19 Burst results for "David Romero"

"david romero" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 11 months ago

"david romero" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hurt shorelines later this week. Hansi Lo Wang. NPR NEWS New York President Biden honored the nation's labor unions this afternoon at the White House. He also reiterated his campaign promise to be the working persons. President Biden says unions built America and when unions win workers across the board win, America wasn't built by Wall Street. They're not all bad folks on Wall Street. I'm not suggesting that But they didn't build America who was built by the middle class and unions built the middle class. During the event celebrating Labor Day, Biden touted his build back better economic agenda and the massive $3.5 trillion spending package that Democrats are pushing in Congress. Biden says the pandemic has taught us that union members are essential workers. He also urged Congress to pass the Proact. That's a bill to stiffen penalties for employers who violate workers' rights. And it strengthens protections against retaliation. Stocks finished lower on Wall Street today. This is NPR Live from KQED News. I'm Raquel Maria Dillon. The city of San Francisco and Central Valley Irrigation districts are suing the state over drought restrictions that prevent them from drawing water out of creeks and rivers. KQED climate reporter Ezra David Romero explains. The lawsuit claims the state Water Resources Control Board lacks the authority to interrupt water rights that date back to before it was established. The agency issued the order last month due to a lack of water in the San Joaquin River basin. If the agencies don't win, there's still a lot of water in the system that can be conserved or recycled. That's according to Heather Cooley, director of research for the Pacific Institute. Some of these alternatives can help address these issues. It can ensure that we have enough water to meet our needs. But as the drought continues, the suit threatens the viability of the state's meager water supplies. I'm Ezra. David Romero. KQED news. A protest against vaccine mandates drew hundreds of people to Sacramento today. KQED is Katie, or reports, protesters marched around the capital at one point standing on the lawn outside the Assembly chamber. Lawmakers, including Speaker Anthony Rendon, looked on as protesters directed chance their way..

Heather Cooley Hansi Lo Wang Raquel Maria Dillon Pacific Institute Congress Sacramento Water Resources Control Board Democrats San Francisco Labor Day David Romero Ezra David Romero $3.5 trillion KQED President Central Valley KQED News New York last month today
Why Doesn't California Build Big Dams Any More?

Bay Curious

02:15 min | 1 year ago

Why Doesn't California Build Big Dams Any More?

"Been talking about how most of our water comes from a system of dams and reservoirs set up to capture the states precipitation so one logical solution here is more dams right. Not so fast says jay lund a professor of civil and environmental engineering at uc davis story. I tell people is if you were the first engineer in california and you were going to build the first reservoir where would you put it. You had put it the cheapest place that gives you the most water. Where would you put the reservoir the next best place. We've done this fifteen hundred times. What do we have left. Expensive places that don't give you much water. He says with fifteen hundred dams in the state all the good damn spots are taken heck. Even a lot of the bad spots are taken but that doesn't mean that there aren't smart things we can do with our reservoirs as david romero takes it from here with four big ideas so the first big idea has to do with managing those fifteen hundred reservoirs differently. I learned how lake mendocino along the russian river. That's where i met. Nick mala savage in the middle of the mostly dry lake bed. He helps manage the lake for the us army corps of engineers in two thousand nineteen. The water was about forty feet over our heads. He says lake mendocino could go dry by the end of the summer mar lake levels here at lake. Mendocino are the lowest they've ever been for this time in the year even though this lake is nearly dry it's on the leading edge of science around reservoir management in the past. Water was let out of the reservoir whether or not storms were in the forecast. They wanted to make room for more water. They expected would come but because of climate change. Those storms are becoming less frequent malice. Savage is helping pilot a new approach at lake. Mendocino conserve wait until a major rainstorm is coming and then let water out of the reservoir. It's called forecast informed reservoir operations. We can sit on this water. We can continue to watch the forecast and then you see that big boomer of a storm conham then you can make the decision. Hey the sun's still shining. We need to put water into the river. Generate that airspace for the next storm. And we're good

Lake Mendocino Jay Lund David Romero Nick Mala Us Army Corps Of Engineers Uc Davis Summer Mar Lake Mendocino Russian River California Savage SUN
"david romero" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"david romero" Discussed on KCRW

"Newsom is expanding a state drought emergency from just 2 to 41 counties. KQED climate reporter Ezra David Romero explains. The new drought proclamation represents 30% of the state's population and now includes counties within the Klamath River, Sacramento, San Joaquin Delta and Hillary like watershed. This is in addition to an emergency declaration last month force in Omagh and Mendocino County's Newsome says the decision was made because of high temperatures and below average snowmelt. He said conditions were already so dry that snowmelt didn't run down rivers but instead seeped into parched soil, the equivalent of one million households receiving water for a year. That's just in the last number of weeks. The proclamation could prevent farms and pulling water from rivers and in the Central Valley. It would allow emergency water supplies to be trucked to communities that ran out of water in the last drought. The order doesn't include mandatory conservation measures. But water saving tactics for urban dwellers could come of the drug progresses into a third year for the California report, Um Ezra David Romero. And that drought announcement from Newsome came as part of a bigger picture. Look at his revised budget plans. Newsome is proposing more than $5 billion in new rental relief funding to help people who have struggled during the pandemic. Our desire our plan To double the rental assistance in the state of California with the goal of getting what 100% Paul the back rent paid and provide 100% support over the next few months, two renters that have been directly impacted.

