17 Burst results for "David Remnick"

"david remnick" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"david remnick" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

"We're not talking about building niger. On park and fifty third street. We're talking about mixed income. Affordable units with people can come and to segregate their communities and a lot of my affluent new yorkers enjoy knowing that their children grown up in diverse multicultural environment. And i think we give new yorkers a bad of really marked by thinking they don't i think is possible. We have to diversify schools. We're doing a disservice while children shoot. You live in bed. Stuy which is a big neighborhood in in brooklyn for those live. Have of town as we say. New york Bed stuy traditionally for decades has been a mainly black neighborhood in brooklyn big neighborhood and it's increasingly gentrified. And how do you feel about that. How do you feel about the gentrification of your own neighborhood. Well i i love diversity and we need to really understand. Justification is not ethnicity is a mindset and when you come into a community no matter what your ethnicity may be and you don't talk to the people who are there You don't patronize the stores. The shops of you basically attempt to displace a long-term of good practices of that's chin certification. But if you come into a community with that all time feeling that you come with a cake that you're now a new neighbor if you engage in you're part of the school if you if you involve that's a wonderful thing i want my son to know i look at his friends and i see the different ethnic groups in how they engage with each other. That's an amazing beautiful feeling but the energy of coming into a community and believing that you are now taking over and you're going to use the police in other agencies as tools to grab to their long-term residents there and displace them. That's wrong that can happen and we cannot allow it to happen. One of the most complicated perhaps the most complicated relationship. You're gonna have to negotiate as mayor and this has always been the case in. New york is with the governor governors and mayors get along like cats and dogs. And i know it. The relationships have always been at best horrible horrible applause. Cuomo can barely say civil word to each other now as you well know. Governor cuomo is being investigated reports of sexual harassment. And you're not one of those who joined the call for cuomo to resign. Why not because it's a process of was great about this amazing country. Where n is something called. Due process and particularly as a black man history has so many examples of where people have just basically stated. We're going to skip over the due process part. We have an investigation. Taking place of the attorney. General is extremely competent. Let her do her job. She did interview him as well as the victim's the stated they were victimized of the process take his course and the accusations trouble. You yes they did. They were extremely troubling I believe that no one should be the victim of any overaggressive or any intrusive actions extremely troubled to hear them of but i do respect the process and we need to allow the process to take his court strategies. A final question. Who's the best mayor this city has ever had a great question I will have to mix up if you I patterned myself After dinkins of bloomberg and Laguardia a blue collar guy. you know. Just in everyday guy blue-collar guy nothing fancy. There's nothing fancy about me you know you're not saying all the main because a blue collar guy bloomberg was good smart person that knew how to use data of when you pat yourself on the ground I think that's the energy and spirit of a person heartbroken. A new yorker. The life i live is a life. That new york is a living right now from being a dishwasher. Going to school at night pay my way through college. Broken heart having a learning disability overcoming that being arrested but going from san. What always meet a why not me. That's what people picked up. When i ran for mayor. They said this is one of this is just an ordinary guy that wants to do something for ordinary people in the city. Thank you thank you take care.

brooklyn niger Governor cuomo New york Cuomo cuomo dinkins Laguardia bloomberg new york san
"david remnick" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"david remnick" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

"Income earners while fleeing because they don't feel safe remember only sixty five thousand people pay fifty one percent of our income taxes that allows us to have teachers sanitation employees police. We can't lose our high income earners and the perception of their is hurting our economy. So your fear. Is that wealthy. People in new york city are going to run off to palm beach. and wherever. and we're gonna lose so much tax revenue that city services across the board are going to deteriorate. I fear that. And i feel large corporations stating I am not standing in the city like this saying to pasta san francisco when you see a tent cities and you see a total disorder in san francisco. Large corporations are leaving the city. And what's happening in washington square. Paul i was there the other day with my son. Someone was injected themselves with heroin right inside the park..

palm beach new york city san francisco washington square Paul
"david remnick" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"david remnick" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

"Large number of people for small amounts of crack cocaine instead of giving them the help. They deserve We had a the crime. Bill that devastated of many of our communities and then we saw the democratic party in charge but not dealing with real crime and i was seeing that crime every day and it was my my protests of just saying. I'm i'm tired of this party. Ignoring the plight of people in the inner cities and that was my protests and reflection. I could have done it two different ways but you know as you move through life you learn from your lessons you don't relive them doing you. Are you saying you regret becoming a republican for a period of time. Yes i do There was no reason to do so. I could have found a better way to voice my outrage with the party i could resigned from the department of rainfall is in there. Were other things. I could have done. but you know i made. I made a lot of mistakes in life. Let me tell you something. I am perfectly imperfect made so many mistakes that you have to laugh and say how did this guy still getting a. But i never stopped. I never stopped grinding. And i never stop learning from those areas. You seem very plainspoken and straightforward. What are your biggest mistakes of all number. One of i should have married my childhood sweetheart. She kicked me to the curve and went to washington to marry someone else. You know so. There are a lot of things that i did wrong. I wish i would have spent more time with my son. That was a real impactful moment for me. I spent so much time. Saving the lives of children that i was really afraid i was going to lose my son and i'm just really amazed at how much he has developed as a child and he said to me After the eric gardner incident some years ago that data understand why you were so determined and now relationship is an amazing relationship even when he was a child. But i wish i would have been around him more and i put the movement in front of being dead that i should have been doing that time. In my opinion new yorkers are beat they're exhausted. This pandemic has been so brutal. In the worst way there's been lockdowns. Death curfews changing mask rules dealing with remote education for kids no access to the arts and the list goes on and on and on and you might soon be the leader whose job it is to restore new york to normal. I just what are you going to do. For example you have twenty five percent of new yorkers who are still vaccine hesitant one third of hospital workers reportedly have not gotten their shots wondered if hospital workers in new york. Why hasn't mayor de blasio tried to get that vaccination rate up what mistakes he made in. What are you gonna do what you said something..

department of rainfall democratic party eric gardner washington new york de blasio
"david remnick" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"david remnick" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

