18 Burst results for "David Remnant"

"david remnant" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

08:30 min | 3 months ago

"david remnant" Discussed on Channel 33

"Thousands of co workers out of the south tower to safety and then died after the buildings collapsed. Now scoreless story was truly heroic. But if you read stuart story about him in the new yorker. You'll find that he gave it this very interesting frame. He wrote it as a love story between re scoreline his wife. Susan who we met just three years before the attacks and stuart story. Has this really interesting really subtle power to it because it's not just about heroism. It's about what it means to lose a hero and be left behind. And when the piece was published in february two thousand and two agats titled from something rick risk oral once said about his military exploits. The real heroes are dead. Here's james stewart. Are jim for people who don't know this story. Who was rick. Risk orla so. I was in our new york city on september eleventh. Like everybody else was stunned. A date unfolding events. I was kind of really didn't want to do. And then david remnant called me and said we're gonna try to put something together for next week's issue you're a set of our wall street person. Could you russell on something. And lisa gave me on purpose that day so i started making calls and the big story really and it was a grandma about cantor fitzgerald. The fixed income firm was on the top of the world trade center than they just got. You know why doubt. I mean every everybody was there di was horrible and so i did some work on that i made it. I think a modest contribution to that first week story. But i you know i think that week. I heard the on the anomaly. That morgan stanley which had the largest number of employees had almost no casualties. They had seven out of the three thousand and that caught my attention for two reasons. One you know. It's like the dog that doesn't bark so That was unexpected. And then secondly it was kind of a glamour of positive news in this like overwhelmingly tragic horrible sad story 'em so that stuck in my mind but it took a while and it isn't poking around and i was kind of asking able like why weren't more casualties morgan stanley. 'cause i notice morgan. Stanley was kind of in the middle of tower one or they were in the upper half but not all the way at the top but it wasn't their location because people firms below then got wiped out firms above and got wiped out. So i wondered what had happened there and that after poking around getting some stars. Somebody told me well. They really drill. They were ready. They evacuated and there was this guy recruits score low. Who had saved. It was funny. Because i think the first person who told me there was this kind of person in charge. There had some had it wrong. He somebody wrote a book about him. He said it was He said something like it was young men and fire. So i went and i got the young fire will. He's not in. That book is nobody that book who had been in the world trade center but it did turn out that. He was in another book about vietnam. I believe it is called young once something. I'd wear salt. We were soldiers once in you. Yes as we were soldiers once yarn and he was in there but on. So that's how i found out that there was the minute i realized. Oh there's a character. Here that only heightened the story for me because it wasn't just like accident it was like somebody really was responsible for this and then i also course learn right away that he himself had been was one of the seven was killed so it did have a tragic element but i thought of this is like i really want to explore this. Because here's a potentially heroic figure in this in this really tragic saga so big push inside the new yorker to find and report these kind of stories well. There were certainly interest but This story didn't didn't come out for months. You know it took i remember. It was about october october. When i learned about scoreless identity and so i called morgan stanley and they handed me onto public relations person and i kind of described what i was looking at it and she got back. She said we're not interested. We're we're not going to help you. We're not just spitting. anyway i was. I was really taken aback by that. Because i thought whoa wait a minute. I'm gonna investigator reporter. I've told many people with like bad news era. i thought i was calling with this incredibly upbeat story. That would reflect on morgan stanley. There immediately shutting down. However i want i want to quickly say that the woman i spoke to name escapes me at the moment would we. She finished telling me that she said well. She said completely off the record here is the name and the unlisted phone number of his widow and she gave to me and i often look back at that moment. There's a here on this story. I don't you know the underlying durbin in journalism this is. Pr women is a hair. Billy went off the reservation and gave me that information net. Unlock a story for me. So you mentioned scoreless wife in one of the things it's always struck me about. This story is the way it begins. Or maybe we could say the way it's structured because you begin with scoreless meeting susan is future. Whiteman is told from susan's point of view. I'll read a paragraph here as susan. Greer was walking. Her golden retriever. One morning near her home in morristown new jersey. She heard footsteps behind her. It was just after six on a warm saturday in late. July of nineteen ninety eight. She like the quiet and the early morning light. The footsteps came closer. And then a jogger pastor he was tall and somewhat heavy and appear to be about her age. She was fifty six. What really caught her attention was his feet. He had no shoes on. It wasn't like her to say anything to a stranger but curiosity over kamer and she asked. What are you doing jogging in your bare feet. And what did you decide to begin the story like that. Well that's always. That's always a fascinating question. I you know as as a writer i think. Beginnings beginnings are the most important part of the story endings at the next most important by a number of reasons I ended up doing that. Even though there are probably more obvious. Places to start this First of all. I wanted the spotlight on susan as characters And as a recording had gone on. I began to sink last as a september eleventh story. Of course it was an more as the headline eventually said more as a love story between two people who met someone late in life so the the time where they meet both content help define this as not just another story a who died in the world trade center but as a love story and also of course There's an element mystery right from the beginning. Which i thought was very important to establish like who is who is this character and there was so much more him than does the head of security morgan stanley and i didn't think there was any way to understand how he saved the people but maybe even more importantly why he died because he didn't have to die. I think is something that haunted susan probably still does. He could have walked. Away and resume is happy. Live and he's still would have been a hero. Why did he go back up there. So there are these mysteries about rick. And the very opening paragraph establishes that you know she's asking him a question you know. Why are you. Were you running your bare feet. And by the way the answer is pretty interesting. He's writing a play and he wants to know about africa and he wants to know what it's like to to experience running in bare feet so that he can write about.