Klamath River Ezra David Romero San Joaquin Delta Sacramento 30% 100% Mendocino County Central Valley more than $5 billion Omagh Paul 41 counties Hillary Newsome third year last month KQED one million households two renters 2
"david romero" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"david romero" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Trees are found along a 260 mile range on the slopes of the Sierras. Many of the sequoias are ancient stand in a grove and you'll see trees that were already old during the time of the Roman Empire, But the sequoias face threats says our climate changes, Drought and wildfire have killed hundreds of them. And his cap radio's Ezra David Romero explains. A new threat is here. Bark beetles Nate Stephenson studies giant sequoias as a U. S. Geological Survey Ecologist Basin, Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. This. Foley said he knew the trees were in danger when I started this season giant Sequoia Ash falling and that's when I knew it was going to be really bad. Multiple lightning cause fires in and around the parks this fall merged into one burning more than 170,000 acres. It was devastating for the iconic species, says Christie. Brigham. The photos from helicopter flights. Joad incineration of large monarch sequoias were hurt. Breaking Brigham is chief of Science for Sequoia and Kings. Canyon national parks, she says there could be as many as 1000 giant dead trees. They just got wiped out in a way that is unprecedented. It's like watching elephants go extinct. Experts believe there are solutions to prevent the trees from dying. Kristen shy with save the Redwoods League, says ramped up climate policy as well as prescribed burns and thinning force could help. We are on the verge of continuing to lose a lot of the world's ancient giant sequoias if we don't act But as researchers find ways to AMP. Up Force Management Stevenson with USGS says there's a growing threat. A native bark beetle that's attracted to vulnerable sequoias. The little beetles in giant sequoias weren't even on the manager's radar screens. So far, Beetles have killed 32 trees and scientists are banding together to investigate ways to control them while not harming the already stressed out ancient trees for the California report. I'm Ezra David Romero in Sacramento. And we'll stay in the forest for this next story. Moving from one of California's oldest living things, the sequoias toe organisms that only appear for a few weeks under the right conditions. Mushrooms, a team at the U. S Department of Agriculture in Northern California has developed a simple portable test that can detect a deadly mushroom poison in minutes. And just in time for the mushroom season. The test is now available for sale online. KQED is Chloe Veltman reports in a parking lots near some words, about an hour east of San Francisco. USDA microbiologist Candace Beaver rummages around in a box containing plastic containers, slides and tubes. I'm going to grab a vial here. And my saline solution. We've just picked an assortment of mushrooms on a hike. One of them a paddy straw mushroom looks suspiciously like a specimen She's brought along with her, Um Anita for Lloyd's also known as the Death Cap. All you need is a rice size piece of the mushroom beaver is demonstrating her new test for a dangerous poison known as I am a toxin. It's found in some common California fun guy. She put samples of the death cab on the Patty straw in a pair of vials filled with saline solution. And Dad's a few drops of each liquid onto the end of two white plastic strips and we wait It looks a lot like a pregnancy test. After a few minutes, two pink lines emerge in the window of the Patty straw test strip. That's a negative result, but only one line forms in the window of the other strip, the one with the AM Anita for Lloyd's sample the death cap so that.

Kings Canyon National Parks Ezra David Romero California Um Anita Candace Beaver Beetles Chloe Veltman Sierras Lloyd Foley Brigham Nate Stephenson U. S. Geological Survey Ecolog Kristen shy Joad Christie Kings Northern California KQED
"david romero" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"david romero" Discussed on KCRW

"Covered over It's all they put on because they want to scare the hell out of everyone. You know, the more testing you have, The more cases they say, cases air up. Yeah, Testing is up by then. And Trump meet for their final debate tomorrow in Nashville. One of the officers involved in the killing of Rianna Taylor is breaking his silence seven months after the raid that killed her in her Louisville apartment. I am Ambrose of member station Wofl has more Sergeant Jonathan Mattingly says police should not have knocked to announce their search warrant at Briana Taylor's apartment and instead should have just stormed in. In an interview with ABC News in The Korea Journal, Mattingly says Taylor's death is nothing like the death of George Floyd, stressing that Taylor's death is quote. Not a race thing. Mattingly says Floyd's death was wrong and disgusting. But he also says Floyd was quote not a model citizen and suggested he might have died of an overdose. Mattingly was shot in the leg by Kenneth Walker Brana Taylor's boyfriend during the raid when police shot and killed Taylor. For NPR News on Graham Ambrose in Louisville. Asian markets are trading lower at this hour. The Asia Dow Down about 8/10 of a percent, the Nikkei the men's of a percent. The Nikkei, the main market in Japan is down more than 6/10 of a percent. You're listening to NPR news, then this is Casey AR W News on a Wednesday, October 21st time. Larry Perella. Here's what's happening at 5 32. With the worst wildfire season on record in California still raging experts from across the state Are now calling for California to invest $2 billion next year in prevention tactics like prescribed burns more on this now from Cap radios. Ezra David Romero with 57% of force did land in California owned by the federal government. The wildfire experts want Congress to spend more money on force management. They also want the California Legislature to approve $500 million for wildfire prevention in January and another $1.5 billion before the end of 2022. Paul Mason is with the nonprofit Pacific Force Trust. It's like trying to win a football game by only playing defense. We really need to be proactive about addressing some of these challenges, especially where the challenges are the result of our active intervention on the landscape for the last century, Mason says. This fundamental change doesn't stop. Any the need for suppression to protect lives and property. It also supports efforts to limit the size and scale of feature wildfires not just fight them on his cap radios. Ezra David Romero reporting elections are expensive, but the race for California's ballot measure campaigns are record breaking. This year. There are still Two weeks until the last day of voting November 3rd. But the campaigns for and against the 12 propositions on this year's ballot have already raised an astonishing $670 million, according to Cal matters. For some perspective, 473 million was raised during the 2016 election cycle. That was California's last highest record. So where are we seeing the biggest spending? Well, prop 22 comes out on top with $206 million. It is the most expensive spending. In state history, with most of the money funneled in by big companies like uber lift and door dash. The pandemic has certainly complicated the election process, and it is especially challenging for seniors living in nursing homes in long term care facilities. Residents there are more likely to need assistance, but most facilities have restricted activities were banned Visitors. Dr. Michael Wilkes is a professor of medicine and global health at UC Davis. He says that could disenfranchise some of the country's oldest voters this year. In the past, family would would come over and they'd have discussions and help their elderly relatives cast their mail in ballots. But Shifting rules about ballots and changing rules about family visits are making this incredibly difficult, He says. Seniors might need help reading or writing on their ballot if they have visual or hearing challenges, and it's not always possible for families to connect with their elderly relatives remotely..

