36 Burst results for "David Schaper"

"david schaper" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:35 min | 6 d ago

"david schaper" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. President Trump is allowing the federal government to begin the transition process for President elect Joe Biden. Even as Trump continues to claim he won NPR's Asia, Roscoe reports a key agency it held off on making the determination would allow binds transition team to begin formally working with federal agencies to prepare to govern. President. Trump says he's directed the General Services Administration to do what needs to be done to begin transferring government control. Trump did not concede the election. He said he still plans to fight and tweeted that he believes he will prevail. But trance legal challenges have mostly been thrown out, and there's no clear legal path for Trump to overturn the thousands of votes necessary to invalidate Joe Biden's win. The Biden transition team welcomed the administrative decision, which will unlock access to federal funds and resource is in a statement, The Biden camp said the decision is a needed step to begin tackling the challenges facing the country. Ace to Roscoe. NPR News of Glory of Picks By President elect Buying Today word he is tapping Obama administration veterans for top national security jobs, signaling there will be a decided shift away from the Trump Administration's America First policy. Half a dozen picks announced today, making a much more traditional approach to U. S foreign policy. By unannounced. He'll nominate longtime adviser Antony Blinken to be secretary of State. Alejandro May Orkest to be Homeland Security secretary and Linda Thomas Greenfield be ambassador to the U. N. Their picks include former Secretary of State John Kerry to be his climate change envoy and April Haynes, former deputy director of the CIA to be director of national intelligence. Millions of Americans appear to be ignoring the advice of public health experts to stay home and instead are traveling this holiday week. NPR's David Schaper has more The T S a recorded more than a million people going through airport security checkpoints on Friday and again on Sunday and more than 984,000 on Saturday. The total of more than three million air travelers is the most over a three day period since mid March. At the airport. Crowds will likely grow over the coming days with next Sunday expected to be the busiest of the Thanksgiving period. But the number of people flying for the holiday is still less than half of what it was last year. Triple A, says fewer Americans are driving for Thanksgiving this year, too, as less than 48 million people had been planning to hit the road and now the recent surge in New Cove in cases has many reconsidering and canceling travel plans. David Schaper. NPR news Elections officials meeting in Michigan today to consider whether certify the election for Democrat Joe Biden have dealt another blow to the Trump Administration. Michigan's elections board certifying the state for buy new one there by more than 150,000 votes. On Wall Street. Today, Stocks closed higher the Dow was up 327 points. You're listening to NPR. This is W N Y. C. Good evening on my own. Levinson. The increasing spread of covert 19 on Staten Island is straining the capacities of local hospitals. Governor Cuomo announced today that an emergency field hospital would reopen on the grounds of South Beach Psychiatric Center. Today, he designated the entire South shore and parts of some communities on the East Shore as ARNs own micro clusters. Neighbors, including the area of some of the highest infection rates in the city, including great kills Bay Terrace and Tottenville. The mayor's commissioner for transportation, Polly Trotting Berg, has resigned. W N Y C. Stephen Nessen reports she took on a simile impossible task. When Trajtenberg started in 2014, she took on the ambitious goal of eliminating traffic fatalities in 10 years. The Vision zero plan, she got speed cameras installed outside schools across the city. Drop the speed limit to 25 MPH and installed nearly 100 miles of protected bike lanes. All of this helped reduce traffic deaths to a record low 205 in 2018. Then the pandemic hit traffic fatalities have shot back up, and Trot Enberg is focused on opening streets and sidewalks for the more than 10,000 restaurants participating in the city's outdoor dining program. Many New Yorkers are canceling or changing their regular Thanksgiving plans to try to stay safe during the pandemic. John Niblett was selling Cha Joan Rather, Niblett was selling chocolate to a long line of people waiting to get covert tests on the lower East side earlier today. She says she and her 14 year old son usually traveled to Pennsylvania to be with family. But not this year. We asked a home It's every fish is better than.

President Trump Joe Biden NPR Trump Administration President Roscoe David Schaper Jack Spear Polly Trotting Berg General Services Administratio Trot Enberg Michigan Governor Cuomo Cha Joan Rather Alejandro May Orkest Asia John Kerry
Fresh update on "david schaper" discussed on Ground Zero with Clyde Lewis

Ground Zero with Clyde Lewis

00:00 sec | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "david schaper" discussed on Ground Zero with Clyde Lewis

"Don't have much time to conclude because GOP Georgia Chairman David Schaper did such a great job. But if you need more on this information, go to bright Bart. It's called black. Well, Ken Blackwell, the greatest electoral heist in American history on legs out what happened to the president and how at this point, most of us know it's too late to do anything about it. Because December 8 they're picking the electors, and the vote itself is about.

Georgia Chairman David Schaper Ken Blackwell GOP President Trump
United Airlines to begin trial of free passenger Covid tests on London flights

NPR News Now

00:39 sec | Last month

United Airlines to begin trial of free passenger Covid tests on London flights

"United. Airlines will soon become the first of this country's carriers to test passengers for covid nineteen on transatlantic flights. NPR's David. SCHAPER report Supreme Flight Rapid Response Testing will be done on a trial basis on some flights from Newark to London. The fifteen minute molecular corona virus tests will be given to all passengers on three to London flights a week for free but it won't exempt them from the UK's requirement that all incoming travellers quarantine for fourteen days upon arrival. If the pilot program is successful though united hopes to convince governments to lift such quarantine orders for travelers who test negative NPR, savage

NPR London United. Airlines Newark David UK
Can Airport COVID-19 Testing Encourage More People To Fly?

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:57 min | Last month

Can Airport COVID-19 Testing Encourage More People To Fly?

"So if you're itching to travel the airlines for their part are going to say go ahead and do it many airlines are requiring masks there disinfecting cabins they're touting their hospital great air filtration systems. They're even starting to Cova tests at the airport. Here's NPR's David Schaper. Imagine. A Hawaiian vacation with the lush islands, sparkling beaches. It's the kind of trip people planned for way in advance and then cove. It got in the way we had a trip from last spring that Battie added his wife and four kids postponed their dream vacation back in. March. When Hawaii began requiring every traveler to self quarantine for fourteen days upon arrival that essentially shutdown tourism after all who would wanna fly all the way to Hawaii just to be trapped in their hotel room for two weeks. But the bad he had a family finally landed Honolulu's airport last week after it opened to those who test negative for the corona virus, we got a rapid test. It took about thirty minutes you know. The NASAL SWAB tests. Everybody's clear. Ever excited in airlines are excited to to get paying customers back on their plane. So they're now offering passengers preflight cove in nineteen testing for some destinations united was the first to announce on the spot preflight testing at San Francisco's airport for Hawaii bound travelers for results fifteen minutes it cost you two, hundred, fifty dollars. There are also cheaper forty eight hour in home or clinic testing options and other airlines are following suit now even some. Airports are getting into the COVID testing game. We do the test right here in the main terminal Tampa. International Airport CEO. Joel Lapointe says his airport is offering travellers to any destination two kinds of tests. The rapid test which will give you results in fifteen minutes cost fifty seven dollars, and then the more accurate our test costs a hundred and twenty five dollars and you get your results within forty eight hours a few other airports now offer testing. To, Henry heartfelt heads the atmosphere research group travel industry research firm what the airlines and airports are trying to do is remove every possible obstacle. People have when they start to think about taking a trip but some public health experts our concern because not all of the tests are reliable and what that means is that the likelihood that they will actually identify a positive case in an a symtomatic individual is fairly low Mercedes. Cardin is an epidemiologist at. Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. You could get a negative test but in fact a day or two later, your viral levels could surge and then you're really quite infectious and so I fear that it provides a false sense of security to do the on the spot testing the less the business travel association's joining others in calling for more widespread airport cove in nineteen testing in an attempt to jump-start industry decimated by the pandemic

Hawaii International Airport David Schaper Cardin NPR Battie Honolulu Joel Lapointe Feinberg School Of Medicine Northwestern University San Francisco CEO Tampa Henry
Congressional Inquiry Faults Boeing And FAA Failures For Deadly 737 Max Plane Crashes

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:57 min | 2 months ago

Congressional Inquiry Faults Boeing And FAA Failures For Deadly 737 Max Plane Crashes