"Having won his democratic primary in june adams is the favourite to become new. York city's next mayor. We just had the primary election for the mayor of new york city and the winner. The very likely next mayor is democrat. Eric adams he's the borough president of brooklyn in a former state senator but most importantly in this race adams was for more than two decades. A police officer and perhaps no debate in our society is more divisive than questions about policing and here adams holds a truly unique position in his youth. He was beaten by police when he joined the nypd himself. He was a firebrand in an advocate for black officers. But now he's a sympathetic figure to the police department. A kind of law and order candidate he rebuked other candidates who spoke of severely cutting police budgets and he made the national spike in violent crime. A big part of his rhetoric. Assuming that eric adams wins the general election which is overwhelmingly. Likely he'll take over a city that faces multiple overlapping crises. That my daunte. Any politician mr adams. You're there this i am day. You are what you do is you. Go to the voice memo you turn it on start a voice memo and start recording and just hold the phone up to your ear as if we're talking on the phone call through the interview my holding like this phone call all right. That's sucks well you know. Life is hard elected man. no exactly. you're the one that wanted to be the second hardest office in the whole country. Get out of now if you want. I know one woman who'd be pleased now. A couple of seems very recently. We're new york. Politics was being talked about as the center of you know the ascent of alexandria cossio cortez and the left in general along. Comes you eric adams. And you're being celebrated on the day. We speak in the most conservative calm in the new york times by brad stevens as something of a a savior of a repudiation of the left you see your Likely assent to the to gracie mansion and to city hall as a repudiation of the left in new york city a no. I don't and i think one of the greatest tragedies of this campaign of was the removal of of my left philosophy. I am a progressive and the thirty five plus years of history shows that you know as a sergeant marching in front of rockefeller plaza only to go to albany to reverse. The draconian rockefeller drug laws of marriage. Equality my conference to get that. Vote on the floor on one year to see who were not voting for it and then later to push it through Gun violence. I testified in federal court. The judge mentioned me in her ruling on why she ruled against the police department. And so. I believe that. I am not a repudiation of the left i believe i am of the energy and spirit of new yorkers of don it. They just want to likes to be on. They want their garbage picked up. They don't want their children not being educated. They're paying their taxes and we should be doing all job with their tax dollars and they heard me. I was confused during the campaign. And i never really got a straight answer that i could glean helped me on this. All you say is true and at the same time you switch parties. You became a republican for quite a long time. Why was that yes it was. It was out of real anger of the democratic party. You know sometimes. We view life based on our current state. But we need to go back. We were dealing with the city where we had two thousand homicides year. We saw a democratic party that created a many of the jakonen laws that were put in place. We were incarcerating..

eric adams adams mr adams cossio cortez new york city brad stevens police department nypd brooklyn rockefeller plaza York city gracie mansion alexandria city hall new york times new york albany democratic party
"david remnick" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"david remnick" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"You've got a very complicated issue to face in in essentially in your wheelhouse of on crime and police reform. How do you sell the police. In the air unions on the idea of reform. And how do you speak to the left which is a which is a very big constituency in this city about the notion of defunding the police. It's not this is not a cartoon issue. Nobody's saying strip the police of all resources on on the one hand So how do you deal with. A very complex situation in which a pandemic was probably largely responsible for a spike in certain crime statistics. It's very serious but you. A lot of public opinion has changed. And you seem to be saying no to defend the police to even reform the police. That is pretty profound. You seem to be saying wait a minute. I'm not up for that. An a norm not. I am a dedicated. My life to police reform. Many people don't know when i was fifteen years old and the police assaulted me. They don't know that around the same time. I lost a good friend to a gun. Violence to crack wars. Were taking place. And so i was traumatized by police and i was traumatized by the gang drug violence and so i come in with this duly motion that the prerequisite to prosperity is public safety injustice and we could have both and i'm going to reach out to my unions and i'm going to reach out my law enforcement unions that is i'm going to reach out to other credible messengers. Crisis management teams my clergy groups and every day. New york is and i'm going to tell them. Let's turn to page. We need each other. The streets of our city those streets will be controlled by the good guys or bad guys and right now. The bag is a winning and it is harmful to police officers in his harmful to everyday people. You said the bad guys are winning. I i hear..

New york
"david remnick" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"david remnick" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"I'm tired of this party ignoring the plight of people in the inner cities and that was my protest and reflection. I could have done it two different ways but you know as you move to life you learn from your lessons relive them saying you. Are you saying you regret becoming republican for a period of time. Yes i do There was no reason to do so. I could have found a better way to voice my outrage with the party i could have resigned from the department and ran for office in there. Were other things. I could have done but i made. I made a lotta mistakes in life. Let me tell you. I am perfectly imperfect so many mistakes in my life that you have to laugh and say how this guy still get here but never stopped. I never stopped grinding. And i never stop learning from those areas. You seem very plainspoken and straightforward. What are your biggest mistakes of all number. One of i should have married my childhood sweetheart. She kicked me to curve went to washington and marry someone else. You know so. There are a lot of things that that i did wrong. I wish i would've spent more time with my son. That was a real impactful moment for me. I spent so much time. Saving the lives of children that i was really afraid i was going to lose my son and i'm just really amazed at how much he has developed as a child and he said to me After the Eric garner incident some years ago data. Understand why you were so determined and now relationship is an amazing relationship even when he was a child..

washington Eric garner
"david remnick" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:42 min | 2 years ago

