18 Burst results for "David Rohde"

Arrest made in 2008 kidnapping of New York Times journalist

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

Arrest made in 2008 kidnapping of New York Times journalist

"Hi Mike Rossi are reporting an arrest has been made in the two thousand eight kidnapping of journalists in Afghanistan an Afghan man has been brought to the United States to face charges in the two thousand eight kidnapping of New York times journalist David Rohde and Afghan journalists and their driver forty two year old Hashi Nagy bull is charged in a six count indictment that was unsealed in Manhattan federal court Wednesday charges include hostage taking conspiracy and kidnapping U. S. authorities did not say where or when now she below was arrested but they thank you craning authorities for their help road and Afghan journalist Tahir Ludin escaped a Taliban controlled compound in Pakistan's tribal areas after more than seven months in captivity their driver escaped a few weeks later hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi Kidnapping Afghanistan United States David Rohde Tahir Ludin Taliban Pakistan Mike Rossio New York Times Hashi Nagy Manhattan U. S.
"david rohde" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

04:04 min | 4 months ago

"david rohde" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"A huge problem with over-classification of information and transparency to Congress and transparency, the public will aid these agencies in long term in terms of increasing public trust and there's a great. Of that going on right now, where most former directors of the intelligence agencies will tell you that as much as it was a pain to prepare for and work with the analysts to generate unclassified intelligence judgments, they thought that the annual worldwide threat briefing the testimony to the intelligence committees with the unclassified, but consistent with the classified judgments of the intelligence community about worldwide threats. Threats was valuable that it was a worthwhile investment for Congress and the American people, but of course this year the Congress has not scheduled it and the administration has supposedly resisted it, and that seems like a step backward for what you're saying in terms of something that had been institutionalized for more than two decades, actually being walked back in being less transparent than before. It is shocking and alarming that four months before the president faces re-election. You know the the leaders of the intelligence community leader, the FBI as well have not testified before Congress. About! The biggest threats face to the country and I told privately. That is because they fear contradicting the president. Dan Coats as I mentioned earlier you know to the president's regarding the likelihood of North Korea agreeing to a nuclear deal and he was ridiculed publicly attacked. The president is successfully silencing current officials and preventing them from speaking out in public to be fairly officials they. Think reporters are gonNA. Ask them you know. Questions designed to get them to contradict trump rating. Democrats are going to ask them, but that's part of the job and I think Dan Coats didn't extraordinary job as deny protecting institutions, speaking truth to the American people you know I'm John Ratcliffe of partisan congressman. From Texas who was complete trump supporter. As. Director of National Intelligence Donald Trump is successfully taking over and politicizing the intelligence and law enforcement community. He's got that with Bill Bar at the Justice Department. He has that with John Ratcliffe at deny. I think. Gina Hassle and Chris Wray have resisted. Pressures to act politically, but you know he is succeeding, and he will continue to succeed in I. I just don't want. People to downplay the seriousness of what's happening here or see trump bumbling. This is extraordinary that these folks have testified this year Let me close by getting your thoughts on. Just how deep seated this, this nefarious deep state narrative made be in fact, could it actually be just a projection of something that's. That's much darker deeper itself. You you've pointed out that in the Eisenhower Administration. Roughly three quarters of people in polls said that they trusted the federal government to do the right thing most of the time. But Post Vietnam Post Watergate. This started declining until in the Obama. Years, the same question asked about do trust the federal government to do the right thing. Most of the time was getting only around twenty percent, and even less than that now between fifteen and twenty percent. When that faith in the government to do, the right thing is the underlying condition isn't some kind of belief in an evil deep state, almost a a necessary next step for people to believe in. It is, and it's a it's convenient. INEX- credibly dangerous. Political Narrative. But again I I didn't find it and I worry that as we continue on.

president Donald Trump Congress Dan Coats Chris Wray John Ratcliffe Bill Bar Texas community leader North Korea FBI Eisenhower Administration Obama Gina Hassle congressman Director Justice Department
"david rohde" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

02:47 min | 4 months ago

"david rohde" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Book. Club to speak with him I spoke to friends and people who are closely with him. I think he he he's not concerned about that. He's not concerned about others. He feels that the trump Russia investigation was improper. He is convinced the John. Durham is gonNA find illegal activity. He thinks Michael Flynn was. Victimized and should have been prosecuted he. He sincerely believes that Roger Stone's. Sentence was. Excessive, this is again an out of control and. In Council investigation. Leading to you, know He. He called it one of the worst abuses of amusing the wrong terms, but one of the worst. Abuses of justice you know in in our lifetimes, and so he thinks the president is between unfairly. He himself said you know, use the term the need when the after the killing of George Floyd for law enforcement to dominate the streets so I I think he's A. Tough law and order tough. Pro Presidential power figure and that's. He hasn't changed a bit over the decades you. Well after looking at the whole history, and after tracing these people's experiences through the bureaucracy, as you've, said you come to the conclusion that there is not some deep, dark, conspiratorial, all-powerful deep state, and yet you do call for some reform. You say there are some things that do need some adjustments. One of them is the Pfizer process and the the Pfizer, court. One of them is that tension? We discussed between oversight. That's effective and oversight. That is counterproductive. What do you think are the top priorities for reform to correct some of the things that the? Post Church Pike Committee. Consensus didn't get quite right and make those corrections without. Setting the seeds down for more damage to this relationship. I think the the work by the Inspector General. Michael Horowitz shown a giant problem with the FIS a process at the FBI itself. You know again why it's my job to be factual as a reporter, you know the fact that a FBI lawyer as part of the FIS application process to to surveilled Carter Page, you know, change the meaning of an email you know as I understand that the original email said that Carter page was was telling the CIA about his meetings with e Gore section and Russian officials and this lawyer reverse the meeting and said you know age was not. Telling the CIA about these meetings or not cooperating, and that's extraordinary I agree with Horowitz's findings that the based on what.