"A sweeping congressional inquiry has found damning evidence of failures at both Boeing and at the Federal Aviation. Administration in the development and certification of the seven thirty seven Max, the report says these failures contributed to to Max plane crashes killing three hundred and forty six people. Here's NPR's David Schaper. The House Transportation Committee investigation finds that there was no singular technical flaw pilot failure that led to the deadly 737 Max plane crashes. In Indonesia, in October of two, thousand, eighteen Ethiopia, the following March instead it describes the circumstances that led up to them almost like. A perfect storm calling it the horrific culmination of a series of faulty technical assumptions by Boeing's engineers lack of transparency in the part of Boeing's management and grossly insufficient oversight by the FAA. The report details Boeing's flawed design of a new automated flight control system on the plane and mistakes and using outdated and faulty assumptions of pilot response, as well as a culture of concealment keeping information from the F., a. its customers, and the pilots would fly the plane. There's something big came out of this. That's just is mind Boggling House Transportation Committee Chairman Peter Fazil Inquiry and says, what's mind boggling is at both Boeing and the FAA contend they followed proper procedures at vowed the seven thirty seven Max to be compliant that the bureaucratic were it was compliant but the problem is it was compliant and not say and people died the report also details how Boeing employees were under enormous pressure to keep costs down in the plane on. Schedule Aviation Subcommittee chairman. Rick. Larsen says misguided priorities of senior management drove. A number of troubling decisions in one case, senior management when as far as installing countdown clocks in conference rooms making clear to Max employees meeting production timelines rather than safety was a top priority. The congressional investigation is one of many into what caused the lion air and Ethiopian Airlines. Seven thirty-seven Max Plane Crashes Christine Negroni is an aviation journalist and author of the book, The crash detectives and she says, while much of this information isn't new. Poll, what is to me astonishing about the report is the depth, the thickness and the jury of both FAA and bowling knowing that there were problems with the redesign of this airliner and the oblivious -ness of both parties in recognizing that this was a problem that needed to be addressed and thing to grow any fines. Remarkable is that a number of people did raise. Safety concerns about the seven, thirty, seven Max. But those were either inadequately addressed or just dismissed by Boeing many of them never seeing the light of day at the FAA and that's an especially painful realization for the families of those who died in the Max crashes. It angers us to see how how much. Boeing did to cover this up and how much FAA is done. To help them cover it up Michael Stu Mos daughter twenty, four year old Samya arose to mow was on the plane that crash last year Ethiopia, he believes evidence in this report now shows that the first plane crash in Indonesia was preventable within covering up to keep the Max in the air after the lion aircrash so that it crashed again in Ethiopia and killed my daughter. was unforgivable in a statement a Boeing spokesman says, the company has learned many hard lessons from the plane crashes and its mistakes and has made fundamental changes to the company's safety culture and protocols. As a result. The House Transportation Committee is now drafting legislation to improve at a oversight and certifying planes. A Senate committee is expected to take its own at a reform bill later today. David. SCHAPER NPR news.

Boeing FAA House Transportation Committee David Schaper MAX Ethiopia Indonesia Federal Aviation NPR Chairman Ethiopian Airlines Schedule Aviation Subcommittee Bowling Larsen Senate Christine Negroni Rick Peter Fazil Michael Stu Mos
Airline Workers Brace As Federal Aid Runs Out This Month

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:29 min | 2 months ago

Airline Workers Brace As Federal Aid Runs Out This Month

"Employees at the nation's airlines are getting nervous many pilots flight attendants mechanics in customer service agents have been kept on the payroll since March only with the help of federal aid that funding runs out at the end of this month, and if it's not extended tens of thousands of them could be out of work on October first from Chicago. NPR's David Schaper reports. Several dozen flight attendants, pilots, and other airline employees masked up as they chanted and marched around the Federal Plaza Downtown Chicago Wednesday to draw attention to what they say is a dire situation. So I'm I'm coming up on four decades of service and I have to tell you I have never seen anything like this in my career with United Airlines United Flight Attendant Jeff Highs says he's not just talking about the calamitous drop in the number of people flying because of the pandemic lot. The impending mass layoffs year and his co workers are facing. Unless twelve thousand of our members are at risk for involuntary furlough and that's just one group of employees at one airline. Industry Wide Cub October. First layoffs could top forty thousand, and that's in addition to the tens of thousands have already taken early retirement or other incentives to leave their airline jobs voluntarily. The initial corona virus relieffactor past March Congress and the trump administration included twenty five billion dollars in grants to airlines to keep paying employees for six months. But now that time is almost up Democrats some Republicans and the president of all said, they favor an extension of the payroll support program but the airline aid was left of the latest relief package proposed this week by Senate, Republicans and the uncertainty weighs. Heavily on airline employees, we're in this limbo right now other holding is a Chicago based flight attendant for American Airlines. Are we going back to work in October? Are Do we have to figure out and find another job? You know we're kind of time crunch right now what our backup plans going to be airline employee unions held a similar rally outside the Capitol in Washington DC to put pressure on Congress. While their bosses at the airlines fret to right now we're fighting for survival make no bones about it. Kallio. Heads a group airlines for America. He says after a brief uptick air travel this summer that peaked over the Labor Day weekend demand is already slumping again is more profitable business travel bookings remain down close to ninety percent is going to be a different world people are to see you're already seen. Fewer flights come October. First, you're going to see a further reduction in the number fledge that are operating Kellyanne other. Say it may take four to five years for the airline industry to fully recover if it ever does wouldn't another round of payroll support funding for the airlines just delay the inevitable of mass layoffs warmer airline Executive Robert. Man Who is now an industry consultant argues the jobs are worth saving. Job in the airline is probably support somewhere between seven and eleven jobs. Elsewhere, the economy is hospitality in these support technologies in other transportation boats in man warns in a couple of airlines may not survive the pandemic without more federal aid. To Gut check question how much of an economy? Do you want going forward congressional and White House to go shooters? We'll have to try to answer that question this campaign season in which the two parties agree on almost nothing. David Schaper, NPR News Chicago.

American Airlines Chicago United Airlines David Schaper Congress Federal Plaza NPR Republicans America Jeff Highs White House Senate Consultant President Trump Executive
George Floyd protests spread nationwide

Weekend Edition Sunday

02:10 min | 6 months ago

George Floyd protests spread nationwide

"Civil unrest rocked dozens of cities across the country last night as demonstrators continue to express outrage over police killings of black Americans triggered by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody last week in many cities peaceful protests in the day turned into violent clashes with police at night fall in Minneapolis last night National Guard troops joined local and state police in a massive show of force to quell violent protests there but NPR's David Schaper reports there were relatively few reports of buildings being looted or set on fire after previous nights of chaos a few hundred people marched peacefully to protest the killing of George Floyd continuing for well over an hour past the state imposed curfew but as they cross the Mississippi River bridge from Minneapolis and St Paul reading police fired tear gas and rubber bullets into the crowd protest groups in other parts of Minneapolis and St Paul Minnesota Miller feeders of the word is used a heavy police presence in more than four thousand National Guard troops to strictly enforce the curfew in the streets appeared to grow more calm as the night wore on this after several previous nights of mayhem of some neighborhoods torched in scars David Schaper NPR news Minneapolis National Guard soldiers patrolled the streets of Los Angeles early today as the city cleans up after a night of violence NPR's wildly psych how tell reports California governor Gavin Newsom has declared a state of emergency in Los Angeles county like many cities across the country peaceful protests turned dangerous Floyd Lewis of LA watch the actions from a safe distance very cannot be exploding police cars and police chasing people up and down the street this has to be a man's life was taken for no reason fluoride was murdered anarchy must not rein in our CD he says but adds people need to be able to peacefully

George Floyd Minneapolis National Guard NPR David Schaper Mississippi River Bridge St Paul St Paul Minnesota Miller Los Angeles Gavin Newsom Floyd Lewis Minneapolis National Guard California
U.S. airlines face deadline to apply for federal payroll grants

All Things Considered

00:44 sec | 8 months ago

U.S. airlines face deadline to apply for federal payroll grants

"York several airlines are submitting applications to meet this hours deadline for government assistance American and south western mom those confirming they've applied for a piece of the fifty billion dollar federal aid package the president signed into law last week NPR's David Schaper reports the pay wall grants and loans come with significant strings attached airlines taking share of twenty five billion in payroll grants cannot lay off employees for the next six months airlines getting those grants or loans or both must keep flying to every city that they served at the beginning of March the airlines are also prohibited from buying back stock paying shareholder dividends of paying executive bonuses and the airlines must also say how they plan to pay back taxpayers for the eight NPR's David

President Trump NPR David Schaper York Executive
Trump asks U.S. travelers to be patient amid chaos, long lines at airports