stuart story rick risk oral david remnant morgan stanley cantor fitzgerald orla james stewart susan stuart Susan rick russell di new york city lisa jim Stanley morgan kamer
"david remnant" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

06:10 min | 2 years ago

"david remnant" Discussed on No Agenda

"Is with yes this is david remnant from the new yorker now is he is he a columnist or is he the high of ram nick took over the new yorker and i think he's ruined the magazine because when he did ed was he brought in the millennials they got rid and very noticeable into cartoons they got rid of their longtime success named bob man cowered manica or something he's longtime at a cartoon editor in his type of cartoon choices were all classic classic new yorker absurdist cartoon monge lines are now he's running up a cartoon collective of some sort to probably making more money than ever made before four but they got rid of him and they put in to millennial i think one of them's a woman i think one of them's a guy can't tell her sexes but they they had a video of him once and the two are so unfunny and it's if anyone ever is dual show episodes where they had the the vice president of comedy this woman had no sense of humor they're very humorless and the cartoon state pick are often baffling to anybody over thirty five years old and and david remnant is a is not a positive force in society apparently well he and brian stelter think a lot of story everything themselves apparently we've seen the republicans stuck where they are they're lucians about trump remain gene and you're you're right to describe it as a flat line here's what i hope that we understand that the the stakes here are immense it's just it's not about the just about the political future of one man donald trump it's about the future of democracy and democratic process and and this is a a trend throughout the world it's about the future of the earth we have a party that has decided to be disbelieving about climate climate change it's about issues as essential as that and right now you have a country that is split and to the great frustration of people like you and for and people like me we don't somehow understand we don't understand why the the evidence of things why facts i don't penetrate so many of our brothers and sisters in the united states of america and this is a source of great station for the press MP MP facts we're talking about facts listen listen to the the tail end here because this is where they get little nut- nutty about it don't penetrate so so many of our brothers and sisters in the united states of america and this is a source of great frustration for the press for the press and for for anybody who's who's thinking talking about these issues that are so important it's so horrible for the press you see press fresh for the press i mean these are key people like remnant and others who run these magazines i have real their scientific background is minimal if any do they have no understanding of computer modeling and what a farce it is in general and they just and they just buy into these things line and sinker it's it's embarrassing and then they have their humorless which i think is reflected in the cartoons in it becomes a nightmare for the culture the new yorkers is they still have good articles that still have good writers for stuff to go in there but the generally speaking is it's gonna fail because of remnant well all largely all they need to do is just listen to nancy pelosi this is about science science science she she which she says it three times you know it's gonna come true yep obviously didn't see and i do have one last topper uh of the of the impeachment clips and k we might as well listen to another madman this is ralph nader who by the away thinks that trump i didn't i had to cut his colleague where he went on forever on a ramp but he he includes in his rant at trump should be impeached because he's a climate change denier case called for impeaching trump for deliberately bedding the climate crisis among other issues his latest book written with mark green is titled fake precedent to coding trump's gas lighting corruption and general BS oh yes except he spells it out back to democracy so i respond to what is happening this week it is historic what do you think about the grounds on which all up why was it ok for everyone to say shit hole when the president apparently had said that even though we don't know if he he actually did but then it's we can't say bullshit where's the line is is that a problem because it's not the president or how does this work you're asking for bait yeah i don't know he's spells it out welcome back to democracy now ralph so i respond to what is happening and this week it is historic what do you think about the grounds on which president trump is about to be impeached far too narrow and perilous if nancy pelosi wants to remove donald trump you went on a very narrow base she is clearly not supportive of impeachment generally she took it off the table when it was proposed to her and two thousand seven impeachment of the criminal war criminals in george bush and dick cheney and she's come forward with a very narrow hand narrow hand for the most impeachable president rosen of all time the.