Kenneth Walker Brana Taylor California Jonathan Mattingly George Floyd Ezra David Romero NPR News Louisville Paul Mason Dr. Michael Wilkes California Legislature Nikkei Trump ABC News Nashville Congress Larry Perella Graham Ambrose Pacific Force Trust
"david romero" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"david romero" Discussed on KPCC

"Not only do you get good The healthy, pliable hazel sticks for basket weaving, But you also reduce that fuel load. Eso If awhile fire does come through, it doesn't burn his heart or his fast. How does a cultural burned differ from what we might call controlled Burns done by let's say wildlife agencies? Well, today, people go out there with fire engines and hand tools and cut hand lines and false nags and do all these things before they do a prescribed fire. You know, they require you to have certain qualifications before you could do a prescribed fire. You know, the cultural burning ideo in a lot of cases doesn't even involved the hand line. Sometimes it doesn't even involve having any water. It's just knowing that time a day to wear a certain type of vegetation will burn, and it's going to go out when it hits that other kind of ID stations right next to it. It just takes a basic understanding of your environment and you no longer you can interact with same environment. The greater understanding can be even prescribed. Burns can have cultural objective. You know, we can use hand tools and fire trucks and all of these fancy toys we have today. To do prescribe burns with cultural objectives as well. So we can get to the point where we have Ah restored landscape to make it part of the culture once again. John Hankins as someone who was both a researcher and a cultural practitioner as well. How do you describe the value of these burns? And how are they different? When I think about the situation of, you know, prescribed burning versus that cultural or traditional side of it. There's a lot of nuance. It's there. As Bill alluded to, you have to have ah, understanding of the environment, the wind the soil. You know the different weather patterns that are coming in houses. They're changing What the fuel moisture conditions are in the vegetation communities you're working in. You don't have Ah, bare mineral soil being exposed by breaking a line around it or anything. You know the system. You know where the fire is naturally going to go. And you worked within that landscape by reading those cues. So while a lot of prescribed Burns might focus in on hazard fuel reduction in wildlife habitat improvement, the timing of when that's happening, the outcomes of those fires will be quite different than what we would necessarily see from traditional burning. I've done burns with agency folks who will set the time go out and burn and based on cultural indicators. I know that it's not the right time. We're not in the right place for those things to take place. And I think about how that can have an adverse impact on biodiversity. So you know there's a lot of very specific objectives around why and when. How are burning? Across different ecosystems, and every ecosystem has its specific time for when it should burn or when it's appropriate to burn within that system that has set forth based on our knowledge, and that's been passed down generation after generation. Let me ask both of you done, Bill. Is there a sure Nick's a short explanation for what is a good place or when is a good time to do some of these burns? During the onset of the rainy season is really a go to time for burning and I can say from my experience and working in northern Australia, the same pattern is there. You know when the rains start to come in People are starting to burn, or they're doing it at the beginning of the dry season is happening, and then there's a time period when there's really not any fire activity happening, but maybe just a little bit here and there. Those were the safe times to burn. And if we know there are systems it's pretty easy to be able to put fire back on the ground in those different places. Bill. Do you agree with that? Yeah. I mean, that's a very valid point. Then there are other time frames for other things, depending on what? Why you're burning in that cultural context and prime example. That we're being right now, you know, with our town stands, people burn and those tan of stands at a very specific time of year and it's not so much because it's Tuesday after reversed or something. But it's because the buggy acorns have fallen with the first wind that came through or light rain. And then you get to a point where some of the good viable a corns without bugs are starting to fall. And so there's a window of time between when that window that happens, and when those good acorn start to fall, where you typically have a range of conditions in between those weather systems. That is conducive for good, safe burning. And so by watching for those cues, you're able to do that at the proper time and achieve your cultural objective to kill off the bugs. Before they get a chance to grow into the ground. I'm Ira Flatow and this is science Friday. In case you're just joining us. We're talking about the role Native Americans have had and wildfire prevention with my guests as read David Romero Bill trip and Don Hankins. Ezra was reporting on the role of racism and undermining indigenous land stewardship. Bill done, Do you experience that? You know, I got thrown into the middle of the government government consultation Arena with four service was about 19 years old. And I'm a blond haired, blue.

Burns Bill John Hankins Ira Flatow Don Hankins researcher Ezra David Romero Australia Nick
"david romero" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"david romero" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You need the air condition that cruelly and lots of state parks and beaches have been closed because of the poor air quality and fires. Now let's go back in time. For a moment, the world's best fears and skaters have come to this remote valley with the odd sounding name Wall Valley. That's archival tape from the 19 sixties Winter Olympics held in a Lake Tahoe area ski resort. That resort will soon get a new name. One That's not offensive to the Native American women and the local washing tribe. Kappa radios. Ezra David Romero has Mohr The squad. Alpine Meadows Resort will be dropping squat from its name because it's racist and sexist, but resort exact say the name won't go away until a new name is announced after ski season. Washing people take offense to the use of the word, says Herman Fillmore culture and language resource is director for the tribe. It doesn't come from here in Washington country, nor does it come from the Western United States. The legend is the land. The resort sits on was given the derogatory name by white settlers when they passed through because no men were present. The resort earned worldwide recognition after it hosted the 1960 Winter Olympics. Ron Cohen is the president of the resort. It's a multi million dollar effort, you know, reasons not to do it, but it's important to understand that it's not something that can be done overnight. But Fillmore with the tribe says there's another issue beyond the resort. Name change, he says Lake Tahoe is pronounced wrong. We more just laugh at the kind of nonsense that it creates when combining two languages. Sort of called something like or in the Anglicized version. Lake Tahoe. It's really just lately. The washing name for the lake is dot out aga and evokes imagery of the moment you approached the edge of the lake. Fillmore says the tribe isn't asking for the name to be restored. But if Tahoe was pronounced correctly, that might be just as orm or historic for the tribe than dropping a racist slur from a ski resort. For the California report a mess Sir David Romero. The State Justice Department has reached settlements with three California school districts over discriminatory treatment of black students and students with disabilities Equities. Vanessa Mangano has more on the announcement..