Roger Stone Michael Horowitz George Floyd Michael Flynn Pfizer CIA Durham FBI Russia Book. Club Council Church Pike Committee Carter reporter president
"david rohde" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

04:22 min | 4 months ago

"david rohde" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Yes and it's. Let me say that kind of core conclusion of the book is. There is no deep state in a conspiratorial way that Donald trump uses the term. And you know again. We have powerful government agencies. We should oversee them aggressively zealously, and they make mistakes, and there was mistakes in the trump Russia. Investigation surveillance of Carter page shouldn't have lasted as long as it did. You know there is no secret cabal of CIA and FBI officials who? PLOTTED TO REMOVE DONALD TRUMP from office He made many mistakes his own that you know increases. His political problems But I just it's very important to me that Americans you understand that that is not true right and yet there's one person in a position of power other than the president who who does seem to believe quite a bit of that narrative, and he does play a key role in your book and you have you sight things going back to the nineteen seventies when he said things that certainly. Certainly led to this openness to the to the narrative, and that of course is bill bar who has a role with advising director in the seventies regarding oversight who has a role in the Bush forty one administration when he's talking about the use of executive power, you've written a lot about bill barn gotten to know the way he thinks the evolution of his thinking better than almost anyone. Talk to me a little bit about how you think. He has both fed into this. Evil deep state narrative, but also in a sense used it to push forward some of his strong. Power views in this administration. I think bill bark sincerely believes that the United States needs a strong presidency and executive branch. That is more powerful. In certain ways than Congress and the judiciary, he says himself in a speech to the. Society last fall, you know he said that if you look at American history. The branch that saves the country when it faces existential threats, the Great Depression. Wars the civil war it's the president that acts the. The president has. The legal authority in the you know obviously the parts of the government to do things and and. He says that's and he believes that the church reforms and other post Watergate reforms of the War Powers Act you know oversight mechanisms. I talked about independent counsels. He thinks are unconstitutional infringement on President's. Power and he complained that you know decisions from judges on the West Coast Trying to throw out the president's travel ban. Early in the new administration were improper. You know he thinks the impeachment. In many of the oversight, efforts by Congress are simply partisan investigations designed to slow down the administration and he really believes president. Should run the executive branch as needed that the only way the president can obstruct justice is sort of suborning perjury from witness or destroying evidence. And that nothing trumpeted muller. You know in bars, mind approach. Obstruction of justice and it's a very extreme viewpoint, but I. Just want to be fair to Bill Barn. That I think he believes this. It's not. He likes Donald Trump in wants. Just please him. He thinks that. Defending the presidency you know is is a way to aid the country and protect the country. And, in doing so enabling, those who who may actually be farther down that deep state narrative than he himself is I mean after all he has been in and out of government for some thirty forty years, not deep state himself, perhaps, but certainly more involved in it than the Steve Bannon's and Steve Miller is of the world. So do you think in a sense he's? He's opening up some boxes for the sake of executive strengthen executive authority that that would have an effect that even he might not like the implications of. Is Harder for me to answer I did not bar to not speak to me for. A.

Donald trump president executive Bill Barn Congress Steve Bannon CIA Carter United States Russia Steve Miller FBI muller perjury director Bush
"david rohde" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:57 min | 5 months ago

"david rohde" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Well I. Think there's you know the ruling last week on Daca Shows that. That he he it all depends on how the court rules on these various things where there's pending cases on you know. Can Congress for Don? mcgann to testify as part of an impeachment inquiry that that ruling hasn't come about yet, but the DACA ruling last week was an example of John Roberts joining the four liberals on the court to say that the government. The trump administration's you know. A cancellation of Dhaka was You know capricious like it was so random that it was therefore illegal So I was much more worried that all of this executive privilege all this blocking of access to White House records at bar supported the president's tax returns. That's going to the Supreme Court also that that bar would succeed if the Supreme Court you know, decided these cases in trump's favor You know there's a lot more cases to be decided, but the judicial and you're going to hear me it over and over I. Want a divided government. I want three coequal branches holding each other in check so in recent weeks you see. The digital branch pushing back the judge pushing back on on the Michael Flynn case. Where are you know drops charges against Flynn so it's actually the judicial branch that's that's pushing back hardest at trump. Congress has largely failed. I mean that's the I mean that's. The I guess the the former you know the president's ability just by executive order to reverse things based on a whim but it. It sort of feels like you know the answer that they got from the supreme. Court was like he can do it. He's got to be. Less incompetent in the context.

Supreme Court trump Michael Flynn Congress DACA president executive Dhaka John Roberts White House mcgann Don
"david rohde" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

03:06 min | 5 months ago

"david rohde" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Really good at being at at buying into a narrative that they're being told about what represents a danger and doesn't Do you think that's changed dramatically? I think it's improved and I think. Particularly in the digital age when these you know these agencies, and particularly the National Security Agency can collect you know staggering amounts of personal information from all of us as we live our lives, you know increasingly online we. We need to guard them really closely. And then here's a little boring as hell hole spinach for listeners, but you know after the Church Committee comes out. Is it just a raft of reforms that are created There's a fear of a forty year reign like Jagger Hoover's and the FBI so under president, Ford and Carter. There's a ten year term limit on how long FBI director conserve? There's a new court created defies a court. We can talk about more which you know gets a judge has to approve. Tapping of of any Americans by the FBI. The. CIA used to carry out covert actions after this conversations with President. There's a new law that says they have to rate out covert action findings, which describing writing what the is going to be doing in a covert action. President has to sign it. The finding goes leaders of both parties. In Congress, there's new intelligence committees granted in the House and Senate in the Seventies. And both houses of Congress to oversee what's going on their inspectors general Carter Creates trump has been firing them recently, but the look out for abuses and waste. An independent counsels they change over. The years are also created in the late Seventies. You Know Robert Muller like investigations, and all of these things are checks on the FBI and CIA. You know abusing. Rights again and also checks on president. You mentioned Nixon and Watergate. The president using these powers to sort of attack his political opponents so. Better You know there was a Ron Contra. There's other things we can talk about, but if you look at nine eleven. That is George. W Bush, you know carrying out Warren what's mass surveillance? He does not tell despise accord these to the court judges, but that's president doing it It's George W Bush the CIA carrying out rendition and torture again at the president taking these actions, it's not the CIA or the NSA doing those things without the president. Knowing so you're not. I may okay just to be clear provokes. You're not saying that that that makes it necessarily any more justifiable just means that these are agencies that are at the very least There's some measure of accountability that they're subject to At least within the context of the the political leadership of the government has opposed to what we saw prior to the to the church committee was these agencies operating rogue.