david remnant ed
"david remnant" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:19 min | 2 years ago

"david remnant" Discussed on KQED Radio

"What you talking talk. Wow. Grabbing by the shows. And she said, Hilton them hiring you go. See them. That's how she. It's very funny. Yeah, but it was it was sort of, like, I think I was maybe the seventh right of color that they had ever hired in Haiti, seventy years. Right. So one of the great things that happened with David remnant was that I would. There was the mazing voice. I'm sorry. His name is escaping me. Now David would go and see anybody who was recommended. So was that a similar thing for you? Yeah. And so for Khalil Muhammad who is a dear friend of mine, and we went to shamburg shamburg right now. He's at Harvard. He was a director of the Schanberg center in Harlem, and he's a dear friend of mine. We went to graduate school together. We almost got arrested together, which was like the way I became friends, very crazy, like brief aside. First year graduate, I master Khalil gets a parking ticket actually driving for some ridiculous little his frame. His university of Pennsylvania alumni frame, blocking obscuring his life. Playing whatever so give them a ticket for this. And I want to go down to the peace and talk to them about this. You wanna come and play. Sure. And like a fool because I don't know Khalil and we get to the precinct, and, you know, he's like I'd like to talk to, like wherever's in charge, and Khalil is like this tall and I'm like this tall. And so I'm like, okay, we get there. And he says, you got this ticket and I wanted to find out why got it was like, well because you have this license plate. And he's saying that y and the officers white guy, who's like, I don't know. Maybe in this forty like, yeah, that's why he said, because my estimation is because they are racist cops in this in this area. And they pulled me over, because I'm a black man driving my car. Right. Was like that silent. My first thought was like we in the precinct and I did not tell anybody I was coming here. Nobody knows we're here the way you are. I am. Lil is like just dressing these people down. I'm looking around like, man, next time, you, do you give me a heads up. So anyway, he and I have friends from that point on. Right. And so. He when he became director of the shamburg. And I have been trying. I've been writing largely like black outlets point almost twenty years. Aside from the Washington paper, that was the only non black outlet. I had written four probably in my life, and I was sitting across. I was coming to this event at the schamberg, and it was like a reception in so Khalil said, I'm going to sit you across from David rim. Knicks say something smart. And so I sat down and better conversation. But similarly, a similar story, which is that he said, you should write for us. You should write something like this guy is not serious. You know. And maybe a couple of weeks after that any Davidson sent me an Email like David said that you were interested in writing you should do something for us. And I said, okay. There was this little story out of Florida about this young man, who had been killed and have been no arrests made. And I was like I just did a basic why you should know why you should care about this why the stories important thing and the young man was named Trayvon Martin. And then the tax opened up because Amy said, you should follow the story and follow that story and then Ferguson happened, and then Baltimore with Freddie gray happened, and then Charleston happened, and then there was all of these stories that were landing on my death. And I felt a kind of obligation to write about them because I put them in a historical context, and I could say this is not a novel development. This is not something that is just a quirk of the system that these people have found themselves receiving end of boot -ality from largely white officers charged with enforcing the law. It's one of the things that you write about in your book, that saying that the history of black, oppression is not separate from police brutality. Depression and. One of the things that I really wanted to talk to you about tonight, was the fact that when I read you on these subjects. I'm learning something about my own history that I didn't and that not only makes it resonate. But also allows me to have the information to talk to somebody else. So thank you. When these stories started coming up you were also thinking a lot about Barat during those years married. The worst thing that right? Is hate in their own words. But Mary something you wrote. Sure. Okay. This is from Gilani's book, the substance of hope. All his Gilani writes, all his accomplishments, Barack Obama's ultimate significance, maybe less as a president than as a harbinger of what comes after his presidency. I know. Even as he campaigns for the highest office in the land, and Abam generation was taking shape. You can't you can't. And you're part of. Little younger part of his generation what affected his election have on you. And then subsequently the title of three Clinton, right?.