Alpine Meadows Resort Lake Tahoe Ezra David Romero Fillmore Wall Valley Vanessa Mangano Ron Cohen State Justice Department California United States aga director Washington Mohr president
"david romero" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"david romero" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Skiers and skaters have come to this remote valley with the odd sounding name Wall Valley. That's archival tape from the 19 sixties Winter Olympics held in a Lake Tahoe area ski resort. That resort will soon get a new name. One that's not offensive to the Native American women and the local washing tribe cap radios. Ezra David Romero has Maur, the squad Alpine Meadows Resort will be dropping squat from its name because it's racist and sexist. But resort exact say the name won't go away until a new name is announced after ski season wash. You people take offense to the use of the word, says Herman Fillmore, culture and language resource is director for the tribe. It doesn't come from here in Washington country, nor does it come from the Western United States. The legend is the land. The resort sits on was given the derogatory name by white settlers when they passed through because no men were present. The resort earned worldwide recognition after it hosted the 1960 Winter Olympics. Ron Cohen is the president of the resort. It's a multi million dollar effort. You know, it's not a reason not to do it, but it's important to understand that it's not something that can be done overnight. But Fillmore with the tribe says there's another issue beyond the resort name change. He says. Lake Tahoe is pronounced wrong. We more just laugh at the kind of nonsense that it creates when combining two languages, so to call something like or in the Anglicized version, Lake Tahoe. It's really just lately. The washing name for the lake is dot out AGA and evokes imagery of the moment you approached the edge of the Lake Fillmore says The tribe isn't asking for the name to be restored. But if Tahoe was pronounced correctly, that might be just as orm or historic for the tribe and drop Being a racist slur from a ski resort for the California report, a Messer David Romero. The state Justice Department has reached settlements with three.

Lake Tahoe Herman Fillmore Alpine Meadows Resort Ezra David Romero Lake Fillmore Wall Valley Ron Cohen AGA Justice Department United States director Washington Maur president California
"david romero" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"david romero" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Defense Authorization Act if it removes confederate names from bases on Sunday trump mocked the push to rename Fort Bragg saying on Fox quote? We're going to name it after the Reverend Al Sharpton. Trump also in support for black lives matter to support for the confederate flag, saying they were both issues of freedom of speech. The new Pentagon policy also means black lives, matter and LGBTQ. Flags are likely no longer allowed on military bases. Heavy floods and landslides from monsoon rains have displaced four million people in India's northeastern state of Assam and in Paul with close to two hundred reported deaths and dozens of people missing. This is a resident of awesome. A. This flooding comes every year this year. It's the biggest one so the roads have been submerged. Live many people are living on boats are houses of also being submerged. The devastating floods are also destroying wildlife and their habitats much as ninety five percent of the Kaziro. Zero Songa National Park may be underwater and over one hundred animals, including eight rare rhinos have died in the floods. Turkish media is reporting rescue teams have pulled the bodies of fifty nine refugees from Lake van in eastern Turkey following a shipwreck in late June. The boat was carrying up to sixty people three times over its capacity limit. At least five suspects have been detained over the deaths. Most of the refugees were believed to be from Pakistan Afghanistan and Iran. In Honduras three Gary Fano. Learned defenders are kidnapped over the weekend and the northern coastal town of Triomphe Oh, delacruz, Snyder Santana Santino Milton Martinez and swannee Alvarez were all taken from their homes by a heavily armed men, and what local leaders say the latest attack against the community by the Government Honduran President One Orlando Hernandez. Afro Indigenous Indigenous People continue to fight against mining and other extractive industries on sacred land in more news from Honduras. The prominent journalist David Romero has died after reportedly contracting covid nineteen in prison, he was serving a ten year sentence over so-called slander and defamation charges for his reporting exposing government corruption and possible links between drug traffickers, top military and government officials including President Tornadoes. Romero was the director of the media outlets radio, Globo and Globo TV. Back in the US in Michigan hearing in family court is scheduled today in the case of fifteen year old student, who was sent to prison for not doing her homework. The girl known simply as grace to protect her identity has been in detention since mid-may after a judge ruled, she violated probation by not completing her coursework online. During the pandemic lockdown, students have rallied in support of the teen who they say was targeted because she's black. The Michigan Supreme Court has also said it will review grace's case. In! New York to ball. Moment has been officially declared the winner of the Congressional Primary Race Against Incumbent Eliot Engel Friday putting an end to the sixteen term run of the powerful chair of the House foreign affairs. Committee Bowman ran on a green new deal. Medicare for all an anti-racist platform to see our.