"david remnick" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Welcome to the New Yorker radio hour I'm David Remnick over the last week we've seen some remarkable headlines about cities and states promising real action on police violence and racial justice promises that would have seemed impossible just a few weeks ago Hey George Floyd's funeral in Houston the Reverend al Sharpton said he was encouraged by how white people have responded with demands for change well it could have been anybody but the reaction was not anything because somewhere I read in the bar the guard said he would pour out his spirit among all flesh and that's why when I heard them talking about they never thought they'd see young white margin like the margin that all over the world has seen grand children of slave master tearing down the slave masters back here over in England and put it in the river while my spirit upon all flesh I've seen whites walking past curfews straight black lives matter and no justice no peace among all finish it may be that the shock and horror of Floyd's death before our eyes on video has finally shaken millions of white people from years of drift and complacency for a long time Suzanne plastic has been talking to white people about the reality of entrenched racism she's a trainer with the racial equity institute and a co founder of that group Suzanne plus expo but the new Yorkers Dorothy Wickenden so I want to put our cards on the table right away and point out that you're a white woman from the south and I'm a white woman from the north and that will that will inform our discussion how did you become engaged with this kind of work it's very difficult to really capture what all the touch points were about to be a little white in a linear I can tell you essentially I've found early in my life a a real sadness for people who were hurt who were harmed who were living in poverty after the birth of my children that came into sharper focus and as they enter school it came into still sharper focus as I saw they they contrast between what was available to my children and what was not available two children of color often not always often so it seems to me at that time that's the way we dealt with the child who came to school and flip flops in January was to provide shoes and it seemed to me at the time that provision of needs was very very important and it is important is not unimportant but as you do that you soon realize that you have done nothing to prevent those needs from occurring again so I moved from that very charity approach into our policy needs to be changed we have got to do something in a larger way to get at the root causes of course you don't do that very long before you realize that even one policy changes that there's something in our culture a narrative that continues to pull back those successes that you have and I had the great gift of coming to a training that explained to me that this one was found by the people tested at the time that that thing was racism and then we decided to form the racial equity institute and to to do the work of bringing an analysis to people that would make them more effective in the work they do many companies offer diversity training but but but you know those sessions you have almost no effect if any on how white Americans go about their lives so maybe you could talk a little bit about what makes the tactics and mission of the racial equity institute different yeah we don't do diversity training we don't do prejudice reduction all those things have their values I'm sure but even if you were able to make people more sensitive and and reduce prejudice and bigotry and and certain racial prejudice you then send them out into a world that is operating from a structure that promotes the supremacy of white people that ensures that whatever you do is gonna disproportionately advantage white people even when that's not your intent and that division is just it continues to work well because we don't understand we don't understand where it's coming from and we continue to put it in the context of of mean spirited racially charged people and statements and acts those things are by they're incredibly bad and wrong but it's important to understand that racism happens and this is the biggest lesson of my life without my intent that we are set up for it to happen and so I have to understand that I've been a fit from that whether I want to as a white person or not I have to further understand it doesn't make me a bad immoral person it makes me a beneficiary of a system set up hundreds of years ago to benefit people who have come to be called white it can you give us an example of how a well meaning organization you've worked with determined to pursue racial diversity and all of the best values has been taken aback by what you have to tell them well I think most of them are taken aback but we recall some years ago to a public private partnership a school actually that had been created to be a multi cultural school they have all the very best intense they however we're having a very difficult time recruiting and retaining students and faculty of color so the night before we did our training the core of the school all white took us out to dinner and they began to tell us all the things they had done to become multi cultural and it was a long list they would bring in one of their favorite things was to have what we call the international day you know to bring in people from men the cultures and and have them share their culture and their cultural ways and that you know they would they brought in everybody in addition to that they did many things that they thought would be appealing to people of color they would do spoken word they would do to stepping that you you name it they did it and are very wise director Deena Hayes Greene said to them at the end of this let me so what did you do for white people and their job dropped because you see the culture that was keeping them from attracting and retaining students and faculty of color was the one culture they had not examined.

David Remnick
"david remnick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"david remnick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To a radio show you know it's funny the whole weather award the Peabody award was created in nineteen forty partly because poachers would not give awards to this newfangled medium called radio is it gonna program we play the episode that we made that won that award tune in this week tomorrow at Taylor on ninety three point nine FM W. NYC this is the New Yorker radio hour I'm David Remnick G. Tolentino is a staff writer and the author of last year's best seller trick mirror is it is one of G. is great passions and for years she's been following Mike Hadreas who records under the name perfume genius yes an album just out called set my heart on fire immediately J. Tolentino talk with perfume genius recently yeah I mean like how are you what's the vibe like I am I don't know I guess the hardest part is that I had envisioned this whole way that this was supposed to go and even visually how I was going to see how how it was going to be you know that required people required being right hired leading and so now I'm trying to figure out a way how can I how can I help it same energy but just like with in my bedroom I've been a fan of perfume genius for a long time I remember listening to his first album which is called learning learning came out in two thousand ten and I think that one of the songs that people still talk about from it is the third track Mr Peterson it's a really sad song it's about a relationship with the teacher and things get really dark but the song almost like it sounds like.

Peabody award Taylor NYC David Remnick G. Tolentino staff writer Mike Hadreas Mr Peterson J. Tolentino
"david remnick" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"david remnick" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Don't tell me eleven o'clock this morning and ten o'clock tomorrow morning twice every weekend here on KQED public radio cloudy skies in the forecast and cooler temperatures than what we've been having sixties around the city and the coast low seventies at the most in line this is the New Yorker radio hour I'm David Remnick go fan input to play is a producer for the program and a little while back he pitched me on interviewing a rapper named chica any seem so enthusiastic about having her on the show that I just said why don't you do the interviews so go fan why were you so excited about interviewing chica what is it about her that you're so enthusiastic about so my family is Congolese from the Congo and one of the experiences that a lot of us have as first generation Americans whose parents were immigrants from Africa is that we don't see a lot of ourselves ever in the media and films in any big stream area major Freeman area and so seeing this rapper who was first in Africa and it had a major label Warner records is really exciting and I was really curious to find out more about her music and her family where they come from so she's from Alabama her family is from Nigeria and she's really young too she is twenty three and how did you come to your attention so she can twenty sixteen became viral off of kind of satiric comedic video that she posted the night of the election I'm in since then she's had a series of videos one major one being a response to Kanye west's kind of politics in the trump era that went immensely viral and so she continues to have this kind of presence tied with commenting on what's going on in society I you want to.