Khalil Muhammad David director Haiti David remnant university of Pennsylvania Barack Obama shamburg shamburg Knicks Gilani David rim Schanberg center Clinton Trayvon Martin Harvard Florida Depression Washington Harlem president
"david remnant" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:39 min | 2 years ago

"david remnant" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Hour. I'm David remnant. Divert, is probably best known for the movie Selma. It's a wrenching, but finally triumphant story about the Alabama civil rights March, led by Dr king in nineteen sixty five but Varennes films have not always been so uplifting, two years after Selma, she released thirteenth named for the thirteenth amendment. She draws a very direct connection between slavery and mass incarceration in our own time. Her new film, also looks Justice, in race in a way, that can rightfully be called tragic a four part mini series called when they see us when they see us about the five teenagers whose lives were nearly destroyed after they were accused and convicted of a terrible crime in nineteen eighty nine it became known as the central park, five one of Donald Trump's first political acts. This was thirty years ago, was to take a newspaper ad out calling for their execution. And Trump stuck by that view. Even after New York City admitted that the conviction of the five boys was wrong exonerated them. And paid the settlement. Either diverse recently sat down to talk about her film with New Yorker, staff, writer, Gilani cop. So can you just walk us through what happened on the night of April nineteenth nineteen eighty nine. The night of April nineteenth nineteen eighty nine five black and Brown boys were picked up in around central park that night of the next morning, I picked up picked up for being voice will be boys in the park, hanging out, you know, loitering unlawful assembly. Those are some of the things that they were picked up for when you go back and look at the police records, it was a large group thirty to forty boys park who were also messing with bicyclists, and in, in harassment cat-calling bicyclists. That was what they were brought in for the next morning early in the morning. It's revealed that a woman has been raped in the park, and she's near dead. She's been brutalized in the most Rick way. And while the police departments assumption is made that the boys who were in the park hanging out were the same people who raped the woman who was founded. Another side of the park. And so they started to be this attempt to put these pieces of the puzzle together, and eventually the thirty went down to five and those five boys were interrogated. They didn't know details of the jogger they didn't know Jerez. They didn't know where she was. They didn't know what she was wearing. They didn't know anything about it through multiple days, of course and deprived. Food bathroom breaks, parental supervision. The boys eventually ended up saying that they did it that they were in fact with the dog or that they did in fact, Raipur in an attempt to just get home, which was what was promised. Within hours of the attack. Five teens four black one Latino, all charged with the brutal rape of twenty eight year old daughter in New York's central park. And so from there, they became the central park, five and the whole city of New York turned against them. The national press began writing about them as wolf pack of wild animals that assault this woman, and they went to prison. So how did that connection happen between these young men who are on a different side of the park? And this woman who was a violated horrifically. What leads people to believe that there's a connection between these two incidents? I mean, what leads them to believe? It certainly wasn't DNA evidence because there was never any, there was no physical evidence time the boys to tissue Miley. Who's the victim the victim? There was no peer simpleton common. No skin. Under her fingernails in common with the boys no weapon ever found. And she was obviously beaten with something that was never found from these boys on her and nothing from her on them from the minute. They were picked up in the park, they immediately taken into the precinct. They had no blood on, but she was completely buddy. So all of these details didn't fit. And yet, the police made them fit made them fit to the point that these boys were arrested tried and convicted of sodomy, rape assault attempted murder, and one of them quarry wise he went immediately to adult prison because in New York state. Sixteen. He went immediately into Rikers and didn't come out again for fourteen years. The other thing range of five to eight years. Talked me a little bit about what the city was like that point. What was the context in which this happened? Well, you know. But you know I'm from Compton. And I was like him. He was very just high crime. When you look at the crime rates, you know, the rates rates of murder and assault and rape. I mean the city was it was it was a city in chaos. And in the midst of that there was an attempt to create some order, create kind of framing device, I believe, for all the chaos for the police for law enforcement, for the district attorney's office, the prosecutors all of them to be able to get a win on the board because there was just a so many losses so many so much going wrong, you know, Tricia Miley, who was so brutally assaulted was in some ways described by a journalist, I talked to. She was the perfect victim her victimization, really fell into certain, tropes, certain racial stereotypes, and tropes in terms of her rape. And, you know, black men in the rape of white women. And there was this kind of. Protector. Stance that was taken and not just by the police by journalists. I mean, there was a study done eighty nine percent of the press coverage at that time from the major New York papers didn't use the word alleged. And so it was arrested judgment. And in the midst of all of that, and so many parts of that story, you can tell you had five boys and their families. So read that reminiscent had reached out to you via Twitter and wanted to tell this story, Raymond Santana's. One of the falsely accused. Yes. Yes. Antenna runs an account called central park five and so shortly after Selma two thousand fifteen I got a tweet asking, what is your next film after Soma question? Mark question, such five hashtag fingers crossed. So I just seen Sarah burns is beautiful documentary about it a few months before and had idea Muslim to his deems, and I. There's no one of your story, the narrative rights to your story and he said, no. And I said, well, I'm going to be in New York and a couple of months, maybe maybe we can connect. So we said about our journey to make this really powerful scene, where four of the five young men are in the same room for the first time, and they began talking in very quickly, realized.