Trump David Romero Honduras Reverend Al Sharpton President Eliot Engel Globo Songa National Park Michigan Supreme Court Fort Bragg grace Pentagon Lake van Fox India Afghanistan Orlando Hernandez Kaziro Triomphe Oh Turkey
"david romero" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"david romero" Discussed on KCRW

"How does How does that aspect of the meeting play out? Especially leading up to the election here? Well, you know, political strategist will tell you that presidents have a lot of advantages when they run for re election. Holding the's sort of diplomatic events at the White House is one of those advantages, and this is a chance to talk about two of his bread and butter campaign issues. Immigration as you know, in trade. And I expect he will. We will hear him talk about the wall, another one of the this signature issues it's related and that could resonate with his base, given that he's standing next to the Mexican president. You know, And at the same time, there is the possibility of showing some Hispanic voters that he's improved U S relationship with Mexico, which is one of our biggest trading partners. Ah carry Mexico's president came into office. I mean, he was he was critical of President Trump. And and now there seems to be this about face they're working together. And even thinking about collaborating on immigration. How did the relationship change? What happened? It is quite a unique alliance that has developed between the two it clearly, Lopez Obrador decided early on. It was better to apiece Trump than fight him, and I talked with Carlos Bravo, who's a professor at a Mexico City University here. He's not a fan of Lopez over doors trip or many of his policies. You know, bowing to trump, especially on immigration. But he says, Look, the president of Mexico has to deal with Trump. It's very hard, very, very hard to be president and off Mexico with Donald Trump in the White House, he says Lopez Obrador's just doing the best he can and appears that the two presidents Have gone grown to respect each other. At least that's what they say publicly. We're goingto watch and see. Erica. Let's at least spend a moment talking about the person who's not at this celebration. Canada's Prime minister Justin Trudeau declined to show up. What's what's going on. Well, The official reason is that Justin Trudeau has ah scheduled session of parliament. But it is really unusual for a Canadian prime minister to turn down a chance to visit Washington. You know, give him a huge economic importance of the relationship. Canadians, though, are annoyed that the United States is once again threatening tariffs on Canadian aluminum exports. There's a lot of talk about that as well. And Carrie, just as someone who has covered Mexico for for so long now and this being the Mexican presidents first visit. What are you going to be looking out for today? I'm just really curious to watch and see how they interact. You know these? These two men are As as different as they are. They're very similar in character. Lopez Obrador, you know, leans left, and Trump is conservative, but they're both populist staunch nationalists. They like to publicly criticized the press, and both have strong bases that continue to support them through thick and thin. They've both downplayed the corona virus pandemic. They don't wear masks in public. S so it's it's going to be curious that we'll see if Lopez Obrador gets to hold his head high. Like he promised Mexicans he will do on the trip. Or will trump you know, once again show off the U. S is upper hand in this relationship. Let's watch and see. Right and leverage and power. Speaking of that, I mean, Franco is this is big a deal for Trump as it is for Lopez Obrador. Well, he doesn't have the same political risks as Lopez over door that carry kind of outlined. These are the kind events where you can't control everything. And, you know, we've seen examples where these things go off the rails, especially if reporters get the chance to ask questions of the two leaders. All right. We will watch and see NPR, Mexico City correspondent carry Khan and NPR's White House correspondent Franco Ordonez. Thanks to you both for your reporting and your context here. We appreciate it. You're welcome. Thank you. This is NPR news. And from the case for W newsroom. I'm Jonathan Bastian. Good morning It's 8 42 California filed a motion for the U. S Environmental Protection Agency to reduce methane admissions as laid out under federal law. Cop radios. Ezra David Romero Reports. Ocean is part of a 2018 lawsuit against the for unreasonably delaying its mandatory obligation under the Clean Air Act to control methane emissions from oil and natural gas operations. California Attorney General Javier Buscetta and other state attorney general's heir asking a federal court to declare the delay unreasonable. They want the order to develop an issue guidelines to control methane emissions sooner rather than later. Reducing methane emissions is a huge part of the state's goal of lessening the impacts of climate change. Oil and natural gas operations are the largest industrial source of methane emissions in the country. Cap radio's David Ezra Romero, and you're listening to K C. R W KCR W sponsors include WHO Lulu presenting the original limited Siri's little fires everywhere. This adaptation of Celeste ings novel stars Kerry Washington and Reese Witherspoon as two mothers whose lives become intertwined any eligible and now streaming only.

Lopez Obrador President Trump president Mexico White House Ezra David Romero Justin Trudeau Franco Ordonez prime minister NPR Mexico City University Carlos Bravo Mexico City David Ezra Romero United States Canada Washington
Yosemite Welcomes Back Visitors After Coronavirus Closure

Environment: NPR

02:16 min | 2 years ago

Yosemite Welcomes Back Visitors After Coronavirus Closure

"Joe Seventy National Park has been closed for nearly three months because of stay at home orders but today the park is reopening in a limited way Cap Radios Ezra. David Romero reports that the closure has had a huge effect on nearby businesses. On the way into Yosemite National Park from Fresno sits the Yosemite Sugar Pine Mountain Railroad, which shut down with the rest of California in March Scott. mcghee runs the operation. We lost every single tour group and school group that we had coming up here. Yosemite is opening with a lot of restrictions. Only about half of the average June visitors are allowed in, and they must make online reservation for each car in advance, Jamie Richards Yosemite spokesperson. We're going to be monitoring condition daily. We're GONNA make adjustments as needed and we're going to work to maintain safe conditions for visitors. Only two campgrounds are open in the larger one. One is operating at just fifty percent of capacity. Other campsites are closed due to staffing Richard says she's interested in seeing how the animals in the park respond again the people we've seen a lot of bears out in active we will see when the park reopens. How the animals continue to reopen adapt to visitors coming back last year, visitors spent more than one point seven billion dollars in the four California counties that surround the Park Brooke. Smith with visit Yosemite Madera. County says that could drop by as much as half this year between fires in government shutdowns. This is definitely the longest we've ever gone with you Ashleigh. Up when she first heard, the park was opening Amy George and her husband Kyle Mon- Holland from Davis. California rushed to book a few day passes. I was drinking coffee I'm like I'm just GonNa. See and says I go. July twenty second has day passes Great. That's our twentieth anniversary. The pair of teachers spent their honeymoon in Yosemite. George has visited the park since childhood and the reservation system has long term effects. Maybe this'll lessen the impact that humans have had on the environment on Yosemite. George hopes unlimited spaces. Don't discourage people from trying to make it to the park. She wants everyone to enjoy Yosemite like she always has for NPR. News I'm as David Romero in