president FBI CIA Church Committee Carter W Bush National Security Agency Congress Jagger Hoover Robert Muller Ford Warren Ron Contra Nixon George director NSA Senate
"david rohde" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:52 min | 5 months ago

"david rohde" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"We are broadcasting live steps and steps and steps. Industrially ravaged below canal in the heartland of America. Downtown Brooklyn USA. On the program today. Yorker magazine executive editor for news. Time Theater. Winning journalist, David Road will be joining us. Does his book in deep. FBI The CIA and the truth about America's deep state. Deem wild trump's Friday night. Massacre Fails Bill Bar. MOVES TO PLAN B. to end. Investigations into Donald. Trump Meanwhile trump's Kobe party in Tulsa also falls flat. It probably barely infected hundreds of people. Mitch McConnell will be bringing a week. T policing reform bill to the floor this week. And the cares act inadvertently shows the best way to fight poverty. This give people money. DONALD TRUMP admits to slowing testing condemns is slam the health and Human Services. For fourteen billion dollars in unspent testing and tracing funds. Out To vote on DC. This week. Important primaries in New York. And Kentucky. As well as next week, more important primaries, and then also next week, a referendum to expand Medicaid in Oklahoma. May Have trouble because of.

DONALD TRUMP America Bill Bar Mitch McConnell Brooklyn Yorker Time Theater executive editor David Road FBI Kentucky Oklahoma New York Tulsa CIA
"david rohde" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

02:53 min | 7 months ago

"david rohde" Discussed on Amanpour

"Well I sure would love to have a game at Fenway Park. It's one of the great pleasures of living in the city best ballpark. I think the United States and best team in the United States too many years. But I'm not really sure that we're going to have an in person. Game at Fenway Park. Because if you ask about opening the ask about our well small gatherings you have a small number of people you could transmit to Fenway Park. My recollections seatings thirty five thousand people in a pretty compact space going to get beer and popcorn. It's a fantastic way to spread virus. And so my guess is that we're not gonNA open up really dense big events until the end of the strategy because it takes only one wonderful was they say super spreader to to spread you know. corona virus in the grandstands. That in Centerfield Fenway Park and disastrous. So I think we have to think about this as opening up so we get our businesses back we we will have workplaces. That are wearing masks. Were places that a practicing distancing but they are actually meeting but just not huge meetings and then as we gained confidence that we have the dashboard and we have the tools will open up a little bit bigger. And at some point there will be a fantastic first pitch. Thrown out at Fenway Park. Dr Eric Linda. Thank you for being with us and stay well flesh Walter and finally today NASA is mocking. The Hubble Telescope's thirtieth anniversary in space to celebrate the telescope produce this amazing interstellar image astronomy according to cosmic grief. Look how beautiful because it looks like an underwater scene for three decades Hubble her stood at the forefront of discovery providing pictures of the cosmos and over a million scientific observations meanwhile China's space agency today revealed the name of its first Mars mission. Tian One that means quest for heavenly truth and it's due to be launched in the coming months so these remarkable milestones remind us of the importance of scientific expiration reminds us of the importance of facts evidence and trusted sources. We want to end this week by saying. Please listen to. The experts do not ingest or inject any disinfectants. That's it for now. You can always catch US online on our podcast and across social media. Thank you for watching and goodbye from London..

Fenway Park Centerfield Fenway Park United States Hubble Telescope Hubble Dr Eric Linda NASA London Walter China
"david rohde" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