rape New York City Selma assault New York Donald Trump Tricia Miley David remnant Dr king Twitter Alabama Sarah burns Varennes Compton Jerez harassment Brown
"david remnant" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:03 min | 2 years ago

"david remnant" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm David remnant. Today's show was recorded at the New Yorker festival, and we're talking to two of the top singer, songwriters in popular music in twenty twelve staff writer area Levy sat down with one of the most acclaimed American songwriters recent years, Lucinda Williams Williams, has released thirteen albums. She's written songs for everyone for Mary Chapin carpenter to Tom petty. She's a winner of three Grammy awards and now here's Lucinda Williams with Ariel Levy. A lot of your music strikes me as really spiritual. And you've got on your belt buckle and he told me it right with God. Right with God. Right on your belt. Buckle. Your song. Yeah. And you're telling me that you've got that you had ended your house naturally, this wall of cross crosses. Yeah. Mike art day of the dead kinda stuff in saunter RIA, and you got in both your grandfather's for minister ministers to tell us a little bit, if you would about about the role that religion, God have played in your life and your music, and I'm particularly interested in concepts of sin, and redemption, which. Yeah. My, my dad's father, for instance was a Methodist minister, he was what I liked what I describe as a Christian and the truth since of the work, you know, he was for women's rights. He was a CEO and World, War One and was involved in the southern tenant unions. Former struggle and all of that, you know, and then my dad by the time I was boring growing up and everything. My dad described himself as agnostic. So what about you? Do you consider yourself? Agnostic. No. But I don't have I don't believe in original sin, so I'm not a Christian. You know, our guess, except I feel like I live my life, more like a Christian then a lot of Christians. You know, it's all everybody knows what I'm talking about. But I just love the, the folk lore and the mythology and the few embolism of it all, you know, one of the things I really envy about religious, people is that they can walk through life with a sense of destiny and it seems that a lot of artists have that same blessing like, at what point in your life. Did you did you know or did you feel that music was your calling? Well, at least probably from the time I was about twelve years old, which is what I started taking Qatar lessons and it was the same year off. I for Bob Dylan. How is sixty revisited in his sixty five there is always a PIN around the house with my mother played, you know, we use it looks it'd be laid around and music being played in the house by dad was listening to everyone from Hake Williams to John Coltrane Chet Baker. Lot in Hopkins. You know. And when did you start writing when did you start doing your own song? Well, I mean, I was, you know, fooling around with it everything, but from the age of probably about thirteen or fourteen. You know, and your father is great poet, Miller Williams was he a big influence on you in terms of writing. Yeah, yeah. He urged you encourage me. And I mean, you know, there are other writers poets novelists in the house, you know, a lot and he taught at different universities. So I grew up in that academic environment. You know it's very stimulating. And just, you know, he'd have people over at the house, and it would just be people like John and homes and John Ciardi and Jay's Dickey. And that was the environment. A little bit about when you when you first started. Playing music singing as as job in New Orleans when you were real young. And you're playing in bars was that a fun time in your life? Tell us about that a little bit. Well, I mean you're talking about the first little gig. I got New Orleans. Yeah. I was inbetween. My dad always wanted me to, you know, get a degree in something. So I could have something to fall back on. And we were encouraged to have a career whatever was. So I was out. I got into the university of Arkansas or he was teaching in seventy one. I was going down to the core. Because we lived there for a while when we when I was going to high school there, everything. So I had some friends zero. So I was going down to the French quarter and hanging out and there's this little folk local air dis on bourbon street, right in the middle of all this joints, is really odd. Anyway, I got offered a little plan. They're like, you know, three nights a week for tips which was a huge deal for me. This is an naughty, seventy two or something. So I call my dad and I said, you know, I don't instead of coming back to school in the fall. I wanna stay down here and do this, and he said, okay. That was probably the biggest turning point my tire. What became you know, my career because he gave you permission to be artists, eventually I needed to have his permission. And we were talking about that, like it's important for kids to have at least one or someone they don't wanna disappoint doesn't have to be one of your parents. But somebody, you know that you don't want to support them. You know, so that was my dad for me. So, you know, and then another big turning point after that. It's when you get your first development deal, and you must have thought tell it, and you must have thought my it, I'm there, I've made it I was cloud on. Yeah. Well, there is a God RCA at the time, and he really liked me. And you know sauce something there. So they used to do this back to they call development deal. And this was a nineteen eighty five I guess they give you enough money to live on for six months or something. That was, so I headed up for the I didn't have to work a day job. And all I do is, you know, rights and songs. And then they send you in studio to do a demo tape and hopefully they sign you. After that. There were some great songs on that demo tape worth, same ones that are ended up on the trade out passionate kisses, and crests at city hall, and passionate kisses was the first song that you wanna Grammy. Yeah. That was Mary Chapin carpenter's later, not four, but the Grammy. So she recorded you win for best country on one country song of the year. That was kind of a funny thing. It was really because virtually carpenter was being marketed in the country. Arena, chief picked that song recorded it and at the time her label or ever was in charge. You know, we don't want that to be the single, it's not country enough as she stood her ground. And they put it out as a single and then won a Grammy for country song of the year, and so wins a Grammy for your, but it was on that first demo of yours that you did. Pick up right? That's gratify got passed on every by rebound. Yeah. Gratifying later on do win a Grant Long. They didn't pick. You couldn't get signed.