Raul Campos

01:10 min | 9 months ago

Trump asks U.S. travelers to be patient amid chaos, long lines at airports

"In a tweet president trump urged travelers returning to the U. S. from Europe to be patient as they wait in long lines to be screened for the corona virus trump weighed in after thousands of arriving travelers waited in airport lines for at least four hours and that led to sharp criticism of the federal directive as NPR's David Schaper reports public officials in Chicago and other cities are complaining travelers returning to Chicago's o'hare airport reported standing in tightly packed corridor smash together with thousands of other people for up to four to six hours as they waited to be screened for cove in nineteen symptoms this is utterly unacceptable Chicago mayor Lori Lightfoot says conditions made it more likely that anyone affected would spread the virus putting lives at risk the federal government must immediately and significantly increased personnel devoted to our airport screening and rather than sending ice into the streets St screeners to our airports acting homeland security secretary Chad wolf says of the tweet the department will be increasing screening capacity

Donald Trump Europe NPR David Schaper Chicago Lori Lightfoot Chad Wolf President Trump O'hare Secretary
Boeing Will Temporarily Stop Making Its 737 Max Jetliners

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:21 min | 1 year ago

Boeing Will Temporarily Stop Making Its 737 Max Jetliners

"Boeing is going to temporarily stop making. It's seven thirty seven Max airplanes. This decision comes nine months. After regulators around the world banned the jets from flying lying following two crashes that killed nearly three hundred and fifty people. Despite being grounded Boeing had continued cranking the planes out of its factory near Seattle anyway but that is going to a change next month Dave shaper covers aviation for. NPR He joins us from Chicago. Hi David Good Morning David. So why this decision from Boeing. And why now. Well you know Boeing. Hiring is facing a couple of how hard realities one is at the head of the FAA last week told Boeing CEO. Dennis Muilenburg in no uncertain terms to just stop predicting that the F. A. A. Approve the return of the Max to service imminently. It's it's not happening. And maybe it's an effort to show an independent streak that the agency After the agency was accused of being too cozy with the company but FAA administrator. Steve Addiction told Wallenberg F the FAA sets the timeline not bowing in agency safety. Experts will take all the time they need to get its analysis and testing of Boeing's fixes for the plane done right and won't rush the plane into a return to service. I'm hearing that means that the plane will likely remain grounded until at least February or March and it now appears Boeing's getting got the message. Well how much of it also might be the company just realizing how much money they were losing. They were continuing to make these planes and not selling them. Yeah that's the second hard reality Boeing is facing you. Could they're burning through cash. Etta significant rate according to some estimates commits about two billion dollars a month the company did slow production a little bit back in April reducing the number of planes produced from fifty two a month to forty two but now it has about four four hundred finished Max jets just sitting in storage at cannot deliver them to customers and cannot get final payment. Richard Lafayette is an aerospace industry analyst for the Teal Group. It's been really painful for Boeing. They've been maintaining production paying suppliers to build fifty two per month while they build at forty two per month and not bringing in revenue. This is very painful From a balance sheet perspective. You know it's important to note David. Just how big of a deal. This is for Boeing seven thirty-seven Max is the best selling commercial airline in airliner in the company's history it had five thousand orders for the planes before it was grounded and it's a very profitable was anyway a very profitable profitable part rob product in a huge part of the company's future tied to this plane. Okay painful for Boeing. What about the people who were there? David I mean. This plane is assembled at a plant in Renton Washington outside Seattle. Twelve thousand people work there. How are they going to be hit by this well? Boeing is saying that there will be no furloughs and no employee layoffs at at least at this time. statement announcing the decision to suspend production says the company plans to have affected workers. Continue either seven thirty-seven related worker. Be temporarily temporary assigned to other Boeing factories in the area but there still is a fair amount of anxiety in and around the plant. We had Ashley Gross of Member Station K.. And ask around about about the impact. She talked with Veronica Medina whose family owns a Mexican restaurant called Toreros it a strip mall called the landing right across the street. From the huge Boeing plant. Well obviously being right here at the landing. It's very significant. We get a lot of lunch. Crowds we get you know. Renton General Very dependent on Boeing's wellbeing Medina says even if the employees aren't laid off if they aren't going in and out of that factory across the street her business may suffer. Well obviously it's going to be a head I don't know how big but I think as a city as a business owner. I think we will feel let David. What about the economy? The economy is gonNA feel here. I mean you've got to have the supply chain that that feeds this big factory. There could be a lot of sectors. Let a companies that could be it could be affected. Yeah I mean there's a lot of companies that could feel this more deeply not so much in Seattle but in places like Wichita Kansas where supplier spirit aerosystems zero systems makes the fuselage and other parts 737 Max and scattered out just around the country. But around the world suppliers Boeing may do something to help. Soften the blow for them. But many of these companies may be forced to to furlough or layoff workers themselves. It's not clear how significant that impact may be N._p._R.'s. David Schaper in Chicago. Thanks

Boeing David Seattle FAA David Good Chicago David Schaper Veronica Medina MAX NPR Dennis Muilenburg Renton Dave Spirit Aerosystems Etta Steve Addiction Kansas F. A. A. Ashley Gross Wichita
FAA analysis flagged 737 Max risks before crashes

Morning Edition

03:12 min | 1 year ago

FAA analysis flagged 737 Max risks before crashes

"You know when the CEO of Boeing testified recently before Congress he faced criticism for the crashes of two Boeing seven thirty seven MAX planes today it is Steve Dixon's turn the administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration is testifying before the house transportation committee that committee is looking into the crashes the FAA is accused of overlooking Boeing's design flaws when certifying the plane and peers David Schaper reports well many air travelers say they won't fly on a seven thirty seven Max if and when the plane returns to service J. Hamann god will but the London residence as only after regulators in Canada Europe and other countries served by the plane said he no longer trusts the FAA thirty nine the American federal agency didn't actually do its job this time that kind of pushed to something that shouldn't have been posted another traveler recently passing through Chicago's o'hare airport Rishon Bernard of Washington DC says he too is concerned that the FAA seems to have failed to provide adequate safety oversight when you have influential players in the market place like bowling in essence you can't have going checking itself right and were you can't have going putting pressure on the relationship that they have at the FAA to get things passed with over the last decade and a half many aviation experts say that's exactly what's happened we're now in a situation where ninety eight percent of all the regulation of Boeing is done by Boeing itself with its own employees Paul hides it is with flyers rights dot org and sits on advisory committees to the FAA the level of quality has gone down dramatically at Boeing the oversight has sought has been reduced a recent report by Hudson's group details how the FAA's increasing delegation of oversight responsibilities has compromise safety the FAA has to take back control from blowing their to no longer piece of regulation as the investigations into the seven thirty seven MAX crashes in Indonesia in Ethiopia find evidence of Boeing downplayed the risks of a new flight control system on the Max at that the FAA failed to catch those flaws the regulatory agencies reputation around the world is taking a hit for decades the FAA established a high benchmark for aviation safety globally and built a strong relationship with its regulatory counterparts in other countries actually really created aircraft in that relationship that's Melissa Garcia and aviation writer and analyst based in Denmark who notes that aviation authorities in Canada Europe India South Africa and elsewhere are now pushing back in doing their own reviews of Boeing's fixes and revisions to the seven thirty seven MAX individual regulators are not comfortable doing it co sign now rapper stamp of the FAA views on this and in recent weeks the FAA has been flexing more regulatory muscle over Boeing FAA administrator Steve Dixon is said the agency will not be rushed in to recertify the seven thirty seven MAX repeatedly telling employees they should be thorough in their testing and analysis and take all the time they need points that Dixon will likely highlight before Congress

CEO Boeing Congress Ninety Eight Percent
Boeing CEO apologizes to crash victims' families

Fresh Air

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Boeing CEO apologizes to crash victims' families

"Top executive face tough questions about two deadly seven thirty seven MAX plane crashes the first of which happened one year ago and here's David Schaper reports the CEO admits the company made mistakes and got some things wrong in developing the aircraft Boeing CEO Dennis Wallenberg appear emotional as he offered sympathies to the families of the three hundred forty six people who died in the two crashes behalf of myself and the Boeing company we are sorry deeply and truly sorry Wallenberg insists the company is learning and improving as it fixes a design flaw on a flight control system on the seven thirty seven Max but under questioning several senators became outraged by some of the CEOs responses and as I sit here today my anger has only grown Connecticut Democrat Richard Blumenthal accusers Wallenberg providing half truths and a pattern of deliberate concealment

Executive David Schaper CEO Dennis Wallenberg Boeing Connecticut Richard Blumenthal One Year
Lawmakers to grill Boeing CEO on 737 Max planes after crashes

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Lawmakers to grill Boeing CEO on 737 Max planes after crashes