11:31 min | 7 months ago

"david rohde" Discussed on Amanpour

"Powerful stuff Jim. What did the movement achieve? And do you believe that it's achieved enough? I think that that sit. In which force the Carter Administration to sign regulations on that ensured that anybody with any organization was getting money for the federal government had successful people with disabilities in a lesser story than the passage of the ADA. The Americans with disabilities act so that was really a major stepping stone towards What we we now have. Certainly there's great improvements in the United States since the thirty years of the ADA but there is still very very much left to do this. Stigma around disability really gets in the way of people really participating in society in you know at the end Afar are filmed in east Jacobson. Says you know you can pass a law but until society really comes on board. Nothing's really gonNA change that substantially for people well. I wonder whether you know a wider distribution of the film might have might get rolling impact. I want to ask Nicole from your perspective as the film as a filmmaker and trying to get it out there. You did win the Audience Award at Sundance. But of course you both hoped to unveil this. Also all the European festivals the film festivals. Just tell me what you know. How has that affected getting this message? Or because it's on Netflix. And everybody's at home is. Are you getting the viewership that you want or hope or expect? The film is just like really powerful beautiful film to CNN theater. Full of people. Because it's a story about people coming together and and different even different groups coming together to try to make change. There's a moment in the film where Black Panthers show up to provide food for the protesters during the sedan and Different other groups are coming in and we've had audiences cheering and so we really are sad to miss out on on that kind of level of people kind of coming into this story and and feeling like they're a part of it but at the same time I think we we recognize that this Story is also a critical story. For this time. I think it provides a much-needed sense of hope About how people can come together to try to make the world a better place And how even though that's a long hard fight It's possible to win and so we actually You know feel very grateful that it's on Netflix. Reaching a worldwide audience and sparking a lot of conversation that we're seeing in social media all over the world Including countries where you know people are sort of saying like we need to have a movement like this or we need to stage a sit-down like this when when this is all over so it's exciting to sleep those fires sparking and I think ultimately we feel grateful that the film's being delivered to people in his time again. It is really an extraordinary thing to watch. James I want to ask you because you know. There are a lot of people having issues with lockdown and social distancing. But I've been reading obviously in all the research for this that many in the disabled community assaying actually. They've had a lot of experience with being isolated or lockdown in that maybe their own bodies in the in the restrictions of dealing in the in the world as it is and now they feel that they can cope and the able bodied world is having to learn how to just put it into perspective. Whether there's something that your community some strength that you you're able to draw right now. I think that the so many of us in the disabled can retreat know how to improvise and that every day. You're basically giving things that you have to adjust to because the world releasing built for us in a lottery specs so I think there were. We have this culture of really interdependence that we all kind of look out for each other and you could see that in order to fill so a this whole notion of G. We're GONNA have to do all these meetings from home. This is something that people in the disabled community have been asking or from employers for a long time saying get. Let me work from home. Oh No we can't do that. That is their work now. We're all doing it so I mean sorry. I'm just having a skype issues in my ear but listen you talking about work from home. So people of working age with disabilities have an employment rate that twenty eight point six percent lower than people without disability. So again I wonder if this moment that we're all living through might positively impact the work opportunities for your community coming out of it but also I just want to say that because so much socializing is going on online. You go to quote from from one woman in in the newspapers saying having the opportunity to visit virtually whether it's magazines sorry museums or performances has given me back something that I'd resign myself to not being able to do within my limitations. I hadn't realized how much I had missed it. Well I think that we You know there's been you know. People organizing from literally their beds for a long time especially in the chronic fatigue syndrome emmy immunity and so Certainly for me you know getting online as enabled me to really connect with people that never had the opportunity to and in fact you know for someone like me who's that wheelchair user traveling is not the easiest thing in the world you know. I can't be in my wheelchair on an airplane. I can't even use the bathroom. An airplane so The this newer acceptance that it's okay to be distant and talking to each other through our computer monitors is going to be helpful and I think it will open up opportunities employment. I at least I really hopes up. We all do thank you. This is an incredible insight. Thank you very much for crip. Count James Bragg and Nicole newnham. Thank you so much indeed now. Our next guest is helping Massachusetts fight against cove in nineteen often New York. New Jersey Massachusetts is one of the worst affected and Eric. Lander is a mighty brain to have on board as a pioneering mathematician and geneticists. He helped lead the human genome project. And now he's transformed the renowned MIT and Harvard Biomedical Research Lab which he runs into a mass testing facility in just two weeks and he tells all Walter Isaacson what it's going to take to scale up the testing that is essential for safely exiting our severe pandemic restrictions. Dr Landau. Welcome to the show. Great Issue Walter. You wear two hats. You run the broad institute which is the Great Biomedical Research Institute of MIT and Harvard. And you're also chair governor. Charlie Baker Massachusetts Taskforce on what to do about Kobe nineteen? Let's start with the broad back in February when this was coming down the high. What did you all decide to do? In order to contribute to the effort to fight the spread of Kobe nineteen well as we were shutting preparing to shut down the institute for most things one of our infectious disease faculty. Deb Hong Wonderful physician also working at a hospital called up the head of our large scale genome sequencing platform. It's the place where we worked on the Human Genome Project. It's actually an old beer and popcorn. Warehouse for Fenway Park. And today we sequencing a new human genome every nine minutes. They were going to be shutting that down and deb. Hong Caught Stacey Gabriel on her way to yoga class and told. Stacy you have everything you need. You have a clinical approval to run a diagnostic slaps. We're doing that. And you have a large scale automation. Could you turn this into Cova test? Three days later the team had covert tested testing up and running. They needed about a week to get the formal approvals protocols in place and then they launched is it is something that we normally expect the government to be in charge of testing and yet all these academic institutions feel. They have to run into the breach. Well look it's great that we have institutions of the country able to do it It's true it would be great if it was coordinated right now but I think in the absence of more coordination. It's it's wonderful to see institution stepping up to the white. If you were to coordinate it better. What type of things? What type of data? What type of standardization would you use to coordinate? Better the national testing effort. Oh goodness I mean in fairness there are a lot of complexities with with speeding up national testing high level the I was just getting those swabs. The nasal fringe along swabs. You stick way back up. Somebody's nose they were in short supply. And when you do that you need to be dressed up in protective equipment. A P P. As they say and there were shortages of that and so at the beginning places like hospitals and others really were confining testing to the most severe cases because they had to treat it like a super scarce resource then at the same time institutions. Were trying to spin up more capacity and many of them were starting without a real playbook it would have been great to have coordination on playbook so best practices cooking tips coordination of supply chains But you know it sort of rolled into place slowly and I think people are beginning to share a lot more and we have a lot for ago today. The whole country is doing only about a hundred fifty thousand tests a day in the road. Were doing about four thousand. A day we could increase to ten thousand a day with a couple of days notice but we need to be doing a lot more than that and there isn't yet a plan for doing one of the things. Abrode dead was stepped in and decide to do the nursing homes all over the Cambridge and part of the Boston area. Tell me about that well. We began talking to the state. About how important would be to do not just firefighting nursing homes. That were known dad. Frank outbreaks where people were dying but trying to do fire prevention by figuring out which which nursing homes had high infection rates and ideally survey every nursing home in the state for the residents in the healthcare workers.

Netflix Nicole newnham James Bragg Kobe ADA MIT and Harvard Biomedical Res Deb Hong Massachusetts United States federal government Afar Jim CNN Carter Administration Fenway Park east Jacobson Great Biomedical Research Inst
"david rohde" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

