I mean donald trump's parting gift here is really sabotaging his own party as he walks out the door. I can tell you sean. Any senator or any congressman that does not meaning on this side. That does not fight tomorrow. I'm telling you will not their political career is over. because the maga- movement going it's going nowhere you're seeing clearly. Some republicans are looking beyond trump. And we've seen this in a few ways. I mean not only this issue but he had his first veto override You know Ju- just just a few days ago But there are clearly you know a lot of republicans did did are fearful that even after trump believes the white house. He's going to have sway. Thank you thank you. we're fighting. We're gonna fight scenes like this. The last time protesters like the proud boys came to town dc officials today urging local residents to stay home kuwait the downtown area and especially of white people who are coming here to look for confrontation so that makes me wonder because this is all inside the capitol. We're talking about even if all that goes. According to plan you know people object but the rule of law carries the day that doesn't necessarily apply to what people are going to be saying outside the capitol right. What are we about to see today. On the streets of washington washington certainly is bracing for very large protests and huge crowds thousands of president. Trump's supporters arrive in dc to protest the two thousand twenty election results. This is bigger than trump. This is bigger than america. Where where to save the world from this already seen a lot of the president's supporters driving through the streets of washington and partly that's because the president is inviting them encouraging them to come in protest That's the exact opposite of course of the message that you're getting from the washington mayor urging everyone to stay home to not come out and take to the streets because as we've seen in the past few weeks and months this can lead to violet. We've got some clashes. Going on just ran behind the police line with a big flag. And there's a very real fear that these political protests may turn into that at some point today. The leader of proud boys was arrested in. Dc accused of burning a black lives matter banner taken from an historic black church. And you're seeing the street's closed around the white house. You're seeing kind of a fortress of building in downtown washington. We'll see just how much it turns out to be put. Donald trump is doing everything in his power to try to summon his supporters to the capital city in. It's easy to underestimate. Just how many voices on the far right are seem to be convinced that president trump still will be president on january twenty first day. Is the david sort of crucial to that. Theory of seeing it works a world in which the vice president's essentially decide who the next president is going to be Giancarl mary bruce breaking down how this is actually about to go down. Thanks so much guys thank you. Thanks brad all eyes will be on the streets of washington today overnight. The concern was on the streets of kenosha wisconsin. That is because yesterday prosecutors announced that the police officer who shot a black man in the back as he got into a car will face. No charges were gonna turn out of that breaking news overnight. A police officer shooting a black man multiple times. It was caught on camera. And it has sparked anger overnight after a night of protests and violence in kenosha. The community is waking up to this disruption. This is the case of jacob blake. Abc's alex perez was on the scene of demonstrations that turned violent back in august. He is back in kenosha this morning. Alex can you just walk me through the vision by prosecutors here yesterday well brad. The prosecutor spent a lot of time a two hour. Long press conference explaining. His decision was a tragedy. First and foremost for jacob blake who still suffers from grievous injuries. These are life lasting injuries that he suffers from today unusual in some parts because he also seemed to wanting to make some sort of connection with the community. But i wanna say that. I feel in many ways completely inadequate for this moment expressing how he as a white man may not know what. It's like to be a black person in america. I have never had a moment in my whole life where i had to fear for my safety with either police officers or individuals in authority. Spend a lot of the beginning of this press conference talking about that but then he got into the evidence. It is absolutely incontrovertible that jacob blake was armed with a knife during this encounter uncontroversial most uncontrovertible because jacob blake in all of the time he spoke to sky admits he possessed tonight even tells us different. He had the knife in different hands at different times. One of the key findings. According to the to the prosecutor was that he believes jacob blake had a knife in his hand and was resisting arrest. So many of us saw that disturbing video. Where you see officer resting chessy shoot. Jacob blake in the back seven times. It appears that blake. It's sort of walking away from him and there are other videos that captured that incident before the shooting. They tried to grab multiple officers. Tried to grab his arms and secure him so he can be cuffed. He admits at one point officers. Were trying to handcuff me. But i was able to get up while the prosecutor says. He reviewed all that video. Look at all the evidence and there simply wasn't enough there. He says for him to bring this case to bring charges forward against the officer and it is my decision. Now that i announced today before you know kenosha law enforcement officer in this case we'll be charged with any criminal offence based on the facts and the laws. As i will describe them to you now. This is a slap in the face. Of course this is not what the family wanted. They've been calling for charges From day one 'til moment that point where you stop in life and ask. Where were you when this happened. Where are you going to quit. Dell because this is going to this city state and the nascent forbidding years to come you know this is a big disappointment for them and their attorney well and so let's talk about the city of kenosha then because we're still getting a sense of the aftermath from the protests overnight but clearly as this announcement came demonstrators were gearing up for this exact scenario. Yeah and you know. Kenosha has been through a lot as as a city here. When this happened back in august you might remember. Things got very violent point. There were two people who were killed. The third who was wounded a businesses were damaged karate. I'm mad nobody. Don't go out on the poor old the bachelor. This is a smaller town not necessarily accustomed to seeing some of the things you see and in bigger cities so A lot of people who live here were impacted by what happened. And so they were essentially bracing for anything as his decision was announced There's five hundred. National guardsmen deployed To really stand by and be ready should anything occur officials. Here say you know. Protests and marches are okay as long as they remained peaceful and so. They're hoping that things stay that. Another reminder of just how fresh the wounds are here in kenosha that the teenager who was accused of killing two people and wounding a third during the protests. Back here in august i. He appeared in court just hours before the prosecutor's announcement. He pleaded not guilty to all of the charges against him. His attorneys say he was acting in self-defence again to such a city on edge alex perez. They're covering all. Thanks so much. Alex thank sprint and one last thing you know what we really haven't talked about all show the thing that is still wracking. The country ovid nineteen will remember how frustrated people had been at the vaccine rollout in hospitals. Now think of how flexing it'll be for people who don't even work in healthcare if that we are already seeing how challenging. It's been just to get people registered for their shot in the first place just of doom giving the vaccinations needs to be improved in florida governor rhonda santa said it is time to start getting seniors vaccinate. Everyone who's sixty five and older who wants a vaccine Were committed to delivering it. Will we have now. Seen ninety year olds waiting in lines for hours which doctors would say is not healthy so local officials thought no. Let's have people reserve a spot but counties had not created these systems ahead of time appointments filled up fast after issues with the website and phone lines phone systems. Were getting overwhelmed. Sometimes with two thousand calls per minute web portals were crashing so some counties turned your service that makes rations all the time event. Bright as in the concert going app will immediately. There's already an issue with telling an eight year old. Hey just sign up online. Many seniors don't have a computer let alone hit up event. Bright on the red with the department of health you know. I've told them. Put more people on these phones. You know we need to help out with the phones. Because if someone doesn't quite understand the internet i mean if you're eighty five you may not Be totally fluent with the internet. Which has led to a new problem. Some seniors are signing up for vaccines heading to a drive through site and finding an empty parking lot. That's right the tampa bay times found fake event bright listings which was charging people money to reserve a spot for a shot that didn't exist officials and pasco and pinellas counties are reiterating. Registration is free to not be paying any money to get your reservation but that is little consolation to residents who are finding real sites and are still finding it difficult to get through so frustrating. One new stab though at attacking this problem. The florida governor now says they're going to get help from publix supermarket chain in administering vaccine sites government not always so big on creating websites. That were all right. Well you keep refreshing. Abc news dot com for georgia. Election results leave us rating in the view on apple. Podcasts while you wait it really does help. New people find the show. I'm brad milkey see you tomorrow.

georgia joe biden senate washington perry bacon republican party jacob blake kelly leffler Donald trump congress Jon ossoff jon ossoff warnock Abc news joe mansion Mcconnell president trump mitch electoral college kenosha
Why We Started Cachi Life

Peru Travel Podcast

28:57 min | 2 years ago

Why We Started Cachi Life

"Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm your host day because loss alongside today. Kevin grow into day. We talking about why we started Kaci. News updates that. We're gonna talk about things that we've got going on outside of the normal business. Talk of Peru, kind of do some explanations. As to why we believe what we believe. And. Yeah, just kind of help educate message. We can. Yeah. Sounds good. So before we get started something that recently just happened. You recently just a blog post for new new proven dot com. So there's a guy on there by the name of Tony Donal. He's got a website. A lot of different things about Peru. Got some good guides on. Let's say, you know, you're going to to Lima lake Titicaca akitas. So he's got some guys on there. But he actually did a guest blog post on there about what's going on at rainbow mountain with, you know, the sustainability of the area, and whether it can be maintained with the monitor. That's that's coming into ramo mountain destroying the area. Right. Yeah. There's a lot of degradation erosion things like that that that's happening around rain bemoaned because of the the massive numbers of people. I mean, it's now the second most to replace in improve buying much chew. Yeah. It's pretty rough like his it's there we saw a lot of problems, and then we had one of our guides. We went out there. We ask them take some photos because we knew that there would be waves of people insurance there is and it's unfortunate because as stuff can happen as spots. Get more popular there's not a lot of control happening, right? There's not a lot of the. Garments narrowly always technically stepping in and make sure that these paths could taken care of. And it's really up to kind of like us type of people people who were these two companies people kind of bring out the the known of like, hey, this is this is going to be a problem soon. And we need to be able to kinda step up and figure out a game plan to maybe. I mean, my thoughts, obviously like shut down for a little while or at least like a week out of the year month out of the year just to be able to kind of clean, it up fix it up, and or just have constant maintaining. I mean, you could kind of do something similar what happens within Cottrell. I mean includes down in February year, just for maintenance to make sure it's maintained for people in the future to be able to enjoy it and see it, right? Yeah. That's the big thing. Right. It's all about long lasting and enjoying it for everybody. And that's kind of the big the big kick. I feel like a lot of people don't really think about is. Well, I just wanna go. See I take my Instagram photo. Yeah. Let's this great go do that. But we also think about the future of like the other people that want to take those cool sell fees. Yeah. No. Of course. Of course. I wanna take myself, but you might not be able to all right? And. Yeah, no seriously. It's I mean, it's rim balance beautiful place. But it's got to be maintained. And I suppose as long as you're on the topic of you know, some other websites that's out there. You know, we all like podcasts. And we all you know, obviously, this is approve is specifically a pro-trump with them. Yes. But all about travel here. You know, I've been listening to some podcast doing some research on the internet, and there's actually a website and podcasts I came around that came across pretty cool. It's called a global gas dot com. Started by this guy named Rick Gazarian. And basically what he's is. He's trying to travel all hundred ninety three countries, man. That's that's a feet right there. He's got quite a few down. He's currently at one hundred thirty out of one hundred thirty Peru. He has. Talked him. Sometimes. Yeah. Get him on the podcast a podcast. He has he has a podcast is podcast is called counting countries. Okay. And pretty cool. There's it's a pretty select group of people that have actually accomplish the feat about one hundred people or so, but he gets all the lot of those people on the podcast and talks about their adventures, and what they experienced, and you know, there's there's guys that one guy. His mission was a postcard from each country. And then another guy that trying to go to every country without actually taking a plane, you know, like by boaters. And so yeah. It's pretty cool. So that's what he does. He basically gets people on the podcast that have been all the countries or in the progress got it. Well in my in the process of six is running. Running. I feel like I'm moving. Six ten hourly. How many countries I've been to actually it's a handful? Okay. But still count them on my hands and feet. Sweet man. We'll obviously great article on new Peruvian and this podcast. Check it out. I'm actually interested to see how many people I wish we knew more that done that. So it's pretty incredible. Actually, he according to his his conscious little over hundred people. Wow, they're alive or. That we start getting. Yeah. Go sweet. Well in case, you guys in know, if you are listening podcast, we are a company called Kaci life and Kaci life is a prude travel company, and I'm gonna plug this right out the gate. We have a book coming out that is about Monchy chew, and it's all about much peachy. So a lot of a lot of companies that can do Peru as a whole we felt we couldn't do that in Justice. If you will we wanted to be able to provide you with a guides on each topic. So the tours that we offer and one of them is obviously much Jew. And when we took this feat on we knew going into it that it would potentially be quite difficult because there's a lot of questions I get asked. Right. And we've tried to impact or input all those questions into blog content on our website. But be able to condense that into a book and put some pro tips in there that you might not get on the blog and vice versa. And yeah, really excited about the book hopefully, coming out in the next couple of months, it takes a lot of time believe it or not and under. Zainur? So I we're gonna parts very difficult and then restructuring all the blog content to be a to be put new book is really hard. We're not. I mean, maybe someday we'll be we'll be author some sort. But so yeah, definitely be on the lookout for its book she'd compass everything it's gonna be free. That's the best part right there. So like free ninety nine you don't gotta pay dime. There's nothing for ninety nine does not mean ninety nine cents at means legitimately free super site about it makes you check it out a couple months here. I'm sure we'll blasted all over social media follows on Instagram or Facebook. It is up there. Check out the website get in touch with us Kaci life dot com. We've had some comments people asking us like what's gonna company I wanna book, and it's Kaci life C A C H I L. I F E dot com. Had to think about that in my head. I can't I can't spell or do math. Very well. Well, here we go guys. Let's see we talked about. We're talking today about why we started Kaci life, and why we? Why it's big deal to us. And I think the first there's a little bit back story that comes into play here. So one day I woke up, and I was like, you know, what I just wanna go somewhere that gives me this this idea of an adventure. And I don't think Peru is on that list. I think it kinda like came to fruition after talking with Kevin. And I was I was dating somebody at the time. And she was like, yeah, let's go to Ecuador, and let's go to this place. And then all of a sudden it was like Peru's got cheap lights when we go to Peru. And then have we wanna Kevin come with us? And and like, so basically she would be the third wheel because you know, there's a bromance going on between. So we end up going, and we're going go to prove in candidates said he's like the Inca trail is like one of the most well-known trails in the world. I never heard of it. Hell, I didn't even know. I don't think when Macci peachy was. I mean like it was brought to me by Kayla the time anyway. So we ended up going to Peru, booking the Inca trail and. As we're on the hike of the Cottrell with another company, which will remain nameless. We ended up meeting David, and he is our main guide. He's he's our manager. If you will he's the guy with the with the plan of what when you get through. He's sort of handles everything the best part about David is that his his empathy his ability to care so much for the locals so much to care for his own people the history, the Niger everything I mean, this guy, and he's just a he's just a genuine person that wants to make sure your experience amazing when we caught that we saw that. He was that way. We italy. Just connected. We vibe there was a conversation. That was had. It was like, hey, this is a really great guy. We want to be friends with him. We want to get to know him. And I'm pretty blunt person if you can believe it or not we were talking earlier today about this Kevin pulls the reins on me, like a horse sometimes kinda like Giles back quite a bit for me, which is good. But in this situation. You know, I sort of adding up the numbers of like of like how much we all paid. And I'm thinking man, hopefully, David's like do really well financially, and we asked him not so much like Indra like directly like how much do you make? But it was kinda like conversation, basically proceeded to that through through dialogue, and he ended up telling us, and we're just like baffled and really honestly sad for him. Because here's this guy who's got two daughters. He's got a wife. He lives in a home. That has definitely below standard of living where we live and. Honestly, a lot of people in Lima to really I mean, his his living conditions weren't that. Great. And here's this great guy speaks English. And it wasn't that. We we looked to like fix or change. Dave is Dave is a very happy happy, man. It was more like men not only is he kinda getting paid poorly. But then all of a sudden the porters are getting paid poorly and they're getting treated not so much the best. And so we did is we set out to basically try to fix that. And it was it was started with that. And then my vision had sort of develop into like helping communities and things like that's where my heart really originally lied. Kevin kept me true in on on a narrow path of