Joe Seventy National Park Yosemite Yosemite Sugar Pine Mountain R Yosemite Madera David Romero Amy George California Park Brooke Fresno Jamie Richards Scott. Mcghee Richard Smith NPR County Kyle Mon- Holland Davis
"david romero" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:56 min | 3 years ago

"david romero" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reply no we're talking this hour about how climate change effects tourism and the recreation industry talking with as with David Romero host of top whole land and Daniel Scott executive director of interdisciplinary center on climate change and he's also a professor at the university of Waterloo in Ontario what what let's come let's continue where we left off as rebuilding more trails and roads as more than just a business can do how how the communities like like Lake Tahoe support these changes yeah well I won't touch on something about how they it's that these projections are SO three really huge in child there's this draft climate change vulnerability assessment for the region I just that's coming out soon and in that they're talking about how the Tahoe area ski areas are projected to lose three hundred million dollars in revenues annually that's in like the most extreme climate scenario and then the medium one hundred forty million dollars a year and so that's affecting the ski resorts in with that big of a dent if the post the fact everything and that's why the city of south Lake Tahoe and other places around the lake are doing everything from bringing in electric scooters you know for a fact they get people out of their cars and then on to the right on the trails and then there's also this commitment to renewable energy by twenty third to win some of these communities and then there's also this grass roots movement to get people in positions of power on platforms of climate change in the tower region and that's because they don't always feel like their national representation believes in climate change and so they want to do things on what they can on their own and so for example ten city council and school boards in public utilities and then the Forest Service is amending how they deal with opening closing trails and restrooms because longer summers you know interrupt when they usually close these places and so they're fine all this trash and all the stuff on these trails and they're they're kind of changes forcing them to change their own rules or are there other businesses that that relying on the snow pack the site the ski industry yeah everything from the right people who clean roads to tourists to hotels to restaurants I mean the whole economy there is based on snow when when it's snowing or when there's not even so it's still based on that and so every sector of society in Tahoe is looking at snow because it's their livelihood and it's one thing that they can't change no it's a symptom of greenhouse gas emissions globally and so they're living with these effects they they have to adapt or they're not going to make it is what I hear in my reporting and and some people just can't meet ends anymore right in the employment staffing exactly like this I met this guy named the porches sleigh ride company in south Lake Tahoe and he was telling me that twenty eighteen he didn't have one sleigh ride because it didn't snow enough there wasn't enough snow at lake level first for them to operate and you know his thought was like they're gonna have to close down and not do it but they're adapting and now he does carriage rides you know and so like there's there's pointed adaptation but it gets to a certain place where you cannot operate on places like this Daniel are the businesses you talk to her thinking about this man had to adapt to stain ability or they just trying to hold on a bit of both all businesses have to focus on the next quarter the next year so they do have that short term planning you know and and they have to from a business perspective the communities but some of the bigger as Israel had mentioned some of the bigger corporate ski areas they can have a bit of that longer view and they can look at their different properties and say well which ones do we want to divest from and where do we want to invest to make our business the most climate resilient and and they they have to and they're they're seeing that sort of writing on the wall from the financial markets they're actually requiring them to disclose their climb at risk increasingly on difference about stock markets around the year around the world so publicly traded companies will have to take that sort of longer view and have that consideration the the vulnerability and and both both of you have talked about this a little bit is is the smaller mom and pop type businesses whether you're in snowmobiling sleigh rides or a smaller ski area one or two three bad years in succession and your capital reserves are gone you can't get insurance you're out of business and and the bigger players they can afford those couple bad years and then take advantage of the good years we had a listener right in with the question Sam restrict the use says on Donner summit in California our waste water treatment plant was upgraded to meet stringent state wastewater discharge mandates Donner summit public utility district includes five winter.

professor David Romero Daniel Scott executive director one hundred forty million doll three hundred million dollars
"david romero" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"david romero" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"It breaks through the KFI twenty four hour newsroom. Saudi Arabia's energy minister says to Saudi oil tankers have been targeted in a Sabbath attack off the coast of the United Arab Emirates. Both vessels reportedly have significant damage, but officials say there are no casualties and no oil spills the UAE had said alleged sabotage targeted four vessels didn't elaborate in the US has worn shippers now to use caution in the area. Iran is asking for clarification about what happened it appears former Indiana Pacers in Orlando Magic mentor. Frank Vogel is going to be the next head coach of the Lakers Volvos expected to sign a three year contract star NBA garden veteran head coach take some kid will apparently be an assistant. In six successful seasons with the Pacers Vogel had a record of two hundred fifty wins one hundred eighty when losses with five playoff appearances. But in two seasons with the magic, although went just fifty four to one hundred ten and was fired last year. But the Lakers are not confirming this at least not yet served say that a transient has been arrested for setting a fire to an American flag on a memorial for fallen CHP officer in the city of industry. The guy was barely spotted loitering in the area of the memorial at valley boulevard and Turnbull canyon road earlier today. C H B officer noticed him was watching the man appeared to grab the flag and sealed it with his hand. And the flag was on fire all of a sudden guy walked away, but he was stopped at arrested by the officer the memorials in honor of CHP officer, David Romero, Democrats looking to take on President Trump in twenty twenty been swarming California competing for campaign cash and attention in Senator Carla Harris's state, Harris herself is ranked in basically the top five. Five of the very long field of democratic contenders..