"Boeing's top executive admits the aircraft maker committed mistakes that led to two deadly crashes of it's seven thirty seven MAX jets and peers David Schaper reports Boeing CEO Dennis Mollen Burke will testify today to a Senate committee in the first of two days of congressional hearings following boss Melander willing knowledge that both crashes involve the repeated activation of a new flight control system that investigators say forced the planes into uncontrollable nose dives those crashes killed three hundred and forty six people in prepared remarks released by the company Mullen Berg tells a Senate committee quote we know we made mistakes and got some things wrong we own that and we are fixing them the Boeing CEO in the company's chief engineer will likely face tough questions about how they develop that system with a single point of failure and whether they misled regulators about

Boeing Executive David Schaper Dennis Mollen Burke Mullen Berg CEO Chief Engineer MAX Senate Melander Two Days
"david schaper" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"david schaper" Discussed on KCRW

"David Schaper reports the planes in question are Boeing seven thirty seven am Jeez or next generation it was Boeing's model previous to the troubled seven thirty seven Max the problem is unrelated to the issues that contributed to the deadly crashes of two Max planes the cracks are in a part of the plane called the pickle fork which helps connect the wings to the plane's fuselage Boeing found cracks on a handful of older seven thirty seven and she's undergoing work at China and reported them to the FAA which order to medium inspections of all Angie's that have made at least thirty thousand flights that includes two hundred southwest planes and crews found cracks in two of them it airliner Brazil found cracks eleven and G. planes David Schaper NPR news apple has removed from its store an app that allowed pro democracy activist to track police movements in the city the Chinese Communist Party newspaper people's daily had accused the company of facilitating illegal behavior apple says it acted after verifying the apple is being used to target an ambush police and threaten public safety the sometimes violent demonstrations began four months ago to protest an extradition law now withdrawn and expanded to demand democratic reforms a super typhoon equal to a category five hurricane is expected to hit Japan this weekend forecasters say torrential rains are likely tomorrow with this storm striking in and around Tokyo by Saturday night I'm Nora Raum NPR news in Washington support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include I drive maker of remote PC providing access to computers with a display of remote computer on a local screen for use with remote assistance and work from anywhere learn more at remote PC dot com today on press play Supreme Court justices they're just like us now imagine being an attorney making the argument and thinking that potter Stewart just to store was getting some very important note about the case from the page and it turns out it was simply the score of baseball I'm Barbara bill gave what handwritten notes passed by Supreme Court justices on the bench reveal about the people behind the rulings and archive peel back the opaque curtain of Supreme Court that's today at noon press play okay Sir I'm more on all night on to the point as Democrats move forward with their impeachment investigation never trump Republicans describe GOP leaders in Washington once you've decided that.

Boeing Moves A Step Closer To Resolving 737 Max Problems

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:16 min | 1 year ago

Boeing Moves A Step Closer To Resolving 737 Max Problems

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from US's online MBA ranked number one by poets in Kwan's, NPR listeners, reap the benefits of a prestigious USC NBA, find out if your if it more at USC online, MBA dot org. Boeing says it's one step closer to resolving problems with. It's seven thirty seven max planes. The company says it's now finished developing a software fix for the jets. But as NPR's David Schaper reports, it still may be months before the airplanes are cleared to fly. Again, aviation authorities around the world grounded 737 max two months ago after the second of two crashes that investigators linked to Boeing's automated flight control system on the planes, the crashes in Indonesia, Neath, opiate killed a total of three hundred forty six people in both cases, a faulty sensor caused the system to repeatedly forced the planes nosedives as the pilots tried to regain control. Boeing has been working on a software fix for the system since the first crash last fall yesterday. The company released a statement saying the software upgrade has been completed the first step Clint bay logs a professor of aeronautics at Embry riddle, aeronautical university. Boeing is following the right path there. Doing the right things to make this system. Better lawn six is at the system will now rely data from two sensors instead of just one that along would have prevented either of these accidents from occurring. The changes will also make the system, repeat. The nose down action less often in less forcefully making it easier for the pilots to take back control. Boeing statement indicates the upgraded software as undergone extensive testing, including more than two hundred test flights over three hundred sixty hours Clint bay, log says that's a lot for software. I think that's very indicative of how seriously Boeing taking this situation and that they are determined to get this fixed, right? The first time, of course, Boeing has been under enormous pressure. Since the crashes pilots complain. They were never even told about the new flight control system until after the Indonesia crash whistle. Blowers accused Boeing of rushing, the development of the max, cutting corners along the way, while safety advocates say the FAA didn't provide proper. Oversight in certifying the plane. The FAA says the company still has not formally submitted the software fix for review when it does acting FAA administrator Daniel L well told lawmakers and a hearing a Capitol Hill this week, what will happen next. We'll do test flights. We will do thorough and robust safety analysis, we will determine based on the software fix. They give us we'll determine what level of training will be required of Seventy-seven, max pilots. The bottom lines has L. Well, is this, we will not allow the seven three seven max to fly in the US until it is absolutely safe to do so. And we will use every tool every day to gathering capability, we have to ensure that's the case. The review of the seven thirty seven max could take months and regulators in other countries. We'll have to sign off to airlines have canceled hundreds of flights as they've had to remove max planes from their schedules for much of the busy summer travel season. David Schaper NPR news.

Boeing David Schaper Clint Bay Indonesia United States FAA NPR Usc Nba USC Embry Riddle Kwan Blowers Professor Daniel L Administrator Three Hundred Sixty Hours Two Months
A new story from All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

A new story from All Things Considered

"They Federal Aviation Administration is putting together a panel of experts to review Boeing's proposed software fix for the troubled seven thirty seven max NPR's, David Schaper reports the popular aircraft have been grounded worldwide since mid-march after two MAC, seven crashes that killed more than three hundred forty people. The FAA's convenient technical advisory board made up of experts from the US air force NASA, the Volpe National Transportation system center, and the FAA that board will review changes Boeing is making to an automated flight

"david schaper" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"david schaper" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Max airliners NPR's David Schaper says the planes could be grounded longer than initially thought. Boeing says the company wants to take the time to get it. Right. And making software fixes for an automated flight control system that investigators say appears to have played a role in two deadly plane crashes in recent months that killed three hundred forty six people. The Justice department is down vesting how the FAA certified the seven thirty-seven max. So Ed Coleman a professor of aviation safety at Embry riddle aeronautical university says it makes sense to take more time. There's going to be some additional scrutiny on this. So they'll probably take, you know, as opposed to just double and triple checking, it they may do it an extra time on top of that southwest American and United Airlines say they're making plans to accommodate travelers with their seven thirty-seven max jets grounded longer than expected. But there may be some flight cancellations as a result. David Schaper, NPR news, Chicago. The ACLU of Texas is calling for an investigation into the conditions of an outdoor border protection detention facility in El Paso, the complaint comes as President Trump threatens to close parts of the southern US border this week for Marfa, Texas, Natalie cribs reports the complaint calls for an immediate end to what it describes as the Cajun of immigrants in outdoor holding facilities. It also demands an investigation into the treatment of migrant who spent up to four nights at a makeshift facility under the Paso del. Norte bridge in Paso show. Drake is an attorney with the ACLU families were held outdoors. Encaged areas forced to sleep in the dirt and on rocks underneath the international bridge on Sunday customs and border protection announced in a statement that it will be closing the holding area and relocating migrants to another facility officials with US customs and border protection did not immediately respond to requests for comment for NPR news. I'm Natalie crabs. The Trump administration may reassign as many as two thousand more agents to the southern US border. Homeland security says there was a jump in the number of migrants who crossed in March two one hundred thousand people more agents could slow traffic at ports of entry between the US and Mexico. President Trump welcomes the NATO secretary general Jens Stoltenberg to the White House today. NPR's Aisha Roscoe reports. The military alliance is celebrating its seventieth anniversary in Washington DC. The talks are expected to touch on burden-sharing, which has been a top. Priority for Trump. The president has repeatedly accused NATO members of not spending enough on their own defense spending has increased but most countries are not at the two percent of GDP target that they are supposed to hit by twenty twenty four NPR's Aisha Roscoe reporting from Washington, and you're listening to NPR news. Officials in Los Angeles say more than a dozen people were injured last night when a stampede broke out during a vigil for slain rap musician, nipsy hustle. It's not clear what started the stampede. But you send you a Gomez was in the crowd.