Grammy Lucinda Williams Williams Mary Chapin New Orleans Ariel Levy Miller Williams David remnant Bob Dylan Tom petty university of Arkansas embolism Qatar staff writer CEO Hopkins city hall John Coltrane Chet Baker John Ciardi
"david remnant" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:41 min | 2 years ago

"david remnant" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm David remnant. Today's show was recorded at the New Yorker festival, and we're talking to two of the top secret songwriters in popular music in twenty twelve staff writer area Levi's sat down with one of the most acclaimed American songwriters of recent years. The Cindy Williams Williams has released thirteen albums. She's written songs for everyone for Mary Chapin carpenter. Tom petty. She's a winner, three Grammy awards and now here's Lucinda Williams with Ariel Levy. A lot of your music strikes me as really spiritual. And you've got on your belt buckle and he told me it right with God. Right with God. Right on your belt. Buckle. Your song. Yeah. And you're telling me that you've got that you had your health naturally, this wall of cross crosses. Yeah. Like art day of the dead kinda stuff and saunter Lia, and you got in both your grandfather's for minister ministers to tell us a little bit, if you would about about the role that religion God played in your life, your music, and I'm particularly interested in concepts of sin, and redemption, which idea. My, my dad's father, for instance was a Methodist minister. Yeah, he was what I liked what I describe as a Christian, the truth of the work, you know, he was for women's rights. He was a CEO and World, War One and was involved in the southern tenant unions. Former struggle and all of that, you know, and then my dad by the time I was boring growing up and everything. My dad described himself as agnostic. So what about you? Do you consider yourself? Agnostic. No. But I don't have because I don't believe in original sin. So I'm not a Christian, our guess, except I feel like I live my life, more like a Christian then a lot of Christians. You know, it's all everybody knows where I'm talking about. But I just love the folk lore and the mythology and the view embolism of it all, you know, one of the things I really envy about religious, people is that they can walk through life with a sense of destiny and it seems that a lot of artists have that same blessing, you know, like what point in your life. Did you did you know or did you feel that music was your calling? Well, at least probably from the time I was about twelve years old, which is what I started taking Qatar lessons and it was the same year. I for Bob Dylan. How is revisited in ninety sixty five there was always a piano around the house, because my mother played, you know, we use it books would be laid around and music being played in the house. My dad was listening to everyone from Hake. Williams to John Coltrane Chet Baker. Lot in Hopkins. And when did you start writing when did you start doing your own song? Well, I mean, I was, you know, fooling around with it everything, but from the age of probably about thirteen or fourteen. And your father is great. Poet, Miller Williams was he a big influence on you in terms of writing. Yeah, yeah, you encouraged me. I mean, you know, there are other writers poets novelists in the house, you know, a lot and see he taught at different universities. So I grew up in that academic environment. You know is very stimulating. And just, you know, he'd have people over the house, and it would just be people like, you know, John, clo- and homes and John Ciardi and Jay's Dickey and that was the environment tells a little bit about when you when you first started. Playing music singing as as job in New Orleans when you were real young. And you're playing in bars was that a fun time in your life? Tell us about that a little bit. Well, I mean you're talking about the first little gig. I got a New Orleans. Yeah. I was inbetween. Well, my dad always wanted me to, you know, get a degree in something. So I could have something to fall back on. And we were encouraged to have a career, whatever allies. So I was out got into the university of Arkansas, where he was teaching and dotty seventy one and. I was going down to the core. Because we lived there for a while when we when I was going to high school there, everything. So I had some friends zero. So I was going down to the French quarter and hanging out and there's this little folk local air dis on bourbon street, right in the middle of all this trip joints