like, we need to make sure that we take care of David I first and foremost goal. And so when we started Kaci live, we basically bridge the gap if you will between like, hey, you're working with us to be able to help them, and so David sort of formulated like an idea of what he dreamed or what he dreamt up. He had tried to sort of business before and kept failing because other businesses were shutting him out because he didn't oughta do marketing. And and these these companies I mean, they're they're from Canada from the US similar to us. Yeah. There's similar to us. And there's nothing wrong with that. I think there's big bad taste mouth about. I need a book local. Well, here's my challenge. The whole book local concept is that if you're if you're booking through us, you're still booking locally. And I know that's weird here. But hear me out. If I go down to Peru, and I'm able to book a trip to Monchy chew, you really don't know what you're getting. So at least Aren it's regulated or somebody who cares, and I can't stress that enough because the the idea here was that David wanted to be able to have something that was sustainable offer a product that was beautiful and great and continue being offered continuously time and time again, David doesn't wanna go on hikes. Right. Like he wants to be. He's getting older he's got two daughters. He wants to be at home with his wife. He wants to be at home with hikes are kind of like the younger people, aka his brother, Frank. So I mean when we think about that though, the goal here was to be able to offer him something that was a little bit longer of stability in a little bit paid better than proper pay is what they call it. Right. And a lot of the a lot of the competition when you go down there. It's like if I'm if I'm at a stand in a farmer's market, and I'm selling apples and Kevin is next to me selling apples as well. And there's an ability to purchase online. I wanna buy locally directly from the farmer. Great. So you go Kevin's got the same apple Zayed you and you come to mean, you're like I tell you my apple is ten dollars. That's what I'm simplifying. And I'm not preaching here. Promise you guys. This is gonna make sense. But I basically say it's ten bucks Kevin say it's five and meanwhile, he's diminishing his product because he needs to make money he needs to be able to support his family. And so we're in this battle all of a sudden more than I combat back and forth. And we bartered bordering may seem like it's this great adventure. And it's this idea that like, hey, I'm gonna find the cheapest bang for my buck now. Are not going to get the quality that you spec to get on top of that. You're also taking advantage of somebody in the local economy that really interior could be taking better. And and that's the problem that I have I guess is is the yes, you can go down there, and you can book these trips by yourself. That's totally. That's the game. You wanna do? Go ahead and do it. And I'm not going to judge you for it. Not like my judgment, Amy matters. But like you can go do that at the end of the day, though, the comes a point in terms of responsibility. And that's why we started Kaci because we wanted to be responsible for making sure that people like David we're taking care of we've had Lindsey Carver on the show, she she was on one of our trips, and she had said that you try to tip our guide, and they refused the tip which is like no don't do that still take the Ted, you know, like instill try to are still tip. But the idea that that she's being paid well enough now where she's not frightened for money. You know, she's not freaking out about where x paychecks want the tip because she's like paid so well good, and that's great. And they still like they're still so much growth opportunities. So. We go ahead with you have something. Yeah. So like, basically what David subscribing is? You know, if you think about the coffee industry for a long time, it was free trade coffee. But then, you know, Fairtrade started get more popular. And that's what you know. Because people wanted to be paid. Well, the the workers in the area. There's a lot of work that goes into a Cup of coffee. That's what we're trying to do. Just make sure that you know, basically free or semi fair fair trade tourism, making sure the the sees the porters guides. Everyone is being paid fairly on top of that. You know, when when David said that we're you know, you're going to be supporting the local Konomi there. I mean, we're we're not outsourcing anything from from for example. All of our gear if you when you're going on that trail with us, it's it's bought straight from overly. Ru there's no there's this concept to that. We have that is very much like even we give back and we'll get into that in a minute. It's always purchase locally. It's all there's never. I think we sent a jacket one time to David. That's the only thing we sent one jacket, and I think it was a hat, and that's about it. And the only reason we did is to make sure that the writing in the low going embedded was was done proper embroidery excuse me was, but as time has gone on we've found out that we do at their job. Exactly so point being is that like we're trying to do it the right way. We're still learning as we go still progressing in a lot of that comes from our travelers being able to tell us about their experience, and what they've got going on what they see. So David obviously was initial part of why we started at David and his family. Then we grew love his family, his wife and his kids and it became this bigger bigger mission. So the first time we went there. We came up the plan. We're starting this business. We're in started with David we're going to partner with him. He's gonna start a company and Cousteau. We're gonna start a company here, and we're gonna partner together. Great. All right. So second part comes into play. My vision was to be able to originally help communities that didn't benefit from tourism. Because one of Sierra Leone got to have a great experience. And it was like how can we find a way to impact communities, and then there's a second part to that that is about sustainable tourism. And we talked about ramo mountain and keeping places clean keeping them long-lasting for the next generation and really how that's our responsibility. Again, everything we're talking. Not really drills down to us to try to be responsible. Right. It's taking care of people. It's making sure that they are getting the pay that they need to get. It's making sure that we're keeping places clean packing impact out mentality. And it's also making sure that there's other places that are blessed fortunate can get the benefits in the income from that entity right out of our business. So yes, we're for profit, but we very much operate as a nonprofit. And here's my here's how I can say that. Over christmas. Actually will ris Ryan action explains when I was going to prove the second time. I ended up telling David said, hey, I need you to do me a favor. I need you to go into a village. And I need you to tell them that we're going to buy them a goat. And he was like what it was like find a community. That's less fortunate. Embalm ago. He's was the weirdest thing ever. And I was like just trust me on this. Like, I promise you. I want them to my offer is that we're in by them. Go buy them pro team. And they're gonna cook a meal for us today. All right, fine. He finds its community Ryan community. And he's like thinks I'm crazy as all get out. We get there and not only just like a an amazing hike. That's so beautiful in is a height that people do take. We didn't see anyone. But I mean, still we know it's a it's a hike that can be taken get up there. They cooked meal for almost killed a sheep in front of me, which about made me cry. It wasn't a go. Actually, they actually got lamb. I was like they tied it up. And I was like no don't do. It. Don't kill it. I don't wanna see this happen. But yeah. So I mean, we ended up. Going through we met with the locals v. Dell was our guy donkey v del had said to us. I can't believe that they made it up there in cash while he didn't speak any English about pretty couple. I think that we're gonna show. Didn't he thought that like he was like, yeah. Of course, they wanna give back Warnaco, but they're not gonna make the hike up. And I was like now we're making hike like we're going to get up there. And so we hike up this beautiful hypes video on Facebook. And check it out. It's right community. You kind of see some of the shots at the hiking. Amazing. It is. We get up there. And we get to eat a lunch with the locals which minds you if you ever do the right community where we bring an alternate launch. Because it is very very very raw very raw experience, and it's not necessarily for everybody. There's sometimes there could be things in your food. You know, obviously, they don't have water that's running to clean a lot of their vegetables. So just keep this in mind, brains, Pepco, tablets and kill anything that goes in your stomach right away. So we get up there. We get to meet the locals we get to see their children, and we get to see how they're interacting in a living. And they're like confuses all get out. Like, why are these guys here? Why are they wanna eat her food? What are they doing right now? And we tell them that. Hey, you know, we're not in the business of telling you what you need in the business of like asking, you what you believe you need and seeing if we can help and the conversation ended up developing David we ended up bringing school supplies up there for the kids originally. And so there was about forty kids ended up getting school supplies and lo and behold, all of a sudden, the next conversation was well, we really would love the Christmas gifts and. And that was something was torn with for a long time lake didn't really like help. But at the same time it definitely boosts morale and keeps people happy keeps kids happy. And so we did is we kind of went fifty fifty right? Like, we really we're going to give them Christmas gifts here in two thousand eighteen and then we're also more school supplies, and we're gonna bring clothes, and so this this Latin this time the fact that it was actually four kids like fifteen to twenty the first the first time. Now. So they then we have this video on Facebook. Check it out. It's beautiful. It is. So well done our friends Toronto. I mean, he killed it from Lima for us and Daniela, obviously came enjoying. But so we we had them come out and film and their spirits what they told us. It was just incredible these kids it's like it's so romantically beautiful because like you watch the video and you're like, wow. Like, we're doing it. We're making a difference. He's kids got close over seventy children showed up and that wasn't everybody. Because again, they still didn't believe we're gonna make it. Now, we have donkeys we've got Cianci's coming with us. We've got like all these these are excuse me, these these balls these these ball dolls like Barbie's, all these toys trucks, cetera t shirt school supplies. You name. It we got it on. It's all coming up on pack meal. Right. Yeah. I mean, when we the first time we went up there as David saying, they didn't they didn't think we're gonna show up. The second time that they would believe right. And like, I remember them saying that usually what happens is they just dropped the Christmas Casaus rather like drop by the base of the hike. Everybody kind of fend for themselves and go down there and grab them which is not gonna that's not her style. So we're guessing their community. We want to be able to be totally. Yeah. So point being is is that they were able to film this amazing video again, please just watch it because it is. It's so heartwarming to know that you're you're making a difference in your able to anyone that's traveled with us. They still listen to podcast in or if you're thinking about traveling with us or you have you know, you are on your way to this is where your money's going truthful hands down like there's not like this is where it's going. It's going back to help people. It's going to again, I can't stress that enough. How important that is to our foundation. That's one of our pillars of our company. And we're pushing it help people help grow communities help educate. I mean, the future were were opened up a lot of different things hopefully for female guides. And just I remember when we were leaving when we were leaving Ryan commu that first time just coming down and just being super Taj. And and until then. Like, it was just we were just running a company. I remember looking at David insane. I don't wanna let these guys down real. Like, let's let's make this thing work. So we can we can do something for these people. It's incredible. It's an incredible feeling. And I think that when you if you ever do travel with us, and you're able to do the Ryan community, obviously, I highly recommend it because to gateway drug because you're basically we're doing we're gonna try to get a trip here. That's basically voluntarism, but this is the gateway drug into you being able to see how you can make such an impact it's not necessarily about giving money as much as it is interacting with these people. And so you're able to go to Ryan community, and you're able to see these kids we have photos of Lindsay braiding someone's hair a little girl's hair like it is impactful. I mean is and these little girls had never like they don't get to hang out with with you know, tourists and travelers like it's not. Really thing. And so you're able to bridge that gap all of a sudden and see something that's real people to connect with the community that you otherwise could never ever dreamed to connect with now granny you don't speak their language 'cause you won't even speak Spanish, they don't speak Spanish speaker schwa-, but you have the ability to be a part of something that you realize men like I'll make an impact. A touch touch the lives. The reason I say that as you know, we met some girls that were like sixth grade, and she's like, I want to be too good and instantly. It opens up an idea or concept of being able to internships and allow them to learn better English with David guides, and there's a lot that can be developed from this and every time that you're booking through a company. That's like Kaci that is really trying to set up these good morals, not going to say, we're the only ones out there that do this. But the second able to open up that dialog of hey, how can we make life better? That's when things get real things get really, emotional and really beautiful. And that's I'm talking about my feelings of it's all its feelings. Too much. I gotta tone it down. But I mean, it becomes a beautiful beautiful experience. And I really hope that everyone listening does to experience that. And if you haven't do it somewhere else, it's amazing. I'm gonna I'm gonna digress here and move onto the next part? But the other the other thing that I want to touch on besides like helping these local communities, I don't benefit from tourism in and outside of. Helping David and his family and making sure that our guides and reporters toss keys, if you will are paid properly are cooks, etc. Which men that part makes me happy to just wanna touch. Our cooks like we've gone review gotten reviews. People will have had the best meal in Peru. Lima's one of the coronary capitals of the world their best meal has been with us from our our cooks like that is so crazy. So you got three of the top fifty. Yes. In the world. Yeah. That's craziness meal is on the trail. It's nuts. And then let's let's go in and take a cab of that too. Like, so we talk about like what we're providing right, obviously, it's amazing food boom. But this idea of like, we started also not to help people, but David was so fire wanting to generate the best experience ever, he knew everyone he had in network. He wanted to build it. And it's like we wanna step above what you typically. So you're paying what you pay for right? And at times, it may seem like we didn't even touch on this Inca trail cost one. But that should be released or. Soon to be released. But the point is that we give you like a Papa toilet. We give you like peace. Go sours before we give you hot cocoa in the morning. You get a thermal rest for free. You can get a sleeping bag for us. You get like this private experience. This ability to be able to get connected with people that are outside of your normal scope, it's just it makes me frustrated that this is an offer by everybody at the price that it is. But it is what it is. And yeah. In the future things are gonna change. Anyway, as we got some really big news coming out soon, but you're going to be even more flattered as to what we're what we're able to offer. But I I'll keep going here. So outside of that, the next thing is sustainable tourism, which we kind of touched on that a little bit with the proper pay. But it's really it comes down to like making sure that places stay clean, stay functional and respecting the environment that we go to David every time. He takes a drink of anything water Coca-Cola Inca Kola was he do put out for Putnam. That's right. Yeah. He loves the earth. He loves where he is. He loves you wanted to last forever. And I think that's what makes David really the key ingredient here as to what we're doing. Because it all of a sudden we as backpackers have always add and Kevin way, more backer than I am have always had as mentality that you pack, it out you, Pat me pack, it in pack, it out don't leave no trace left behind right. David wants that as well for his community, which that's a beautiful thing. Because believe it or not. There are a lot of places in Koos go outside of the the main square where there's a lot of trash everywhere. And you got to think about a lot of developing countries. There's not a lot of places to put trash and I'm making flak for saying that, but it's true. You I've been to Sierra Leone garbage everywhere in the reason there's garbage arose because there's not garbage. And I mean, I've seen pictures of you know. I've seen some pictures of cell KC trick or this garbage on the side. And whenever I see stuff like that. I mean consistently when I'm talking to David. I'm always asking him too. Big too. Big questions for one are being treated, right? Are they you know, is is everything okay there because we want to treat them really well to make sure we're not trashing places. It's right. Make sure every all the garbage is going up because you want to maintain these places. Exactly now, it's very very valid point. And then and with that comes the responsibility that the more that we get cloud, the more that we get developed into the proving culture and get more established than we also have this responsibility being able to communicate and step up to say, hey, we got a shutdown Remo mountain for at least a week or we go, do volunteer work to clean it up to make better. I don't care if we got build better trails at whatever we need to do we need to find time to do that. And that takes capital that takes volunteers that takes the local Peruvian workers that we can pay to be able to help us to do it to give them a job for the week or two. To me. That's the most important and that is the goal and the big picture scope of like, how can we find a way to make these places work for because not everyone's always gonna jump on board. Hey, we gotta fix us up. That's going to relate. Sometimes we don't have government who's very slow. Well, since we're a tight small business able to get our feet wet right away a note, we're making a change right now. So yeah, I think that kind of sums up really the whole reason why we started Kaci codgy life. And it's exciting stuff. It's an exciting time for us. We've been doing really really good things. We're gonna continue to keep pushing those really good things. We've got a trip coming up here if you're interested. We don't have a said day, we're assuming an August potentially to be able to do a voluntarism trail. We're gonna go to Ryan community spent a couple of days there. There's actually it's it's it's a community outside of right communion little bit further down the road. And the idea is to help picks up a school. We're gonna be able to replace on their toilets that are kind of busted paint the rooms possibly going to spend the night over there in the community and then wake up and keep working and then head out the next day. So it's only today's community, then we're also gonna take you out to do some fun stuff. Like, obviously Dumont you nature so much issue. Yeah. Absolutely. Well, they they see so much for listening. We appreciate it. Again. I'm David because Las he woman Kevin grow the bearded genius. And we hope to hear from you guys soon and see you on the website, his muscles for media, etc. Travels. Take.