President Trump NPR US David Schaper Natalie crabs Aisha Roscoe president Embry riddle aeronautical univ Boeing Paso del NATO Washington DC Texas Paso ACLU Los Angeles El Paso FAA Ed Coleman
Boeing introduces 737 Max software overhaul

All Things Considered

03:33 min | 1 year ago

Boeing introduces 737 Max software overhaul

"The aircraft manufacturer Boeing is trying to rebuild trust. With airlines pilots regulators and the flying public in the wake of two deadly seven thirty seven max crashes in recent months today, the company unveiled software fixes for an automated flight control system in the company seven thirty seven max airplanes joining us from Seattle where Boeing representatives briefed reporters and others on the software fix is NPR's, David Schaper. He covers aviation David set the scene for us. How did Boeing rollout? The software changes. Yes. Sure. Audio since we're in the month of March madness. I'll use a basketball analogy, it's kind of a full court press from from Boeing the primary audiences Boeing's customers. The airlines the pilots who fly the 737 max. And ultimately the people who fly on the planes, the flying public. So while there was one briefing going on. For reporters and other was taking place for about two hundred pilots and into industry officials and regulators also from all around the world, many pilots have particular quite upset to learn about. This new flight control system called 'em. That did not exist on previous versions of the seven thirty seven in many pilots say they didn't know about the system until after the crash of the lion air jet in Indonesia last October. And so Boeing's vice president of product, strategy and development. Mike Senate acknowledged that it is opening remarks to the media, we're working with customers and regulators around the world to restore faith in our industry. And also to reaffirm our commitment to safety and to earning the trust of the flying public after that cynic got into quite detailed technical explanation of what the the flight control system does and doesn't do and how these software fixes are going to prevent such tragedies from happening in the future. In promoting these fixes did Boeing in any way, basically knowledge right that the system was originally designed in some way that was problematic. No. And in fact, they they didn't say the system is inadequate at all the Boeing executives air say the system worked as it should have as initially designed in in the implementation of the system was a good one the changes that they're making now are just making it more robust. They say they went on to say that they don't see systemic problems internally in the company and the way they went about engineering and developing the 737 max, and this caste system, and then ultimately by having it approved by regulators. But they say, you know, crashes like these two in Ethiopia and India in Indonesia, are terribly tragic heartbreaking in the company says it always learns from such is incidents to make the airplanes that they build even safer than they already were. What about the pilots are they confident that this is the right fix? And I don't know has the FAA weighed in on what it might approve the upgrades. Well, spoken with pilots from American Airlines, which is one of the airlines of flies the max eight and I wouldn't quite call him satisfied yet. They have a little more confidence in. Knowing that they may have several months ago, they feel much better informed about the software system, and they feel better trained, the they feel like they're getting some improvements in the training process. But then some of them have actually tested the software themselves. So they're they're feeling a little bit more confident. I I know United Airlines has put out a statement saying it's optimistic in the software updates. But the FAA has has not begun its process of reviewing it. They've worked alongside Boeing is. It made these changes and the FAA get could take a long time for them to actually for these regulators to approve and get these planes

Boeing FAA American Airlines David Schaper Indonesia United Airlines Seattle Basketball Vice President Of Product Mike Senate NPR Ethiopia India
Investigators find similarities between Ethiopian Airlines and Lion Air crashes

Q

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Investigators find similarities between Ethiopian Airlines and Lion Air crashes

"Investigators say they found striking similarities between last week's crash of an Ethiopian Airlines plane and the lion air jet crash in Indonesia last year. NPR's David Schaper reports the planes are both 737 max aids and both crashed shortly after takeoff yet, they grounded Boeing seven thirty-seven max planes last week after finding both jets that crashed shared similar flight tracks now investigators report finding data from the GOP in planes angle of attack sensor that is quote, very very similar to that of the lion. Air jets faulty sensor, which triggered an automated flight control system to force the nose of the plane down former Boeing safety engineer. Todd Curtis calls, those crash, malaria troubling and more importantly, it may be a systemic situation. That's inherent in every seven three seven. Max that's either in production or an operation. Boeing is developing upgrades for the. The flight control system software that it hopes to have installed on the planes

Boeing Ethiopian Airlines David Schaper Todd Curtis Indonesia GOP Malaria NPR Engineer
Similarities found between 737 Max crashes

Fresh Air

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Similarities found between 737 Max crashes

"Boeing is under increased scrutiny over it's seven thirty seven max airplanes. The Wall Street Journal reports federal prosecutors and the US department of transportation are investigating the development of the new aircraft and its approval by regulators NPR's David Schaper tells us the news comes as investigators say the crash last week of an Ethiopian Airlines seven thirty seven max showed clear similarities with the line air jet crash in Indonesia last year. The FAA acknowledged flight track similarities last week in ordering all seven thirty seven max planes grounded in Boeing says it is developing a fix to software that under certain circumstances automatically points, the nose of the plane down but both Boeing and the FAA are facing scrutiny over. How regulators initially approved the plane is

Boeing FAA Ethiopian Airlines David Schaper Us Department Of Transportatio The Wall Street Journal Indonesia NPR
Aviation Workers Caution Another Shutdown Could Affect Holiday Travel

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:33 min | 1 year ago

Aviation Workers Caution Another Shutdown Could Affect Holiday Travel

"Among other things the partial government shutdown affected aviation security, though, fears of another shutdown have eased fears of security problems have not NPR's David Schaper reports throughout the reason. Five week partial government shutdown air, traffic controllers continued to work without getting paid until day thirty five that's when a handful of controllers called in is unable to work at two east coast air traffic control facilities short the FAA had dramatically slow air traffic in the heavily congested northeastern US airspace. Grounding planes at New York's LaGuardia and other airports lengthy flight delays and cancellations mounted and within a few hours, President Trump and congress finally ended the shutdown but only for three weeks. This is all just abysmally stupid. Oregon democrat Peter defazio chairs the house transportation committee. It's absolutely absurd to think that we're going to allow another shutdown of air, traffic control and the. FAA defazio wants to insulate the FAA and keep its employees working and paid during a shutdown. We collect the tax every day and that tax was collected every day during the shutdown and went into the airport and airway trust fund, we should just allow the agency to draw on that trust fund and never shut down. Again, depaz you'll has a Bill to do just that. And his committee is holding a hearing on today, but the legislation cannot become on time to prevent another possible shutdown this weekend, and that's raising safety concerns. Again. Mike Perron is president of the union representing airplane inspectors, safety technicians and other regulators every day that goes by that people are not working doing their jobs or doing on a stressful conditions, the possibility of safety being eroded is definitely there. And if airline crews believe safety is compromised, they won't fly says Sarah Nelson of the association of flight attendants flight attendants are going to watch very carefully. And we are not going to come to work in an unsafe system. The flight attendants and other unions are planning rallies in the coming days in hopes of increasing pressure to avert another shutdown. David Schaper, NPR news. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast.

FAA David Schaper Peter Defazio NPR Comcast United States President Trump Mike Perron Sarah Nelson Oregon New York Congress Laguardia Three Weeks Five Week
Air Travelers And Workers May Feel Government Shutdown Effects