06:57 min | 7 months ago

"david rohde" Discussed on Amanpour

"That is extraordinary archive footage in six strawberry story and the film is the latest to be acquired by the former. First couple Barack Michelle Obama's higher ground productions and to discuss it are the CO directors Nicole Newnham and James Bragg. They join me now. This is really amazing. Thank you for being with us. And it's a really great subject to talk about James. I just want to ask you because you were so instrumental in the camp and you become an activist. Obviously can I just ask you about the name because it's quite a controversial name? You take you call it crip camp. Tell me what made you both all of you decide that that was the right name. I think that the use of the word is very indicative of how I feel about identifying as culturally somebody with a disability and That it was certainly indication that this wasn't going to be your average a documentary about a bunch of kids in wheelchairs at a summer camp You know with not everybody likes his term but it is. I think that Mike Humidity is used this as a way to reclaim the word cripple and And and so kind of when you know you meet somebody else in you in an Corbett. Who's in the movies said to me years ago? Hey Jim camp and it was just. It's shorthand but it also says that you know I I have this sense of identity within the community so so tell me about it. This camp camp genetic was was created. I think in one thousand nine hundred eighty one lasted for more than twenty years in the catskills in New York. Just tell me a little bit about it. That clip was really amazing. People were able to have fun enjoy themselves and not feel in any way discriminated or sidelined. Tell me how it came about. Well I think that the time that genet- it was really a product of the Times so it had been started by these two sisters and over the course of time they've managed or the run of the camp went into different hands. But on the late sixties early seventies When Larry Allison up started to run the was the camp director one has remember Woodstock. That just happened a couple of years ago. There were all these liberation movement going on black power and women's live and such and You know this was not a can't that sheltered as for anything they were not overprotective. They really want us to really be teens. And young adults there and there was this sense that no one ever taught down to us. We were talking about what was going on in the world. We can talk among each other and say you know. It isn't fair that we can get on buses or that we are not able to get into buildings and we were looking at these other movements and saying why not us is amazing Nicole. What brought you to it and frankly I mean. Did you know that there was going to be so much archival video so much? You know real sort of documentation that you could look back at. No I mean Jim is a longtime colleague of mine. He's a brilliant sound designer and he'd been the sound designer and my three previous documentaries and And Luckily he took me out to lunch one day and pitched me a bunch of ideas around disability. Because he was really advocating for Increased representation and more stories about disability In our in our documentary world and kind of off handedly. He mentioned this camp and I asked him questions about it and when he started to describe it. I realized we don't have a way of of even recognizing kind of I mean many of us who are non-disabled that there even is a disability community are that there is a disability culture and that The even the still photographs of these incredible kids just like having the time of their life and and being wild and raucous and all of this was just shifting my perception around disability and so as a documentary filmmaker. I felt like there was this incredible opportunity to not only tell one of the great kind of untold civil rights stories of our time the disability rights movement but also to just shift the way people perceive people with disabilities And so but we didn't know there was all of this footage so we thought perhaps we would cast young actors with disabilities and recreate the camp and we were got. How could we do it? And then we found This real treasure trove of archival from a group called the people's video theater which was a radical hippie video coalition that had stumbled onto the camp at one point just really kind of by by a chance encounter an had spent days. They're filming the kids. And what's so extraordinary is that they just let the kids including JEM have the camera for himself and it just everything plays out in this. Very organic Beautiful Way so you really see the coming together of this community of young people and you see how they are finding their way to kind of empowerment and liberation. I'm because you talk about civil rights movement and Empowerment and liberation. I want to play another clip because it does actually show how protests were were held and how they actually did you know use everything at their disposal to be able to make statements and just so the so that we can tell our audience that are according to the official statistics. One point three billion people living with disabilities worldwide. That is a lot. I WANNA play this clip about the protests and talk about the results of that afterwards decided to have a demonstration in New York City in France. Nixon headquarters we decided that we were gonNA sit down in the street. We were GONNA stop traffic so at four thirty in the afternoon. We form this huge circle. We cut off for streams. Get the call to action to the barricades in Judy. Recall it. I remember being on the ground. What these big trucks come in like. Whoa so it was a very unusual demonstration. I mean people are not used to seeing a whole lot of folks wheelchairs and you have to back up. I mean you had to back up if you're on the wrong side in front of that. Young woman never stops busiest w why they were announcing paraplegics. Stop traffic in Manhattan..

Jim camp Times Nicole Newnham New York City Barack Michelle Obama James Bragg Corbett Manhattan Mike Humidity Woodstock Larry Allison France Nixon director official
"david rohde" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

05:40 min | 7 months ago

"david rohde" Discussed on Amanpour

"I WANNA ask we. We sort of running out of time a little bit but I want to ask what you think and then very quickly if I can get back to David. What will we see once? This pandemic is over politically. Just want to remind everybody was here in the United Kingdom. Which has you know. Westminster Parliament the House of Commons. A CORONA VIRUS. Bill was rushed through parliament here allowing government ministries to detain an isolate people indefinitely banned public gatherings including protests. Shut down ports and airports more with little oversight. You know this is a big deal. What's going on? How do you see the world emerging from all of this and well? I think the question is how people you know. We're in early days. You say the question is how people react to it down the road. I can imagine two very different outcomes one. I can imagine this crisis resulting in a big transfer of power to the state in every country democracies and dictatorships as leaders. Try to hold onto those powers That they've gained and After after this crisis is over I can also imagine people rebelling against them and I would not be surprised to see even in some very strict authoritarian countries a kind of backlash against these control already. Okay and just quickly to David and is more of a deep state question. This idea of the deep state I mean. President trump gets to any president gets to nominate his political appointees at the top of the level of every ministry every department. The rest is sort of. I guess. Career Civil Servants Foreign Servants so foreign service so essentially is not trump. The deep state himself is any president not the deep state so to speak. If you're going to actually use that term. Well what if you to me? A deep state is sort of a consolidation of power in where power is in the processes. The decisions are kept secret in you see that increasingly in the trump White House you had rudy. Giuliani carrying out a private foreign policy in Ukraine. Sean Hannity. At Fox News host is constantly talking to the president every night by phone acting like a private communications arm of the White House We it's not clear. Who's visiting the White House? So that's the danger trump. It could be because he fears these leaks in fears. Everyone around him. I don't know if it's fear or or calculation but he is creating an essence of deep state of his own where these loyalists behind closed doors. He's rejecting congressional subpoenas. He stopping everyone from the White House from testifying before Congress. You know are making these decisions. There's no democratic process. There's no standards. There's no transparency and that's very dangerous. I I've found in researching book the more concentrations of Power. You have the less transparency. You have the more ability for abuse and in crises. Like that that that I agree with Dan. That's when this can happen so much more to talk about. We'll have you both back David Road and Applebaum. Thank you so much for joining us this evening. Us Bank thanks you for going to work and for staying home for treating patients and having patients for being on the front lines while having our backs. Thanks for working together and playing. Podcasts you love. Us Bank can't thank you enough but we can do our part. That's why we have donated millions to help our customers employees and communities in need equal housing lender member. Fdic this week. On boss phones. I talked to Cleveland Cavaliers Player and FIVE-TIME NBA All star. Kevin love about what he calls the pandemic. No one is talking about mental health. He shares with me his personal struggles with anxiety and depression. And we talk about why. He's speaking up in order to draw more attention to this issue especially during the. Krahn virus pandemic went so. Many of us are isolated. Listen to the latest episode of Boss Files. Wherever you go your podcasts. If you enjoy the sport of basketball and also half a year earning for medieval things. There's a show. You should know could game zones. And the final episodes airing on bleacher report April thirtieth and now death Americans have been urging the White House to use sign language. Interpreters at the corona virus briefings a reminder of the challenges for many who want to access any information now. A new documentary on Netflix. Looks at a historic summit camp for the disabled community which was not only fun but also launched a generation of activists. Here's a clip. From the extraordinary and inspiring CRIP. Kemp Woodstock was happening. I remember being at my grandmother's listening on the Transistor Radio and say wish. I wish I wish I could go on there. I was I was what stock the music and the people who these people are great. You know I mean in a good way to camp. Alpha.