officer Frank Vogel United Arab Emirates Lakers Senator Carla Harris Saudi Arabia KFI Indiana Pacers CHP Turnbull canyon Orlando Magic David Romero Iran US NBA California Trump President
"david romero" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"david romero" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"With apparently being assistant on Vogel staff in six successful seasons with basis Vogel had a record of two hundred fifty wins. One hundred eighty one losses with five playoff appearances. However in two seasons with the magic we'll go wind just fifty four to one ten and was fired last year news brought to you by gen air and feet seventy say that a transients been arrested for setting fire to an American flag on a memorial for fallen CHP author in the city of industry. Guy was apparently spotted loitering in the area of the memorial valley boulevard. And turbo canyon road this morning. The officer notice the guy with watching the suspect appear to grab the flag and shield it with his hand the flag burst into flames. The suspect walked off, but he was stopped at arrested. The officer the memorial is in honor of David Romero who was struck and killed by a driver while on motorcycle the duty at the same intersection in two thousand five and a police officer's been killed one injured during a traffic. Stop in Georgia last night, and savannah when the officers were following up on a robbery call they pulled over a car when they approach the guy inside started shooting cleanup underway and the Houston ship channel after a barge collision. US coast guard, captain Kevin Oded says crews are making good progress as the investigation continues into what caused the bars to crash in capsize Friday remain the same with during the public safety is our top priority as well as security, barges, roaming and removing any product, and then reopening, the ship channel crews are working to secure the barge. Remove oil from the water among other things Cryer. She NC. No one is on the northbound side after white oak a crash taken away the right lane. Stop and go from the four oh five see that clear enough or something else? Give us a call and arou. Saving time traffic line. Triple eight five hundred five zero zero three Sherman oaks is stolen the four or five north at the one on one. That's taken away the left lane slowing up men, a crash in corona seventy one north after the ninety one that is over to the right shoulder. And tapping the brakes in Boyle heights on the five south between fourth and the five ten southern split. Can't find this guy. Get you there faster. I'm.

officer Guy Vogel CHP US Cryer Boyle heights David Romero Sherman oaks corona Kevin Oded savannah robbery Houston Georgia NC
"david romero" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"david romero" Discussed on KCRW

"Did not do anything wrong. We were peacefully protesting. And now you have a riot squad. As if we broke windows in the community the groups targeted the neighborhood because they say that's where people live that helped make major decisions in the city. The group is planning more protests this week for NPR news. I'm as David Romero instrumented government officials in Pakistan say they have arrested several dozen people believed to be associated with militant groups one of those militant groups claimed responsibility for a deadly suicide bombing in disputed Kashmir province that killed at least forty Indian soldiers. The bombing has led to escalating fighting between Pakistan and India in Kashmir and both countries have shot down each other's military jets, Pakistan, shot down one Indian air force pilot, but released him back to Indian custody last week. This is N P. Cr. The Justice department says attorney general William bar will not recuse himself from oversight of special counsel, Robert Muller's probe. The agency says department officials advised bar against recusals during confirmation hearings. Democrats had objected to a memo borrowed criticizing the special counsels work. The US selective service system is appealing ruling by a federal judge. He declared it unconstitutional to require only men to register for a potential military draft. NPR's David welna reports the decision to appeal Houston-based US district court judge gray. Miller's ruling comes a little more than a week after he found it unconstitutional that only men between ages eighteen and twenty five have to register with selective service women had earlier been exempted from registering because they were not eligible to fill combat positions if drafted but since more than three years ago women have been able to hold any job in the military, including combat the national coalition for men group that oppose. Uses what it calls discrimination against men had sued to halt, the registration requirement for males only the case is being appealed in the fifth circuit court based in New Orleans. David welna, NPR news, Washington, human rights experts attending a UN event allege Saudi Arabia is using terrorism. Laws to silence activists, including women they allege Saudi Arabia detains people and undisclosed locations without allowing them to communicate with anyone. Saudi diplomats told the UN gathering in Geneva. The kingdom, observes international human rights standards. I'm korva Coleman. NPR news. Support for NPR comes from creative planning and independent wealth management firm. Taking a financial planning approach to managing clients. Investments at creative planning dot com slash NPR, creative planning wealth management redefined. And the Annie E.

NPR Pakistan Saudi Arabia UN David welna US special counsel William bar David Romero Kashmir Justice department Miller Robert Muller N P. Cr Annie E New Orleans
"david romero" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"david romero" Discussed on Here & Now

"It's just a couple hundred yards away from the restaurant where that explosion. Took place. There were a lot of people out on the streets. There was a sense of bustling daily life residents have come back after the battle liberate that town and and deputy life continues. But there were also a lot of tensions. It did not feel comfortable as a crew we discuss trying to get some more interviews while we're on the ground, and we all kind of. Agreed. You know what I'm not? I'm not loving the atmosphere here, I'm not loving the vibe here. There was a definite sense of tension. And sure enough we drove along and we came upon a funeral for two local security officers who have been killed by a bombing attack on their car. These are the kinds of things that are going on on an almost daily basis, Robin. I mean, the question that I have is trying to understand what exactly those u s servicemen would have been doing frequenting at restaurants sitting down in a crowded public space in a town where the veneer of security here is very very thin, and it all. It all centers on this tenuous balancing act that kind of works to a limited extent. But of course, the fear is once you pull you as forces out of that balancing act that the whole thing tumbles down that you create this power vacuum. And that of course, we know creates an opportunity for groups like ISIS that CNN's chief international correspondent Kalisz award. Doing some terrific reporting there in northern Syria. Clarisa thank you so much. Stay safe. Thank you Rahman will in California there is not really a fire season anymore. They're fires all year more than seventy five hundred wildfires burned nearly two million acres of land in the state last year that was the most destructive and deadly year in the state's history. But officials preparing for this year had to stop that prep on federal land because of the shutdown that means dead trees are piling up in controlled burns too thin. Dr education aren't getting done. This is important work and costly as capital public radio's. Ezra. David Romero reports from Tahoe national forest. Deep in the woods of central California giant machines called mass and skids are plucking trees from the earth as if they were toothpicks this equipment is in the branches off of it. Placing it in a pile ready to go to the mill that's Joe Flannery with a Tahoe national forest out of the way here is this piece of equipment to drive rival restore this is forced thinning? It's one way to clear flammable material to prevent large scale wildfires. It's important because many of California's force are overgrown and that plus climate change make force prone to devastating wildfires. Flannery ni- or hiking through an area. Like this not too far from the town of Truckee crunching along the one of the symptoms of an unhealthy for us. Excess underscored kind of hard to walk through making her four safer is expensive take the Tahoe national forest. It's one point three million acres. Seven million dollars was recently allocated to help manage the effects of climate change here, but that money will go to treat just ninety eight hundred acres barely scratching the surface..