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:10 min | 2 years ago

Air Travelers And Workers May Feel Government Shutdown Effects

"Air travelers are used to flight delays and cancellations because of the weather maybe mechanical problems. Well, it soon might be the partial government shutdown that is disrupting travel new planes are not being certified to fly security screeners and air traffic controllers are working unpaid. Here's more from NPR's, David Schaper in Chicago. I'm here Chicago's O'Hare airport. Standing next to one of the large CT eighty scanners. It's essentially a CAT scanner for your checked luggage. And the TSA officers who operate this machine. They're here at work lifting the heavy and sometimes odd shaped and overstuffed bags onto the conveyor belt to go through the machine. Even though come this Friday, if the shutdown continues, they won't get paid. And that presents a severe financial hardship for many of these officers. I've been here sixteen years. Plus, I am a single mom Christine vitality. The security screener at O'Hare with a in college. And she's trying to figure out how she'll pay his tuition, and I. Just bought a house. I'm not going to pay my mortgage a lot of the office. They live paycheck to paycheck. Janice, Casey is president of the union local representing TSA employees in Chicago. And she notes that are among the lowest paid federal employee. Some average thirty six to forty three thousand dollars a year, but start only in the mid twenties and for some TSA workers in their families, the situation could get dire rather quickly. There's no check on the twenty six I have no idea what we're gonna do thirty six year old. You Cindy's husband is a TSA officer in Portland, we're not using your last name because she fears. He could be fired. They have two kids a six month old girl in a boy turning four of the end of this month. Yes. Into says, they are planning to buy a few presents and decorations to celebrate. But now, they can't Iran's. Do the electric Bill is to our cell phones are now passed to you soon to says her husband's hiring by the TSA three years ago helped lift the family out of poverty. Now, she fears. The shutdown. We'll set them back and scared, and I'm trying to be okay. 'cause I can't be out everyday from like heavy stressed out. Because it affects how parents you know, my husband's stressed out to and you had to go to work and deal with it at work. And you know, he knows he's working for free, which is ridiculous. More ridiculous agenda says that he came home the other day with instructions on how to file for unemployment while he still working forty hours a week. And the situation is not much better for higher paid essential government workers like air traffic controllers at the very high stretch job. And you need to be on your game at all times mic divine is with the national air traffic controllers association in Boston. He says the shutdown is forcing controllers to make tough financial decisions and weighs on them heavily. There is a concern that has this goes on that the human factors aspects of this shutdown will take a toll on the psyche and the concentration level of our members. And they do the best job that they can't eat every day. Nearly twenty percent of the F as ten thousand air traffic controllers are eligible to retire and union leaders say some might do that rather than continue to work during the shutdown. There are also concerns that many of the nation's fifty one thousand TSA employees. Will quit and find work. Elsewhere rather than continue to work without pay already a greater number than usual. Been calling in sick and only some FAA safety. Inspectors are working right now. We're starting to see the beginning. Tremors of a situation will only get worse over time. Captain Dennis tasers pilot for American Airlines at a spokesman for the Allied Pilots Association. He says many planes are not being inspected and pilot training is not being certified we are able to maintain a margin of safety and security. But everyday another player is pulled off the field in a comes some point where the game cannot be played properly back in O'Hare air, travelers are expressing concerns to here's Erica west guard of Indian land, Florida, if TSA's affected in lines get longer work could get sloppier. They might not be checking things as well. And that's always a concern for safety. But Ray Ortiz. Who just arrived on a business trip? From New York says he hasn't seen any ill effects from the shutdown yet I flew out of JFK today. Like, I actually showed up early because I thought the wait times might might be very long, but it was actually really short today. Nonetheless, Ortiz and other air travelers and industry insiders worried that as the shutdown continues. There could be a tipping point where safety and security could be compromised. We're operations could slow in a commercial aviation system. Already plagued by delays. David Schaper, NPR news, Chicago.

TSA Officer Chicago David Schaper O'hare Ray Ortiz NPR Christine Vitality New York Iran Boston FAA Tremors Casey Allied Pilots Association Captain Dennis Tasers Cindy JFK Janice
"david schaper" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"david schaper" Discussed on KCRW

"Here's NPR's David Schaper. When designing new versions of airplanes manufacturers like Boeing wanna keep many elements is similar to the previous model is possible. Analogy purposes training and just ease of operations prettier ones. Richard Appalachian aviation industry. Analyst with the teal group says that helps airlines keep costs down. So Boeing plays up the similarities in sales pitches for the newest version of the seven thirty seven the max. But there is one critical difference of the max that pilots and American South west. And other airlines say they were never told about a new automated flight control system. We had no idea. None whatsoever. Captain Dennis pager. Fly seven thirty sevens. For American Airlines at his spokesman for the Allied Pilots Association. He says pilots were not informed until shortly after a seven thirty seven max operated by lion air nose-dived into the Java. Tober twenty nine killing all one hundred eighty nine people on board Indonesia crash investigators say it appears that a sensor on the plane falsely reported that the nose was too high and the plane was stalling even though was. Not the flight control system automatically pointed the plane down a corrective action that was not needed. Investigators cannot say yet if that's what caused the crash, but Boeing immediately issued a safety bulletin about. How to regain control of such a dangerous event occurs. 737 pilots that is your calls that situation both professionally and ethically. Insulting shakes the trust. You have in the manufacturer. Why would we told about this? I understand where the pilots are coming from again aviation industry. Analyst Richard Appalachia looks like a an error of omission. Boeing does not acknowledge any such mission critical safety information from it's seven thirty seven max training manuals. In a statement. A spokesman says the two urgent updates sent out since the lion. Aircrash reemphasize existing procedures. David Schaper, NPR news, Chicago, take a look at a map of Asia. And you will see that Pakistan shares a border with western China. The two countries have cultivated friendly relations, and in some cases, friendly personal relations, many Pakistani men have traveled to China for business. They've met women in the weaker region married and settled down these husbands say their wiser being detained inside Xinjiang province as part of the wider crackdown on weaker. And it's tearing their families apart. NPR's Diaa Hadid reports from his Lana bought near stands outside the ministry of foreign affairs in Islamabad. His one of.

Boeing NPR David Schaper Allied Pilots Association Analyst Richard Appalachian Diaa Hadid American Airlines China Captain Dennis pager Xinjiang Indonesia teal group Richard Appalachia Islamabad Pakistan Asia Chicago Lana
"david schaper" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"david schaper" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To pass before the end of this year npr's david schaper to new volcanic fishers have opened on hawaii's big island there are seventeen fishers that have cracked opened the landscape with lava and clouds of toxic gas one of the fishers is said to be thousand feet long magma has found out of some of the fisher's you're listening to npr iraqi election results are showing a surprise a political alliance backed by shiite cleric muqtada al solder has made large gains against incumbent prime minister hyder ali body solders old militia fought us troops in two thousand three he later disbanded the militia to focus on politics a nearly one hundred year old dam in central washington state is under heavy pressure from flooding spawned by melting snow the northwest news networks anna king says officials are warning residents downstream to be ready to evacuate if the dam breaks the eight mile lake dam near leavenworth washington was built in the late nineteen twenty s it's rock and mortar on one side earth in on the other the problem is this there is a tremendous snow melt from canada coming down into northeast and central washington rivers that's creating flooding in many areas and around the dam a major forest fire burned much of the area's watershed last year so soils are less absorbent the high water has already peeled off a four foot section of the earth and portion of the dam an excavator to help with repairs was flown into the remote site using the helicopter they plan to siphon water with large hoses released pipe that could help is clogged with debris for npr news i'm anna king police in utah are investigating a crash of a tesla sedan with a fire department vehicle in a suburb of salt lake city the tesla apparently rear ended the vehicle add about sixty miles per hour at a red light officials want to know whether the tesla autopilot device was turned on this is npr support for npr comes from npr stations other contributors include people for the american way committed to defending a free press protecting the rights of vote fighting for equality and building the bench up progressive leaders more at pf a w dot org and the corporation for public broadcasting.

washington salt lake hyder ali prime minister npr tesla utah canada lake dam anna king us fisher hawaii david schaper one hundred year thousand feet four foot
"david schaper" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"david schaper" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Including the landmark roe v wade for npr news i'm claim astor's in des moines the federal aviation administration is expanding its order to commercial airlines to inspect more boeing seven thirty seven jet engines this follows last month's deadly engine failure on a southwest airlines flight npr's david schaper reports one of the jet engines fan blades broke in the days after the southwest engine failure the faa ordered airlines to inspect all similar seven thirty seven engines with more than thirty thousand flights now the as widening that emergency order to demand ultrasonic inspections of similar engines nearing twenty thousand flights to try to detect microscopic cracks that could indicate fan blade fatigue npr's david schaper reporting on wall street the dow jones industrial average is down forty seven points at twenty four thousand forty six the nasdaq is up ten points said seventy one forty you're listening to npr news a large group of migrants continues to wait in tijuana mexico at the us border they rode north through mexico and a caravan intending to seek asylum they say they're fleeing political and gang violence in their central american countries they have infuriated president trump who has tweeted angrily about them a new report estimates nearly five thousand people were killed riding motorcycles last year that's actually down from the previous year npr's gile snyder reports safety advocates say the weather in 2017 may have played a part the report from the governors highway safety association suggests last year's hurricane season may have led to fewer motorcycle riders on the road but spokeswoman karume success bad weather should not be relied upon to prevent us have just been an anomaly of course we're hoping it wasn't and we're hoping to see a continued downward trend but that's the suspicion anyway report crunch preliminary.

astor david schaper tijuana mexico trump npr governors highway safety assoc roe des moines boeing faa president gile snyder
"david schaper" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"david schaper" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The visit us coalition to combat the foreign travel slump challenge we have we've got to get the message out for the world that their welcome we want them on we've light evisceration destroy always say workload to terrorists a wide open to everyone else the travel news is it all grim domestic travel is at record high levels so hotels resorts of theme parks are hardly empty the dow wind others want the administration to do more to reassure foreigners that the us is not just open for business four or visit david schaper npr news jio no this is npr news the california report is next after a quick look at the roads from show still working on the door returned big rig northeast eighty at whipple to left lane still blocked off there i will 84 pigeon pass when we controls continue power poll repairs from an earlier crash 37 west at mare island a collision but moved to the shoulder joe mcconnell for kqed okay that was really quick thanks joe that report brought to you by penninsula del rey you're listening to kqed fm san francisco the time is six fifty one good morning this is the california report good morning i'm john sepulvado democratic state senator tony mendoza shocked his colleagues yesterday when he abruptly resigns was comes as lawmakers were considering expelling him following sexual harassment allegations here's kqeds east katie war earlier this week senators were given the results of an outside investigation into sexual harassment claims made against mendoza the report found more likely than not mendoza had harassed six women over the past decade on thursday lawmakers struggled over whether to suspend or expel him but then a rumor began to spread that mendoza had resigned a short time later senate president kevin daily own confirmed it letter a resolution has been submitted by solar tony windows and has been accepted in the letter mendoza said the leone wanted his head on a platter and that he wouldn't be treated fairly by democratic senators running for reelection the leone had been pushing for mendoza's expulsion the two men used to be roommate's and sacramento and daily on was looking to distance himself from and does that as he makes the run for the us senate against senator dianne feinstein he held mendoza's resignation up as an example of change in the.