White House president David Road trump Westminster Parliament House of Commons Kevin United Kingdom Sean Hannity Bill Us Bank Netflix Fox News Kemp Woodstock basketball Transistor Radio Cleveland Cavaliers Giuliani
"david rohde" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

13:23 min | 10 months ago

"david rohde" Discussed on Amanpour

"Is the force fervor and comprehensiveness of assault overnight religion yours today this is not in decay. This is organized destruction secular residents in their allies. Have Marshall all the forces sources of Mass Communication Popular Culture the entertainment industry and academia in an unremitting salk on religion and traditional values abused. Give us an insight into Baas early years. How did he come because he was meant to be a very respected legal scholar? He was respected and and he is very good as a lawyer but he's always been deeply conservative. He sort of saw the sixty s as judicial activism with coming in in terms of affirmative action tune. And he's very much against abortion rights. A person that's close to bar said that the the viewpoint is sort of yes. DONALD TRUMP IS UNORTHODOX. But he delivers but you know what. It's not. Just that he delivers. Its that he does it in a way. That's not necessarily religious. I mean these are religious conservatives you kind of get it. They are a big force in this country but they have chosen to hitch their wagon to somebody. WHO's not religious? Maybe doing what they want him to do. Politically judges taxes abortion action rights. What is it that allows them to say? The means justifies the end. I believe it was Jerry. Junor said this about Donald Trump. He's a street fighter. And there's this feeling and you hear it again in bars rhetoric about siege that you need a streetfighter to stop this elitist assault which I don't think exists exists. But that's what bill believes. And that's what you know people conservatives feel so you you need donald trump to you know keep you to help you survive live. Keep your values your family and lives the you know your life the way you want to and this is the broader polarization of our politics. It's not about disagreeing it's at the other side is going to destroy you and your way of life. If you don't fight back and other parts of Clever Messaging Alan Dershowitz very canny lawyer very successful lawyer on trump's side push the envelope as to why the president should be impeached over this. Let's play it. Every public official that I know believes that his election is in the public interest. And mostly you're right you're elections in the public look interest and if a president does something which he believes will help him get elected in the public interest that can can not be the kind of quid pro quo that results in impeachment so again very clever messaging on the day. The verdict came Mitt. Romney is one Republican senator. Who voted to convict so not many people moving out of the the party dogma? Essentially it's it's clever messaging and it's Dershowitz saying that this is an impeachable offense and this is what many of the Publicans have adopted. which is it was wrong or questionable symbol? It's not enough to throw him out of office. But what's so. Scary is the sort of precedent of what Dershowitz saying so if the president thinks what he's doing is right right and he thinks it's good for the country that he or she be re-elected than they can break the law. And that's what's so scary and so strange about this moment in American history you you have Donald Trump's sort of violating all these norms arguably violating these laws and a third of the country. That's relate to him saying you know it doesn't matter and he says I didn't do anything wrong. There's this kind of black white thing. His response was no. It was a perfect phone. Call the kind of fear that you'll be held accountable if you lie too. Much that's existed said Cincinnatian has dissipates. Outraged completely is become to quote a phrase the art of the deal. Yes as you know Laurence tribe. The scholar has said about Baas ideas of presidential power. If those views take hold we will have lost. What was one in the revolution we will have a chief executive eh who is more powerful than the king? How would baugh respond to that kind of criticism? What's sort of extraordinary about bar and the speeches he's given? He said this throughout his life I want to be fair to him is that he is always thought that to keep this country together you needed a president that was strong and could act decisively. If there's a nine eleven style attacked the president does what's needed doesn't have to consult Congress and what we learned from sort of Nixon and Watergate is that you need an equal division of powers. You know it's very cumbersome but you need the executive branch fighting the legislative branch judiciary. They're also those three branches hold each other in check and you I do see with the acquittal of president trump the presidency is gaining tremendous power it I think it recouped the power loss from Watergate after nine eleven no now George Bush and Dick. Cheney took a lot of power there And I think the president's even even more powerful now let's go back to this sort of the religious just a theme that that sort of Unites Quite a few of the president's men again incredibly people wouldn't believe it if they didn't see it in front of their eyes because also Mike. Mike pompeo is a conservative evangelical Christian. He apparently according to Susan Glasser. WHO's profiled him for the New Yorker? He actually has an Open Bible on his desk. Ask What does trump see in them. I think he sees support. He sees people who embrace him and welcome him and I think he's committed to Kinda on a defying the elite. It's this sense. Donald Trump's always had that he's the outsider and he's persecuted and share that. I think that you know religious Americans feel that way day and they you know they. There's a feeling I get and I hear this. From sort of moderate Republicans will heard a member of the House that there's a sense that liberals liberals are all just overreacting to Donald Trump. He Says Syndrome that. He's he's kind of amateurish. This phone call is a sort of amateurish thing to do. The phone call with Ukraine and all the liberals are sort of overreacting to the president. And again there's and this is the broader problem of the kind of you know the integration of our politics. I think Mike Pompeo and bill bar and other religious conservatives do feel that they're under siege that this cultural elite is persecuting them for following their religion. I don't I don't think that's I hope that's not true. But this is how our politics has gone about like playing to the base Conspiracy theory you know. My side is under siege in this suggests that so anyway Baugh as the top law enforcement officer of this land has made a lot of interventions to the federalist society a Conservative Legal Society as the impeachment hearings were going on. He made this comment. And the fact of the matter is that in waging a scorched earth no-holds-barred war of resistance against this this administration. It is the left that is engaged in the systematic shredding of norms and undermining the rule of law. So that's a real challenge. Chief law enforcement officials saying president's political opponents are undermining enshrouding. The rule of law. It's again I want. I respect bill bar. He's he's a very serious learning very effective one but but this is effective messaging. Your side is battleline. You're destroying the norm when clearly. Factually though it's been president trump and his administration. That is limiting. Information's never happened before for anything that Barzani's launched these investigations. He's investigating the F. B. I. Officials and intelligence officials who have said that Russia interviewing the election to help trump investigate the investigators. So there's a real fear that there's a chilling effect that this is saying to. FBI agents are intelligence analysts. Don't investigate this president. Don't question question anything he says publicly because you yourself will be investigated if you do that. And it's it is a very dangerous precedent that bar setting up. Anbar bar might believe that there are these conspiracy theories and what's so unnerving about this is where does it end bar thinks he's besieged these. FBI People in our investigation their air besieged. And everyone is sort of believing their own conspiracy. Theory and You know that frightens me and I worry sometimes about violence in this country really I think as we go through a very heated twenty twenty election there were bomb sent. You know two journalists in some public officials. I don't want that to happen. I hope it doesn't happen. But when you look at the level of rhetoric opponents of trump saying he's destroying democracy supporters of trump saying. No you're destroying democracy. You're trying to force him out of office in a coup. Oh that's very dangerous rhetoric. What does a very earnest Democratic Party do sticking to the facts being rigorous about the the truth of the matter in terms of facts and figures and trying to win a fair fight at an election? They've obviously not managed impeachment or or with the Mueller investigation instigation. What do they do? What is the tactics that they should employed? It's very it's very difficult. I think there's an a level of substance what's happening. Terms inequality healthcare was a huge issue in two thousand eighteen. Climate is a tremendous issue among young Americans and is to focus on those issues. Is it's also counterpunching. Because Donald Trump is so good at defining them and whoever the nominee is he will define them as he defined Hillary Clinton and there it was a sense that maybe this wasn't sticking on Hillary Clinton but it actually works so it has to be someone who mixes those two things. I think. Trump is cleverly sort of trolling his political opponents members of the press and. There's a tendency to overreact to the trolling. So it's kind of pushback. Define yourself and focus on issues. I want to engage you as a foreign correspondent again in this post truth world even something as strong as a as a as a criminal criminal trial against genocide is the conviction of warlords and lead is like in the Balkans now languishing for life in jail because of crimes against humanity Hannity perpetuating genocide even that can be questioned in this post truth world. We've got Peter. Handke hadn't been awarded the Nobel Prize for for literature and here in the past has questioned the notion that there was a genocide at Srebrenica which you've written about he's questioned Slobodan Milosevic's involvement menton all of this and now we have an American journalist. Jessica Stern who has visited Ratan carriage the Bosnian Serb henchmen responsible and judged and tried and convicted for crimes against humanity. She's visited him in prison and has written a sort of touchy feely book about my war criminal. I mean where wins this end. It's a strange thing. And the tactic too is that we'll all sides committed atrocities in Bosnian. And it's all about everyone that is not true. The vast vast majority of the crimes were committed by Serb radicals not by all Serbs and. But there's a tendency to kind of muddy the truth and again this kind of counter narrative and and it does grow. It is appealing to people. And it's I think it's easier for people maybe for Serbs to think my people didn't do this and and you don't want to think your your group is guilty. Here's it here's a quick and easy answer from Jessica Stern saying actually know everyone was bad. You know your group wasn't particularly surly bad so there's an appeal to that. I don't know where it ends. And it's just all this history being changed for people to feel better about themselves or people to score political points again. It's all very dangerous to me. And everything's at stake everything. It's an incredibly important election but I think people are listening the. US says deeply divided. It's very unclear who will win. And it's a real test for for journalism and democracy and we just have to stick to the facts in our traditional national tradition as journalists. Trying to get it right and David Rowe thank you very much indeed..