David Remnick producer Congo Africa Warner records Alabama Nigeria Kanye west KQED Freeman
"david remnick" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"david remnick" Discussed on KCRW

"This is the New Yorker radio hour I'm David Remnick I think all of us are feeling like social distancing is pushing us a little too close to the edge and I don't mean to belittle that feeling at all but for some people the lack of direct contact is a genuine threat Alcoholics Anonymous and many addiction treatment groups depend on in person meetings Reagan reed is the executive director of the New York intergroup association of Alcoholics Anonymous she's also a member of a a herself the radio hours Rhiannon Corby called up read a little more than a week ago just as organizations all over the country we're shutting down I mean you want to start by telling you like what the past seventy two hours and then like for you they've been completely chaotic I think I've been sleeping about two and a half or three hours a night we have over five thousand meeting in just the New York City area and most of them are shutting down and nobody knows what to do we have young people who are able to easily start at noon meeting for example but for our older AAA community on social heart what we're doing what I'm doing now it's trying to follow up thank god M. eighty eight emergency center so that we can hold our home game of the hour all of you three hundred participants each what's your sphere with having those needing closer Cody go digital like how different for people attending group it says is the tremendous tremendous difference the way that our college record what we have room together and talk to one another eight eight the meeting R. D. cornerstone and foundation of alcoholic and non while we're moving Rahman basically he is not going to have a really big impact on people's ability to I mean you think about like that decision to start closing down and like read part of the application I personally with the permission of my board made the decision to close down our central office she earned our central office is where all of our volunteers answer phones and provide a web shop on our website and we've never shut down the office or even during martial for what I had to do with them immediately that remote call forwarding check which I did and we are unable to keep the phone the live chat on our arms by doing one point one one our outreach and it seems like you know on top of not being able to a meeting like this is just an incredibly sort of like alienating time for everyone like I can imagine that it would feel more important than ever to kind of you know show up and talk about about seven people yeah absolutely I mean not everybody thinks IT is higher and you know a lot of alcoholics suffer from depression and and you know problem outside of alcohol and all of those things those other interns are are are blowing up you know my own anxiety is much higher than it was that would be two weeks ago and for most of our who are in the program black unlocked bottom in our drinking days we always go back to where you and that you know things progress make it much worse every time you relax I am an alcoholic and expands very hard I have not been able to go to a meeting on one say the meeting that I coach you are close and I am personally just talking to my sponsor and trying to get take care of my basic needs which is often the hardest thing for alcoholics you're not just eating and sleeping um in I think I think that you know we've been discussing things that are very weak but I also I also we have that you know we have a program that's been going on since nineteen forty six and has grown by millions and millions of people and shared all over the world and at the very solid and remarkable scholarship and in fact within our own communities you know we're gonna find a way through and get through it and we should.

David Remnick
"david remnick" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