David Peru Kevin way Kaci Facebook Cottrell ramo mountain Lima rainbow mountain Monchy chew Ryan community Lima lake Titicaca Tony Donal Kaci life Sierra Leone Ecuador Kaci codgy Rick Gazarian
Black Friday

Dateline NBC

43:41 min | 1 year ago

Black Friday

"Ashley was a wild and Funny Texan who everyone seemed to love caring loving compassionate. So so why did she have this strange premonition as he always felt like she was GonNa die in the call came on Black Friday. She said Ashley's apartments on fire. When win the corner pulled up Muhart broke and this fire was no accident that had conducted surveillance at his apartment? They're going back to the place. Were Ashley worked as they were going after tens of thousands of dollars was money. The only motive or was there something else. There are a lot of rumors going around. That ended up. Being true. Couldn't believe that somebody could do that to her. Just pure evil. I'm Lester Holt and this is dateline. Here's Keith Morrison and with Black Friday a hot August night in Texas two thousand fourteen. The alone figure knew where to go new where the store kept. The cash grabbed eighteen thousand dollars and was gone but it was only money. No one got hurt not that time anyway. The story begins here in Fort Worth Texas which turned out to be the perfect growing up place for a rough and tumble free. Spirit named Ashley Harris. I was around ten when she was born and so perfect age to pretend she was my baby. Melissa Hill is actually as eldest sister. She marched to abate of a different drum. She would wear just things that did not match her hair was just didn't seem combed princess. I know there were three three girls in the family. Ashley was the baby. Their mom Monica remembers. How actually loved sports and Music and art and Bingo? nope are mom and daughter bonding kind. And she'd just get on getting excited by the time she got to high school. Ashley had lots of friends even the boyfriend and she was devoted to her two dads her father. Tommy and her stepfather chuck both retired police officers. Didn't you talk at one one point about getting into actually your line of work. She was interested in policing I think that she took naked understand but after after high school. She ended up working for a short time at blockbuster video. And that's where she met a customer named Laura Love and and I walked around the store for a little bit and just what cannot arcus you so beautiful Laura wanted to meet a girl behind the counter. They became friends friends. And then something more. We hung out for a few months for like eight months before it ever really got there there by that. She means she and actually fell in love. It was a lot of growing up. She had to work through her feelings. Being gay isn't necessarily an easy thing. It definitely wasn't easy. Fourteen fifteen years ago. Oh No it wasn't coming out period during which she sort of I believe is two thousand four. She come over to the House and she goes Mama got something to tell you and check. I just want you to know that I was gay and I said well Ashley I already Eh but you need to give me some space. I need some time so Monica took some time prayed about it came to this conclusion fusion. I can imagine I'd given this child and living with her embracing her that he would want custodian. We'll have hang her would make any sense at all yet for a long while. Monica wasn't comfortable with these new relationship. Though the Laura Ashley Good together she was just always very giving and very what else can I do for you to make you happy. The romance lasted more than three years. Then it was over but they remained friends. Laura remembers how Happy Ashley was when she started working. Yeah the Merican Eagle outfitters at the Ulan Mall in Fort Worth Nasty loved it. She was an assistant manager. And good at it sitter boss Chris Gravy just personality caring loving compassionate. She just loved life and she loved taking videos of her life. Lots of them at work. I'm extremely tired. And this right here is not even helping with my eyes. It's it's horrible. She had this laugh. It was so infectious than she. All like that however employees. Lindsey Green said another assistant manager. Carter Carter was very different from Ashley. S- Tummy out to love myself to appoint Carter just taught me a work. Related things jokester poster right but Ashley Polar opposite and popular. This is what it looks like. I'm so hood. So so work was going her love life too much and then one night Ashleigh went out with friends and April moffitt was there and I was there waitress and she was having a bad line and track coach trying to pull her out of her shell. She wasn in having it so I just fine. April gave up on her grumpy customer until months later they connected on social media media. They met for a dog. Walk Ashley brought her dog. Nala April brought cooper and everyone clicked. What was it like when you I started going out with her? See has a magnetic force to her like. It's hard to not insanely thinly. Love her so by the summer of two thousand fourteen life was good for Ashley Social Life. Her job does. She did hit a bump of sorts in August when someone stole eighteen grand from the store. Safe and was Ashley who realized the theft occurred and reported ported to you correct. She even helped ide- suspects with her interest in police work. Ashley thought she might have a calling here. She wanted to go onto loss prevention and a work for our Home Office at American Eagle. She was thirty one. She had all kinds of plans but on the morning after Thanksgiving Black Friday the biggest shopping day of the year. Chris Cravey's phone rang at home. It was our other assistant manager saying Chris Ashes apartments on fire and we can't get her on the phone for close on as fast. I could get started driving a fort worth and you followed the smoke trail and the sirens coming up. No one would have guessed where that trail would eventually lead. We were asking if we could talk to Ashley or where she was at that. You said that she's unavailable right now and Ashley's friends weren't the only ones with questions. The police shuffling us into the office. It was the morning after Thanksgiving Black Friday. Laura love had only one thing on her mind. Black Friday was my favorite day of the year. I love to shop and save money but Laura rose black. Friday was about to turn very dark. Indeed I got a call from best friend of ours. She said Ashley's apartments on fire. Ashley's friends ends arrived at her apartment. Parking lot something like chaos. There is multiple police cars. Crime scene was there for was detective Jerry Studio and his partner partner Ernie sped over there to Ariza a Crowd that was starting to gather Next thing you know we have about forty to fifty friends and family and Co workers And then we had residents that were just you know looking from balconies so we had quite a crowd out here and now firefighters had squelched the flames and the detectives walked up the steps APPs to Ashley's door when you went into that apartment. What was that like? It was It was very disturbing. A woman's lifeless body was lying face down on the bedroom room floor. We waited until she was turned over. We gotta go look at her face and she was also identified by some of the tattoos and then they knew the victim Edward Name tattooed on her ribcage. Ashley Harris outside Ashley's friends were totally in the dark and we were asking If we could talk to Ashley or work she was that they just said that she's unavailable right now. Ashley's boss. Chris craving just arrived in trying to get some answers. I for a couple of hours. We just assume that she was being taken care of while they waited for information investigators. There's were realizing this was no accident. It was obvious that she had been beaten to the amount of blood that we found. And then we observe that her arms were bound behind her back and and her ankles were bound it looks. The detectives like actually had been fighting back against a truly vicious attack. She had been beaten and possibly tortured. We later discovered that her naked man slipped only that the fire looked suspicious so veteran arson investigator Wallace Hood. Good was called to the scene now knows there was fire damage on the bed and I also noticed that there was some fire damage to the victim now saw so newton abbado of alcohol Phi Gamma generally on the victims so like somebody set fire to her. There was some good luck. There was some burn marks on her. What did you also lead determine about the fire and how those silver points from origin and that's an indicator of intensity? Sit If our true so somebody took that rubbing alcohol ported here Puerto for their here Sir Chris gravy standing in the crowd outside watched his worst fears ears. Roll up in front of Ashby's part. I think hit me like a sack of bricks once I saw them. Start Taping it off for a crime scene and and when the corner pulled up Muhart Bro I lost and then the detectives looking very stern came came outside. Who asked some pointed questions it someone knows something see something at that point they start the police shuffling us into the office and they tell us I said even if we try to leave we could be arrested? Miller told you something very bad happened in there. Yeah one person not in the crowd. That morning was Ashley's girlfriend April muffin about one PM. April got a text from one of Ashley's neighbors. Hey have you checked on your girl. There was a fire in heart. -partment it's really. I thought Nala Ashby's dog April assumed Ashley wasn't at home. It's like holy crap. got a message from another friend saying simply call me and they called her and I said where is like where is harshly. Where's it all? And she's like all his fine. We'll whereas Ashley choose like Pashas Gone and didn't register go what do you mean gone. Then I said DOC will is actually okay no role. She's dead and I was sitting through my phone on the ground. Like that's not real reality settled in in April all of Ashley's family and friends and even the police had to wonder who would do such a thing to such a good sweet person Ashley. Harris had no enemies. Did she coming up for you out here on the cigarette. What did you see saw vehicle perk there that I'd I've never seen before but someone had seen it before a said I know who's car are asking about when dateline continues? True crime is my passion. If you're listening to the show I'm guessing you can relate but sometimes even I need the occasional break and I'm looking for a mental pallet cleanser my go-to refresher is best fiends. Best fiends is a five star rated mobile puzzle game and it only took me a couple of minutes of playing to figure out where all those five star ratings are coming from. It's fun it's challenging the gameplay changes every once in awhile I'm already level thirty five and it has stayed exciting the entire time I've been playing. You could play offline too. So best beans means is great for travel on a plane train wherever you find yourself. All of my upcoming holiday travel is definitely going to be a lot more manageable knowing. Have this superfund game in my pocket to pass the the time. Engage your brain with fun puzzles and collect tons of cute characters with best beans. Trust me with over one hundred million downloads. This five-star rated mobile puzzle. The game is a must play download best fiends for free on the apple APP store or Google play. That's friends without the our best means. Mother and stepfather were Out of town when the news began arriving in awful jagged bits first they heard about the fire. A Monica prayed actually wasn't hurt and she's father. Tommy Harris called and saw chat get off the phone and sign tears and I knew my prayer Wesson answered jock. Couldn't reach Ashley sister so we left a message sewage and not two minutes later my husband called me and he said why are you need to come to you and I said what is wrong with my mom. What happened to my mom needs? It's much some. It's actually I mean it. Just like a blow back and forth worth beliefs were still rounding up. People gathered outside Ashtrays apartment. Non Among them was April. April impact hadn't seen nasty for a few days their their romance. It hit a bit of a bump that night. We talked briefly about me coming over. After I got off work I went home but someone else was. Their name was Alexis. Torres Alexis Torres was the last person to see actually alive and was the actual last person to leave her apartment. The this certainly somebody would wanNA talk to. Obviously yes Sir Alexis said she. She and Ashley had gone to an early Thanksgiving dinner with friends in Ashley's complex so you had Thanksgiving dinner and that was from twelve ger and then hung around for the afternoon. Yes but actually had to work that night well actually schiff wasn't me from seven PM until three. AM and Alexis agreed to come over during the time that she was working to take care of Ashi dog then Alexis told the police on later us that she went back one more time after actually got at home for work. How long did you stay? I stayed for an hour that would make four. Am if Alexis was telling the truth. The police said the beginnings of time line but before they could check her story or anyone else's for that matter a neighbor gave them more to work with an ex COP named Steve Lee at noticed something about six thirty that morning here on deck having a cigarette. What'd you see saw a vehicle park there that I'd never seen before? What was that it? It was a black guy holder infinity to them back over to the observance ex cop that seemed worth noting. Did a stay there for a long time. It was there when I left for work about Seven forty detectives also talked to a neighbor. Live directly below Ashley. He had heard noises a heavy breathing coming from. She's apartment just before eight. Am few minutes later. The fire alarm going off Water started coming down and says there's apartment that's when the neighbor saw a black Infiniti g thirty five driving away armed with this new information deal. I went back to Alexis Torres. I asked her if she knew anyone or fascinating. You anyone that drove a Infiniti g thirty five. I never gave her a color simply asked her about g thirty I five Alexis said No. After he's done asking me questions I walked outside and sat down on the brick and it was Chris that was there that would be Chris Crazy. Ashley's boss at American Eagle. Alexis told him that police were asking about Infiniti sedan and Chris made a beeline for detective studio. I approached him and I said I know who's car Yar asking about. And and he says I just WanNa make you aware that I have a former employee that drive a INFINITI G thirty five. Her name he said was Carter. Peter Carter Cervantes that business like assistant manager. Who worked with Ashley and so then I ask them what color is the? GM thirty five that she drove and he mentioned that it's a black one. What was that like to hear that? Well that beats here in the colored red or white and by the way Chris told detectives Carter Carter left American Eagle because she was fired so. Do filed that away and sorted through the crime scene and talked to witnesses and the day that began at eight thirty that morning didn't end until one am. Did you get any sleep. No Sir. I didn't the story about Carter. Savant is under black. Infinity was just bugging him. Well I'm thinking about the case and I'm thinking word I go from here might have tossed and turned all night thinking about that but something thing inside him said Nope. I'M NOT GONNA be able to get any sleep on us. We'll go back out there and see what I can find. Wouldn't be as I wild. Goose Chase he had Carter's arturs address so we are Saturday morning. He drove over there and I saw a black infinity back Dan right in front of an apartment but he didn't knock on her door. I was going to go ahead and basically sit here and watch the vehicle to see if it moved for more than four hours. He sat in his car are cold but patient and then about eight. Am Saturday you saw the lights of the infinity flash as if somebody was unlocking remotely I see the male enter the driver seat vehicle. I then see a female enter the passenger side of the black infinity. They drove off. The detective followed all owed and after a few minutes the infinity bold into of all places the human mall so there they are. They're going back to the place. Where Ashley really worked? Where the American Eagle was? Yes but what would they be doing all that was that was the million dollar question coming up I ask him. What are you doing here at the mall? He said that he had dropped his girlfriend off to pick up some papers a routine errand or something else he didn't. NCAA lesser did anybody see her lesser And on the Saturday morning after Black Friday two thousand fourteen homicide detective Jerry Sedillo followed a black infinity into the parking lot of the law. He watched as the passenger a woman dressed in dark disclose headed inside. She fit the description he'd be given a twenty five year. Old Carter Cervantes a former coworker of actually Harris. The male driver driver stayed in the car so deal called his partner. Earning fate asked him to check up on the guy and when I approached the car then the person identified themselves self as David Mallory. David Mallory was Carter's live in boyfriend you to was a former employee of American Eagle. I asked him what he doing here at the mall. He said he had dropped his girlfriend off to pick up some papers on Air Apostol where she was at manager so perhaps it was just APP APP. David giving Carter a ride to pick up some paperwork at her new job aeropostale so decided to go inside. The mall was open but the stores were still closed. And I happen to go up to pasta and there is a A manager that's actually in there. Working and I was able to confirm that Carter Cervantes do not work for hammocks. He hasn't even novitiate as well. So much of that story. Yes sir. Scipio turned his attention to finding. Carter's Avantis no luck. You didn't see her at all and lesser. Did anybody see her lesser so so deal had a disgruntled employee coming back to the mall where she'd been fired hired. Her boyfriend was telling lies about a job. She didn't have an a car. Looked bikers had been spotted at the scene of a murder to take pates still. I've had David Mallory out in the parking lot. And he's looking for a reason to hold him decided he had a driver's license but he didn't have his driver's lessons with him. Reason enough us. He arrested Mallory and brought them in for questioning. But Carter seem to have vanished wasn't anywhere in the mall but then police went to her apartment complex at their she was now where was she in the apartment complex. Well she initially was in the In the laundry room. 'cause you please. She agreed to answer questions without a lawyer down at the station. Eagle by Carter or Carol Patter Kamau. She'd switched her dark closed for bright. Pink scrubs Do Nothing for work. I had a job opportunity. American Eagle outfitters. Oh Yes Carter's American Eagle connection detectives to do already heard a thing or two about that. Carter had worked at the Fort Worth store for about four months and it was business. Like but unlike Ashley. She wasn't a very friendly assistant manager. She did however make an impression on some younger clerks. Like Weiser Sean Toll. Carter is very smart very deep. She was good at reading people and knowing how to converse with thank you tell that she was well. Educated just had a lot more to her than most sales retail managers. Do but detective. So you knew something else about Carter and David Mallory. Something very important. Remember that burglary at American Eagle three months earlier Carter and David Mallory were the primary suspects and Ashley. Harris was the one who discovered the money missing and when actually came into open opened the store she found the safe open actually knew it was Carter who closed the night before and when she showed her boss the security video view of the burglary. She he pointed out the Monitor and she said that's David Mallory. I said WHO's David Mallory and they said it's Carter's boyfriend amass was easy actually figured Carter Ryder set up the burglary and David carried it out. Carter got fired. David sort of disappeared and both heard that it was Ashley who identified mm-hmm They hadn't been charged not yet but the case was basically actively being investigated when this happened and now three months later. Here Chris Carter talking to the police who were growing suspicious that she and her boyfriend were connected to Ashley's murder. Why am I here? Well which do you started off easy and see so we raise Morello or from Lubbock. Your family's still there. Mom Dad Brothers Sisters Brothers by deputy sisters and they all have you seen your mom and dad and awhile now. I've talked to him every day on text message and snapchat but I haven't been home more friendly family questions. And where did you go to school. Hoekstra Phenom University so. Do asked about Thanksgiving small. Would you make and I made Turkey A and they're stuffing mashed potatoes and green bean casserole and this cabbage bacon salad that my mom really likes to make but I don't think David liked it very much. This wasn't really small. Talking detective was paying close attention. All right so let's start with this morning all right this morning. What time do you get up about? Seven thirty cutting. I'm in what happens in and then we talked and I went back to sleep when I woke up. He wasn't there okay. Eat hurt enough. I know that's a lie. You know it's not what I know. It's a lie why because I saw so you come out of your apartment and get in the passengers fuel. That car and I saw him drive out of there. That's why I know it's a lie. A deal was tough. Your Car Carter. Savant wasn't giving an inch coming up. If Carter's lies weren't reason enough for suspicion suspicion. This was she starts wiping down the bottle. She was afraid that we're going to attain her DNA. And what was this all about. And who was it for. There's an actual human grave that's been Doug Christie fresh grave when dateline continues. Hey It's Chris assays sometimes it's good to just take a step back from the day-to-day onslaught of news and take a broader. Look at the issues. That's what I'm doing each week on my podcast. Why is this happening happening? We're exploring topics ranging from school segregation to climate change. Well the way that I think of it is climate change will be the twenty th century. What maternity west of the nineteenth century? It'll be the central subject of questions about economic justice. Everything you care about in the world will be affected by climate and digging deep with guests uniquely qualified to analyze issues from mass incarceration listen to race relations as you know for the first time in our history at the national level whites are on the verge of losing their majority status in twenty years. And I think it's no coincidence that our politics are getting more trouble. Join me for wisest happening. New episodes every Tuesday. Wherever you get your podcasts and it was late Saturday morning the day after Black Friday? Twenty thirty five year old Carter Savant was talking to detectives at lying through her teeth. I know what I did this morning. I know where I was. I know where Wing detectives certainly knew where she went. The he will in law but she kept insisting she'd been at home all morning here about to make the biggest mistake of your life. You understand me. But she's still wouldn't confess to US wouldn't budge. I got up. I went and put the laundry in and I went and checked the email. That's all you found me on the line. Then from the detective stepped out of the room. She did something interesting maybe incriminating. It took a drink puts the bottle down. She picks it up again before she can take the second drink she stops mid air. Spills watering herself puts the bottle down and just stares at had it for about ten to fifteen seconds she then reaches over and grabs a tissue from the table and starts wiping down the bottle. And then wipes down the mouthpiece. What does that say to you well that she was afraid that we were going to attain her DNA from the bottle after that police? Let her go David Mallory too but detectives had a theory cooking. The Carter and David Killed Ashley out of revenge for being fired for the burglary. But they also wanted Ashley's she's keys to the American Eagle because they were planning to rob the store again. Those keys were the only thing missing from the murder scene and went store manager. Chris Chris gravy looked at his surveillance video from earlier that morning. He told police that they wanted to hear. Describe what you saw the videotape. Somebody dressed in breath dark clothes. What their face wrapped walk right up to the store and try to get in with keys that he said was Carter trying trying to pull off another bigger burglary? Police just knew one day after killing actually and taking her keys. Carter was trying to break into American Eagle where this time tens of thousands of dollars the Black Friday prophets were in the safe but the key didn't fit because after Asti was murdered. Chris Crazy changed. The locks wasn't gonNA take any chance on whether it'd be a deposit or them harming somebody else in the store when you tell locked them out. Good detectives pulled the surveillance video and look at this Carter. Slipping away from the mall. Having already changed from her sweat. CLOTHES GOES INTO PINK. SCRUBS had to be trying to fool potential trackers. They thought this was after she would have spotted. Police talking to David in the parking lot and then she. She walked all the way on over the next few days. Police got a warrant for Carter and David Cell phones that camera APP so useful cool. Well we learned that they had conducted surveillance at Ashes apartment weeks before that that a picture of her apartment Her actual door to her apartment and they had pictures of her vehicle in the white dodge. Ram Pickup in early December. Two thousand fourteen Carter Savant. Doesn't David Mallory were arrested and charged with the murder of Ashley harassed. Cold Comfort for Ashley. Sister it's just such a loss and it so pointless. I just don't understand how people could do that. Separately the cases against them we're virtually identical asked assistant. Da Kevin Russo led the prosecution a that actually diener assistant from the witness stand. Detective Sedillo help lay out the case. Surjit her apartment parmenter vehicle and or find her seat. That's the sales receipt showed them. Aw Purchases on Carter's credit card. She had purchased to shovels. She had purchased a tarp. She had purchased gloves. Why I was fat significant because of a discovery way out in Texas Scrub Discovery Worthy of a horror movie? The the key to finding is right there on Carter and David cellphones each other longitude latitude coordinates and led us to to a remote area near Abilene. What was there As soon as we got to where spot says you're there we look up and there's an actual human grave sweats been Doug I grieve. Fresh grave prosecutors believed the original plan was to kidnap Ashley. Kill her and put what her body in that grave. She was killed in her apartment. The prosecutor thought because she fought so hard. What is that they in fact? Investigators believed Ashley. Harris was pistol whipped so when this block nineteen was found in the black infinity prosecutor. You had it tested. The results are both sad conclusive came back positive with Ashley's DNA on the gun so that was very significant. Can't what's this was not hearing all. This was so hard and Ashley's mother other Monica. I'd love ones like nope so I went and I went back into the room. Remarkable is and. She was consoling me. And she's pulling me. The brutality of the murder was never far from the prosecutor's minds. I just thought how painful and how awful the last few minutes of her life and absolutely terrifying absolutely terrifying. Ah even that said even that appear to be part of the plan. This wasn't just about robbery. Or even revenge said prosecutor Security Russo was Discussions Carter Savant has had had with people where she expressed Certain I guess you can call them. Fantasies fantasies involving killing people. Lies are shown. Paul Remembers one such discussion at work. And he's just us and we were folding clothes and she mentioned isn't that she had thought about killing someone before and whether or not she could watch them die. As if the murder wasn't shocking enough prosecutors were pretty sure Ashley's Ashley's murder was a thrill. Kill plan by a sadistic young woman. Thought she was smarter than everyone else. But tiny meek Carter's avantis admitted none of that. She still had a plan concocted all by herself to explain why she too was a victim coming up a vicious killer. You wanted to see the death penalty yet. Don't here's what I want or a young woman forced into a life of crime And when people talk about the trial of Carter Savannah's this is what they remember. Carol set against the advice of her turns Carter survivors took the stand. was that criminal mastermind years at a helpless victim. She gets up on the stand and it was insane. Carter said it was all her boyfriend. David Mallory controlling every aspect of her life. Free this is where Carter's defense truly began. She told the jury she was a woman enslaved by her sadistic sadistic lover. He's telling me what to drink with each. And and and he had that gun the glock she said used like a threat and it scared her not feel comfortable with that weapon to tell the jury she was asleep at home. When Ashley was being murdered she didn't know where David had gone? But somehow he wound up with a set of American Eagle Keys. She's on the lawn and then handed me a pair of American Eagle and he said lutely brilliant over and then she said he pulled out the glock any in just pointed at me yes across his body. I shook my head said you. There's somebody sitting outside you can go in. And so that's why she tried to rob the store. She said it was that or be killed. Just a couple of hours before she showed up on the security video she said David made it very clear. There're just how far he would go to make sure absolutely sure that she would do what he demanded down to the during the night before the break in attempt she said David brought strange men into their apartment. She you heard an angry voice above her then. Her story got even more a harrowing down raincoats. At not raped twice. She said sobbing by two different men. Prosecutors Kevin Russo Ashley. Diener seem to take it back as the rest of the courtroom. I know what I think. This is not true and they needed to regroup fast. This is the biggest lie she's ever told. We know that. But you never know what the jury's thinking Carter had an an explanation for just about everything even that moment during her interrogation when she wiped the bottle she wasn't wiping off her DNA. No she said the smell from the bothell reminded her being raped and she said that she suddenly overcome with the the smell of semen in the in the air and it had something to do with drinking out of this bottle of water and I thought now that that took some work. That is one heck of a lie and it was at that point that I put my pen down and said I am not writing this. I'm not going to write this down. His voice dripping with Sarcasm Prosecutor Russo took her story apart. It showed the jury a picture talk about various things. That's the one is laying there beside you go. Then he drew down into the heart of Carter Story. Just who were for. Those mysterious rapists all spoke way them described as your in here but said the prosecutor. That's exactly what she was suggesting if she was going to try to play the car and I was GonNa make spell it out as I don't know where his comments I associated with a certain type of speech has the right gap but if she was hoping to play to some random jurors racial bias. She guessed wrong. The jurors didn't believe it not for a second they. They found her guilty in less than two hours. As for David Mallory. His attorneys argued he had nothing to do with the murder he was involved with Carter. Yes but not with any killing. The jury didn't buy that either rendering a guilty verdict. In no time at all the verdicts were some consolation Lows who loved Ashley Harrell's. She saw the pastern. Everybody even when you couldn't see she she could see it. She had such a big heart in. This world is worse off both David. Mallory Carter's avant has received mandatory sentences of life in prison with no possibility of parole. It wasn't enough Ashley's MOM and Stepdad. You wanted to see the death penalty yet. Don't do what I wanted to what Monica wanted in put. It wasn't to be and now now. They claim to memories of their actually. Tell me it was the last time you saw your daughter physically in person and ah about a week before she died Ashley had invited Monica play. Bingo Monica was busy. I almost said no but something told her to stop what she was doing and go at always she glad she did. And I walk into the Bingo Hall and God their belt little girls and I smile at her going for and I kissed this side of her neck. And tell her tell you remember every syllable every moment of that day don't you. Yes these days Monica is is making new memories at the Bingo Parlor. Remember how skittish she was around. Ashley's girlfriend that I no longer now. Their family family. When WANNA can I go and get her nails done they always say oh your daughter so pretty she never correct them her? She's concerned. She gained several daughters and win their altogether. Ashley Sleep is there too. That's all for now. I'm Lester Holt. Thanks for joining us.