senator dianne feinstein sacramento kevin daily senate harassment senator kqed california npr david schaper us leone president tony mendoza san francisco joe mcconnell mare island whipple
"david schaper" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"david schaper" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The popular children's health care program for another four years windsor johnston npr news washington schools are closed today in chicago and several other midwest cities and hundreds of flights were cancelled at chicago's o'hare midway airports is a snowstorm drop close to foot of snow in some parts of the midwest npr's david schaper reports the storm is continuing to make travelled difficult as it moves to the east will show was not quite as deep as predicted national weather service forecaster said the storm was moving out of the chicago worry more quickly than initially forecast with there is more than enough snow to make travel on roads and highways difficult and at times dangerous if snow showers are expected to continue on and off all we weekend state and local police report dozens of crashes on area roadways and expressways snow and ice on the runways has significantly slowed the rate of takeoffs and landings at o'hare and midway airports so airlines have had to cancel more than one thousand flights their significant delays or cancellations at airports in milwaukee in detroit to the air lights it may take days for operations to recover david schaper npr nick chicago at last check on wall street the dow is up thirteen points this is npr movie producer in studio executives jill mesic has died according to her family she took her own life after years of battling depression and bipolar disorder mesic's family also says she was victimized by media coverage of the harvey weinstein scandal and peers elizabeth blair has more jail mecic was rose mcgowan's manager in 1997 the same year the actress alleges she was raped by harvey weinstein mesic also went on to work for weinstein's miramax in a lengthy statement to the hollywood reporter masks family says she became quote collateral damage in an already horrific story mcgowan has in part blamed her managers for not protecting her from weinstein metrics family says it she reported what she knew at the time to her bosses and handled the situation appropriately they also say mesic supported women coming forward to report sexual misconduct joe mess exmovie credits include frieda mean girls and baby momma she was fifty years old.

weinstein joe mess weinstein metrics reporter hollywood rose mcgowan elizabeth blair harvey weinstein jill mesic washington miramax chicago harvey weinstein mesic depression producer nick chicago detroit milwaukee forecaster
"david schaper" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"david schaper" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The popular children's health care program for another four years windsor johnston npr news washington schools are closed today in chicago and several other midwest cities and hundreds of flights are cancelled at chicago's o'hare midway airports is a snowstorm draw close to foot of snow in some parts of the midwest npr's david schaper reports the storm is continuing to make travelled difficult as it moves to the east who snow was not quite as deep as predicted national weather service forecaster say the storm is moving out of the chicago worry more quickly than initially forecast with there is more than enough snow to me travel on roads and highways difficult and at times dangerous and snow showers are expected to continue on and off all weekend state and local police report dozens of crashes on area roadways of expressways snow and ice on the runways has significantly slowed the rate of takeoffs and landings at o'hare and midway airports so airlines have had to cancel more than one thousand flights their significant delays or cancellations at airports in milwaukee in detroit to the airline say it may take days for operations to recover david schaper npr news chicago at last check on wall street the dow is up thirteen points this is npr from kqed news i'm brian watt the head of the california legislative women's caucus is taking a leave of absence after facing allegations of sexual harassment democratic assembly woman christina garcia a prominent supporter of the mi2 movement has been accused of groping two men garcia is under legislative investigation after a complaint that she cornered and groped a staff for after the 2014 legislative softball game in a statement released this morning she said she is certain she did not engage in the behavior she's accused of but garcia said she is voluntarily taking immediate unpaid leave she emphasized that any claims of sexual harassment should be taken seriously and elected officials should be held to a higher standard of accountability mover and googles economists car division waymo settled a major intellectual property lawsuit this morning waymo had sued over alleging it stole selfdriving car technology the settlement is worth two hundred forty five million dollars and comes as the trial was entering its fifth day is modo reporter kate congere has been following the case and a lotta time on some of the.

christina garcia reporter modo selfdriving kqed washington kate congere waymo harassment chicago california brian watt detroit milwaukee forecaster david schaper npr two hundred forty five million four years
"david schaper" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"david schaper" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Easy but as npr's david schaper reports the president's plan may have trouble gaining support from his own party as well as democrats the white house says trump's plan will use two hundred billion dollars in federal funding as leverage to secure private investment in state and local funding for infrastructure robert fuentes of the nonpartisan eno center for transportation explains they're going to give direct grant to date local government and empathizing those places that are raising their own taxes raising me road revenue and putting their own skin in the game puentes says that makes sense to a degree but the problem that we have right now is that even the two hundred billion dollars with the president has talked about uh is going to be hard to come by some republicans may oppose increasing the deficit to pay for it and if the funding comes for budget cuts to other programmes some democrats will have a problem with that david schaper npr news on wall street the dow is down one point nasdaq is down thirty six points s p down nearly three this is npr news from washington officials in the philippines say they will determine whether safety regulations were violated at the site of a fatal fire over the weekend the fire broke out saturday at a shopping mall and quickly engulfed a call centre and an upper floor 37 employees of a us based research centre were killed the justice department plans to launch a criminal investigation tvs longest running scifi series made entertainment history last night for member station k el sisi and eugene oregon brian bull reports on the first actress to play the lead in doctor who.

npr david schaper president white house trump robert fuentes eno center nasdaq philippines oregon washington brian bull two hundred billion dollars
"david schaper" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"david schaper" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Season david schaper npr news chicago this is npr a bipartisan group of lawmakers has introduced legislation in the house that would force the disclosure of sexual harassment case settlements involving lawmakers and their staffs the move comes as accusations of sexual harassment come to light in congress news reports say michigan democratic congressman john conyers paid a settlement to a former staffer who accused him of harassment conyers has denied the reports of the settlement the man who organized the deadly whitesupremicist rally in charlottesville virginia last summer wants to hold an anniversary rally from member station w c v e hawes spencer has more rally organizer jason kessler declined an interview request but on his website says white citizens have a constitutional right to speak out about saving themselves from what he calls cultural and ethnic genocide however can you unity activist mimi are bite says charlotte's millions should prevent any attempt to repeat what happened august twelve when white supremacists marched and a woman died after a rally your drove a car into a crowd of counterprotesters we have howard together and we can stop our community from being used for nazi propaganda the city of charlottesville is currently suing tests are in an effort to prevent future events for npr news i'm hawes spencer in charlottesville police in the netherlands are investigating the suicide of the convicted war criminal former bosnian croatian military leaders slow down probably acquis was being resentenced by the un warcrimes tribunal for crimes against bosnian muslims probably ex suddenly shouted in the courtroom he was taking poison he later died at a hospital the incident was streamed live i'm korver coleman npr news support for npr comes from npr stations other contributors include the doris duke charitable foundation celebrating 20 years of grant making the jazz artists and the organisations that support them learn more at dd cf dot org.

hawes spencer howard michigan congress chicago david schaper npr un warcrimes tribunal netherlands the house charlottesville charlotte mimi jason kessler virginia congressman john conyers harassment 20 years
"david schaper" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"david schaper" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Two thousand six franken is apologizing for kissing and groping lianne tweeting dorian uso tour it's the latest in a series of sexual harassment or abuse claims james involving powerful men including at least one former official here at npr the white house has alabama voters should decide the fate of roy more alabama republicans are standing by bore despite calls from national gop leaders for him to step aside from a senate race amid allegations of past sexual misconduct npr's debbie elliott has more elevator republican party chair terry leith and says the state's gop steering committee supports more as the party's nominee and quote trust the voters as they make the ultimate decision more remains defiant he calls the accusations scurrilous and faults and part of a political attack by democrats and the gop establishment to keep him out of the senate this is enough but mitch mcconnell and his cronies to steal this russian from the people of alabama us press secretary sarah huckabee sanders says president trump believes the allegations are very troubling but thinks the people of alabama should decide who their next senator should be debbie elliott npr news somebody's partisan group of senators is backing legislation to improve the national database used him background checks on gun buyers is following revelations that the air force failed to report the criminal past of the gunman in the texas church shooting with earlier this month this is npr news usbased airlines or bumping far fewer passengers after a violent incident aboard in overbrook flight at chicago last april npr's david schaper has details on a new report from the department of transportation the figures show that only about one in every sixty seven thousand airline passengers had do involuntarily give up their seats on flights in july august and september that's the lowest quarterly rate ever recorded in the twenty two years the government has been tracking involuntary bumpy the bumpy greatest went out a steep decline since april when chicago airport security officers violently dragged a man who refused to give up his seat off of a united airlines regional jet since then airlines have significantly increase financial incentives for passengers to voluntarily give up their seats and they've cut back on overselling flights david schaper and earnings chicag tesla has.