12:21 min | 2 years ago

"david remnick" Discussed on KCRW

"The New Yorker radio hour I'm David Remnick we're in a time now of the terrible uncertainty in just about every aspect of our national life not least in our politics with the pandemic brings us to a greater sense of common good really remains to be seen some of the business community and on the right are now arguing that widespread death may be preferable to the economic depression that follows from containing the virus and president trump meanwhile is insisting that the country be brought back to work by Easter and all through this there's a presidential primary race still going on and we have no idea how the pandemic will affect the November election to get some insight on all of this I called up the new Yorkers Washington correspondent Susan Glasser Susan hi hi David now you've called this crisis the most clarifying of Donald trump's presidency what do you mean by that well look I mean all crises reveal and what we're seeing is the man in full with all of his limitations his character quirks and the strengths and weaknesses of his administration and by sort of waging war on the institutions of government as we know it for the last few years creating and constructing a White House that runs or doesn't run eight unlike any other of any Republican or democratic presidents those are the tools that he brings to this most unusual battle and you couldn't imagine a president personalizing a crisis with a virus but somehow that's that's where we are that's where we are the trump show applies even to the pandemic what do you mean by personalizing this crisis well look at one of these days me press conferences that he's now been holding in the White House briefing room and what do you hear you hear the word hi an awful lot and you you hear a president whose dramatizing this as if it's something that is affecting him and him alone he talks over and over again about how awful the corona virus test was that he had to take which is literally consists of a swab it was shoved up his nose and you know the same thing with the economy I had the best economy it was a growing great it was the best in world history can you believe this happened nobody nobody expected this to happen and on and on and on it goes and it's this sort of very narcissistic kind of stream of consciousness approach to a crisis it's really well documented that the president played down the seriousness of this pandemic for a long time and do we have any sense of why that is you know this week was the one month anniversary of the president's first substantive treat about D. corona virus on February twenty fourth he said essentially this is not coming to the USA in a big way and we're all going to be fine and it's it's not going to really happen here February twenty fourth that was more than a month after his own government had been warning him that steps needed to be taken that weren't taken so there might be in the future some sort of a nine eleven style commission to look at why that was but I think you know with trump sometimes the answer is pretty transparent and in this case I think the answer is pretty transparent he didn't want anything to interrupt his reelection campaign plan which entirely hinged on the strength of the US economy and also the strength of the U. S. stock market which it hit its highest point in February and that's the risk of personalizing government where his overwhelming need for our personal political resurrection after his impeachment and trial absolutely over where the increasingly dire warnings that it seems he was getting from inside his government work outside this kind of reaction which may be understandable for an ordinary citizen at least temporarily seems to me inexcusable for the leader of a of a of a country that he rather than face the facts of a growing hurricane of cases illnesses death the shortages in hospitals reacts the way he is by saying we're going to be back by E. stor and this has to be enormously confusing to so many people in the United States and is likely to cause behavior that leads to tragic consequences David that's the essence of it that's so striking is that in the end when the catastrophe came and hit trump it was one that had to do with public health and where his slim Flannery and narcissism and insistence upon creating constructing and projecting alternate realities would are colliding with armed you know empirical reality in such stark way you know the masses the mass look at those charts look at those numbers X. number of people are sick two weeks from now three weeks from now X. number of people are going to be suffering and dying we have X. number of ventilators and so I think that really hit home for many people this Tuesday when the president in the face of that overwhelming scientific and empirical reality was simply declaring we'll for a walk I insist that you know I would like to reopen the country by Easter and how people packed into pews and up it's it's painful to watch it because it gets to the essence of trump and why he's different than all other presidents of yours in my lifetime it's not about ideology it's about the unique flaws in his character and and for me that's what makes him so potentially dangerous in this particular kind of a crisis we've got truth tellers whatever flaws you may ascribe to the overtime but you have truth tellers like Anthony Fauci and Andrew Cuomo we're speaking straight to the president how is it from your understanding of what's going on inside how are their conversations with the president going are they reaching him at any level does he just ignored them does he push back how was how those conversations going well it seems to be almost a radic in the extreme based on the accounts that you've heard from Sauchie and Cuomo in various interviews they both claim that the president does listen at times that you know the the sort of abrasive attacking personality that when you when I observe in his public performances is not always the case in private and you see about with trump who has a sort of love hate relationship with Cuomo right he often speaks of the fact that well we get along really well and then ten minutes later he'll attack him publicly and suggest that New York state is going to suffer in terms of federal aid because they're not being quote nice to him and again they have the problem of needing to speak the truth maintain their own credibility with the public and with their own teams but at the same time we all know that if you alienate trump too much you know that is a real risk both throw you out the door well and again the public safety New York state in the case of Cuomo and the country in the case of Sauchie to a certain extent involves them not having some catastrophic rift with the president and so that's a very very delicate line that they have to tread and it it really is so worrisome we've already seen the president publicly attacking numerous governors mostly of heavily democratic states you know he went after governor Pritzker in Illinois he's gone after Cuomo and various points he he's attacked many figures who are crucial to the actual on the ground response to the pandemic and this is one result in terms of the pandemic there's another in terms of public opinion Gallup released a poll which found that the president had eight forty nine percent approval rating which is high for him with sixty percent approving of his handling of the crisis what what's driving his number so high assuming that everything that you've said is true well that's right it is a remarkable phenomena SO two things we've seen since the beginning of the trump presidency number one news about Donald Trump are remarkably fixed and immune to almost any kind of external changer shock and so no matter what trump is said and done over the last few years you know he's had this core of a little bit more than forty percent of the country in these opinion polls that have supported him and then a small group of waivers and now what you're seeing in that Gallup survey is remarkable essentially the people who have gone back and forth on trump that small number of people who remain undecided have swung back to approving of his conduct in office last year's you don't see Democrats changing their mind about the president and I think that's the other thing as far as the politics of this moment go that is notable which is that you have essentially blue America and red America very partisan and divided country right now there at least initially experiencing the pandemic in a very different blue state red state way and so you have the big cities that are predominantly democratic on the two coasts are being hit first and hardest by this and trump seems to be exacerbating those divisions that already exist in the country with how he's talking about this and some of his rhetoric about wanting to return to normalcy and how it's not really that big of a deal essentially are playing almost overtly too small less populated states in the middle of the country that so far have not been hard hit he actually mentioned the other day yeah Brasco and Idaho on you know they can go back to work and so you see the president clean off of those political divides in our country in a time when others would speak of national unity he seems to be speaking and encouraging division are there any Republican senators were breaking with the president we see Lindsey Graham in a in a sense Lindsey Graham arguing with this approach that the cure can't be worse than the problem yes but to me what's striking as it has been throughout the trump presidency is V. deafening whack of public pushback from Republican senators Republican house members I think that's the most remarkable thing where you are hearing some rumblings and some pushback is among Republican governors and officials at the state and local level whose job it is to actually protect the public safety so governor Mike DeWine in Ohio governor Larry Hogan in Maryland there's been two of the loudest and most effective Republican state officials in terms of there are clear eyed response to the Pantanal one implicitly their behavior and their public statements have been a rebuke to trump almost every day in fact Larry Hogan the other day when Donald Trump said he wants to bring the country back to work by Easter Sunday Larry Hogan just came out and said this is fate this is an imaginary timeline and no that's not gonna happen yeah that may be true and it is but the lieutenant governor of Texas Dan Patrick suggested on fox news on on Tucker Carlson's show that senior citizens shouldn't put their personal safety from corona virus ahead of the health.

David Remnick
"david remnick" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:56 min | 2 years ago