Tahoe national forest California Joe Flannery Syria CNN Truckee David Romero chief international correspond Robin Rahman Ezra ninety eight hundred acres Seven million dollars three million acres two million acres hundred yards mill
"david romero" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"david romero" Discussed on Science Friday

"So so what kind of data are they looking for what what data do the researchers want to get from this project? They wanna see what kinds of snowflakes are falling. And by the type of snowflake the way, it looks what kind of crystals have hooked up together on it can give them information about what whether that storm was really wet. Whether that storm was really cold. And what what happened when that snowflake fell? Basically every snowflake that falls throughout a storm tells a story and that story's is shown by how it looks. And so they look at that snowflake and analyze that snowflake to see all that data, and they look at that data over a region. They can get a sense of what's going on in that storm, and maybe even predict future future storms. What will happen in the future in that area? Did you did you try to snap some snow flake? Yourself and I did I want I met with much of kids in Reno. And we learned how to use on salt at first because it wasn't snowing and then the researchers and I went up near the Tahoe area and got some snow ourselves and snaps pictures, and our our photos were are snow are snowflakes for a bit broken. Because what had it just snowed? So it's kind of tricky they're getting the hang of it and figure. Exactly, they say the best time is to go out when it's snowing and have the snow fall organically onto the piece of felt and then the snow that way the snowflake won't be broken. Very just you're imitating, very famous photographer who went out and collected snowflakes that way, thank you and good luck to you on your snow hunting. Hey, thank you so much David Romero environment reporter at capital public radio in Sacramento. You can read his story about the snowflakes project on our website at.

David Romero Reno Sacramento reporter
"david romero" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"david romero" Discussed on Science Friday

"So so what kind of data are they looking for what what data do the researchers want to get from this project? They wanna see what kinds of snowflakes are falling. And by the type of snowflake the way, it looks what kind of crystals have hooked up together on it can give them information about what whether that storm was really wet. Whether that storm was really cold. And what what happened when that snowflake fell? Basically every snowflake that falls throughout a storm tells a story and that story's is shown by how it looks. And so they look at that snowflake and analyze that snowflake to see all that data, and they look at that data over a region. They can get a sense of what's going on in that storm, and maybe even predict future future storms. What will happen in the future in that area? Did you did you try to snap some snow flake? Yourself and I did I want I met with much of kids in Reno. And we learned how to use on salt at first because it wasn't snowing and then the researchers and I went up near the Tahoe area and got some snow ourselves and snaps pictures, and our our photos were are snow are snowflakes for a bit broken. Because what had it just snowed? So it's kind of tricky they're getting the hang of it and figure. Exactly, they say the best time is to go out when it's snowing and have the snow fall organically onto the piece of felt and then the snow that way the snowflake won't be broken. Very just you're imitating, very famous photographer who went out and collected snowflakes that way, thank you and good luck to you on your snow hunting. Hey, thank you so much David Romero environment reporter at capital public radio in Sacramento. You can read his story about the snowflakes project on our website at.

David Romero Reno Sacramento reporter
"david romero" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"david romero" Discussed on Science Friday

"These are local science stories of national significance, and whether or not your holidays had a coating of white to them, you know, that predicting a winter storm predicting it can be challenging researchers have a lot to learn about what goes on in the heart of a snowstorms clouds, and there are a couple of ways to find out. One of them involves flying through the clouds. Another pro approaches trying to study the results of these storms the snowflakes themselves, and that's what a snowflake school project aims to do in list a team of students to capture and photographs snowflakes. Joining me now to talk about the project is as David Romero environment reporter at capital public radio in Sacramento, California. He recently reported on the project. Welcome back. Hey, thanks for having me again. So tell us the point of this project. Well, the whole idea is that when an airplane goes up into the clouds that can. Only get data from wherever that plane goes in that moment, but scientists of the desert research institute in Reno wanna expand that they want data points from across the Sierra Nevada when a storm comes through. So then they can get the information out to whether forecasters and ski resorts and places like that to give him a bit more accurate information about what the snow looks like. And the trends they're seeing so the so they're they're training kids to do this. Then collect the data. Yeah. They're out about something like between fifteen and nineteen schools this year. What they do is they have to have a smartphone. And the what students do, and they give you a rubber band, and in the rubber band is an embedded magnifying glass, and you put that around your phone to line up with your camera. They give you a piece of felt on plastic and you put that out in the snow and tell it's really cold, and when it snows snowflakes fall onto it. And then you go out, and you take a picture of it. And you upload it to an app, and then the scientists take that and. Collect all that collectibles pictures. And so their students across the region doing that as well as just citizen scientists across the Tahoe region in California and Nevada..

David Romero desert research institute Sierra Nevada Nevada Reno California Sacramento reporter