DONALD TRUMP president Mike pompeo assault Baas Jessica Stern Baugh Alan Dershowitz official Marshall FBI Mass Communication Popular Cul Anbar bill Hillary Clinton Mitt Jerry Russia chief executive
"david rohde" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"david rohde" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"KFI AM six forty more stimulating talk David Rohde stays with this the the author of treasure template Templars **** and the holy grail so we were talking about this a painting the get altar piece which was really revolutionary this piece of artwork by the then Ike brothers back in the the fourteen twenties and it's the most stolen painting in history so it's recovered up was it you recovered after the war by the allies right so the not the stole the the the painting after they rolled into Belgium and then at the end the allies are covered at the very end of the war but we want to find a little bit back to nineteen thirty four this one particular panel those one panel that for some reason people believe was the map to the holy grail called the Jeff judges panel that panel still even before the war in nineteen thirty four it was obsessed with it on one of the possibilities is that Belgium Belgian nationalists patriots stole it fearing that Hitler was gonna get a hands on it eventually and they took it as a preemptive move but that the mystery about this penalty it that one panels Nevin recover even though the other parts of the of the of the painting other fifteen panel had been recovered that one panel that map the holy grail has never been recovered so Hitler believed that the just judges panel of the Ghent altarpiece would lead him ultimately to uncovering the Templar treasure which might lead him to the holy grail and all these other Christian artifacts exactly and what did Hitler imagined that he could do with these artifacts and he he was in a cultist he hated Christianity why did you want the holy grail so badly it Christianity but they also recognize the power of these artifacts of possible power the artifacts are two things you wanted to do right exactly one he wants to weaponize them could he possibly turn for example the spear of destiny to some kind of weapon using the the magic that was associated with it.

KFI David Rohde Belgium Hitler Nevin Ghent altarpiece Ike
"david rohde" Discussed on 94WIP Sports Radio

94WIP Sports Radio

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"david rohde" Discussed on 94WIP Sports Radio

"Start at at my condolences. Believe I family It was a great caller WIP family And let's get onto the Phillies Dan so I really. Liked the, chances of winning, the east I mean after the. Cards we have a pretty easy schedule, and if, you look at the Braves. The, schedule they get David Rohde September well. They have seven games against the brace for one they have like twelve games against. The Mets and Marlins the Rockies act they played four games and who am I. Missing the nationals at play three games they have to win like nine at twelve from the NATs and, Britain that's in, or the Marlins Mets which is unfortunately they. Have, not played. Well against the Mets yeah, I agree I think like I mean we used to call a good game good game, and we played a memorial immoral. Letdown, but we don't play too well well they can't afford tomorrow when Nola, goes out with a lead the ball they can't afford. For the. Bullpen to blow it tomorrow. No more no. More, of. This, bullpen blow arrested away. Yeah here hey on the, eagles tank I. Think we got a good shot but I think, a little worry about a lot of guys being guys. Every played. Like j Peters and sprawled. Another vets but. It's, gonna, be, really tough warned it You know what I I was I. Was thinking that. Same day but that's why I'm glad I defensive clicking. On all cylinders because of the defense, I feel like they can keep us games for the first few gave me to the office action catches up it gets, it gets it gets on the. Same. Page Yeah Betty, man I might. Go.