alabama department of transportation overbrook texas church president press secretary mitch mcconnell gop james united airlines david schaper chicago senator franken trump sarah huckabee sanders us senate terry leith debbie elliott roy white house npr official harassment lianne twenty two years
"david schaper" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"david schaper" Discussed on NPR News Now

"By from npr news in washington on core of a coleman the trump administration is putting in place new security measures for airline passengers coming into the united states embarrassed david schaper reports starting today travellers will likely face more scrutiny of their electronic devices and brief interviews enhanced screening procedures will be in place for all usbound flights from any country that means about three hundred twenty five thousand airline passengers on more than two thousand flights every day will face this increased scrutiny airlines have some flexibility for implementing the new procedures for example some will conduct briefed security interviews of passengers of checkin counters others may do so at the gate while still others will just have travelers fill out a questionnaire but many airlines and travellers groups are concerned the new procedures will lead to a lot of confusion and lengthy flight delays some airlines are telling travellers diploma giving to the airport at least three hours before their departure time for international flights heading into the us david schaper npr news congress is taking a critical step toward republicans goal of passing tax cut legislation by the end of this year the house is scheduled to approve a budget resolution later today that will make it easier to pass a tax bill in the senate npr susan davis explains final passage of the budget resolution triggers a special process known as reconciliation it's a boring word for a dramatic process that let's certain fiscal legislation passed the senate with just a simple majority of votes that means democrats can't filibuster it republicans are expected to release their tax plan next week lawmakers say it will cut taxes for american businesses and taxpayers but only brought outlines have so far been publicly released.

washington united states electronic devices congress the house susan davis senate npr david schaper republicans three hours
"david schaper" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"david schaper" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From npr news in washington i'm dave mattingly airline passengers flying to the us from other countries are dealing with new security screenings npr's david schaper says the changes took effect today the new security measures being imposed for the trump administration include heightened screening of personal electron of devices and new security interviews those interviews are to be done by airline employees some airlines will conduct the short interviews at the checkin counter others will do so at the gate but some me just give passengers a questionnaire to fill out the security changes affect passengers on twenty one hundred airline flights bound for the us each day president trump is preparing to declare opioids a national emergency with the centers for disease control and prevention saying their abuse is killing thousands of americans each year the president is delivering a speech on opioids later today in turkey accord in istanbul is ordering the release of eight of eleven human rights activists thrown trial on charges of terrorism and espionage npr's peter kenyon reports the human rights staffers were arrested last july and if convicted could be sentenced up to fifteen years in prison one amnesty international's turkish chairman is being tried separately and is still in custody the group caused the case politically motivated and an attempt to silence critical voices within turkey wall street futures are lower this morning i'm dave mattingly npr news in washington on the next fresh air thare had monju who has covered the tech road for twenty years tells us why he thinks technology has crossed over to the dark side he's been writing a series for the new york times about what he calls the frightful five apple amazon google facebook and microsoft but he admits he's out that it is home with every tech gadgets available join us you're the program this afternoon at one and again this evening at.

washington us david schaper president istanbul peter kenyon chairman new york times facebook npr dave mattingly turkey human rights apple google microsoft fifteen years twenty years
"david schaper" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"david schaper" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from npr news in washington i'm dave mattingly crews in northern california say calmer wins have helped them halt the spread of wildfires in the state's winecountry they've killed at least forty two people north of san francisco about six thousand homes and businesses have been lost npr's david schaper is in santa rosa cal fire incident commander bright convey us as firefighters have been making significant progress in recent days in containing the wildfires what that means is we have a lot of work to do still we have a lot of hot areas on these fires but we have stopped the ford progress and movement of all these fires we have line around them the greater containment of the fires means tens of thousands of people who evacuated from their homes are now allowed to return though several thousand remain under evacuation orders and many have no homes to return to meanwhile search teams are looking through neighborhoods that burned to the ground for more victims as a few dozen people are still reported to be missing david schaper npr news santa rosa calif authorities are still investigating a motive for yesterday shootings in maryland in delaware believed to have been carried out by one man police say thirty seven year old road deep prince shot five coworkers at a granite company and edgewood maryland before wounding another man hours later in wilmington delaware three of those shot in maryland died investigators described the man shot in delaware as an acquaintance of prince accord in pakistan has indicted the country's former prime minister nawaz sharif on corruption charges sharief's daughter and soninlaw were also indicted they wrapped the hearing in islamabad and pleaded not guilty to the charges sharief is in london his lawyers entered a not guilty plea on sharief's half.

dave mattingly london islamabad soninlaw wilmington delaware ford commander santa rosa washington npr sharief minister nawaz sharif pakistan maryland david schaper san francisco california thirty seven year
"david schaper" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"david schaper" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The us david schaper npr news stocks closed higher on wall street yesterday in getting into further record territory att boeing and other major companies reported stronger profits the dow jones industrial average is up ninety seven points the nasdaq up ten the sp 500 gained a fraction of a point this is npr nine months after calling for a moratorium on charter schools the end of alesi p is focusing on forprofit charters and calling for an outright ban npr's claudio sanchez reports of the eight hundred m thirty seven thousand african american students enrolled in charter schools fewer than ten thousand in the ten charters in the two states that allow for profit management companies to run them california and arizona the end of lease ep argues that that numbers much higher and that schools that contract with forprofit companies are not helping black students instead the syphoning off money from traditional public schools charter i'm glad the kids especially in the black community have pushback saying the end of lease ep does not speak for black parents who see charters as an alternative to failing public schools some states already prohibit for profit groups from running charters w sanchez npr news the hearings officer in hawaii is reckon amending data controversial telescope project move ahead they'll doorman of hawaii public radio reports it's a sensitive issue in the state vr you've heard of thirty meter toll scoop of been going on for years in hawaii live been very emotional and vis of protesters have gone to the summit of moniquet on big oiled calling the toll scoop a d secretion of a secret place scientists say is the perfect place went to explore the skies arguing it will bring economic and educational benefits to the island in the state hawaii public radio's built doormen reporting i'm windsor johnston and you're listening to npr news in washington support for npr comes from npr stations other contributors include the state of jobe kroc whose bequest serves as it a during investment in the future of public radio and seeks to help npr produced programming that meets the highest standards of public service in.

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"david schaper" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"david schaper" Discussed on NPR News Now

"The tsa is beginning to take a closer look at ipads tablets and other electronic devices at our ports security checkpoints in the us as npr's david schaper reports airline passengers will now have to remove those devices from their carryon bags so they can be screen separately for years the transportation security administration is required travellers to remove their laptops from their carry on bags had put them in a been by themselves for xray screening now travelers left to do the same with their i pads computer tablets e readers games than any other electronic devices larger than a cell phone airline passengers may experience more frequent bag checks to in a statement the tsa says the stronger screening procedures for carryon items are part of a global effort to raise the baseline for aviation security as the department of homeland security now require similar screening procedures at two hundred eighty airports worldwide with flights going directly to the us david schaper npr news one person was killed and at least three others were critically injured on wednesday when they were thrown from their seats on a wide the ohio state fair dramatic video captured by a bystander shows the fireball ride swinging back and forth like a pendulum and spinning in the air when it crashes into something and part of the ride flies off this is npr news a burnedout convenience store and ferguson missouri that became a symbol in two thousand fourteen of a community's frustration with police brutality has been transformed into what local state and national leaders call us symbol of hope st louis public radio's rachel lippman has more from wednesday's ribbon cutting at the ferguson community empowerment center one of the organisation's offering services at the nipple thing is the urban league of metropolitan st louis national urban league president marc morial says the empowerment center stand as a national example of turning anger into action not.

tsa electronic devices us npr missouri rachel lippman ferguson community empowerment marc morial david schaper ohio metropolitan st louis national president