Ashley Carter Carter Ashley Harris David Mallory American Eagle Monica David Tommy Harris Carter Savant Laura Ashley Ashley I murder Carter Cervantes Ashley Social Life Ashley Polar assistant manager Ashley Harrell Ashley Sleep Carter
Mason & Ireland (HR 1)

Mason & Ireland

34:17 min | 1 year ago

Mason & Ireland (HR 1)

"Michael give me a guest woo. Gotta get ready for this. Do my boy rick flair. Some justice ooh michael tops in is here sports fans. It's mason in ireland mason still gallivanting across europe who was growling yesterday. He'll growl with yesterday. Was it communist camps today and tomorrow yeah as you say. All the white guys grow but i've you today is definite funds. The funds odds with a tomorrow trudell thursday and then i have either your brian friday thing is brian again friday but then mason's back next monday but michael a lot got to get to today and you haven't had a chance to react to the andrew lucked story. We'll get to that in a minute. You also haven't really had a chance to fully reacted the dwight howard signing. We'll get all your <unk> thoughts coming up but i want to start with the dodgers last night. <hes> they're continuing to struggle offensively. They strode against the yankees on sunday and and then last night they scored only three runs in san diego and lost and at the end of the game. Justin turner struck out looking. Here's what it sounded like the padres t._v. Network pitch from three tories fired up is number three and that's the end of the ball game rodrigue copeland upmeyer is hearing hearing it from turner and dave roberts out there getting into way. This game is over and i'm telling you michael. It's going to happen greg greg today while we're on the air. They're going to suspend justin turner because he made contact with that umpire rob drake and they absolutely should not do it. Turner was walking towards drake who was walking towards the exit and turner simply got in his path. He didn't bump him. It wasn't aggressive. It was i would say incidental contact and michael greg. Do you agree with me that baseball's going to overreact and suspend him i don't. I don't think he's he's gonna get suspended for this. It's that was nothing. There's heated not actually go in and try and bump him. There was no hard as the bump. It's more of a brush over. There was run into you you harder in the aisle on the plane right. There's i don't believe that the m._l._b. Will go way overboard and if even if they do then he's gonna go and he's going to. He's going to appeal it and he won't get suspended at all. I might might be a little bit of a fine well which is what they should do. Fine yeah fine you. Can you make some incidental contact and usually get fine but that's it now. Let me argue argue. What baseball's lawyers are gonna argue cheese. Any contact with the empire is never appropriate and we have to draw a hard line with no physical all contact at all. You made the contact. You gotta look at intent also who believe but how do you gauge. That's like a ball. How do you gauge intent you can tell when a pitch gets away from ah pitcher and you're gonna tell them times and you can tell when an player intentionally but gets into a referee or umpire space and tries to bump you can tell come now since now a bigger decision is going to be great. Did you watch the ninth inning. I missed it okay so a._j. Pollock kirby eight struck out the side for the dodgers a._j. Pollock was was rung up on a pitch right on the line like right on the border. Justin turner was rung up on a pitch right on the border so as i'm making this argument i i fully realize that both of these guys may have struck out anyway but we gotta go to computer strikes next year. Gotta do it these these these calls that are deciding games that it depends on how big or small the home plate umpire is this guy. Rob drake was kind of a normal bill but if it was that fat guy eric gregg from a few years ago then the strike zone gets wider remember when he leave on hernandez was throwing anything near the plate and air greg was calling it a strike greg. Give me the argument against going going to a computerized strikes. Oh i'm fully on board with a robot umpire but i guess if you want the actual argument for why it's not as because there has to be human error involved in in that game. This is how it's always been. It's the way that it's been back since the baseball began away. There's always a guy that's this is the argument michael we have. We have video replay now for close plays at home play bang babies first base so we're correcting those umpires why not correct balls and strikes correct <hes> in and out calls and tennis all the time and <hes> you still have the empire behind the plate but yeah i mean they've had this conversation with your son. Trace way for people don't know michael's youngest son is a major league baseball player who is in the minors right now played for several years with the dodgers and other teams. Have you ever had this this jail did he's trace in favor of of <hes> of computerized balls and strikes he wouldn't be against it obviously still have the empire for plays at the plate to make calls but <hes> yeah he's not against it. If that that the technology to do obviously do it's already michael. It's called quest dak and that's why when you watch again. If you're watching the game last night they put that box up and show how fast the pitch was was an actually yates's pitch to turner kind of kick clips the corner of the box so i'm arguing that we should put in a computerized strike zone but turner me have lost the argument in this case anyway. Joe turner was justin. Turner is known for arguing lots of balls and strikes where the way that he stands on the plate and that it's that outside strike is called on him consistently gently and he's very tough for him to realize it's outside and inside but going to a robot until actually are with a robot umpire. You can't complain about the umpires. This happens night right in and night out. Sometimes you get to know. I actually think the exact opposite. I think that if you michael tell me if you agree if you put in the computerized zone then they'll l. all stop arguing computer. I think that's the best way to go but that had meantime now since it's subjective turner is going to argue tilles blue in the face and probably probably get suspended at eight for this incidental contact thing which is stupid because mike when you play didn't you have way more give and take with the officials in the n._b._a. Guys yeah now. That's what drives me crazy to m._b. Officials are so sensitive now so in tune with their feeling so into their feelings as they say that players can't yell at them and the and the arms adults. Don't give it right back to them. They're so quick to tee up guys in the n._b._a. Now just because a guy vehemently vehemently disagrees with a call. I hate that well in your day. It would take you had to do something extraordinary to get thrown out of the game now. If you swim wear at an empire they will they will literally throw you out yeah. I i mean it's so hypersensitive that and understand that if you talk to say well we're man and we deserve respect. Yes they heat of the battle right realized that no one's paying to come see you empire up. Give them a war. I give them a stern warning if they use colorful language in town if you keep it up then three yeah and it just seems to me if <music> i'm gonna greg. I'm absolutely gonna lose it if they throw if they suspend turner today i just it. It'd be a shame abbas was arguing vociferiously differs slightly michael and he he made this wasn't slammed the hill puff your chest out in bump into the empire and yet everything i read on the the internet today was turner makes contact with umpires and i'm afraid because they're kind of absolutist when it comes to contact with the empire that they're going to get a ah game or two and i think my biggest thing here and you saw it who made the contact. The umpire walked into justin turner. He got in front of him but then the umpire chicken and egg thing if if you're walking to your office and i stand in the hallway and directly stand in the around me who in your office who bumped to right well why mom to me but i got directly in your way into it was it was terrible. If if you get suspended for that it's an absolute absolute travesty. It's dumb that would be the worst thing for there's other much more bigger reasons to suspend people than that and so the dodgers sending walker bueller tonight to hopefully get this. What's greg what's their offense capitulate ferris bueller right. No he's been good. The two guys that have struggled are not even two guys reuse struggled kershaw gave some home runs but buehler last start looked pretty good. He's looked good last couple starts and he's been he's going to be good against the offense though is just at a situation where they're not playing like they did at the beginning of the season when their patient and waiting eating for pitches there's pitches that are coming right down the middle of the plate and they're looking off of it and then there's just a pitch that's way outside and they're swing like crazy for it. They're just the patients has gone away. Instead of taking these long at bats walking. They're just swinging away and that's not how this dodger offense works. I think that's all going to fix soon michael. How worried should dodger fan speed that the yankees handke's took two out of three from over the weekend. Judge homered in every game. Yeah you always wanna win those games against a team. You think you might see in those series but <hes> nothing to worry about now. It's only august this apple in october and then you've got something to worry about yeah. I thought the yankees look really good and they're going to get a bunch of people back so i think there are a really formidable opponent but the yankees may not get to the world series. The astros stroz are very good. You know the twins in the as could rise up the i think the dodgers have the best chance to get their if the yankees get there we talked ad nauseam mhm yesterday about all the things the yankees do well and they match up really well against the dodgers. They're the number one team in the majors against left handed starting pitching the dodgers would throw three left in that series review kershaw richhill they also hit more home runs than any team in the major leagues and they would be the yankees would be getting back. Michael probably eight guys that aren't on their on their team right now. Including john carlos stanton dylan vitanza sale and luis severino all all were key guys so they they're really big team to watch and it seems like it's coming altogether for them. Okay coming up next more fallout allowed from the big andrew. Luck announcement. Michael hasn't had a chance to react to that and we're going to tie it to the n._b._a. In a weird way michael michael thompson information. I'm john ireland e._s._p._n. L._a. All right mason in ireland michael tomson information today and on saturday night in a stunning thing turn of events andrew luck who michael you want to argue could be the games i two hundred million dollar guaranteed player back when he was healthy yeah i i thought it was a sort of a trending that way when his next big free agent here would come up. I thought he would be the first guy to break the two hundred million dollar barrier but now that looks like that's going to be another quarterback in kansas city yeah padma homes but <hes> andrew luck retired he. He explained that he's in too much pain. He can't play through it. Reaction has been swift. Most people are understanding of it. They feel bad. Other people like veteran quarterback. Steve berlin says you can't do that to your teammates teammates. You can't do it in august this close to the start of the season. What's your take on andrew luck retiring when he did on saturday night we we did the right thing. <hes> i don't care about the timing saturday night or today or yesterday or last week. Whenever you decided you know sending over the sideline my body's all broken up. I've probably maybe right now. He's feeling i've lost the passion to play and once you lose that passion to want to be out there and it's time to move on. I don't care who you are. What sport you play and so i'm sure he talked it over with his wife and his and his father who was a former n._f._l. Quarterback and he figures saying if i can't do it physically anymore. It is time to go out on a prolong on this drag it out mislead my team on my teammates on my owner so he did the right thing the right time. Whether it's <hes> saturday or today uh you've talked openly on the show before for people who don't know michael and his wife julie raised three professional athletes. His oldest son and michael made it to the n._b._a. You know clay who is a star player for the warriors and we talked about trace whose baseball player you made a decision when when your boys were arguably the best athletes at their high school that you would not let them play football right why does look at the toll it takes on your body and plus they all love football love playing youth football and they play it up until seventh grade eighth grade but at that age the game isn't that violent. It's more tackle with drag you down home instead of head hunting like they do in high school college in the n._f._l. When the kids are bigger than the bigger stronger faster and again gets even more physical youth football is more wrap view up dragging down rugby style tackling but i told play trace and michael say do you guys want to play college football. They all said no as well if that's the case case then no high school football because it makes no sense to put your body through kind of punishment if your goal isn't the plan college or eventually in the n._f._l. Like most kids is a who played football would like to believe that it can reach those next two levels so since they were not going to allow interested in playing pursuing football beyond <hes> say high high school i said then play the other sports you love and that what you say the punishment on your body. I'm gonna reg- a quote from lebron who said this a few years ago and he feels exactly the same way assume he had this conversation with his wife julie. Did here's a little brian a few years ago quote. We don't want them to play football talking about his own kids. We don't want them to play football in our household household until they realized how physical and how demanding the game is then they can have their choice and they get older into high school. We'll talk it over but right now. There's no need need for it. There's enough sports. They can play. They play basketball. They play soccer. They play everything else but football and hockey. It's a safety thing as apparent. <hes> you particular kids as much as possible. I don't think i'm the only one that's not allowing kids to play football. It's just that i'm lebron james. It gets puts in the headlines for some reason and quote michael you. You had this position fifteen years ago. Lebron had it five years ago now. A high-profile stanford graduate quits before he turns thirty is this a trend did did andrew lectures. Just start art a safety. No decision has been a trend other guys have done a linebacker from the forty niners played his rookie year then i think he had a concussion decide. I'm hanging it up right you just these. These people just aren't as bigger name. He's the biggest name player to ever do this sort of maybe retire. Prematurely because of injuries other guys have done throughout the years for the last last fifteen twenty years it just that nobody of this highest stat status or stature and you know i wouldn't surprise me to see him. Come back not this year. Maybe you'll take a year or talk and we'll take he's only twenty nine thirty one thirty two because you know jim. Everything's gonna keep calling and checking on him. Well yeah and they should for for way. Sacrifices body for the franchise <hes> but you know earth is going to stay in touch with them. How you feel in you know six months from now a year from now. What do you think you think you still wanna play and a thirty one thirty thirty two if he says you know what i've rested up i two or three years off. I think i wanna play again when surprise me you <hes> you left out in a another big name. He's the second big name n._f._l. Fell player who's quit before the age of thirty this year the other one i miss everybody's already forgotten about him. Rob gronkowski. Oh yeah that's right and and gronk was doing a talk the other day and he basically this was yesterday he laid out he quit for the same reasons luck quit. Here's rock wherever i go. Patriots fans always ask and my coming back when i'm coming back. Where am i coming back. I'm walking across the street. You're walking because you're coming back. It is crazy. I understand i feel that love by. I wanna be clear to my fans. I needed to recover. I was not in a good place. Football was bringing me down and i didn't like it and i was losing that joy in life like take the joy. I'm sorry oh dang oh. I really was and i was fighting through. It and i knew what i signed up four and i knew what else fighting through and i knew i just have to fix myself my god. I don't blame these guys once it. Once angela at one hundred million in the bank grunk got close to it it they don't need to do this more and i have a very hard time criticized. I know that there are a lot of x. n._f._l. Players criticizing lucky yesterday chris chris mortensen said he's heard from a lot of x. quarterbacks who won't go on the record but feel like lex screwed his team over. Oh please go there. No they're idiots. The guys beat up he saw four. He's lost a passionate a will play what is he supposed to fake it go out there and and and his heart's not in it and go out and steal from his team and rob from his teammates because he's really not into easily so this is. This is one of your core things that you've said from the beginning and they you said jerry west told you and you've got traded to the lakers michael. If you don't wanna be here for any reason let me know and we'll work something out you think you do you think people got to be all in physically and mentally it got to be all in. That's why he's criticizing him. I don't get it <hes> if the guy's physically physically feels a can't do anymore he doesn't wanna do anymore and he's mentally checked out. You got to go. He's doing the right thing and if the costa side the key pain because out of out of gratitude for what he's done for the franchisee which is good for them. What is wrong with people these days. I actually think andrew l._x. Retirement announcement may change the way teams practice moving forward. We'll get into that next michael thompson information. I'm john ireland. This is mason in ireland e._s._p._n. L._a. Hey let me read you this. The big three championship. Yes is on on the line this sunday at staple center. Gotta go joe johnson. I so joe is the favourite his team. The triplets take on stephen jackson accident killer threes if you call right now eight seven seven seven ten e._s._p._n. Caller seven and ten when a four pack of tickets the big three championship chip comes to l._a. This sunday staples tickets on sale. Now or catchy action live on c._b._s. Too at twelve pm on sunday eight seven seven seven ten e._s._p._n. And your chance to win tickets to the big three championship right now e._s._p._n. L._a. players that are your age. Some of the dick butkus can hardly walk like me yeah. I mean and i'm wondering these are pretty high profile guy gronk andrew lock in the n._b._a. Hey we're seeing load management and i hate but hey it's. Here's you don't need any n._b._a. Tearless in football aren't they going to have to go to some type of for lack of of a better term hit management and limit the hits on these ready doing that ireland the only allowed to think maybe hit once a week and i'm sure they don't go full out on the obviously the candidate the quarterbacks. I don't think they go for anybody's knees or anything. They've already reduced the contact in the n._f._l. Practices i mean you can demarco far. They'll tell you that right. Eliminated eliminated completely on sunday night well. That's pretty much. What mcvay does now mcveigh the guys he's planning on starting. They network one opener against carolina have not been in any games not even like in practice that interior linemen who gets contact every every play like aaron donald guys. They haven't been hit at this whole year. It's very limited but i don't think todd gurley he's been hit. I don't think jared goff's been hit and i wonder if he's not ahead of the curve because you look lux twenty nine but then how do you i guess on week. One is when you get your first bit of contact. Would you say for you for starters and just let let your body these are n._f._l. Players michael been getting hits entice school in your case. You said your boys played middle school yeah so yeah so how do you how do you police. Do you not let it until the first game i would. I think you may have to hit in the in the likely they'll be too much of a shock to your body will finally get that first week of hits. I don't know oh i mean you're the one who played in the n._b._a. I think you've got two different thing yeah n._f._l. I it just seems to me that this has been coming for a while. We had the concussion movie. We have all the moms filling their our kids can't play football. Now we have andrew and rob. Gronkowski retiring probably will go into the hall of fame for sure. Oh yeah no question lot probably not one of my <hes> fasttrack questions. I was going to argue shimmering now. How's it going to argue on his behalf. Deceive you and greg who's greg is hard on people wind comes to hall of fame. He's he's. He doesn't want to put anybody. Anybody's unreasonable equally barry sanders should have got it but it is the hall of fame not hall of very good. He's already yeah well. We'll do it say ashtray. We'll talk with by the way in fifteen minutes. Allen sleep well the host of laker talk. He hasn't been fired yet has the most we won't get fired but he's he's going to. He's going to explain himself had the most absurd tweet in his short. Laker talk hosts career that we will get him to explain. That's coming up in fifteen minutes coming up next what the heck happened last night at the u._s. Open that was supposed to be like like the greatest first round matchup we've ever seen a rematch of two grand slam finalist and i have a theory on what has happened to maria. Reassure povo really and i'm going to run it by you next i it. It's the only thing to me that makes sense so i know you have tennis again. We'll get into that neck and wait to hear this. Hey employees bosses. If you need a quality employees like a john ireland and not an employee like steve steve mason who's always looking for a day off then ziprecruiter is the place to go to find that quality employees for your your business could've sends it's your job to over one hundred of the web's leading job boards and they're not gonna stop there. The matching technology ziprecruiter is gonna scant thousands of resumes to find the right people the right experienced spirit and vitamin apply to your job ziprecruiter so effective four or five of the employers who post on ziprecruiter get a quality candidate right on the site the day it is posted right now. Well listen you can try ziprecruiter for free. This exclusive web address ziprecruiter dot com slash l. a. ziprecruiter dot com slash l. A.'s ziprecruiter dot com slash l. a. they will find the right employees like for you like a gregg bergman like a john ireland and they'll get the riffraff like me won't waste your time ziprecruiter ziprecruiter dot com slash l._a. All right mason in ireland show michael thompsons information. Michael is the biggest tennis fan at e._s._p._n. L._a. <hes> i'm the u._s. Open began yesterday. Near daytona lisa's going my wife's going over next week to go next wednesday and thursday. Have you ever been to the u._s. Sopa yes i was there. The year jimmy connors made his run. Wow eighty nine. It was really one of the funds. You know ninety one one that's. Why did you see one of his matches against aaron. Christine thank you were there for that. Yeah that's like the iconic signature match yeah and he thought he was dead. Re times and krickstein like i can't can't kill this great and it was it was it was a magical bid if you've never been to one of these pro tennis tournaments the first thing you notice is how unbelievably leaveli hard they hit the yeah i mean the consistency would destroy all of us who love tennessee play tennis on a four or five levels amateurs. That's pretty good tennis would man that's a whole whole new world. It's like when you like you. You're like a five six seven handicap in golf around nine but thank you but now you go out there and you say you play with brooks. Kepco does all different world buddy so last night through a weird set of circumstances the u._s. Open was able to pair to former grand slam champions against each other. Maria sharipova is is chasing is eighty seventh in the world right now names now maria shera it's over yet could be and then serena williams is not ranked as as high as she normally is eight seat right well but in vegas. She's the favorite so depends yeah. They only really really good beater last year but anyway the bunch of girls who will so they decide okay. We're going to take advantage of this. We're gonna we're gonna put serena and venus or serena and maria head to head on the first night live on e._s._p._n. And they hyped it all week and it was going to be a really big match and so in prime time it was seven o'clock in the east coast. It's four o'clock here <hes> they said all right. This is our featured match. Serena destroyed maria she beater eight or six one six one in less than an hour eight minutes and i have a theory and i want you to tell me if i'm grabbing at straws about about what is wrong. Sharipova censure povayev failed a drug test in two thousand sixteen. She dropped eighty seventh in the world and hasn't made it past the quarterfinals in any grand slam event. Marie had been taking a drug called melt. Donate them which she'd been taking for ten years but it wasn't always band about halfway through that run. They banned it. <hes> is it possible michael that she's like jose can saco. She can't play if she's not on the juice. No maria still can beat women every now and then this bushfires winnie a major or slams when they call him. Now i mean those days are over with because the girls the women on the tour now ireland have expanded so much in their athleticism there movement on the court. You look at simona halep. Look at naomi osaka the top women in the game now they really can cover the court from sideline the sideline they run down every shot. That's why serena has a hard time. Beating <hes> ladies ladies like simona halep or even before because they run down those shots that make serena hit one more and soon against a little impatient and makes eras because she's not used to these fast women remember serena and venus is to be the fastest women on the tour could run down all the shots because they had that speed but now the women have evolved oh so much in the last ten fifteen years their athleticism lobbies fast girls are coming out there now. Maria never had that she always had to groundstroke she could hit with power but she never had that court coverage and that's why today's women evolve in that part of the game and improve party gained so much better and that's why i'm maria can't beat the top women anymore because they have better athleticism that she ever had let me ask you something your several times over the next two weeks you will spend two or three hours watching the turn ago strictly from atv product standpoint. What's more entertaining the men and the women ooh. That's a great question. I think the women even though the longer rallies rallies around is because of that and the men are kind of like a three headed monster those those three guys victory federer lost a set in his last night yeah he hadn't woken up yet yet but <hes> i think the women are more compelling to watch <hes> because there's more evenly matched now in the doll and fatter in joke joke of its play each other. It's ten is you. I just can't believe guys are that good but i think women's feel as deeper because it's more wide open. Anybody can pop up and win but you look at the man's <hes> demands tour looks looks like is between the big three who are in their thirties thirties and the young kids or an early twenties look. I'm not ready to challenge those guys. I think women are more compelling because serena's probably the most dynamic player on the tour because he's because of a mood swings of what we saw in the u._s. Obama she had a meltdown and <hes> so she still the most famous woman athlete on the planet so i think women are more compelling than the men you see what she said when they asked her about carlos ramos no promise was the empire she got into the argument with last year and so this year in a preemptive move the u._s. Open decided not to have ramos being the big stick for any match involving being venus or serena dumb imagine if he was in the chair. I imagine this is just match. They said hey serena what's your is. The fact that the u._s. open band carlos ramos from you're in your sister's matches. Do you have an opinion on that and serena's answer was. I don't know who that is. The the greatest smile real serious. Look just dead serious like don't wait a minute report a follow up with a guy who you know you had the problem in the models. That was their answer. Would you have acid a follow up the when the guy who wrap up see if she took the bait it gave reminded me of kobe during the final. Do you remember how kobe used to go dark during the playoffs and so you know kobe is one of the smartest always dark no no but he was one of the smartest most engaging interviews you could have and in the finals you would say to him. Hey koby you so you now have to go up against carmelo anthony and the nuggets. They're you know they're having a great season and they're really good at home. What are the challenges of beating them in kobe would go score for more than they do. That's it like go into bill belichick mode and i've always wondered about that the other day he was doing an interview. The serena thing reminded me of it. The other day kobe was was doing an interview with this guy named patrick bet david. He's an entrepreneur noor and kobe said that when the games would roll around especially the important games he would this won't surprise you because of vow competitive you know he was but i've never heard of admit this. He said he would actually in his own head. Go through a personality change he would would pretend he was an actor in a movie. Listen to this. I've never heard him. Admit this separation from me. You know emotionally to be able to put myself in a place. We're at practice and i'm training during games. I switched my mind to something else. Switch mode into something else right for me. It's the equivalent a billion of maximum desma meridia sin gladiator picking up dirt. Smelling dirt is go tom right so that was my mental switch. It was like an actor getting ready for film. You gotta put yourself in a cage when you're in the cage. Are that character then when you leave. There is something completely different but when i'm in that cage broke. Don't talk to me. Leave me alone. I used to be so games like for like certain certain key games <hes>. I don't think i ever said this before. This kind of makes me seem very psychotic. Whatever i used to it play the halloween theme song over and over and over in my headphones pre-game seriously seriously seriously eh it was important that it was michael myers because the mask itself was void of emotion void of emotion sure it has nothing to do with hype. It has nothing to do with camaraderie stone cold killer and i will listen to this song over and over and over and that's best when you know you better run in 'cause that's a lot of people coming out or so might go. We've always thought that kobe was people would say the difference between kobe and all the other players was the other players wanted to win. Kobe wanted to kill oh you know he wanted. He wanted to beat you and make sure you knew he beat. You does it but this is next level stuff. This is the song would listen to his headphones phones over and over and over again but he's different from magic. He's not even from steph. Curry was a nice guy yeah but not when it came to the finals in the playoffs awesome tell us persuade position okay boys as playoff time <hes> make let your wife and your girlfriend's take a family stuff is all about business now so different. I'm from michael jordan from of from kevin durant that i saw in around the warriors or lebron nebraska center playoff mental modes kobe's all great. Tom brady's like does she think tom brady's all genie congenial and hunky dory when the patriots will run all a great all great massage wall players who will who are helping out the major stars like kobe. Yeah we get into our little <hes> focused on our little world but those guys take it to another level so all a great ones are like that when they when they know that the success the winning on the team is on their shoulders because the rest of us. Are there help we not. We understand that the when you know that all the focus is going to be on you because you are the man. They all go into this. This sort of this sort of weird realm the david sort of go into he also said in that same interview bet david asked him if shack would have had your work ethic. I always take the result being kobe said he would have been the greatest player of all time would not have been close. Yeah i agree. I always say that well. We saw a version of that in the finals against the seventy six when shack iron that three ruined where he wouldn't three straight files even nowadays against the sixers for some reason shack took it personally against the tumble. Remember mama was rank defensive player of the year. The media was talking about. Maybe talkin slowdown shock. I remember this shack. You know thirty six and twenty in that final. Nobody will change us. Never done that. Kareem's number thirty six twenty. He the average engagement tumble. He destroyed them and you're right if he had that kind of mentality every year to say i'm gonna go i want to be the greatest kobe wanted to be known as the greatest so jordan these other guys as we all know about a shack had that's kobe's mentality kevin garnett's tally would been the greatest ever. There's one person here at e._s._p._n. L._a. Who thinks shack it was the greatest ever anyway and he will join us sub bergman again next e._s._p._n. L._a.

michael michael thompson football justin turner dodgers andrew l._x ireland baseball kobe tennis greg greg yankees john ireland steve steve mason serena williams rob drake turner michael greg europe Rob gronkowski rick flair
Does Anyone Really Know What Socialism Is? (Ep. 408 Rebroadcast)

Freakonomics

48:02 min | 7 months ago

Does Anyone Really Know What Socialism Is? (Ep. 408 Rebroadcast)