Braves Mets Phillies Marlins David Rohde Dan j Peters Nola Betty eagles Britain
"david rohde" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"david rohde" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"I would think about that differently one of the things that becomes clear as the identity of american was coded white that was american and that that american is the one that people are harkening back to in terms of we need to get rid of this identity politics but in getting rid of this identity politics they're not talking about getting rid of the structural inequalities that had been based on that identity politics and so it's another version of black people brown people women hush understand your place and get in it and be quiet that's what that really is and so it doesn't say and i find this fascinating it's it's like the the the studies done several years ago couple of decades ago actually well but like david rohde gir that talked about whiteness because what that does is that identity politics is not white identity politics are african americans talking about voter suppression or bleach shooting young black people identity politics are latinos who are concerned about america's immigration policy identity politics are women saying you know we are really sick and tired of being harassed sexually assaulted when we're just trying to work so so that's identity politics but identity politics is not the poor white woman in kentucky who is concerned because those people have better health insurance than she does or that she supposes that's not identity politics identity politics isn't the secretary of the treasury mnuchin and his wife talking about you know as that picture that horrific picture where they're holding up those dollar bills or you know sheets of money in crafting policies that ensure that rich white get even richer that's not identity politics identity politics then is coded as people of color identity politics is coded as the lgbtq community and identity politics is coded as women who do not know their place.

america secretary david rohde kentucky treasury
"david rohde" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"david rohde" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"The transcripts from the syrian you know when the in the news center vietnam in you don't like what are the kid brought up this there was a place called email pavilion you know at lunch or older i guess you know that the un's who kids had the sick and he wasn't even acceptable to say that the euro but very and i'm just thinking about mind why is it why even have a damn mop really it you know what i mean it's just these wasn't aimo right leg like the kids can't be very exclusive if you if you look like you might not want to belong in the imo pavilion not red eye radio but i will say it i mean if if news cames would just you know this was you know obviously personally at home going through a lot and then when he goes the school they just picked on him that is all well and a half ago that the pack mentality it always has happened it always is going to happen howdy just you know you can tell your kids to be kind and passion compassionate and apathetic all you want but the wheat kids are gonna get picked on by the strong kids just like the week the run of the litter gets picked on by the alpha's that's what happens but it doesn't youngest saying it did that that seems to be part of the root of the issue with a different time and it used to be you know thirty years ago i mean ninety the mayor of i i'll go i'll take heed ice on the radio of the book going south pretty good actually are you really is the baby of the daily el chapo while baby cook taken an app yesterday it saw david rohde had like he was a 15yearold girl so it's a tough free by sticking with it crazy hollywood stores twitter says the option all the way to a big party so i'll i guess what would happen to their hopefully sex please do i think i have the ah book by arrive your listeners albon is a party photographer is that the main character alvin it at his controversial tastes making site as brought fortunate famed the hundreds including the wild girls of the hit reality series all apps imagine that means are all f cups with.

un david rohde twitter hollywood thirty years
"david rohde" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

Talk Is Jericho

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"david rohde" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

"I want two either one day one day guest host raw mmhmm oh my god and be you're have a match or and a spot with either we man or dinkal h i want alexa i feel so bad for god's holy malia or any of the original dwarf wrestler wrestler but yeah like he did a stuntman dude yeah he hit takes i wanna i wanna do a may weather mcgregor tape payperview fight and we matter boys we've we've talked about it do people volley guys act there there's all time he building and women not so much english he looks will different than me but yeah they they legit and the the the crazies bars when they i tell them not and mellick fight malik no no you're him get yeah ilk his yuccas wrestlers have a look i i hope you add that the for me it's is bon jovi gordon ramsey which is gordon rams years what's this was a good one lady because at the approaches i gotta i know you are okay i'm like okay i'm gonna tell you one big family movies who need them stories in mr swayze and that can see will and i think he's been dead for like a year it's okay they were sweden's this those patrick's ways ouessant death well i can rivers before death opposed to the patrick's raises a hot dude small takes ways which she was select it's okay you don't have to deny i know it's okay it's okay so that the soil thing you know a judge on what a couple of leslie did you ever less life is short with yeah orrick daves that is yes so funny i was yes that was him and those are the regular vase rick you're vase david rohde gray and along those lines of.

malik gordon ramsey mr swayze patrick leslie sweden david rohde gray one day
"david rohde" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"david rohde" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"The right word i don't worker dumped a really smart on on a broadcaster the budget have thirty nine died on a to right now and they vicar fair out three to provide if they want to and they're player all of guiding the continuity he's not quite there now i know why robert and doing that because i wrote about this at when the rocket ruin their character and you remember it was on the wider they were finishing up at stretch of twenty of twenty nine games well the road had been the pittsburgh of buckle herb in chicago the code west go through rebel prime got swept in los angeles in one of three and air go they were they were store they were knocked it they were really hired at the time the dodgers at the airport and play point torn david rohde will probably pop awards reporter aaron diamond what very quickly put all your home game guess what dodgers 28 out to 48 toy according it on the road with your artist in the middle of august and look what happened they got erupted worked villiger halford they got they got there no one krypton without poets prey on ordered editor crowley and all that it it caught with them and so robert devalue crummer give my guys will be a break i'm going to bring up all these guys from triplea ever for all these different wire together i would think he envisioned they will lose wider petr 1450 wherever watt but i think i don't think he's panic either i think he knows when i kept my property actor i could will quit and turks are out there for the first game i liked by chance so i think uh the player may uneasy about the i'm sure the feira note andrew easy about los angeles i think we club clubhouse they know what will spring training right for that right elbow guys they're quote out i think when they heard back yarn reporterfor the playoffs i think you'll get much better to undertake or sure they feel that way too last time out patrick corbyn goes five in a third one earned on two heads of four strikeouts three walks all what do the rockies need to do in order to beat him because they beat him badly the start they.

pittsburgh los angeles dodgers aaron diamond villiger halford crowley patrick corbyn rockies robert david rohde reporter editor andrew