"david remnick" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm David Remnick we have had twenty eight Democrats vying for the party's presidential nomination just over a week ago Bernie Sanders seem to be the clear front runner after three very strong primary performances then came some prominent withdraws from the race and the resurgence really the resurrection of Joe Biden in last week's primaries what will happen next is entirely up in the air Joe Biden could keep writing this new wave of momentum or we could be headed for a contested convention something that we have not seen in many decades Amy Davidson Sorkin is a political columnist for The New Yorker and she's going to help us with a little civics refresher course you know there's a lot of states left the road and you've thrown up the nomination when you get one thousand nine hundred ninety one of the pledged delegates when you cast your vote in a primary you're not really voting for the candidates so much as you're voting for a delegate who's pledged to that candidate as long as that person is still in the race when the convention comes and then things can get really complex you guys then convention with a certain number of delegates were pledged to you so everybody gets the convention and they vote if nobody has a majority then there's a second ballot but on that ballot there's another factor at the super delegates they don't get to vote on the first ballot they get to vote on the second ballot the super delegates are democratic insiders members of Congress senators higher ups in the party there are nearly eight hundred super delegates at the convention and if they get to vote it's a whole new ballgame no it doesn't go without saying that the super delegates are going to be N. greatest proportion on the side of Joe Biden as opposed to Bernie Sanders if it was today but who knows what might happen on the campaign trail what could be revealed what could come out you know a lot of people who are the super delegates they voted in a sense I had of super Tuesday by coming out and endorsing Biden getting their local networks activated for him club which are decide to apparently in Minnesota she didn't just say that she wanted people to vote for him she helped get out the vote so it's not a conspiracy or is that a party acting like a party and saying you know we know this person we have this sense of how it's going to have this effect on races in the state we're making a judgment about what the party stands for as well well in your view is it part of democracy or anti democratic in some way I mean how purely democratic is it bad for the states that were in different ways not entirely representative of the whole country had so much say a word New Yorker is the word it might be this might be settled by the time it gets to us so there are a lot of ways that the democracy here is in perfect what's the last time we had a contested convention I believe it was nineteen fifty two for the Democrats nineteen forty eight for the Republicans but you know both of those nominated candidate on the third ballot so it was contested but it wasn't an epic contest with like a Fletcher Knebel novel that goes to the fill out that there is a right the classic the one that you know people dream of in this entered the realm of contested convention legend is the nineteen twenty four democratic convention which went to wait for it a hundred and three ballots and neither one of the the front runners got it what happened who is who is running against him back into versus Al Smith and for a lot of lot of issues you know prohibition all a lot of other issues but the thing that broke the convention was the Ku Klux Klan mac could do one of the clients support and he basically killed an anti Klan plank in the party's platform and that because the chef where there are people who are opposed to him but might have reached some sort of deal became just posed to him on principle and rightly so and they just kept going until they finally both of them withdrew won the nomination how did it end up in the general John Davis congressman from West Virginia who lost badly to tech Calvin Coolidge but it was probably better for American history that the Democrats didn't coalesce around somebody who was sort of cozy with the clan you know even if you're gonna go into the election divided but believing something you actually believe and that's worth it and he seemed to say that that's not the case with any of the candidates on the democratic side right now it unless you really really really really feel strongly about democratic socialism they're not the party is not at a point where the divider like so so existential so much about the fundamental values of the party Biden argument is I'm the guy they can unite the party bring in independence when those counties that went over to trump I can do it because I'm a basic Sanders's argument if the case is I will expand the electorate then I will bring in new voters many of them young what do you think of those two cases both of them have a have thanks recommend them I would I wouldn't mock either of them even in states that that Biden one significantly Sanders said the route was with younger voters and those are going to be the voters who inherit the parties they can't be alienated Biden is gonna have to make some choices about how he talks about about Bernie remember he's can we propelled forward possibly by a lot of money from Mike Bloomberg a man who on that debate stage called Bernie akin to a communist and a threat to that was ridiculous yeah right so is that what he wants the ads that are going to be in every state paid for by Bloomberg to be saying that the choices how does by can now talk about democratic socialism you know just it's not gonna be enough now to just be the decent kind human being who you'd rather have in the White House and Donald Trump this is not gonna be an easy election because the hideous and ugly yeah and it's just we're still not quite uncertain period I think this is not just going to be cruising along until November and then people decide whether they like the excitement of trump or the niceness of fighting because in a more fundamental way to what people want from.

David Remnick Democrats Bernie Sanders
"david remnick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"david remnick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is the New York radio hour I'm David Remnick Tyler fog it has a wide range of interests recently she wrote about J. secular one of the trump lawyers in the impeachment trial who also happens to play drums in a classic rock band if you like that sort of thing and Tyler knows all kinds of weird stuff and she's always got interesting things to recommend Tyler welcome please surprise me so I recently saw this movie called the cure it came out in nineteen ninety seven it's this Japanese horror film directed by kyoshi Kerr saw and the reason why I went to go see it is because I saw bong joon host parasite and I really liked it and I read an article where bomb was talking about how cure was his all time favorite film to east by the other Carissa our right of course so is there a classic filmmaker from from Japan who we all know this is the other guy exactly yeah on this one is about I thank you for like fifty years later yeah but yeah so the the movie is basically about a string of what seemingly unconnected murders I'm taking place in Tokyo oral quickly do that sort of starts off as like a police procedural who done it type film but they tell you who did it pretty early on and on to convince running in the US open in this particular scene the detective and suspect are having a conversation where in which the suspect says that he sort of feels a kinship with the detective and you can kind of see reality break down and it's actually unclear whether the conversation is even happening or whether it's an active sat on the only KKK okay the conversation went from conversation to throw against the wall yes yeah there are a lot of mood shifts in this movie which is also how I I see it as being kind of similar to to parasite let's move on let's go to you the second thing that you're up to what have you been listening to me yeah so it's a remix of Kanye west's song say you will which was originally on his two thousand eight album eight awaits and heartbreak and in twenty fifteen he came out with this remix of the song that just like completely different where he collaborated with Caroline Shaw she's a Pulitzer Prize winning musician the youngest musician ever to win a Pulitzer Prize and she is really interesting because she has this coral technique where it's sort of like her voice singing layered on top of it like over and over and over again so it's like a one person choir almost and then and then and then and then and then and then and then and then the well she may cause a blue yeah I remember this and then and then and then and then and then I absolutely love this song I listened to it almost every day now he's sort of known for his whole Sunday service thing which is three matching all his old songs as gospel tunes and a lot of people don't really like it either because they don't like gospel music or because they think it's sort of indicative of a.

New York David Remnick
"david remnick" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"david remnick" Discussed on KCRW