is really odd. Anyway, I got offered a little kid plan. They're like, you know, three nights a week for tips which was a huge deal for me. This was an naughty, seventy two or something. So I call my dad and I said, you know, I don't instead of coming back to school in the fall. I wanna stay down here and do this, and he said, okay. That was probably the biggest train point my tire what became you know, my career because he gave you permission to be eventually I needed to have his permission. We were talking about that. Like it's important for kids to have at least one or someone they don't wanna disappoint doesn't have to be one of your parents. But somebody, you know that you don't want to support them. You know, so that was my dad for me. So, you know, and then another big turning point after that it's when you get your first development deal, and you must have thought tell it, and you must have thought my I'm there made it I was on cloud on. Yeah. Well, there is a God RCA the time, and he really liked me. And you know, saw something there. So they used to do this back, then they call development deal, and this was an RT ninety five I guess they give you enough money to live on for six months or something. That was, so I headed up for the first time I didn't have to work a day, job and all do is, you know, rights and songs. And then they send you the studio to do a demo tape and hopefully they sign you after that. There was some great songs on that demo tape worth same ones that are ended up on the trade kisses. And at city hall, and passionate kisses was the first song that you wanna Grammy. Yeah. That was very tape carpet years later four, but the Grammy so she recorded you win for best country one country song of the year. That was kind of a. Funny thing it was really because Merite recarpet or was being marketed in the country. Arena. She picked that song and recorded it and at the time her label or whoever was in charge. You know, we don't want that to be the single, it's not country. Enough. As she stood her ground. And they put it out as a single and then won a Grammy for country song of the year, and so wins a Grammy for, but it was on that first demo of yours that you did. Pick up right? Gratify got passed on everybody. Everybody. Yeah. Gratifying later on to win a grand long. They didn't pick. I mean, you couldn't get signed for anything. I mean because at the time. Back in the mid eighties. There was no Americana. There is no alternative country. There's no you know hold this. So they didn't know I literally fell in the cracks courting to them between country rock. But in terms of music, people, a lot of credit for having a lot of integrity. Your sound which I certainly understand. But you think sometimes that that's how fear there was a lot of it was just, you know, when I was first starting out, I was terrified of being overproduced and all of this, because I had seen other folk blues, heroes kind of, of mine who had made these horrible. Horrendous albums like the seventies. You know the disco thing came along. And all of a sudden, you know. So I think of you as one of the great erotic poets of our time. And, and it seems like you're really comfortable and really uninhibited as well as really brilliant writing and saying about sex is that you feel like yes, I liked the truth is to push peoples buttons a little bit. I'll say this real growing up, as you know, with my dad a poet and all the poets and everything. I mean they didn't censor themselves and that was one of the things my dad taught me about writing, don't censor yourself. You know, so that's the way our protest song rocking. And although I like to do it in a sort of elegant, some what you know, it's not like a punk thing. That's a whole different thing. You know. So I don't wanna like cram it down people's throats. Yeah. You're trying to make people feel something you don't trying to salt them. Yeah. But so just maybe it is sort of punk wasn't their thing where a woman sort of. Of your playing essence. And there's a woman at a show whose spontaneously God didn't sec. For the house of blues, the New Orleans, and it was after Katrina, so there is really odd energy in the, you know, you could feel it in the whole city really just kind of threw kinda subliminal angers and thing you know. Anyways, always there with the band play essence in the places packed. And I did see it. I wouldn't us it you know, but apparently there's a woman who was there who is masturbating. Are they call the cops? And apparently she was kicking the police because.