"FREAKONOMICS radio sponsored by shipped shipped is delivery done differently. There s shoppers, pickup fresh groceries, tech gadgets, video games, and even pet supplies from local stores. You love get everything delivered to your door and as quickly as one hour. So you can save time for the good stuff like taking her dog to the park or watching your favorite show for the hundredth time we won't Judge Your Shopper, will keep you updated with texts from the aisles and can pick in season produce like total pro thoughtful shoppers, convenient service, and peace of mind. That's the difference shipped makes try same day delivery for yourself at. Dot Com slash freakonomics today that's S. H. I. P.. T.. Dot Com slash freakonomics. Improve Your team decision making process and turn big data into big revenue. Develop essential skills for the digital world with the ruckers online master of science in business analytics to learn more about one of the hottest degrees in twenty twenty visit go dot rutgers dot edu slash freak that's go dot rutgers dot edu slash freak. Stephen W. what you're about to hear is an updated version of an episode we released just before the covid nineteen pandemic took hold in the US we thought with an upcoming election it might be useful to hear it again. Hope you agree. The United States like many countries around the world seems to have entered a period of broad and deep discontent. Much of this discontent is related to economic issues some of them specific like wage stagnation and the spike in healthcare and college costs and others are more systemic like inequality in crony capitalism. This discontent has grown into an indictment of our entire political and economic system with multiple constituencies harboring multiple grievances, some overlapping others in deep conflict. I'm telling you nothing here. You don't already know. You also know that different actors have harnessed this discontent in an attempt to steer the country in different directions. Perhaps, the most successful to date is Donald Trump who in two thousand and sixteen defied just about every prediction on earth to win the US presidency. The Democrats have also tried to steer that discontent in their direction especially Vermont senator. Bernie. Sanders a longtime registered independent who was for a time leading candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination. We now have an economy that is fundamentally broken and grotesquely unfair. Sanders is support came largely from young and progressive voters who think capitalism should be overhauled or perhaps replaced entirely the majority of American millennials now identify as socialists why are so many millennials gravitating towards socialism over capitalism the United States must choose the path I call democratic. Socialism. As. Much as Sanders embraces the Socialist Label, he does understand I do understand. That I and other progressives will face massive attacks from those who attempt to use the word socialism as a slur. If Bernie Sanders says, we need Medicare for all trump's answer. Is that socialism like Venezuela to Socialists have done in Venezuela all of the same things. Socialists have done everywhere, not looking at Venezuela. The results have been catastrophic looking at countries like Denmark and swing. Sanders, of course, lost the Democratic presidential nomination to Joe Biden but the trump White House has still found it useful to connect the Democrats to socialism. Whether it be Joe Biden it'd be Bernie Sanders they're advocating socialist agenda and now Joe Biden Andy Radical left or try to impose socialism plus in America dry look like a radical socialist really. How can one little word? Possibly contain such a range. Today on economics radio what we talk about when we talk about socialism. And if it makes you feel any better. Everybody else's confused to I personally would not use the word socialist find the woods socialism in the US context. Kind of odd. You know how is it to live in a socialist society and then say what are you talking about? From stitcher and productions this is freakonomics radio podcast that explores the hidden side of everything. Here's your host Stephen Duffner. If you WANNA talk to someone about politics and Economics Abou- Venezuela and Scandinavia about what socialism is an isn't. There are few better people to talk to than the economist, Jeffrey Sachs, Stephen Hi. How are you? He? He's official Title University Professor at Columbia University and Director of the Center for Sustainable Development at Columbia University. Also, I'm an advisor to the UN in. Sacks is also advised governments around the world especially as they tried to climb out of poverty or after the Cold War to shift from communism to a market economy I've had the chance to see economies functioning and malfunctioning in more than one hundred, thirty countries around the world and my view is that the countries that come closest to what we're after for decent lives on this planet are the Scandinavian countries, the social democracies of northern Europe because why the model of universal quality public services. Is At the core of social democracy that means health education starting from early childhood development up through university level childcare for all that enables of very high level of labor force participation of women of Mothers of young children. So does that make sacks a fan of socialism per se the first thing I would say is that terms like socialism are. Too Big too loaded too poorly defined to be a very useful starting point. Okay. What's a better starting point? There are two concepts that I think should be distinguished start of any sensible discussion. One is the concept of a mixed economy which means that a economy has. A market system including private ownership and trade market functions and supply and demand, but it also has government government that May. Run. The schools or may provide for healthcare or the police and the fire department and so on. That's a mixed economy. A socialist economy in the traditional usage of economics and political history though it's a term that has been used for all sorts of things generally means. An economy organized around social ownership, which might mean state ownership. or it could mean a cooperative ownership or in some views it has meant worker ownership or in other. Citizens ownership but the idea is that it some kind of social ownership of the means of production. When you talk about, let's say Nordic Economy Norway let's just pick as a socialist democracy. What component of that economy is socialist well. The Nordic economies, not socialist democracies they call themselves social democracies. That's a very big difference. They do not call themselves socialist in general because most of the production, most of the businesses in the economy are private corporate ownership. But what they do, which is quite different from the United States is that they collect. Far More in total tax revenues and then use those. Additional revenues to provide far more public services than the United States provides. So Sachs's nomenclature for the Nordic or Scandinavian countries is social democracies with mixed economies now. My claim would be that all successful economies. Are Mixed economies, and that there is a important set of questions about where boundaries should be drawn between government and market. How does he see those boundaries in the US in my view? The United States draws that line in an inappropriate place too much market, not enough government and where in the US would sacks like to see more government. So top of the list would be medicare for all or a single payer health system and I would say to somebody who said that that's socialistic that that is exactly what was said about Medicare and why Medicare was so strenuously opposed. It may not surprise you at this point to learn the Jeffrey Sachs Supports Bernie Sanders. He was an adviser to Sanders is two thousand sixteen campaign and he's endorsed him this time around. But if you would like a prime example of the confusion around the word socialism, here's one for you. Sachs, says that even Bernie Sanders is using it wrong when for instance, Sanders talks about the path America needs to choose and that is the path that I call Democratic Socialism. Is Part of our confusion, which has fascinating roots also in our internet seeing left schisms in America he calls. A democratic socialist that has explanations back to the verbiage in the. United. States. In the nineteen sixties, seventies and eighties actually. But to my mind, what Bernie Sanders is talking about is social democracy that is. What we see in operation, not only in the Nordic countries incidentally but in Germany in the Netherlands in most of western Europe my senses. That works that's Nice we should do that to this may sound like nomenclature all hair-splitting to you the difference between a Social Democracy and Democratic Socialism. But Sachs argues otherwise especially because socialism as opposed to social his plainly become a political term now, the term socialist. Is used often as a pejorative for a mixed economy with more government than the US has in other words if Bernie Sanders says, we need Medicare for all. Trump's answer. Is that socialism like Venezuela? So since we're on the nomenclature, what do you call Venezuela? Oh, typical Latin, American populist mess which I've seen for many decades and have been involved many times in trying to help clean up. And just how big a mess is Venezuela at the moment it's really unprecedented. That's Ricardo Hausmann a Venezuelan economist who teaches at Harvard's Kennedy School in the US Great Depression GDP by twenty eight percent. In, Venezuela at the end of this year, GDP will have fallen by sixty two percent. We spoke with Houseman in the fall of two, thousand and nineteen. So he was talking about the end of that year. So it's something of a completely different order of magnitude. Last year, we had two million percent inflation along with this inflation Venezuela has seen severe shortages, food and medicine. It is a full blown humanitarian catastrophe. President trump and others have blamed this catastrophe on socialism and Venezuela surely seems to fit Jeff Sachs's description wherein the means of production are owned by the state. This intensified not so many years ago there were expropriating things left and right the expropriates over ten million acres of land the expropriated the whole steel sector of wholesome an sector supermarkets, yogurt factories, detergent factories, banks, telecoms, electricity companies, et Cetera et Cetera, et government. Housing the means of production that sounds pretty much like the textbook definition of socialism. It also called mind the heyday of the former Soviet Union, the mother of all socialist models but Ricardo Hausmann doesn't think the label fits Venezuela. Socialism is a term that is used to brawl V. I would refer more to counteract totalitarian economic systems where property rights are very weak. In Venezuela, for instance, you never know when your property can be taken away by the government. There is extensive price controls, exchange controls, import controls. We should say here that houseman is a strong and vocal opponent of the Venezuelan government that's currently in power you're constantly having. To request permission for many many things and these permissions are an opportunity to extort money from you or to blackmail you. So I don't want to call that by the same name of whatever is happening in Scandinavia but Hugo Chavez, the architect of Venezuela's current political and economic system did call his vision twenty-first-century socialism. So how did Venezuela get to this point? It's fascinating story if a depressing one remember Jeff Sachs calls Venezuela. Today a typical Latin American populace mess. But for decades, Venezuela was an outlier between nineteen twenty and nineteen eighty. It was one of the fastest growing countries in the world. Most of this growth was fueled by the country's great good fortune or at least what seemed like good fortune massive oil deposits Venezuela began producing oil way back in the nineteen tens, and it soon became the number one exporter in the world. Did it become too reliant on this single industry. In retrospect, the answer is yes. But at the time you must have been less evident Venezuela was a country on the rise and in nineteen fifty eight, it became a democracy at a time when many Latin American countries were moving in the opposite direction. But after say August eighty one. Oil Revenue. Started to decline. OPEC tried to protect prices by cutting production. So you're cutting production by nineteen, eighty, six, the price collapsed in some sense we had over borrowed and overspent, and we mismanaged that we didn't prepare ourselves for a period of low oil prices. Venezuela has lived on one resource for decades now, and that is like standing on one leg or even the school with one leg, it is profoundly unstable. Every country that has oil loves to live off of this resource rent, but it doesn't work economic and political instability created an opportunity for man who had become Venezuela's next leader in February nineteen, hundred, eighty two. Charges organized a Military Court Tint Ricardo Hausmann at the time was Venezuela's Minister of Planning. I must say it caught me completely by surprise. It's completely outside the thinkable houseman was trying to help reform Venezuela's economy to make it less dependent on oil. Hugo Chavez was briefly imprisoned for his. Coup but the government was sufficiently stabilized and it soon lost power. House men's market reforms were abandoned and we're paying a very, very hefty price for that Chavez high ranking military officer was charismatic and popular in Nineteen Ninety nine he was elected president I went to see Google Chavez early in his presidency and he gave me a big bear. Hug and we talked about baseball which was his real passion and then we talked about the Venezuelan economy and I felt. Quite. Good. About the meeting because I had listened to myself. Talk I suppose and went home, and then watched over the next decade plus that he and his revolution did everything the opposite completely of what I had recommended, which was what so what one needs of course is to undo the mistakes of trying to live off of one natural resource and you need a normal set of financial operations Restructuring of the debt, but rather than diversifying the Venezuelan Economy Chavez nationalized it remember as Hausmann told us the expropriated the whole steel sector, the? Whole Cement Sector Supermarkets Yogurt factories deter wide the government need to seize all those assets. So you end up with an economy that has oil and very little else that can be exported. no-one oil falls you need more dollars, but you don't have a part of the economy that is able to generate those dollars when Thomas got into power. Venezuela's producing three point four million barrels of oil a day. When he died it was producing something like two point five million barrels of oil a day. Last month it probably it Bruce. Six hundred thousand barrels of oil a day. So you need somehow to shift. Towards more non oil exports. And it's very, very difficult because in order to become good things were not good at before you face a chicken and egg problem you cannot export because you don't know how to do it and you don't know how to do it because they're not in it. Hugo Chavez died in office in two, thousand, thirteen, his successor Nicholas Maduro has essentially held Chavez's course. For the average Venezuelan, the economy has gone from very bad to terrible. Ricardo Hausmann says the minimum wage is about two dollars a month in two, thousand, twelve it was something closer to four hundred dollars a month. and. Then people say well but maybe the dollar buys a lot in Venezuela. So instead of measuring it in dollars, we measure it in calories in the cheapest available calorie, which right now happens to be Yucca. And we find that the minimum wage buys four hundred calories of Yucca a day. If you stay in, you will consume two thousand calories. So, this doesn't even feed the person going to work. Let alone his family. In two thousand, Eighteen Madero one second term as president of Venezuela now, how does the president of a country failing? So badly, win a reelection. Many observers claimed the election results were, shall we say irregular? The US and many other Western countries rejected the outcome. Among the countries that accepted it. China Cuba Iran and Russia so more than a few echoes of the cold, War and the battle between capitalism and socialism. Venezuela's own. General Assembly declared that Maduro without and installed as president the young reformer one Guido. But that was only declaration Maduro chose to stay in office and the military now is on his side the US and other countries have recognised why does legitimacy and have been trying to oust Madero? This is left Guido in a rather precarious limbo. For what it's worth. The Harvard Economist Ricardo Hausmann is an advisor to the Guido government such as it is. President Madero has called Houseman an economic hit man, which means Houseman cannot practically return to Venezuela as they say, is no problem returning. It's getting back out my brother-in-law's three years in jail for being a journalist. So. Let's think about Venezuela. Was it social ISM as practiced by Hugo Chavez and Nicholas. Maduro. The drove the country into the Ground Donald Trump lakes to say. Or was there embrace of is version of socialism just a late stage attempt to recover from the underlying problem, which was chronic mismanagement of a one resource economy. There is a famous concept in economics called the resource curse. That's when a country seemingly blessed with valuable natural resources ultimately suffers because it fails to diversify their economy. and. That is a pretty appealing explanation for what went wrong in Venezuela. Not, all economists embrace this sort of explanation I don't think there is a resource curse James Robinson of the University of Chicago is CO author of the book why nations fail the consequences of natural resources for society's development completely conditional on their institutions meaning natural resources don't have to be a curse. The argument Robinson makes along with his Co author drone glue is that a given country's long-term success is dictated primarily by the strength of its institutions, its judicial and legislative systems. It's educational and health care and social safety apparatus a fair and transparent economy even as culture. If you've got a lot of that going for you. Then striking oil can be a blessing. Just ask Norway you. No way was a pretty poor country relative to many parts of Western Europe when it discovered oil but it had very strong institutions. It wasn't corrupt. They were able to take the resources and use them in the interests of the average. Norwegian. The problem in Venezuela is not the oil it's the political system. The fundamental problem is the institutions. Coming up after the break, we'll ask just how miraculous Norway miracle is. We'll see how socialistic ish it is or isn't and more important since we're American, what does all this talk about socialism mean for the US. The most important thing to learn is how precious the institutional architecture that the US has created is and how important it is for people to. Defend the institutions in the United States it's coming up right after this guy also the freakonomics radio network has been expanding. We now have to spin off shows no questions with me and Angela Duckworth and people I mostly admire with my economics friend and CO author Steve. You can subscribe to both of them right now, every get your podcasts. Also, we will be dropping lebowitz latest episode rate here in the Freakonomics, radio feeds, keep your ears out for that. But the best way to make sure you keep getting his show is to subscribe right now to people I mostly admire as well as to know stupid questions come and thanks. freakonomics. Radio sponsored by rocket mortgage getting a mortgage is a necessary part of the home buying process for many but it doesn't have to be a hassle. 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If you're looking for the best in home fitness solution checkout hydro, a rowing machine that transports you to waterways around the world for five and on-demand classes. Hydro engages eighty six percent of your muscles. It's nearly double bikes and treadmills or the remaining fourteen percent choose from Hydros, Library of pilates strength training and mobility workouts order today, and save two hundred dollars on hydro with code freakonomics at checkout on Hydro Dot Com. That's H. Y. D. R. O. W. DOT COM. Norway is. The exemplar of a hydrocarbon economy that does not wanna live off of its hydrocarbons that again is the economist Jeffrey Sachs what they do in fact is says. Most of the hydrocarbon earnings rather than turn them into a consumption binge, and that's why they've accumulated a trillion dollars in their sovereign wealth fund for the four million Norwegians and they're gonna live very well into the future. Thank you. So My name is Chelsea. S. Salvin S is one of those four million. He's a professor at the Norwegian School of Economics and also, and also deputy director of a research center for ten years. Most of this research is related to income inequality of which Norway has not very much Norway like the other Scandinavian countries ranks among the world's best in equality and probably not coincidentally in happiness. The Norwegian government provides a big basket of universal benefits including Health Care Free College at public. Universities parental. Leave childcare unemployment insurance, and more which to some people sounds like socialism. So I have been met with this argument also. Gel to live in a socialist society and then say, what are you talking about you be don't think about it like that a more appropriate description remember would be a social democracy with a mixed economy. I mean, we have free market economy as you have in the US. The important part is the commission of. Let's say liberal. Society. Free. Market and eventful state. You need three things and that is not what people think about socialism. So nobody in Norway talks about socialism no no. What how then does a Norwegian economist think about the Nordic as if not in terms of socialism, it's not so clear and nobody can give a precise definition better means sort of everybody gets something. I said, we do have a free market economy meaning that. The cake should be as big as it could be, and then you try to share it and how is this sharing accomplished Texas important part This is, of course, a huge point and a huge differentiator from country to country. The Nordic countries rely on most people paying relatively high taxes, which is how they can afford such generous benefits. Norway, in addition has that trillion dollar sovereign wealth fund built up by selling oil Sweden to see no has no oil and relies on a more diversified economy and relatively high flat taxes. By comparison the US has most people paying relatively low taxes, which leaves less money available for the more generous programs that many Democrats would like to see which is why Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren and others have been calling for raising much more tax money but primarily from the very wealthy. In Norway, the tax burden is more equally shared, and then those taxes are aggressively reallocated says your reallocating. Texas. You also need trust that is being used for something useful. So. I think the to create institutions that are trustworthy is probably the most important thing. So in another country, trust is higher one example of this high trust or at least of less friction between employers and employees in Norway is the prevalence of labor unions. The public sector has ninety percent in annexation. And in the manufacturing sector is like sixty percent and in the service sector is thirty percent in the US. Meanwhile, the private sector industry with the highest share of unionized workers is the utility industry with just under eleven percent. So unions are still strong in the Nordic countries. Negotiated medium of ages that differs across industries and differs across the age the workers. That this, extremely good for people at the bottom economists tend to have mixed feelings about unions pointing out there inefficiencies and inflexibilities. James Robinson who has spent decades researching why certain states and societies prosper he's come to a more nuanced understanding. You can't think of unions just from an economic point of view the unions have all sorts of political consequences in society that may be even more important US companies use market power to repress wages. No unions complained powerful role in pushing back against that you know in columnists might say, well, we should be using fiscal instruments taxes. Transfers to redistribute but that means that the state has to be very involved in that process. So what happens if you're in a society where the social contract doesn't really allow that? Well, then you have to use other instruments and I think the Scandinavians clever by equalizing the pre tax distribution of income. You know the state actually had to do a lot less that could be very politically important especially in a place like the US where people. Antagonistic towards the government doing more in other words, unions reduce the need for government redistribution through a sort of pre redistribution that's negotiated directly by employers and workers. This also tends to. Financial outcomes creating less of a gap between the higher and lower earners. So many countries including the US and the UK especially you have seen an increase in inequality. If, you go back to nineteen thirties. You will see that the income inequality in. Norway. was S hi s in the US today. Norway today path for that income inequality decreased, but also social mobility increased. If you look a- cohorts born in the early thirties. See that income mobility was s low s in the US today. You know parents meant a lot for your own. Income, your position, and over ten fifteen birth cohorts this completely changed. So it was a very. Development in his research, Salvin S has found that in Norway parents income has almost no effect on their children's income a remarkable facts and uncommon in most places around the world. But that doesn't mean the Norwegian economic model is flawless. One disturbing trend tied to the oil industry is a diminished demand for education, and this is what you see in own resource based economies. It's easy to get the job good job in the oil sector without any education. It's very tempting. The people I grew up food. From the core. Industry sector that was very common and you see it very clearly in the data that investment is much lower education in those areas. And of course that is fine as everything is goes to lenders enough oil and Gas Dipoto Mr Vandevelde. Dries out. You need to restructure to do something else, and then you don't have a human capital base for that. So that is the big worry i. think another worry is that while Norway has high levels of income mobility, educational mobility is almost non-existent completing a college also have an assist, agree and especially going to an. Elite school let's say become a lawyer. You see that it's extremely unequal than the parental background means a loft in this regard Norway is to the US pretty similar. So that recruitment to delete is very unequal and that's important because the Nordic model requires a high level of trust in your institutions and the people who run them. So for trustworthy elite to rule and they need to have recruitment from different parts of society you know. They need renewal and different perspectives and so on. Another problem Norway faces and this is what a lot of Americans are afraid of when you start talking about socialism or even social democracies is that strong universal benefits including generous unemployment payments can diminish the incentive to work hard the government and then you budget said that you're going to cut back. On some of the support especially for young people because it turned out that. Young People in the twenty S. On Support David Sort of paid better than people at the same age working. So that is a big concern. It's a concern not just for individuals, but for the whole society, the whole economy. This is something James Robinson has spent a lot of time thinking about. Well it may be tempting for the US to import some elements of the. Nordic model. How much would that affect the foundation that has made the US such an incredible engine for innovation after the financial crisis in the United States, there was a lot of discussion love. Oh, the US has the wrong model. The US should just be like Sweden look at. Sweden. There should be more redistribution we pointed out. This is sort of fallacy in economic theory fallacy because well, countries differ from each other on many dimensions, not just three or four. Yes. The strength of their institutions and their tax system and natural resources, but also their culture, their spirit. The US. For instance, you know it's a much more cutthroat society. Why is it like that? Well, because that creates incentives to innovate and people are just very and bishops on entrepreneurial as much less social insurance and the stakes are very high and that doesn't just benefit the US. It's also benefits Sweden because all of that technology and innovation spills over to everybody in the world you know Ukraine ideas, those ideas spread everywhere. So some sense the Swedes. Can have this very harmonious redistributive society because they're free writing off the CUTTHROATS society. So the US is, Kinda, stuck there because you actually went to a model with more redistribution then the whole world rate of economic growth would slow down. There are, of course counterarguments to what Robinson is saying here. Here's one. After decades of high-octane capitalism in the US and elsewhere that is left behind many many people. What if economic growth is not as important as economists have been telling us. Also Robinson's argument is a theoretical argument wouldn't necessarily be true that growth would slow if there were more redistribution in the US. Here's something to think about the economist Casey Mulligan. Also of the University of Chicago recently did a very rough analysis of the economic impact of Bernie Sanders is agenda if it were implemented exactly as sanders claimed during his campaign, an assumption that Mulligan says makes us more of an academic exercise and not a very good forecast. Still Modems analysis considered sanders is proposals for universal healthcare free, public college free childcare, a full transformation of the energy sector and more. MULLIGANS verdict. Quote Senator Sanders. Agenda would reduce real GDP and consumption by twenty four percent. Real wages would fall more than fifty percent after taxes employment and ours would fall sixteen percent combined. There would be less total healthcare less childcare, less energy available to households and less value added in the university sector. The stock market would likely fall more than fifty percent and quote now. Keep in mind that predictions of any sort are nearly impossible and even more. So with something as complicated and massive as the US economy. Also keep in mind that Mulligan is a former member of the council of economic advisors in the trump administration. So make of that what you will. But if the question today is as Jeffrey Sachs earlier, where in economy should the boundaries be drawn between government and market? If that's the question, the wisest counsel seems to come from James Robinson. He reminds us repeatedly that a nation's destinies determined by a great many factors some hard in some softer with no two countries in close to identical. Now, why does that matter? Well let's say you want to substantially increase the role of government in the US to make it look more like those trusting Nordic societies. But as Robinson points out, the US has a very different history based in part on a collective distrust of the state. In the sort of social contract. If you go back to the late eighteenth century, think that created this federal system with is very decentralized state rights and autonomies unlimited role for the federal state. The way many things operate you know it relies on private initiative but how relevant is that history? How much does it affect our modern society and economy? It's not some disconnected thing. It's part of how the US has kept this balance between states and society historically when we started doing research on these topics. We were too focused on. Political institutions we didn't understand well enough. The role of society and Social Institutions Robinson's latest book also co-authored Withdrawn Awesome ugly is called the narrow corridor states societies and the fate of Liberty we emphasize this balance between state and society and having. A balanced between states and societies not just a sort of static thing that you achieve and then you feel good about yourself and go home you know it's not just some kind of moment like the Constitution in Philadelphia all we achieved a balance no no, it's a constant competition and struggle between state on society and unbalance the US has done incredibly well, we tend to see all the imperfections in the United States but I suppose. Working, in Latin America, I tend to look at the comparison all time over the last two hundred years, and what you see is that for all its imperfections course, the US managed to solve these problems much more effectively than any Latin American country and it remains this enormous engine of innovation but Robinson says that's not a call for complacency. Yes. The United States is to solve pretty well, a lot of problems at Latin American countries. Couldn't solve but lesbian a cost to that the fact that you have Ferguson Missouri or you have the south side in Chicago. The inability to deal with those problems is part of the architecture of the state sense. You could say, well, the US state is weaker than the Norwegian states all the Swedish state because you don't really have problems like that in Norway. If you want to combat state institutions I, think the state institutions in. Sweden, are able to deal with problems that the state institutions in the US all table to deal with. But that's because sweetie state didn't have to deal with so many problems historically and it didn't have to figure out how to call in lies this enormous territory and how to avoid kind of centralized tyranny, how to avoid decentralized Anneke and how to find a balance between all these different competing forces and interests and that just left gaps. The gaps in the American state and society are particularly wide at the moment there evident in general discontent you feel in this country right now, they're very evident in our political discourse. And their evident in the fact that Donald Trump was elected as the biggest outlier in the Republican field. While Bernie Sanders the self-declared democratic socialist is the biggest outlier in the twenty twenty democratic field. What does this say for our? Future One more mark of successful states and societies that James Robinson has observed. You have to make compromises and you have to build coalitions and you have to recognize respect. Okay. We differ on that but let's agree that this is in the benefit of the nation I think this issue of like texting the rich in the US context whether I think that's a good thing or not. It seems very unlikely that you can get a coalition around taxing the rich but there's other things you could do which is consistent with this whole notion of the American dream. You Know Corny though that may silent I mean my own view is that still just resonates with a lot of people in this country and you. Can't really deny it but I think there's lots of ways of thinking about redistribution which are consistent with this notion that there should be equality of opportunity for example, look at the enormous inequality of the education system. Why is it that people in US console agree that this is a problem. This is undermining you know a fundamental principle about US society. If you go back two hundred years, this is one thing that made the US what it is you know enormous investment in education going right the way back into the early nineteenth century. So I think there's some issues that you could focus on where you could really gets a political. Coalition you know that's consistent with some fundamental things that we think. This society should be based on. Coming up next time on FREAKONOMICS radio I've heard the argument that paying protection money was part of the cost of doing business in Afghanistan and I think it is a terrible terrible argument you have to weigh. Okay. How much money is going to the Taliban? How much harm has been caused their versus the good news overall doing. The headline at the top of it was seventeen killed outside of Kabul and a suicide bomber and I collapsed and he said he's gone did protection money paid by American firms in Afghanistan Fund Taliban attacks on US military personnel. We will be back with that story next time until then take care of yourself and if you can someone else to. FREAKONOMICS radio is produced by stitcher and W productions. This episode produced by Matt Hickey. Our staff also includes Alison Craig Low Greg, Rippin Zach, Lipinski, Daphne, Chen married to Duke and Cornwallis our intern is immaterial. We had helped this week from James Foster. Our theme song is Mr Fortune by the hitchhiker's all the other music was composed by Luiz Garra. You can get freakonomics radio on any PODCAST APP. If you want the entire ten year back catalogue used the STITCHER APP or go to freakonomics dot com we are on social media and you can reach us at radio at freakonomics dot com as always. Thanks for listening. Stitcher. Support for this podcast, the following message come from an opportunity, a podcast for Morgan Stanley. And entrepreneurs have colored traditionally have a hard time accessing capital the starter grow their businesses joined vice-chairman. 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Hour 2: Back In My Day