"This is the New Yorker radio hour I'm David Remnick one of the marquee issues of the twenty twenty democratic campaign has been taxes not tax cuts but higher taxes on the wealthiest Americans that issue is a cornerstone of the Warren and the Sanders campaign but these days you don't have to be a socialist to talk about income inequality is a severe problem this is a meeting that took place a couple of months ago in San Francisco thank you for being here today and taking part in this incredibly important conversation it's time for America's millionaires to start stepping up in tackling inequality head on Morse Perl who's at the Mike here is not exactly your stereo type of fired up leftist he is a really rich and he's not shy in admitting it being rich is great I've done it I recommend you all try it it's a lot better than the alternative and I'm not here to talk to you about al trooper was the chair of a group that calls itself the patriotic millionaires any spoke recently with she'll call had Kerr who reports for us on business and the economy the patriotic millionaires really tap into several things that I'm obsessed with right now income inequality of the political debate over how to address income inequality and the ways that some wealthy people and successful business executives are struggling over how they might play a part in solving this problem to see a group of these people really sort of publicly advocating for policies that would potentially cost them money at least in the short term I thought was really interesting and not something you see very often the main issue we're trying to address is the fact that this growing inequality this having a country the few rich people not to poor people he's not going to work in the long term that's Morris pearl he's the chairman of the patriotic millionaires having no middle class doesn't work for the rich people we make money for investments when there's millions of people paying their bills on time every month so that's the over all rubric we're trying to address that with three policy areas one is progressive taxation were in favor of rich people having higher tax rates the regular people not the other way around were in favor of higher wages for working people we think that people who work full time make enough money to live on an argument you typically here around this issue is that it will hurt small businesses that small business owners can't afford to pay employees more they can afford to pay sick leave if a small business people are thinking about the minimum wage they should also think about their customers getting raises and so if you look at a small business like a restaurant having the customers with more beer money in their pockets on Friday nights is a lot more important it makes a much bigger difference than how much weight is the one guy standing behind the bar pouring the beers making that were in favor of higher minimum wages and we're also wanted to reduce the influence of big money in politics we would like to take money out of politics especially my.

David Remnick
"david remnick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"david remnick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is the New York radio hour I'm David Remnick Russia has always maintained an outsized role in the world its economy is smaller than Italy's Russia has the GDP of roughly Texas and yet it's expanding its sphere of influence all over the world all the time and let's not forget that Russia successfully interfered in a presidential election here in the United States despite economic problems and repressive regime Vladimir Putin seems to be untouchable the popular at home Josh we offer is a Moscow correspondent and he's written a book called between two fires truth ambition and compromise in Putin's Russia the book explores how people of principle living in an authoritarian world navigate their day to day lives and Josh writes about the role of television in maintaining Putin's grasping power particularly channel one the state on channel channel one was for a very long time the dominant TV channel in all of Russia and Josh describes it as a combination of fox news and Disney it's run by a peculiar and pivotal character in Moscow life name Constantine errant's Josh knows the Soviet TV in the old days was absolutely state run and it was wall to wall political propaganda channel one under Constantine Aronson the Putin era is somewhat different house so I think there's a few key distinctions between Soviet era propaganda and the much slicker more post modern propaganda of Putin's Russia so we propaganda was essentially about convincing the viewer of a single truth at the expense of some other truth and that in the later days of the Soviet Union reached a real state of thirty announcers on state television every time a high ranking Soviet functionary would die there would be a funeral on Red Square a big pompous well attended occasion broadcast on television and for years the person who died there their coffin or casket was placed under the ground of Red Square and the announcers would narrate exactly that though with time the space under the Kremlin became scarce and a high ranking Soviet functionaries began to be cremated and there urn with the ashes was placed inside the wall of the Kremlin though the voice over continue to talk about a coffin being lowered into the ground this led to an obvious clash between what people could see with their own very eyes on television and what the voice over was telling them and a group of Soviet linguists these were not dissidents are insurrectionary is this was a commission of the state linguistic institute and the Soviet Union appealed to the politburo asking with all due respect here maybe we could think about updating the language just so it matches the action on screen and we don't have this dissonance between word and deed and amazingly the polit bureau declined to the suggestion propaganda like that could really only work for so long and would certainly never survive into the kind of information and media age we have today and I would say what channel one dozen other Russian state media outlets is first and foremost they appeal to a kind of truth that viewers are already inclined to believe it you know as as one of your predecessors as Russia car spun then for first the wash imposed on the New Yorker I knew a lot of these people who worked in Soviet state television and then and Russian state television after nineteen ninety one after the Soviet Union fell and their relationship with the Kremlin and Kremlin leadership was extremely close and they took orders and if they went too far they really heard about it now Constantine errands comes with a background of non news so much as show business and how is that background played itself out why is that important in the projection of putting doesn't tell me a little bit about Constantine errant's and what he brings to the party I think what makes constant earned so interesting and so good at his job is exactly that backstory you alluded to he came of age during perestroika the convulsions of the time led him toward art toward music toward film and he was really a kind of counter culture not quite hippy than someone certainly consumed with this new flood of information and the and the new cultural opportunities and he developed really art house off beat impulses one of our inst most beloved projects from the mid nineties was a musical variety show called old songs.

David Remnick Russia New York
"david remnick" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:08 min | 2 years ago