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Hour 2: Back In My Day

"The Dan Le Batard Woodstock. Gotcha podcast is brought to you by capital on capitol. One is reimagining banking offering accounts with no fees or minimums that can be opened in five minutes, Capital, One. What's in your wallet Capital One and a member? FDIC. We will get to the funniest thing from the sports weekend in just a moment. But first, there have been very few athletes treated as poorly by a region as Boston treated Bill Buckner, so that with his passing yesterday, people revisited, what a great baseball player. He was because some of the numbers are staggering never had a three strikeout game, even Tony Gwynn, had one of those never once a three strikeout game almost three thousand career hits, but is remembered for his worst public baseball moment, yet, it's interesting. He was it was such a good player. Such a solid professional baseball hitter right up until he made maybe one of the biggest mistakes in baseball history. And that's what people remember most that I think people were objecting. Not even his own city did anything to sue the him. He you know, eat years later, many years later, he would come to Fenway park and the time had healed it. But how many years after that was eighty six ninety six it was, like twenty two years later or is that too, they wanna world, sir? They basically Bill Buckner when he was quoted when he did interviews would say, you know, I can't live there. I can't be there that, that, that city basically has wrecked my life. Yeah. I do think it's worth recalling that his famous infamous error happened in game six you know they still had game seven to win it and didn't vote context is totally irrelevant. We could sit there. All the was bad moves in that game context doesn't matter history, remembers his name for one thing, it was a game seven with Roger Clemens on the mound for the Red Sox xactly. That's, that's what I history doesn't. Remember those details. History goes to the winners. Like, that's not the way that one works, not the context, you could. You're right brother, the context on all of this. It deserves to be shouted, but it takes someone death for us to apply that kind of nuance only because now a whole lot of people should feel guilty about how they treated that man notes threw God. I mean I listen, I don't know. I think people should feel badly about yesterday. And after he, we learned that he passed away that was the first place that we were going. I think I think a lot of what you felt yesterday from American sports fans was shame and guilt about that man died, and we treated him over a human mistake, right? We raced his entire two decade career. And I understand that. I'm just saying in the moment eighty six game six fans being upset with him after they had won a World Series since one thousand nine hundred eighteen and we're trying to erase that drought and he made a colossal mistake. I do understand fans and I understand why they would be upset with Bill Buckner twenty two years. Even number well until they wanna World Series, even knowing that he was a great hitter and a great player for that team. I do understand why so his life enough for him to not be welcome in that city enough for him to have to move. I mean perhaps that's a bit too far probably is too far for. I mean it's too far but I mean, I kinda get in the moment. Why Red Sox fans would be upset with him doing that. Or why Orlando Magic fans will be upset with Nick Anderson. For missing a couple of big rose God's, but when your empathy is so lacking that a human error makes you punish someone for twenty two years. Right. As a city Boston should feel great shame and guilt about what they did to him. But they forgave eventually, which is not know. It was very nice of them to finally forgive him after winning now. And I very early in my career, I was trained in how to write obituaries. I love the idea that forgiveness was only readily available. Well, now we got the. Title. So it's okay. That was my favorite of the takes after they won the championship. Bronson Arroyo became celebrities, right? Bitch worries. The first question you ask is what was this person most known for and, like, like it or not Bill Buckner was most known for that mistake. The analogy is Scott Norwood in the Buffalo Bills, placekicker costing them a Super Bowl offload entreat him that way. Maybe in the moment they did. But buffalo run him out of the city, but buffalo wasn't trying to erase them sort of drought where this is like one of those legendary. Never won anything, give it at the time we all know is the Red Sox that was the team. Right. Gone the longest without winning champion. This is sports though. Don't Omar Vizquel and Jose Mesa? Still hate each other over. Nineteen ninety seven World Series were mess with throw at Omar Vizquel, every single time he faced him just because of things. He said about him afterwards like this sports. This is what you do. Right. Exactly. There was an overreaction yesterday to the overreaction of daring to mention this famous error in writing about his life. I mean, it's fine to, to put that in context to say man, this guy had a great career twenty two year major league career, but it's not nothing that he's most known for that one mistake to put that in the second paragraph of vizo bitchy. I don't think is illegitimate just too late on the forgiveness is what I would say just much too late long. He went into old age like, you know, Larry David sort of tried to resurrect the softer side, man. If you read. Quotes from Bill Buckner about those two decades what they felt like to him. It's dark man his his family, worried for him by because he wasn't. He had he was a fugitive from Boston. But eventually they forgave, I mean that, that never done them after they won the World Series right after they won the world. He was fed b before his late life dementia hit in. He was certainly aware that he ultimately was forgiven by Boston, which is I'm grateful that he had that at least some telling me to be a human Dan sports. I wanna boo them. They make a mistake. Who don't make mistake wanna hold things against them forever. Let me do you, do you. Okay. You can forgive for all of us. All right. You guys are all entitled to twenty two years of burying got wanna hate the official that through the flag against Miami. Again, stayed gonna hate him forever, and change that if you want to go ahead and not hate him, your full entitled and make up for my are you sure though, because I feel like in Boston, once one person aids, all of them after eight are you sure about that? Like all like you think that, that's something that, that you're positive about. I don't even want to say to reporters name, but. Whoa, whoa, whoa. You made me do. Now. Apologize to me. He had over twenty seven hundred hates and had a career to ninety average. I'm wondering how great would he would he have had to been where that was it? The first they think about what it's Bill Buckner. Whatever you thirty five hundred heads. Mazed it. I think that the nature of the mistake was so large, that there is no forgiving. It there is no career that would have arrived at Boston, forgiving denying us title until many years later when they did happen upon forgiveness once they won the title. Yeah. I think maybe hall of fame might have trumped the error fame career. Maybe it's the same thing with Bartman, though, like didn't they try to get them back after they won the World Series? They tried to give him a ring, and he's like nab good. Like they didn't wait to Bartman. They did do it to Bartman, and he's no longer someone. Who's in the public eye? He's never these these still the getting sports. No one's talked to that dude about how she cog. Oh, ruined his life. He won't. He won't do interviews because of how scarring old thing was, but it took a championship for them to forgive him. But did they they wanted to give him a ring? Yeah. I'm good. I don't want to be seen there. Are you going to have this exact same segment when the time comes at he passes away, and his Dan reveal going once again, make it about him? Break out the red panties. We arrange baby that was amazing to see reveal eulogize Bill Buckner by saying, I'm sorry, that I want my one championship at the expense of your pain. We were all thinking that, you know what Mike I gotta be honest, though, that was predictable, or less predictable than what I thought we were going to get which is Bill Buckner got two million dollars in endorsement before his death with a bowl sold for. Your spring is finally here. And if you're looking to get back into a great workout groove, I had to tell you about the latest from peleton the tread heard about the bikes. I've told you about the bikes. 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Discover the immersive and challenging total body training, you get from peleton tread Balaton is offering our listeners a limited time offer. Go to one peleton dot com. Use the lebatardshow one hundred dollars off accessories with the purchase of a trend. I can't believe it that Philip brought his little brother on our mission into orbit along until it got their alarm poli get there. I'll learn to get there. No. I can't believe how easy it was to save hundreds of dollars on my car insurance with Geico. What's this button? Do what's this button, do what's this button, do what's this? Believe that Geico could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. Donlevatar a common listen to Misora, but a man named Jay of hormone near barely kept his family fed. But then one day, he was shooting at them food and up through the ground. Come in crew all that is black gold, Texas tea stugatz. Well, the next thing you know, we'll just. Again, folks said jet getaway said, California is the place you ought to be. So they loaded up the truck and they moved up overly. Libertad show with stugatz on ESPN radio. Get in touch with the show any time through the one eight hundred flowers Twitter feed at lebatardshow at stugotz ninety act. Greg, Cody, if you missed any of our interviews, go check him out on demand. And the Dan Le Batard podcast brought to you by Capital, One Capital, One is re imagining banking offering accounts with no fees, or minimums, that can be open in five minutes, Capital, One. What's in your wallet Capital One and a member FDIC guys? It's time for straight talk. It is brought to you by straight talk wireless. We'll get to funniest thing from the sports weekend in a second. But this is an actual thing that just came out of stugatz mouth. He's doing highly questionable all week, four thirty eastern ESPN. And he actually said while looking at the show, outline bleep, there's a lot of Lakers stuff in here. I'm going to have to read that damn story. Aggressively lazy in ways that no no bounds. Put it on the poll. Guillermo is there anyone in the media aggressively Lazier than through got as he laying down the foundation for stepping out a couple of segments early, though, to read that now I did say, at the same time as I said, hey, I'm going to take the Ron McGill segment to read the Baxter home store. Listen, it's a long story, man. Who could take me a while to get through it game on my favorite thing. When stugatz does highly questionable by far is when the producers are shocked that he gives them information. They did not just shocked when he produces a stat or something that shows that there was some research involved what was yesterday's you were. So proud of he took a victory lap outta here which was the stat of yesterday out of nowhere. What I tried out stat. It's like they've been hit with a blow torch. I mean it really is at. So I had I had two guys Leonard, and LeBron James. It's nineteen sixty three who have averaged twenty nine point eight points per game and nine point eight rebounds in the Eastern Conference finals, only to LeBron and kuwa- the reaction you just had Greg was the reaction of the producers have when I said it is. And then we thought it might be wrong. Was it wrong? Did anyone check you just got? Right. I checked it and by checking it. I mean, I got it from Ryan Cortez time now for the funniest thing from the sports weekend. Hey people what sport man, you laugh hardness. He's weekend is a segment would go, what made you laugh this weekend. Buddy thing for the sports weekend is brought to you by Wendy's right now. Enjoy a small frosty at Wendy's for only fifty cents chocolate or vanilla, either way it's just fifty cents. Hurry into Wendy's and treat yourself to one today at participating Wendy's for a limited time. Chris, what was the funniest thing from the sports weekend. Now this didn't happen this weekend. But I learned of it this weekend, Drake has a Steph curry and Kevin Durant tattoos on his arm. And he is such a front runner. Are you kidding me? Put it on the poll, Guillermo at lebatardshow is Drake lame, for having a Steph curry, and Kevin Durant, had to on his arm of Gambro. What was the funniest thing for you from the sports weekend? I didn't see this. But I want to hear the story it just as Greg, Cody getting pranked into pouring half ajar parmesan cheese onto a slice of pizza. Oh, this is great. This is our oldest trick in the book with them. We've talked about how Greg, Cody lives life, every day for the first time he doesn't know how to turn on his own TV he doesn't know what he orders when he goes the restaurants. He has to ask his wife, so every single time we have a pizza shop, that we go to in Hollywood, Florida, we go to it all the time anytime I was in town and every single time we go there, my brother and I screw the parmesan cheese and he pours it on. So he pours an entire jar parmesan cheese. And every single time he gets livid. And do you ever sees a pizza, all of a sudden, it's gonna amount of and every single time he acts like it's the first time it's ever happened to. Ammo put it on the poll. Is it a jackass prank to get your father with the unscrewed lid to the parmesan jar on pizza, ROY they've also done that with pepper Boeing? How do you keep falling for it? It's only happened twice. I don't like it happened. I'm sure at least five times trust his loved ones that they wouldn't do layer him the sons the fruit of my own loins turning on me. Roy. What was the funniest thing from the sports weekend? Yesterday coming out. Bullpen indians. Reliever Oliver Perez did not feel comfortable wearing his spikes. So he asked the clubhouse it to give them new shoes. So is left on the mound standing, there are no shoes on just sucks, set the same Oliver Perez, that is the same. Can't be the same all of that phrase career campy the same Oliver Perez. It's not the same. There has to be another Oliver Perez. We will look it up. We will send our pack. Mike enough, alva- Perez is a common name. Yeah. Yeah. Mike. What was the funniest thing from the sports weekend for you? So I really enjoyed watching sue God's call the lacrosse women's final four great games. He was pretty good very informative but there was a great moment. And same Puzo career in sudden victory. I learned that they don't call. It sudden death. They call it sudden victory classic game between North Carolina Boston College, and Stu guts, expert color. Commentators says you want anyone but same Puzo shooting here. Moments later. I'm talking second. Same Puzo game winner. Not the ending. I I was hoping for listen. I was feeling very good about myself, I was confident they were using SAMA Puzo the greatest women's lacrosse player of all time as a decoy most of the game. I thought they would do it again. They didn't. They went to the greatest player of all time in the biggest moment of that game I was wrong. It's the same Oliva Peres it is, I've confronted. I mean way to going by the way to go out there and say the greatest female college lacrosse player of all time, you're going to want her to not shoot here. I was getting so much positive reaction might that I started to think I could tell you things that we're going to happen before they have Tony Romo was Roman. Did. There was a couple of times that you were also I it seems I'm happy that you're consistent consistently not listening to your co workers, because often they would make a point, and you would echo it as, if you was like your the point for the first time I said that very poorly. Greg, greg. What was your favorite funniest thing from the sports weekend? This made me laugh because I pictured a bunch of white guys in blazers burgundy, blazers the Harvard baseball team made the college World Series of the first time in eons and celebrated by formerly shaking hands with. Very formally Stu gods. What do you have dodgers pitcher? Rich hill filled with breakage shouting, curses after a raise hitter bucket down the third base line to beat the shift his exact quote bleep bleep bleep. Dammit bleep. The whole bleeping left side is bleeping fully wide open pretty good. I've got Lamar Jackson getting to camp and learning that they've installed an entirely new often quote. Quote. When I got here, coach was like, yeah, we have a totally new system. You're going to have to go through this, and that it's been getting to me a little bit, and quote, according to CBS sports donlevatar threat. Cody is married to a Saint of a woman and this morning. She finally shouted shut up at Greg Cody, and the reason she shouted shut up disrespectfully Greg, Cody is because he would not stop singing kung FU fighting's through God's house in the kitchen, making coffee and it's just, you know, soon gets in your head, and you gotta let it out, and I only know like everybody was kung FU. Has a fast Eddie. After about a ten renditions of that at first the volume on the TV went up a little bit. And then he's like, what? He's like, would you shut up? I'm trying to listen to how did you get into your head? Do you remember? I don't know. It just appeared is a magical. It's just appeared in my hand. I had to let it up. VC's donlevatar show with his two guys on ESPN radio. Greg cody's back in my day is coming at you in a couple of minutes in this segment after stugatz begins to read poorly that you'd Dan ESPN radio is presented by progressive insurance. Guests on the Dan lebatardshow up here via the shell Pennzoil performance line. Here's your sports center update Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert, is awake, responsive and resting comfortably after suffering. A stroke Gilbert, fell ill, and was taken to the hospital where he was then stricken with a stroke capitals forward. If Guinea, what's the name again? Roy who's nets off is denying that he used drugs of wants to prove it by undergoing a medical examination following a video showing him sitting next to a table that has two lines of white powder. Her on top of it. And finally, the funnier die special limited series between two ferns, which stars Zach galifianakis is being turned into a full length feature film that will premiere on Netflix in September. Single mistake, which you got their Levitz. Eric the mistakes. Way the vivid seats app. It's easy to find awesome. Synthetic game go to the app store or Google play. Download the app and at the promo code chips at checkout to get ten percent off your first order. Don't buy just any see get vivid. See, yes. For all the latest headlines and information tune into sports center on ESPN radio all throughout the day. Here. They come. Off the mistakes. Hear my ad-lib was here. It comes the mistakes. Up on a I take right now Stephen a Smith is going to be doing a finals preview. Game tonight. Seven PM with Doc Rivers, and Magic Johnson. And Michael wilbon. What are you laughing about Guillermo I have a lot going on in my head right now? I'm so excited about that. Also. Now what we're talking about. I kind of believe Palinka on this Kobe story. Yeah. I believe it. So the story is that he arranged a dinner with heath ledger. And Kobe Bryant. Right. And everybody's saying, well the dark Knight came out and heath ledger. Died six months before it. Right. But Kobe's a powerful guy it's very possible that Kobe couldn't have gotten. Invent screening of it before he went to Madison Square Garden. And he saw it before heath ledger died. So I started looking it up and I see that Kobe Bryant played against the Knicks in Madison Square Garden on December twenty third, right? And he's leisure died in January. So it's possible that he either saw a preview of it. He got a screener or in advance or he just. Read about it, and the facts were somewhat jumbled a little bit when telling the story. But I kind of believe that this happened, even though everyone else in the world is saying, no, it didn't happen. It's impossible because it's such like there's people involved with actual names, and these are things that could be verified. So it'd be so ballsy if you can say that of him to just totally make that up and no one would ever catch him on it. It has to have had. It's an agent and agent would they do that all the time? I believe him. Okay. Very good. Now can plant your flag over there, you go ahead and ride that out. See where I'd takes you to glory and championships. I'm sure just ride plunk into the sky and like a chariot made of hope. So Jeanie Buss. What they're asking on. I take is has Jeanie Buss ruined the Lakers and what's funny about that. If you think she's bad. Get a load of the boys like. Her father is a notorious womanizer for all time gave her the power because he knew those boys. And she was the most competent of anything that was happening there, boys. Got I crack though. And then there was like some language in the will of like if they screwed it up after a couple of years, Jeanie gets it. And they did so genie got it one of that we're asking, she's screw, you know. And they all are all of them are doing a great job of appearing incompetent where you it would appear right now. Put it on the poll Guillermo at lebatardshow is Kurt Rambis, his wife running the Lakers, because the Lakers only gravitate to people who were in that very small bubble of the Lakers, which is how you come to think that Magic Johnson would be good for that position that what about Magic Johnson? Gives you the idea that he would be visionary about the evolution of basketball. Nothing just as play. How did they let Jerry West getaway? That's my question. And I'm have serious. He's in the family. A lot of people are writing in that Greg Cody got it wrong on Roger Clemens. Starting game seven of the Bill Buckner World Series. It was Bruce Hurst. I actually got that wrong, Greg confirm what I said. So you both got I thought you said it, but I, I did think it was. I thought it was the all sorry about the time now for Greg cody's back in my day. Now in these treat. The mineral name, here's your guy, Rick could he with back in my day? Drugs. I have never understood the popularity of food trucks. And I'm glad that popularity is waning. It may not actually be waning in which case, my apocryphal comment might hopefully serve as an instigator of that decline. Food trucks, aren't even an original idea. The original food trucks of the small silver cited vehicles that roll up to construction sites around lunchtime. Now these food trucks serve a utilitarian purpose. In might be the unsung grand marshal if ever, we have a parade of vehicles, the food truck, we think of now is the large lumbering, elaborately painted rolling monstrosity typically offering specific fare, such as tacos MAC and cheese, or barbecue, like, yachts, and other showy boats these food trucks, tend to have plenty or other, too clever names, a park near my house has food truck Tuesday, and we ventured there once for dinner abroad, circle of some fifteen or twenty trucks surrounding us, like a nineteenth century circle of Ticonderoga wagons in the wild west, I discovered three things about food trucks. They aren't fast. They aren't cheap and the food is closer to okay, then memorable, they weren't even convenient in an age when I can get anything. From any restaurant delivered directly to my door. I'm supposed to use an app to track down a wandering truck. Yeah. I don't think so. But the other thing about food trucks is I don't know who slinging my hash. I also suspect that somebody who only bought a food, truck, because he couldn't swing a Bank loan to buy an actual restaurant. And now he's an embittered folk cook getting a bunch of extraneous ingredients the MAC and cheese, charging twelve bucks or, and taking too long to hand it to me through a window as I stand in an open field with a plastic four rounded by exhaust fumes, who trucks make about as much sense as, as me driving to the curb of a busy intersection at noon popping, the trunk of my car, and purporting to create gourmet fare in a pup, pup kitchen, sit next to my Gulf. Give me the silver panels food truck at the construction site. Hey, here's two bucks. Tossed me a cellophane wrap triangle of a sandwich and begun with you. I'm Greg, Cody. And that's how it was back in my day. Put it on the pole, Guillermo at lebatardshow. How do you feel about food trucks for or against? Sometimes it just takes a couple of words like I'm wondering where he's going about laughing too hard exhaust fumes. Yeah. Want it is funny. That's, that's what I didn't think there were many people, are you? Okay, greg. How many times are you going to clear your throat into the microphone? We the you've got a big demand. Woo. All right. I mean I'll hats in is at twelve thirty eastern. We are fifty minutes away from him trying to tackle again, the American ninja warrior, cores eleventh season of American ninja warrior premieres tomorrow, eight to ten on NBC and again, fifty minutes from now, amino has an on ESPN news. We'll take another crack after failing miserably, and it's the most viewed clip in the history of American injure, warrior returns to the source of his shame donlevatar do lists include the dead because if they do then Lawrence alleviate continues to be an a list, actor stugatz, a list does not include the dazzle Buster, Keaton. Analyst Charlie Chaplin is no longer in a list. I think he is. Because he's such an icon, Mr. silent films, make up your mind and does it change in not you're all over the place. Gag me with the another one changes with death. Not what death of career Cagney time VC's live at our show with this two guys on ESPN radio. So many sons with famous names and a grandson now running around out there, you strengths key name. So many famous baseball names producing sons that are in the major league. Yes, I have found my baseball team. This seem is going to get me to fake pay attention to the sport. The Toronto Blue Jays not only do they have busy owes kid flat Guerrero's kid running around there. But in the organization, the Blue Jays have Dante Bichette skid. Mark, lighters. Kid Roger Clements kid, and Jeff Conan's kid. This is my squad. Gamma put it on the poll, do the current Toronto Blue Jays lead all of sports history and famous, sperm, Niner. So Greg, Cody sent me some notes here on things that he's interested in talking about, and at the very top of the list is a ninety six year old playing the harmonica. Oh my. We'll get to that in a second. But before we get to that I don't understand why that's the top of his list the story of the day. All over television is Baxter homes going inside with some reporting on the Lakers and the Lakers, have had a ton of turnovers to God's and unusual amount of turnover. It is the, the reporting is so damning in terms of showing an organization that is leaderless, that is having a real problem with leadership, and it goes into all of the tensions that were in play the Tel the tensions that were televised. I wonder if magic feels that all bad about what he's done to the Lakers over the last couple of weeks, where he came in wanted it to because she thought it would be cushier wasn't working that hard. They lent his name to things to bring some credibility didn't have the power that he thought he had wasn't trusted by the people to use the power. He thought he had correctly and then bolts on the process. Without telling anyone blindsiding these people who are family. And now it's just doing the broadcasting circuit going right back to the cushy thing, he had before where it's like, hey, I'll be on with Stephen a Smith tonight at seven PM on ESPN and say, a whole bunch of other things that are going to poop all over the Lakers. Tonight's going to be interesting. I do wonder if magic sit on the front end. Hey, I'm just a figurehead. I'm here to get guys like LeBron James. I'm here to be Magic Johnson. I'm not going to work hard. I got other things going on in my life. If he said that on the front end the magic did what he said he was going to do. He was Magic Johnson. Who got LeBron James? Oh, but Stu gods. To go on I take and blame everybody except for LeBron James to go on I take and put that in the news stream in a way that required this kind of reporting from Baxter homes about one of the premier franchises in the league. Magic Johnson did something very much for himself and no one else there. And he did it. At every turn when running that organization like in terms of a team player everyone loves for a smile. Magic johnson. Is that guy? But in adulthood, as an executive men he buried everyone with zero teamwork. Cut. He's magic Johnston. Everyone buried everyone. Magic johnson. A fascinating parenthetical to the Lakers dish, shovel moment right now is the idea of Pat Riley, suggesting that he might have been receptive to going back to L in replacing magic, but they never reached out to him. I thought that was very interesting. It's odd that they would not reach out. I don't think he said, might I think that he said something that has crossed his mind, but nobody reached out, right? But he's been thinking about going back to Malibu for the last fifteen years. But when you say no one's reached out to you. You're kind of saying, isn't it odd that no one reached out to me? I mean that's saying, well, but isn't it yet given that you're consulting with Kurt Rambis, his wife and now Kurt Rambis is the shadow president, Kurt Rambis last seen being laughed at for allegedly liking porn accidentally on Twitter. And then denying it fervently, but wouldn't you, guess, like I have to think they're at least smart enough to there had to be a conversation, where, hey, let's reach out to Pat, and I think that got LeBron. And LeBron was like, I don't want to if I wanted to be with bad. I'd still be with them in Miami. Yeah. I do think pets said no one directly reached out to him. I mean, he's got so many friends still in LA that, you know, through a friend of a friend, maybe a conversation, one of the interesting things in this Baxter home story is the imprint of LeBron and his people, where Rich Paul is comfortable saying to Adam silver coming up to a table. Hey, we gotta get rid of Luke Walton. We got to replace him with Tyron Lou as if Adam silver supposed to do something about it, like just that comfortable, speaking in front of people about wanting to oust the coach of the team will Silva did engage him because he originally said, hey, I don't think Luke Walton is the right coach and silver kinda shrug. And he said, well, who would you hire? And then he said, typewriter caged him, with polite dinner conversation. Why is Rich Paul standing over my table telling me that they need a new coach? I'm the Commissioner of the league and he runs the league. But the follow up is odd if you're. Mm silver? I found it on that he has did sue guys just give a detail of a story just making conversation. But let's get speaking of stories to this ninety six year old her Monica player. Why is this interesting to you? Why the hell was this interesting? Well, it's fascinating may, Dan, Greg, Cody on the ESPN radio.