"david remnick" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm David Remnick if you've seen the movie the Irishman you're familiar with the character of Chucky o'brien the young assistant and friend to Jimmy Hoffa almost Hoffa's surrogate son in the film it's a Brian who betrays Hoffa playing a crucial role in his disappearance and presumed murder a new book about Chucky o'brien has just come out but it's not exactly the mob thriller you might guess it's by a prominent legal scholar named Jack goldsmith so pause and not for a second gold Smith is a professor at Harvard with books on international law and regulation of the internet he ran the office of legal counsel for a time under George W. bush goldsmith is often called on to discuss legal theories of executive privilege which is very much a subject of the day but the story of Chucky o'brien seems like a different kind of business altogether but Jack goldsmith comes to it from a very specific and personal angle he was a Brian step son his new book is called in Hafiz shadow and staff writer Isaac shot or sat down to talk with them about it Jack thanks for joining us thank you so much for having me I want to start with that with your stepfather how did he come to know Jimmy Hoffa and how did he come to be your stepfather he came to know Jimmy Hoffa when he was nine years old his mother came from crime family in Kansas city his dad left when he was seven and half for whatever reason took a huge shine to them and they were so close that people thought Jackie was Hafiz illegitimate son to check you sort of have involving opinion of him or was he pretty consistently in your mind loyal towards him and find him yeah no no he was extremely close I mean intimately close for literally twenty five years you know they spend evenings together we can together talking did all his errand forum and half eyes as they looked out for Jackie they did have a falling out about six months before the disappearance and this is one of the reasons why suspicion came on Jackie the reason for the falling out was in part because Jackie realized that he didn't have a future in the teamsters union to top I had no power and the teamsters union but mostly because my mother came into talkies life they fell in love and wanted to get married and that meant he had to leave off on half was not happy about that so yeah I talk a little bit about your feelings towards Jackie sure I was twelve years old when he entered my life I it had father and stepfather neither of whom were very good fathers I was very close to either one of them and very suddenly at age twelve I had this new stepfather and he was an extraordinary father I loved him deeply my mom was suffering from mental and physical health issues and Chucky before and after the office prince he came into my life about six months before the Hoffa disappearance just showed me extraordinary love and attention and gave us a stability and really just help us get through some very very difficult times even though he was himself going through a very difficult time so I actually changed my name which was Jack goldsmith to Jack o'brien when I was thirteen and I just adore him for my teenage years I'm you write a check in the books that quote Chucky and have a two different linguistic and conceptual universe than I what what did you mean by that I'm in a lot of things by that first of all I mean his his nickname for me when I was a young man was the educated idiots and that kind of captures the differences between us he viewed me as having lots of book learning which I do and lots of degrees which I do he got his degree on the street as he said he's not an intellectual he's not widely read he's very smart he's very insightful he also we have different conceptions towards truth I think it's fair to say when writing this book my main concern with to try to figure out the truth the truth after his involvement in Hoffa disappearance which is always been accused of the truth of what happened the Hoffa and basically puncture the layers of misinformation that has surrounded the Hoffa disappearance for forty four years Chucky on the other hand while he was trying very hard to help me figure out this truth he had a different truth and that was the truth of America the code of silence so he really struggled a lot with what he could tell me how you could tell me he wanted to try to help me he told me a lot of things but he also held a lot back one of the themes of the Irishman the Robert De Niro character who in the film is responsible for office death it portrays his daughter in the film as looking at him suspiciously realizing he's up to no good realizing he surrounded by mob figures did you ever have that sense that maybe there was something not quite right and did that ever not you so I agree with your take on that part of the movie I thought it was very powerful and the answer is no I had something of the opposite reaction when I was a teenager I knew a bunch of monsters I mean I we we hung around with them Anthony Jack Loni an anti problems on our to high level mob guys in New Jersey in Detroit who were also in the film these are my uncle's Tony and we used to hang out with them and I was completely under Truckee's world view and what that meant was I was kind of thought the government was full of it and cutting corners and saying things that weren't true my experience of these mobsters who are described an FBI reports I later read as terribly violent people was it they were fine upstanding gentleman they were nice to me they were well dressed they lived in nice homes and they treated me well and they were part of my family you know I read the newspapers but I kind of discounted matic convenient world view that was basically Chucky's worldview it wasn't till I got to college and got some distance from it started reading books and thinking about it that I came to understand the truth do you think accuracy matters for a film like this number one and two what did you think of the movie apart from its potential issues with the truth I think the accuracy of the story matters to me personally for one very important reason the book on which the movie space and the movie put my stepfather Chucky in the car picking up off and taking them to his.

David Remnick Chucky o'brien
"david remnick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:29 min | 3 years ago

"david remnick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"New Yorker radio hour I'm David Remnick a couple of days ago I called Dan a good year who's been reporting from California on the wild fires Dana how are you I'm doing well thank you no it has to be said you among many many other families around the Los Angeles area had to be evacuated take have you ever been evacuated before and what's that like I had not so I've been in California since two thousand five and has as you know often written about fires and to do that I go out trying to find fires and people who have been evacuated it was weirdly convenient that the story came right to my door it wasn't harrowing from a kind of you know asked falling from the sky in flames looking at the houses point of view for me and my family was just more I was so surprised that the concern and I think the reason that the evacuations were so aggressive this year that the wind was blowing very very powerfully and and in a direction that put a whole bunch of neighborhoods in the past has or have a fire so this is the new normal for so many people in California northern California southern California and other parts in a country how does that change your psychology going forward what I loved it last year when Jerry Brown called it the new abnormal stirs perfectly well put it has always been normal here to have seasonal fire that is the ecology of California what's abnormal is to have so much residential development up into the mountain areas housing has pushed into those territories were fired you to burn freely and not bother anybody but there is also obviously the huge factor of the warming crime at the brushes very dry and the winds are blowing very very intensely so that has created the possibility not as you know major conflagration separated by fifteen years in which people can recover and forget but every year and that's without really different about this fall was in southern California the will the fire which killed three people was very devastating and to have another fire a year later that have the potential to do that much damage or more I think that was a bit of a shift in the psychology for me and and for lots of people I talked to where the idea that this could happen every year or could happen again next month also in the month after that because fire season is getting longer and longer and I think that's that's hard to cope question hard to figure out you know well but it's also caused a lot of stories about whether ultimately California is habitable it in other words we're hearing a lot of kind of catastrophe riding it's fine to them well I think California will be habitable for a very very long time I I don't think it's as dire as all that in terms of how people will respond respond to it you know well we have a reverse dust bowl no I don't think we well but you know I think that it has caused people to question some of the the tenants of the the California dream and well you know California is a place that is supposed to represent a kind of a ideal expression natural beauty and creative possibility and people aren't you know their health fanatics here and and everything is supposed to be about the sort of glorious shiny expression of being your best possible self and the illusion that this place was a refuge from every you know problem and struggle which I think some people actually believe even if they don't really live it out I think that is gone but that was silly and unrealistic anyway do you ever think about leaving California look if if every year there was a catastrophic events that caused me to steer for my children's lives I might think about going somewhere else but I also think said this is a place where people really do innovate and you know if if these kind of problems were not coming home to roost in California some of the potential for the solution wouldn't be here I mean there's an urgent need for solutions to how we're going to live in the future all of us not just Californians and I do have I hope not misplaced confidence in the in the brains that are here and the people who are working in the sciences in particular who you know I have heard of new soils that are being developed that are flame resistant and it the way people are planting now is much much more sensitive to the issues of crime at and the water conservation lessons that we got from that extended drought those are lasting in is so there is a way in which we see a lot of the problems originating here and being manufactured here and also a lot of the solutions any good you thank you thank you so much.

David Remnick Dan fifteen years