Greg Cody Bill Buckner ESPN Lakers Guillermo Magic Johnson Boston lebatardshow LeBron James Capital One baseball Dan Red Sox FDIC Roger Clemens Kurt Rambis Wendy Tony Gwynn Fenway park
Catherine Rampell on covering the "economic coma" caused by the coronavirus

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

35:13 min | 1 year ago

Catherine Rampell on covering the "economic coma" caused by the coronavirus

"Well it's been another week of bad terrible downright horrible news and that's true on multiple fronts. Obviously the healthcare story. The hospital story is first and foremost. There's a political story that continues to be disturbing and then there's an economic story about an economic coma that may last for very long time. So let's get smarter about that part of the story but skew the music and start this week's reliable sources podcast on your host. Brian stelter coming to you again. This week from my apartment in New York City. We've been figuring out how to remotely tape these podcasts. In the same way that hundreds of media companies have been figuring out new ways to broadcast and report and do it all from remote locations. I'm recording this on Friday April third. The end of the week that saw an official March unemployment report came out but report was incomplete to the boy to be misleading. Because what we're seeing every week. With applications for unemployment benefits. The jobs claims they staggering. They are terrifying. They are a massive story. And I know I'm not an expert in this but I wanNA bring in an expert to talk with us about what reporters should know what everyone should know while covering this economic collapse in the the weeks and perhaps months to come. I caught the rim. Pell is a nationally syndicated comets for the Washington Post. She focuses primarily on the economy policy. Coulter anti join me now. Catherine thanks for on get to be here. Let's talk about what the press gets right and gets wrong when covering the US economy because there's a lot of reporters right now who need a crash course in how to cover? What is this ballooning unemployment rate and this massive crisis in in the business world whether there's multiple emergencies happening on multiple fronts right now? How should we best cover the economic emergency? I think there's always sort of a deficit in economic business quantitative fluency within the media. This was definitely true around the time that the financial crisis and great recession hit now over a decade ago at this point and I think that there was some catching up to speed that happened of necessity in the couple of years after that but A lot of those skills have maybe gone fallow In the years since and so my concern is that I wanna make sure that members of the press particularly those who are in a position to be interviewing economic experts and surrogates of this president or White House officials about economic issues are sufficiently informed to be able to push back when they're being spun end to really have some grounding in what actual economists are saying is going on in. What should what we should be looking for. So I think it's a matter of journalists getting up to speed doing their homework. This is the issue regardless of what the topic is being discussed whether it's economics or national security or anything else but I think it's especially critical today that journalists really quickly get up to speed. Get some familiarity with the data that are coming out and the kinds of ways government officials who need to be held to account might try to allied their questions. So what are communists telling you and other reporters? What are they seen happen? How did they describe what's happening? I think there are a few major themes that I'm hearing and that I'm reading about as well. One is that theories no tension between what's good for the economy and what's good for public health. I think that there has been sort of this narrative out there in the right wing media in particular and among some people who are advising president trump who call themselves economists that there's a trade off between what we need to do to save lives and we need to do to salvage the economy and that's just not true both at theoretical models and historical data based on for example the nineteen eighteen Spanish flu. Show that when you intervene. More quickly When when cities locked down more quickly than implement social distancing things like that to save lives that also has the long term effect of maximizing economic growth that in nineteen eighteen the cities that shut down businesses and schools earlier in a long run did better economically than cities. That didn't so that so that's one major theme another major theme. Is that given that? We need to shut down a lot of economic activity both in the name of saving lives and preserving future activity. We need to get help to people as quickly as possible right so that they can afford to be able to stay home whether that means their business has shut down or not If they're sick or there's Worry about customers coming to a restaurant or whatever Finding ways to bridge that gap to make it financially possible for people to do what is in the best interests of again public health in in long run economic growth. And then the third thing that I would say that is emerging as a theme is that we really need to prepare people for the duration of these dual crises. No the the public health emergency and the economic crisis for example. If you look at an estimate that came out from the Congressional Budget Office on Thursday they estimated where unemployment would be this quarter and also what it would be over the next couple of years and they estimated that unemployment would top ten percent for the second quarter of twenty twenty Which is as high as it was at the worst of the last recession great recession but it will also remain at nine percent at the end of twenty twenty one which has a long way out so I think economists people do. These sorts of economic forecasts are coming around to the idea that this is GonNa last a while and the job of the press. I think is to prepare people for that very strong likelihood that this is not going to be a brief shutting down of economic activity Maybe will bounce back you know. Maybe there'll be some phenomenal treatment or vaccine that surprises US and keeps the rate of infections and mortality at bay and therefore the economy is able to bounce back quickly. But barring that possibility we really need to be able to prepare for the long haul to prepare households and businesses for that and we need to have policies that take into account those kinds of possible long running a very negative effects. You you see any political leaders or media institutions doing a good job of preparing books for the long haul and. I'm not sure I've seen little ears do that. That's a good question. I think this White House has done exceptionally bad job. And when I say the White House I primarily me president trump where he obviously downplayed the risks of the public health. Emergency until quite recently saying you're going to be open by Easter at Sarah. He seems to have come around to listening to some of his public health experts and has relented and taken less pollyannaish outlook. I hope that lasts. We don't want to scare people but again we want to prepare people for what's to come. There have been some lawmakers who have been working towards a so called phase four corona virus relief. Bill that I think takes into account some of these long term. Knock on effects. The proposals are not perfect. But the idea that they're thinking about face for and that they're trying to think ahead to what additional adverse phenomena we could be facing for example states and cities are gonna be broke and they're in a lot of trouble and that's part of the reason why the anticipated generation of this economic downturn is relatively long. You know that it's that it's not going to last just a couple of months because you have these. This sort of domino affect people lose their jobs. State revenue goes down. Demand for state services. Goes up States go broke. They lay off teachers. And then you sort of have this downward spiral so there are these kinds of adverse consequences. That some folks are anticipating eating. Certainly some public policy experts have been shouting from the rooftops about and I think some lawmakers are talking about. You Know Nancy. Pelosi has talked about some elements of the face for Bill. There's been discussion of but from both trump and end Pelosi. I believe about an infrastructure package which I think is I'm in favor of more infrastructure investment. I don't know that it's the thing that we need now but it could be the thing that we need a year from now to get the economy up and running. So there are some glimmers of forward-looking this. Maybe but I'm not really optimistic. That the whole of government or the whole of the media is really there yet because if I was a dismissive news about this at all then there was a fifteen day plan from the federal government. Now there's a thirty day plan from the federal government. I guess forty five days comes next but it's all piecemeal. It all feels a few inches at a time is incredibly frustrating. So we're talking on Friday April third and the monthly jobs report just came out the the unemployment rate a jumped up to at. What four point four percent read in some ways? This was almost like some of the misleading cut cup covering this data was misleading was confusing Because it all came before the real turn the real shutdown of mark so tell us how to be a broken these numbers so the numbers in the jobs report came out Friday morning. Those are usually among the most watched data points whether the economy is good or bad. You know this is like a blockbuster survey everybody pays attention to it. But it's just frankly not that relevant this month there are two surveys. Actually that this report uses to to pull both the unemployment rate and the job growth or job loss numbers and those surveys refer to basically what was going on in the first half of March and if you recall March seems like it was lasted about a decade. But if you can remember back then the real bloodletting did not begin at that point. This jobs report says that some seven hundred thousand people lost their jobs on net or seven hundred thousand jobs were were destroyed on net. So that's still quite a lot. But it almost certainly underestimates the magnitude of the job losses because a lot of cities in states not really begin either suggesting or enforcing mandatory stay at home orders. Non Essential workers until after the reference week for these surveys. One thing happened in early. March was at market like Seattle. That felt the impact early. And that's why we're starting to see the unemployment rate tick up even though it's behind. I think it's partly that people also on their own cut. You know consumers on their own decided you know what maybe I don't feel so comfortable going out to a restaurant going shopping at my local department store or going out to the bar or whatever so there was some of it was just consumers responding people getting sick people staying home initially or fear of those kinds of things and so the the the biggest declines were in leisure and hospitality food services and drinking places in particular so. I think a lot of those Job Losses were just due to consumers on their own. Saying you know what maybe now's not the time to going to a crowded pub and then since then of course have been much more widespread closures around the country as evidenced by the fact that have these weekly unemployment claims data which is basically if I get laid off in. I qualify for unemployment insurance. I put in a claim through my state government and those numbers have been like astronomical just way off the charts in the last two weeks of March alone. Ten million people applied newly applied for unemployment benefits. And so that gives you. I think a much more up-to-date reading where things are and that to probably understates the severity of the problem because a lot of people were not able to apply their state. unemployment insurance website crashed or the phone lines. Were overwhelmed so Adam. It's probably much more than that ten million. Did you ever think you're crazy? Would see numbers like this for for weekly jobless claims. No absolutely not if you look at the long historical record the previous peak one week peak was in nineteen eighty two and it was like a six hundred ninety five thousand or something Less than seven hundred thousand and last week it was something like six point six million. So you know what's a little bit hard to say is in many ways. This economic crisis is unprecedented. Is it actually going to be a a much deeper recession than we've seen in the past or is it just happening much more quickly than what we've seen in the past because that's what's really new here it's that everybody loses their jobs at once essentially and maybe the total number of people out of work won't be higher than we had seen in previous recessions? I think it's hard to imagine that being the case just given how widespread these kinds of business shutdowns are around the country. But look it's possible that what we're just seeing that's new is the speed of job losses and in the months ahead. It all kind of stabilized. But I'm not super optimistic about that. I think what we are probably seeing as both unprecedented speed of a recession coming on as well as unprecedented scale. And that's what's really really scary here. I read this described as a nuclear bomb on our economy. I've heard this described as a self inflicted wound. What do you think of the right metaphor right ways to describe this sudden jolt for that? I've been using is that we are going into an economic coma. Basically a maybe. It's a medically induced economic coma. I don't know how how tortured you want this metaphor too but basically what's happening in what's a little bit. Different from previous recessions is that this is sort of deliberate that that it. It's not that everybody loses confidence at wines and decides to stop engaging in economic activity. Because they're worried about the future. There's a part of. There's an element of that. Certainly as we were just talking about a lot of people stop going out to restaurants on their own but beyond that you know these are basically orders from government officials and recommendations from public health experts that we saw engaging in economic activity and in a sense. It's like we want everybody to go into this collective coma simultaneously in hope that after about. I don't know two months three months however long it takes for the pandemic to get under control in those estimates may be too optimistic at this point we all wake up from economic coma and then resume business as usual but of course the problem is that even as we all go on hiatus or go to take a nap or whatever whatever. The Metaphor is our bills. Do not people still have to pay rent? They still have to pay mortgages. They still have to put groceries in the fridge and buy meals for their kids so those financial obligations continuing. I think that's what makes this particular economic challenge unusually difficult the kinds of tools that we would have used in previous recessions. Don't exactly apply here. Because in previous recessions the goal is to get people out spending again and say please go shop. You know. We'LL GIVE YOU MONEY. Go buy stuff but higher invest and now. That's those are not really the message. Is We want to give people. We want to make sure that people can stay flow and continue to pay their bills but we are not encouraging them to go out and shop in. And patronize their favorite restaurants or Broadway. Show or whatever because for other reasons that you know poses major risks to society to people's lives so you know instead we kind of want people to just go on hiatus for awhile figure out a way to keep them as whole as possible and get the economy in shape to reopen at some future point like I said there are these kinds of knock on effects. Where if people don't pay their bills get you know? May maybe they get evicted or whether it's a coffee shop down the corner or it's a household or whatever and if if the government doesn't get tax revenue they're unable to keep schools open so there are these kinds of knock on effects that we can't anticipate in we had seen in previous recessions. But policymakers have not yet gotten ahead of. And so you know strategizing around. This crisis is just so different and so much more challenging than had been the case in previous recessions. It makes me wonder if you're seen enough creative thinking and creative problem solving in the past few weeks or not. I don't think the problem is a lack of ideas. I can only speak for myself but I am inundated with emails from everyone from like. Phd ECONOMISTS AT FANCY SCHOOLS to random reader. Saying maybe the government should think about doing this. Have they thought about getting the checks out to people this way? The ideas getting to the people in charge. That's the problem I think. Part of the challenge is as you were talking about before kind of a a lack of fluency with what the experts are actually advising in kind of basic misunderstandings about what you know whether economists are saying we should reopen the economy or not. They are not saying that. Part of the problem is just political. Dysfunction and part of the problem is that the basically the plumbing of the federal government is just not equipped to handle these kinds of problems quickly that even if you can get our lawmakers which drew are notoriously polarized and dysfunctional right now even if you can get them together where right now are the last. I've Seen Anyway Mitch. Mcconnell was saying that Nancy Pelosi should cool it with her face for proposal. Idea which I think is very unhelpful. But let's say McConnell and Pelosi get together and say yes. These are the three or four things we need to do. We need to expand food stamps for need to shore up state and local government budgets Blah Blah Blah. These are good ideas even if they come to. Some sort of bipartisan consensus. The government moves so damn slowly to actually implement anything. But if you look at Romney I guess it was the phase three bill to send out checks to American households of up to twelve hundred bucks. That's GONNA take weeks if not months for many people to get that money the IRS. I think had said that it's going to send a hundred million checks at a rate of five million per week and it could take twenty weeks meaning at the final round of payments may not go out until September. September is just like years and years away in With in the scale of the urgency that we face it may sound like. It's actually twenty weeks but in reality people need that money now and I'm also similarly worried about how quickly these loans are going to go out to small businesses. I just. I'm not convinced that the plumbing is there to get that money out basically through financial institutions which are actually doing the administrative work but the the small business administration is backing those loans. I'm not convinced based on the reporting that we have seen that banks are prepared to do it that the SBA has set up a system sufficiently said that money can get out very quickly so there are a lot of challenges here. It's not that there are good ideas. It's that we need there to be some convergence on the best of those ideas and we need that. We need our governments actually function correctly. So that those ideas get executed gottlieb's meter weather in government officials and media leaders are really in touch with what's happening on the ground. Let's take a break and then talk about that more with Catherine Pell on the reliable sources podcast in just a moment as the corona virus pandemic has four schools across the country to close teachers are scrambling to get their curriculum and their students online. I'm poppy harlow in this week. On box-files I talked to two leaders. Who are supporting those teachers students and their parents during this crisis Russia Johnny the founder and CEO of girls who code and Joe Holland. The CEO of teachers pay teachers. They talk to me about how their organizations are working to help the most vulnerable students during this uncertain time. You can listen to the latest episode of Boss Files. Wherever you get your podcasts. Your about to seize your Keel. O.`Neil like you've never seen him before the show about my life just because I have more than the average guy doesn't mean I'm better than the average got like all new Thursdays at nine on. Tnt and we are back here on reliable sources podcast taping remotely with Catherine Round Pel Washington Post. We used to be colleagues back from New York. I'm David sort of during the great recession more than a decade ago. I do wonder I wonder this for many years. If there's too much of a disconnect between the big national news rooms in the United States where coverage decisions are made and then the classic mainstream the average American working a fulltime job do. There's that disconnect cather doesn't affect the news coverage at a time like this. I think there's always a problem with that disconnect whether we're talking about the economic realities facing so-called real Americans or their cultural tastes or there are other political views. I mean this is not to economic coverage right. There was a lot of soul-searching newsrooms in twenty sixteen about why so many major media organizations kind of missed the trump phenomenon This candidate who seemed so far fetched ridiculous to those of us at major news organizations whether we're talking about newspapers or cable. Tv or otherwise you know. Why didn't we see this coming? Why do you think that there was going to be a ceiling on this candidate? Donald Trump obviously when he managed to win at all maybe not the popular vote but he obviously won the election so I think that this has been a question about. How do you shake your news coverage to be in touch with that kinds of circumstances political views that are not well represented historically in those newsrooms and some of the answer to that has to do with personnel decisions getting more diverse in your hiring not just in terms of some of the targets that have been the goals that have generally been prominent historically talking about media diversity things like greater gender diversity or or racial ethnic diversity but also socioeconomic diversity getting people from different parts of the country not just only journalists who went to the same set of a narrow bucket of Ivy League schools or whatever? So this is always the case. I think it's especially critical now when we're talking about people's livelihoods that newsrooms are more in touch with the actual financial strain. That a lot of Americans are under that news organizations at least the big news organizations may be somewhat shielded from right because I can work from home. You're working from home. Most Americans you know who who earn less money than to their ability to work remotely is much more limited especially if we're talking about service jobs that require usually require person to person contact right so having an awareness of that you know as I was talking about earlier I think the other fundamental challenge for news organizations is not only you know what are the personal backgrounds of the staff and how representative are they of the of America as a whole but also how skilled are we in subject matter expertise. How familiar are we with numbers? Now this is the other big issue now not only. Dr Newsrooms often disconnected from their audiences and their communities. But we're afraid of numbers yes. Journalists I feel like the prototypical journalist was like an English Major. If not an English major you know something that was not terribly quantity something in the humanities. Let's say and right now The skill set to be able to analyze data. Even just do basic things like know how to know your way around an excel spreadsheet which is like stone-age level Data analysis given. We're given the tools that we have now but even being able to do that. I think is is quite rare and really important right now to really understand the the INS and outs of what's happening in the economy where the need actually is and how well our government is performing right when we're talking about whether we're talking about policies that are being considered now how well targeted are they for example if we're talking about getting checks to Americans At different income levels as well as you know where the biggest problems exist that we don't have policy tools yet developed for so having familiarity with data being able to talk with experts who are actually much more fluent in that data than than we are and really understand where the need is where the problems are. I think that's really a historical failure of journalism that again predates this crisis but will be especially problematic during this crisis because as we have discussed. This recession is so different from previous recessions. And getting your arms around how bad it is and what's needed to address. That pain will be really difficult in having the tools available to do that kind of rigorous analysis is really important. You everybody has anecdotes in their own. Lives that they bring to this. But we need the press to quantitatively show us what's happened right through through through charts and graphs and analysis as well as personal stories. The personal stories are still crucial. Absolutely and I worry about you know reporters not being in the same lines. The same food lines as the people we cover. That's the thing about this right now. Is these food lines in lines outside. Cbs and all of that nowadays But then the other element of this comes to the presses. Reporters are losing their jobs. Like a lot of other people. It was in their jobs. We arson layoffs and furloughs especially the local news level and vulnerable digital media companies. So on one level. Yeah there's this national me. A disconnect sometimes to the realities of people who are paid living paycheck to paycheck. But then there's this other element of Media Distri wear journalists and local outlets are being furloughed and laid off because advertising revenues troubled up so they sort over going on. They should get it. Well I would not assume that. Even the big players will be safe from those kinds of layoffs and furloughs as you may recall when we were at the Times I don't remember exactly what year this was but at some point either during the great recession or immediately afterward there were follows and there were layoffs. I remember you know colleagues and friends of mine who I worked with. Were laid off. This was probably around two thousand nine two thousand and ten. I don't remember the exact timing of it but we packets in the mail. We were offered to leave our jobs. You know getting getting buyout offer for the first time. Yeah Yeah and so right now. The media organizations that have been obviously showing their financial strain. Our local papers You know the the Gannett chain of newspapers which is obviously a big corporation but owns a lot of individual newspapers. They have announced cuts of various kinds. But I I don't think we should assume that major organizations including the one that you and I work for We'll be spared. I I hope I hope it will. But to the extent that advertising revenue drops off a cliff in I think we should anticipate that it will given. What's happened in previous recessions? Given the fact that you know major retailers basically aren't able to do business right now. Restaurants are not able to do business right now. We should anticipate that ad revenue at the big players is going to fall as well if it hasn't already. I'm not aware of any up-to-date data on that yet but I'm guessing. Some stuff will come out soon so just because journalists at major news organizations haven't felt the pain yet doesn't mean that they won't eventually and of course many of us have already felt non-economic pain at this point. You know we've lost colleagues. Who have actually died from or I don't know about you but you know there are college. You have gotten very sick. A woman at CVS recently passed away. So there's GonNa be more of that as as some people recover but others do not and so it honestly it really bothers me when I see in particular right wing critics of the media. Say Oh well the media has just been you know sort of been alarmist about this whole public health crisis in has been cheering on a recession. Because they're all out to get trump you know it's gonNa be bad for trump than than bring it on which a I don't think would be true. Even if journalism were spared but be journalism is not being spared and we are already feeling economic pain. We will probably feel more of it and we are already feeling the effects of the public health crisis because our colleagues getting sick so anyway. I just think that that that whole line of committed only we only have one setting default setting all they know to do is to bash the press yet really. It's boring time like us. We're talking about the weeks to come. This is the beginning of April. It seems like April is going to be the cruelest month. All what what what. What are you looking for? What are you expecting in terms of this coverage in the weeks to come as a journalist I will be looking for whatever the latest data to come out our including these weekly jobless claims for example or other measures of manufacturing activity or service sector activity. So that in other kinds of things that I cover as an observer of the media in a I'm a participant of the media but also an observer and critic of the media I will be looking for how well those in my profession hold to account public officials as they try to spin these numbers and hold to account public officials. Whether it's people like Larry Cudlow who claimed not very long ago that the virus was contained in the economic damage was contain. Hold them to account when they reverse themselves. So what made you decide to reverse yourself in? How can we trust you going forward and I think there have been some journalists who have done a good job at the asking those kinds of questions but not everyone has so. I'll be looking for how well those who had access to the so-called newsmakers public officials whether their elected officials or senior aides and this administration. How prepared they are for the kinds of talking points that they are likely to get that. Presumably push all of the responsibility onto the stage or claim that the problem isn't as bad as they is. The media's making it out to be or whatever how well prepared we are with data with numbers with you know what with knowledge of what the actual experts are saying and how much we can push this administration to be transparent about what it's doing to mitigate the effects of the public health crisis as well as the economic crisis. It's a perfect place for us. Stand on so much news to come. I wish we could hit pause for a day on the news that we've been on our lot but we are lucky to be in this in this industry time and have a chance to cover it as it happens. Catherine thank you so much. Remind people where they can find you online you can find my columns at the Washington Post Washington Post Dot Com and you can find me on. Cnn periodically talking about economics and politics. There we go Catherine Pal. Thank you so much. And thanks for joining us on. This week's reliable sources podcast. We will see you on televison this Sunday and every Sunday at eleven am eastern time on up. Thanks for tuning in.

government US Catherine federal government Washington Post New York City Nancy Pelosi president Catherine Pell White House Bill Brian stelter
Prof. Jason Haffner, Prof of Physics and Astronomy at Rice University.

Scientific Sense

40:26 min | 2 months ago

Prof. Jason Haffner, Prof of Physics and Astronomy at Rice University.

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation be color a wide variety of domains. Red new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide edited content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do a companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info get students purchasing jason hafner. Who's of physics and astronomy at rice university. His lab studies nano photonics at inter facial biology. Thanks for your much. Yeah thanks for doing this. So before we get into your your papers I want to send the context of these two things so natto photonics and into fish biology. What do those things need. Yeah sure so Netanyahu has just sort of a part of nanna science in general. You know nanno has been a big thing since Sort of the nineties. This idea that if we shrink material matter or control materials down to the nanometer scale they with the world differently and that's sort of big picture we study so as you can imagine nature. Photonics is doing that with light so normally we think of light does not being real nanno. The wavelength of light is about five hundred. Nanometers is why we have like a limit to what we can see an optical microscope but as delight interacts with materials the nanometer scale some materials will focus the light downed meter skill. Or you know Heat the liar heat up due to the light in special ways so really big picture photonics is just. How can we manipulate the nanometer scale with nettle materials. Yoke okay. we'll get into the details of that deficit deficit have any sort of computational. Applications also computational. Yeah yeah You know Doesn't doesn't have a sense of design or anything like that. The debt are right. Yoga ways to go also competition alexa. We use many competition tools in. It's actually critical in many areas of research these days but especially these interactions. In terms of an application. There are ideas. There are some aspects of y light would be better than electrons chips I mean it's not it's still definitely sort of a research phase stage thing you know. How do you do the couplings. And and in my field we can send light. We can turn the light into an electronic exultation in send it down a metal wire. Have it come out the other end of light which is really cool. But it's very easy. You know metals you'll lose a lot of of the energy so it's definitely been looked at but for now you know i don't think in terms of completely taking over a chip that's still quite a ways away. Yeah i was just thinking you know One of the houston saugus needed. Quantum tunneling issues conventions into this issue all flood heat on chip so i was just wondering if there's a direction there what is interface your biology so really there as a general way to talk about membranes. So if you think about the picture of a cell that you saw whenever the last time you took biology was you know. It had this outer circle the membrane and then inside of these organs and that picture kind of cells membrane short because really remembrance around every one of those organizations you know the the the cells full of membranes on these inter facial membranes lots of the action ought to the biological Action happens so membranes. Very huge Part of sort of microbiology and so biology but also the hardest to study which we can get into later when we talk about What we're doing with it so really. It just means you know where the liquid meets another liquid. The liquid meets the solid. If you want to think of membrane a solid that's inter- facial part each and so this has applications in So you mentioned send biology so it would getting getting into the cell at using the cell infrastructure to replicate itself Do some applications and debt collection. Yes for sure. So that's that's getting sort of into synthetic biology hijacking. That's getting it all biotechnology. Really sort of if you out sort of worked on sensors a lot and i've always it's always interesting realization to me that the most powerful syncing technologies. We have our from hijacking. Biology essays were great in the critical part is the antibodies. We get from an animal and You know. pcr thing amplifies. Dna completely hijacked biology. So yeah so. I forgot what talking about allergies that idea taken that even further membranes are just one component of all that i would say hello. They need to understand memory. It's make a lot of that work but a lot of biology. You can hijack without really understand exactly what's going on. So if we don't understand membranes they'll still be a components of of that kind of technology. There is one area that is membrane home by a membrane specific. And that is you take the cells membrane and you lay flat on a surface and then integrated into sort of a chip kind of technology as kind of a wet chip so these are called or lipid membranes and the ideas you can take some of the ion channels and things from a cell and then turn them into centers on a chip and that also it's kind of like the photonics photonics thing. It's it's it's in progress. It's not happening any day now. But it's definitely a thing idea. That's that's coming along. And so i want to have the budget order papers Entitled a two hundred dollars plasmon residents in gold nanno bells right. I don't anything about this jason. So gold nano bells. I'm just assuming the this this is some sort of a a gold to nanotubes assaults right what. Yeah so the belt really is just sort of the the way we say. It has a rectangular cross section generally. It's just a wire something that's really long in one dimension and the nanno in cross section but for some reason you know the names of these nanomaterials are all just kind of made up by the people that write the papers and of their you know for a while there's session with food like all new materials were named nanno and then after a food but built usually means something with a rectangular across sections that's always stuck with with the belt the belt in the name and plasmon restaurants What exactly yeah. So plasma or sort of a sub-field annetta photonics so there's different ways you can manipulate light at the nanometer scale. You can go with dialectic structures like glass or you can go with. Semiconductors wrinkle with metals. So merle's do this interesting thing so if you think the reason a metal is a metal is free electrons in it. They're drift around occurrence so when the light hits a metal why does an electric field that oscillates whip pushes those free electrons and that's why metal has the optical properties. It has lots of details there but interesting is if you have a very small particle of mental in the light comes in it pushes the electrons up and down and that sort of like a mass on a spring when the electrons go out of the metal they wanna get pulled back in because they leave positive core ions bind them and if they go the other way when pullback in to the electrons like a massive spring light is like a driving force. So you can think of a platform resonance just like mechanical resonance of a mouse on so at a certain light frequency the electrons. Move up and down really big and calls a lot scattering and a lot of absorption and basically pause on resonance In it sort of it doesn't happen in all metals. It visible wavelengths of some metals. It'll happen in the. Irs had happened to the uv medals oxidise like most metals could make a teeny nanoparticle. The whole thing would oxidise so you metals like gold and silver That have this resonance in the visible and they they're inert enough that you can actually have a piece of metal that's ten nanometers and not a peace oxide yet usa I sometimes feel jason that these properties that disputatious metals have gold and soon way son was like somebody designed this to be that way. It's it's really. I mean the history of this is unbelievable. it goes vino prehistoric. they would find that the sand from certain rivers when they made stained glass. it would be red. And the reason is it has a little chunks of golden it and the michael faraday is the one that figured out. That's actually it's the metal. It's a gold. It's doing it and if you take gold and get into. The smaller particles turns red so faraday that out and then me scattering theory was one of the main things he was figuring out is. Why do these go. Particles turn red so the original electronic theories of scattering was based on this as well. So it's sorta been experimentally seen for a long time but it's only been used since around the two thousands when we started to get enough nanno chemistry going to make really mono disperse shapes of different kinds of gold and silver nanoparticles south when the field really exploded with all these different shapes and silly names. Everything you know coming out yup If i understand this correctly jason. So you have is like tangle cross section Nanno barreled off gold Indivisible read linked bend light hits that That is some phenomenon and like the electrons three electrons moving out then put back in David sort of You can get into some sort of residents. So that's idea right so so can be used as for anything from a practical perspective. Yes so that's what. I found interesting about about this area. Actually remember exactly. Why did the first paper. But but retrospective what i find interesting or what else doing at the time is that you know. There's huge studies on. These plasma nanoparticles and many others. You know quantum dots and everything for auxerre what i call zero dimensional particles so even if at the little elongated rod or it's a cube or whatever it is it's still nanno in every dimension it's like a point particle to us and there's a lot less on just elongated things like wires. I mean i. I mean you know people in the field as they wait a minute. i mean. there are making accidental wires. those are very widely studied but mental. No wires which you would think would be the most fundamental material nanno science for some reason just aren't as frequently synthesized and aren't as widely studied. There are applications and people are pursuing them so one is a transparent conductors. So if you want maybe for a sensor or something you want something that completely see through little conduct trinity like maybe you need to pass current through it or maybe you don't want to get a static charge on it whatever One way to do that. There's a lot of ways one is to use sort of some semiconductor that's transparent in the visible but still you know Enough current will flow through it i condemn to excite or something. Another would be to put a really thin metal film on it but really thin metal film. still absorbs light. So you still get a little bit of a tent. You know. I keep thinking about that. The walking windows and buildings or we look a little bit green. You know but another idea is to coat it. With really fine metal wires that you could just spin on from solution and then their optical absorption would be negligible but because they make a network that will give a little bit of conduction. Which is all you need for these or their. You know be dense enough that if you touched it you definitely complete a circuit could potentially be a sensor. This resonance phenomena can be used in any sort of information storage. Yes so that's another thing. That was interesting about these wires There have been a little bit of synthesis on them before you know we were kind of following another paper and it was when i looked at them in a microscope that we saw the colors like nobody really thought about whether they would have a sharp plasma or not i mean a sharp residents that would give it color and we look at him into the right kind of microscope that we use a lot and they were all red and green and yellow. We realized they have the sharp residents. So that gets into a lot of potential. Applications of these plasmids summit information storage. So you know you could shine like we actually have some of the belts that change colour from one end to the other. You know you could Shine maybe read in excite one in red and see if green comes out the other end excite the red and green. There's lots of i mean. These are served. Futuristic is but they're mostly conduits but then there's a lot of things you can do where you can when you send light into one end of the wire and turn it into a plows. Monica expectation and then it comes out. The other end is light again. While it's plasma exultation that's really shrunk down to very sort of novel state of light and people work on you. Put a quantum dot nearby when it goes by can excite the quantum dot excites a quantum. Dont then you lose the plasmatic station. If the condo authority excited it'll just go by so there's a lot of interest in putting sort of quantum dots near these wires to make. Sort of. Single photon kind of transistors. So what a work is gone into that. The belts You know we showed that. They acted as conduits but We didn't you know. We're not really a quantum. We're not that kind of a group so we didn't go much further. So what is that quantum dot. Yes quantum dot. So that is another kind of material. So that's a really really small piece of semiconductor. So it's sort of like a just a big at our molecule because you get these discrete states and then when you shrink the semiconductor down to really small size. The spacing between those states get so big that the space between the states gives you visible photons so when see like a quantum dot led tv. Or whatever i think they may want about. Tv's now those are just quantum dots that their size determines their color. And that's how it admits the light. Yes i was going to stay fabrications display for so for the semiconductors because they're not so aussie the metals that are like wires in between them like that i worked on but i'm synthesizing. It's the loss and the metal. That's an issue so there's lots of tricks people work on like what kind of a of of an electronic mode you use to transmit this this alight. If you have one where the field is in the metal you get a lot of loss but you can try to find another mobile field mostly outside the metal and then you get less loss so that macroscopic scale but similar tricks are being tried. Sort of a microscopic skill energy. It is really small right it could. It cannot have any storage application. Yes so. I think that you'd have to get into statics and making capacitors will be the generic kway a Or i mean there are a ring. Modes in electric structures. Were a photon will. Just go in there on a ring around for a long time there so we'll loss allow slobber. Don't think it's thought is energy storage out. I think compared to any chemical system. It doesn't even come close. So i think that's why they're still still using the chemistry. I i was wondering more sort of Space applications where the fleet To storage rations are some sort of call. I wondered so if get away from the photonics bit and then these really fine wires could be electrodes in sort of ultra capacitors. There's another application. You want to get the highest. You wanna get if rather than storing your energy chemically in a battery. You're going to store. it's you know. A making air quotes electric. Statically in a capacitor. You just want the biggest surface area. You can get so. There's always interested in increasing surface area structures by just sort of coating them with very high very fine wires like this and that's one application now that we're doing the nfl's again we're kind of thinking about. Yeah longtime ago. I remember jason Been electric cars. Were beginning to you. Make sense about using capacitors as energy souls rather than the the batteries type. Because i don't know what happened to that. Is that still increasing field. Come and go so ultra capacitors kind of what. I was talking about the second ago. About putting the wires on their ultra capacitors did get very a popular especially as nanomaterials started coming out. And i think they're still working on him and i think it's ultimately just a capacity issue. You know what i mean. They a store less energy but they can deliver it much faster and they way out but they store west energy so so ultimately you know if they don't store enough to drive all the way to san antonio from where i am this good as a battery But what i think. The older bathrooms do have sort of each locations. Where you need that power really fast without you know melting a battery down so i think they have niche applications but i think replacing big capacity batteries. A very young yeah. It's not a coup leader with the infrastructure. So if i am a charging station let's say every fifty miles lively at forty five to fifteen seconds charge job it'll be almost infinite infrastructure ability. You have to stop. Just have some veterans on the ground. Then you're basically train eventually i know. Yeah yeah yeah. I want to go into another paper It's it's related. Obviously noble plassnik structures based on gordon annabel's So it's a little later in the first week or so. So what what. What you're looking at here. You talked about quantum dots already Was that the so. Yeah so the novel structures. We just found these novel structures so he wrote a paper about him. One though was the fact that so this gets a little bit more into the plasma resonances those belts so if the cross section of the bill to square the plaza in residents as green it happens at green wavelengths or green frequencies five thirty whatever nanometers And then if it goes elongated it happens more in the red so seven hundred nanometers or so and we found there are structures where it would just evenly shift from green to red so structurally the belt is going from earth square cross section than it's spreading out into a wide cross-section optically when you look at it. It's this nice. Little thing that changes colour so in a sense we thought this is kind of like a spectrometer but a very different kind of spectrometer trauma take lights of all these mixed colors and you shut it off of like a some called diffraction grating and that makes it reflect out a different angles. But this little plasma. I think we call it. Applies monitor on oprah said that in the paper but what we could do is say you wanted to measure how different plasma wave links enhance like quantum mission. You know if you make your plasma energy match your quantum dot energy than you get more light out. So i think one figuring that paper was we took one of these Taper belts we call them and covered it with quantum dots and just looked at the mission in it was brightest where the quantum dots were resonant with belt somewhere between red and green so it was basically like a structural way to measure the the exhortation spectrum of the quantum dots of thing. We've never really thought about being able to do. But it's something that this weird structure let us do so up potentially some applications Event right yes. So let's if you wanted to proven Mid if you wanted to really ideas would miniaturize something like you needed long term. Maybe we can make it higher resolution and everything but but it wouldn't require like the long arm of hitting grading and then when you hit a grading you gotta let the light spread out for very long distance. So this is sort of like a spectrometer. You could put on a chip because you don't need that. That separation is a completely different kind of way to do it. You don't need the the angle difference from the greetings very small so you to let it go for a long way to get the wave separated where this is more of a direct separation so can applications to set consideration Maybe ten to sculpt space space if you sort of had these on something where you could you could detect which part of the belt was getting excited than potential you. Could you could really shrink this and have sort of a chip level spectrometer. So i can. I can imagine that. Yeah yeah. I wanted to go into One of your recent jason analysis by enhanced rahman's catherine So rodman scattering. What is the romance cutter. It's a special kind of light scattering so so if you think about When light scatters off of an object than can we start over it depends on the cody. Object okay so let's imagine we have a white house right and the white marble and if you shine green lights off of this marble you're going to get green white. It's got an off of it because the the marble being white just tells you that scatters all wavelengths the same so that's called raleigh scattering so scour that goes into the same color that comes out so think about it in terms of photons there was no energy change. The energy of the photon coming in the same as energy. The photon coming out. But now if you replace this ideal white marble with a molecule. The molecules vibrating so white. You're abrasions are important. Thing and analysis and chemistry and that really happened. So when the lights scattered molecule it can actually lose some energy to the vibrations. Liken creative abrasion or the molecules already vibrating. It can give some energy to the light. It can take energy away from the vibrations. Most of the life has the same color but a little bit of light gets its color changed by interacting with the vibrations so it take a spectrum of the light gutters off something most. It'll be the original color you know you use a laser monochromatic but then a little bit in the wings of the spectrum will reflect the vibration of the molecule. This effect was discovered by ceremony In the twenties or something like that and you won't prize and everything so it was very fundamental idea. That light does lose energy when it's a bounces off something but now it's a huge tool for analysis so in kim analysis vibrational analysis powerful in its usually called. I are because the energies of the vibrations are at infrared. Wavelengths and away infrared. Not just kind of a little bit. Infrared i can feel it but way out there In unfortunately that's just the technology for that isn't as good you know. The centers aren't as sensitive. You can't make lasers it's not as bright Etc so romance guttering sort of an interesting thing. It's a way to use visible light. Where technology is very good. You know we have. The lasers and single photon sensors and everything. But you get the vibrational information because you just get it based on how much visible ice shifts you're not directly trying to measure the infrared vibrations. So basically we're one is just a way to get this sort of fingerprint. Spectral information with visible technology though suit can get structural information meaning In a complex molecule like that In infamy yeah. So that's that's the power on so so it's called a fingerprint a spectrum because it has the you know if you imagine every one of these big complicated bio-molecules or other big molecules all vibrate in their own special way so you could say well. Vibrations gonna tell me exactly what me i have. So that's sort of an ideal situation as you can imagine. With millions of different molecules autumn vibrate pretty similar. You know so. You don't really have the you know perfect. Identifying molecule in the universe Based on its spectrum. There's a lot of overlap. But there's still plenty of chance for insight so especially research labs if you're working with very pure solutions of identical molecules. You can quite a bit from the romance maximum and on like bow membranes. I talked about if you can make about membrane from a single Lipid component lipids of the molecules that make membranes the now. There's a lot of structural information you can get and you combine the rum with other methods and get a lot of insight. But if you just shot a ramon spectrometry big mess. Jumble of spectra and it's it's harder to apply and sort of the natural world. I was just thinking jason. So i wanted to take some sort of diagnostic applications for example pharmaceuticals or something like that. They're you know once the product is approved a Precisely what chemicals is supposed to be You know if you want to look at it. That is any sort of contamination of something right that would it be Would it be sensitive enough yet. So that's so you sort of hit exactly where rama's used so widely used in research. Labs industry is harder but basically just think of industries where they're looking at pure things and that's where it's probably going to be used and i'm not expert on the world uses of rama but pharmaceuticals is definitely. Want the nickel these pills. They wanna make sure there's nothing they don't expect them to pills so they could under rahman spectrometer Cosmetics also don't put something on your skin that you don't know what's in it and those tend to have a fairly finite number of Of ingredients in them so there are some real world. Applications rahman is not super sensitive but for those applications. I mean optics is so good. Now that it's it's kinda good enough and the key is you know you could use it on those applications because you have a giant milligram scale pill to look at if you want to act like one molecule on the pill rahman that's the problem with ramadan is it's not super sensitive so you talk about here The lipid double body was found to be the to the by the next from from so so so you can really potentially get the club information of a complex molecule. Right if you know precisely but that mark gli this gets into the Into so there's rama and now they're stairs so this is now getting into makes springs in the nanno component. So it makes it. Real quick stairs is surface enhanced ron scattering. So what happens is so the rahman i described was just a plane wave of light. Hits materials scatters off. That's all you're looking at. So and as roma's aren't real sensitive so if you send in a million photons nine hundred ninety nine thousand nine hundred ninety nine. We're gonna rayleigh scatter and one is going to romans so you so you don't get a lot of signal but these metal nanostructures these that have these plows on resonances. They basically focus the light down onto a molecule at their surface and then they act like an antenna and broadcast the scattering. So that's what the surface enhanced part means molecules their surface Greatly enhanced scattering in the enhancement can be sort of like one hundred million just because of the physics of how it works. You get really huge enhancements so Servants guttering has actually been shown to give you the vibrational spectrum. Down to a single molecule. If you make the right arrangements of metal structures you can get just huge enhancements and watch single. Jump around and everything. So that you would think that would have big applications. It's just hard to get serious. It's hard to make it real reproducible. So we did say. Forget getting the super high enhancements. Just look at particles in solution and take medium enhancements and see if we can understand the signals and get structure the basic what we did in that paper yet. Sweetie fascinating you say. The new method can determine specific in the facial structure. Under under apple conditions mike quantities of material dog market level. So i i see just like you're doing in the lab. Tom potentially industrial applications See more diagnostic site Jason you know because it takes energy. It's easy to just make this crew That into some sort of the needs to mend a working on long term is so it is through. The method is very easy. So if i was you know right now so you know this is how science works you get away to do something then if you really wanted to catch on you've got to convince the people to do it or you wanna look at their samples or getting. I'm sort of in that stage of now demonstrated this now going to look at a bunch of systems and get people excited and realize what this method can do. So it's sort of like. I kind of think of it a little bit like anymore. You know anymore is widely used method in. It's a method that really is a spectroscopy. But there's a little bit of structural information buried in the spectra says basically what i'm doing with stairs it's just spectroscopy. But we can tease structural information out and sensing and things like that. But it's a lot easier you know really if somebody already as roma's trumpeter when all of industry does you really just need the particles and all the stuff i had to do on the of calculating molecular properties and everything so something that could be very easily uptaken by industry or other researchers relative to like in our. You've got to install a whole facility but finding what to do with it. That's trickier so i think one thing i've thought about is Is this series has the same problem of ram on that. there's just too many signals. But if you put this lipid beyeler like reporting on the particles. The net sorta holds back. Most things like the only thing i get near the particles stuff like to be an by where instant screen for you know. Ninety nine percent of the junk in the solution and will just accept sort of the membrane Attracted molecules yet. I mean if you have a practical instrument presumably jason. You can attentive brain to a ticket machine learning if the decision sort of binary Meaning it it. It is not good. It might be that specific mind. You mentioned that carbon carbon tobon. That's actually used an It's it's diagnostic for cancer when they're doing the margins when they're in surgery so there's one group. Ut austin who is actually doing sort of during the surgery A mass spec you know mass spec is very powerful industry so everything can be solved by mass back And they had this little tool that they'll do surgery and they'll like suck the margins around the surgery and get a quick measurement on how much carbon carbon double bond is in the lipids guide them. And whether that's malignant or they need to cut further so this is another thing that in principle we could begin to kind of measure the relative amount of of carbon double bond in the tail relative to the nor normal lipids. So yeah and then that would be something where you'd wanna machine making that decision quickly rather than me sitting there going. Well i don't know so yeah and you can do it right Dominating the during the procedure often. What happens is you go back and you study at and you say that it's enough margin. You have a second surgery so if you can avoid that this group actually. The method was so successful. They actually have a mass spec in the operating room at least of this in this test demonstration phase. so it's a little while and the destructs material. Go straight to a mass spec because mass spec a very advanced technologically but i guarantee if they can put a mass spec in operating room. I can put a little baby rahman drama. That's another advantage of the rama. It's just a little teeny. It's not a doesn't have to be a big fancy instruments. So it's it's pretty other things i mean. That's that traction. here. I think you know The instrument and be really small. It can be potentially incorporated into existing heart. There presumably giving inflammation a procedure. That things are working of examples of people who try to use rom on it in these ways during surgeries on natural samples. And that's really a direction. The field i think is headed what. I'm working on some now. Even in my own work on the the method were looking at the lipids. Is you know. We use quantum chemistry to predict these modes part of this method. I did was. We used quantum chemistry programs to you got to know something about how the molecule vibrates and how the ramadan properties change. And i did that. I'm furious but there are commercial packages. The what you do that. But i did that on. Just an ideal molecule structure and that'll predict on spectrum but then molecules are always fluctuating around around all the single-button their rotations. And how does that affect the roman spectrum so latest paper. I didn't send it to you. It's still it's still under review is looking at how molecular affect these spectra and infect the termination of the romans room which is a further complication and interpretation really. That's key to all. The applications is read papers on want to be critical. But i've read papers. Were they say. Here's a spectrum Funniest thing about probational spectroscopy is they always say. We assigned the modes in in this field. I think a sign is a euphemism which basically means we don't know that these are the modes but these are the sign of those because it's just get a lot of dense information. But i think knowing what every peak really is. I think there's a long way to go to really know. Yeah yeah yeah and As you say Human bias get into interpretation. So you agreed to mason buys and this is what really quantum chemistry needs to. just get faster and faster. So it is getting faster and faster so Just the ability to measure to calculate a ramadan spectrum on a big molecule. We came out like twenty ago. And i'm sure only one you needed a supercomputer to do it and all the calculations undoing now and twenty. Twenty one are on a gaming. Pc spent about an eighteen hundred dollar gaming. Pc and i can get pretty accurate calculations on pretty big molecules. It needs to go even further and we need to basically combining a molecular dynamics to get all the contractors and these quantum calculations for every step of the molecular dynamics that's called ammunitioin another amex and that or not passed yet but eventually it will be and i think we could calculate really highly realistic romo inspector at that point a lot of interesting things here. jason so in conclusion. You have done a lot of work in the nanomaterials If you look forward flight to ten years What what do where do you think we will be I'm thinking more in terms of applications. I know that you are sort of sitting at the intersection of lucid. Coming out with labs There there appears to be at least some practical directions. Uc we will. I think you know this. This is always the tough question. i think. A lot of the nanomedicine that was talked about in the early two thousands a lot of it is getting very real and i think one reason people don't realize why is that not known as we know with cancer at this point. There's not going to be a day that we cancer. There's not going to be a skull method that cures all cancers but a lot of these methods are really happening in the clinic. Know the one for my field that i think about is the photo thermal therapies for the Gold nanoparticles golden shells on. This actually came out of rice from my colleague. Naomi house and a for west and they put those and they go to a tumor in shine the infrared light and it heats up and cooks the tumor. You know inside the body so that was first shot around two thousand and he said where is it. Widely that had to go to human trials it takes forever but it really is happening in people and it's really being used. It's just they're going to be used. According to the doctors and the cases where they should be used which is going to be all the cases. So i think all this nettle medicine all these applications are basically going to sneak up and they say oh it's everywhere because there are real patients doing it now. I think the doctors have to figure out. When is it better than the standards and you know when she we try one over the other. But i think the nanomedicine is going to really Become more and more common. Yeah it's You know the the approval process a standard of care definition. It has to get into the medical school education cross gift friction. Not even one of trying to do it. I mean you could talk to my house. And whilst i'm sure they're very well aware of all the difficulties but yeah but after twenty years i mean you know. People really are being injected. These in and i'm just speaking of that once application. Because i know it. I'm sure there's many nanomedicine applications. That really are starting to happen. It's exciting yeah testing. Thanks for spending time out. Thanks yeah and good luck. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations bit leading academics and researchers off a variety of topics. If you like to sponsor this podcast please reach out to info. At scientific sense dot com.

jason Eappen jason hafner nanno rahman rice university gordon annabel earth square michael faraday Netanyahu gil gill catherine So rodman merle faraday houston Irs