Grammy New Orleans Lucinda Williams Cindy Williams Williams Tom petty Miller Williams university of Arkansas David remnant Levi Mary Chapin Bob Dylan Ariel Levy staff writer Lia CEO Hake Qatar Hopkins
"david remnant" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:04 min | 2 years ago

"david remnant" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm David remnant. Today's show was recorded at the New Yorker festival, and we're talking to two of the top singer, songwriters in popular music in twenty twelve staff writer area Levy sat down with one of the most acclaimed American songwriters recent years, Lucinda Williams Williams, has released thirteen albums, and she's written songs for everyone from Mary Chapin carpenter to Tom petty. She's a winner of three Grammy awards and now here's Lucinda Williams with Ariel Levy. A lot of your music strikes me as really spiritual. And you've got on your belt buckle and he told me it, right. With God right with right on your belt. Buckle. Your song. Yeah. And you're telling me that you've got that you had in your house nationally, this wall of cross, live crosses. Yeah. Mike art day of the dead kinda stuff and Sondra, and you got in both your grandfather's for minister ministers to tell us a little bit, if you would about about the role that religion God played in your life and your music. And I'm particularly interested in concepts of sin, and redemption. Which, yeah. My, my dad's father, for instance was a Methodist minister, but yeah, he was what I liked what I describe as Christian and the truth of the word, you know, he was for women's rights. He was a CEO and World, War One and was involved in the southern tenant unions. Former struggle and all of that. And then my dad by the time I was born growing up and everything. My dad described himself as agnostic. So what about you? Do you consider yourself? Agnostic. No. But I don't have because I don't believe in original sin. So I'm not a Christian, you know, our guess, except I feel like I live my life, more like a Christian then a lot of Christians. It's all everybody knows what I'm talking about. But I just love the folk lore and the Thala g and the view embolism of it all, you know, one of the things I really envy about religious, people is that they can walk through life with a sense of destiny and it seems that a lot of artists have that same blessing like, at what point in your life. Did you did you know or did you feel that music was your calling? Well, at least probably from the time I was about twelve years old, which is what's taking tar lessons, and it was the same year. I for Bob Dylan. How is to revisit it? In ninety sixty five there was always a piano around the house, because my mother played, you know, music books would be laid around and music being played in the house. My dad was listening to everyone from Hake. Williams to John Coltrane Chet Baker. Lot in Hopkins. And when did you start writing when did you start doing your own song? Well, I mean, I was, you know, fooling around with it everything, but from the age of probably about thirteen or fourteen. And your father is great. Poet, Miller Williams was he a big influence on you in terms of writing. Yeah, yeah. You encouraged me, you know, there are other writers, poets novelists in the house, you know, a lot and he taught at different universities. So I grew up in that academic environment very, you know stimulating. And just, you know, he'd have people over the house, and it would just people like John Colin Holmes and John Ciardi and Jay's Dickey and that was the environment. Tells a little bit about when you when you first started. Playing music singing as as job in New Orleans when you were real young. And you're playing in bars was that a fun time in your life? Tell us about that a little bit. Well, I mean you're talking about the first little gig. I got New Orleans. Yeah. I was inbetween. Well, my dad always wanted me to, you know, get a degree in something have something to fall back on, and we were encouraged to have a career whatever was. So I was out got into the university of Arkansas, where he was teaching in seventy one. I was going down to the core. Because we lived there for a while when we when I was going to high school there, everything. So I had some friends air, all, so I was going down to the French quarter and hanging out. And there's this little folk local Andy's on bourbon street, right in the middle of all the strip joints is really odd anyway, I got offered a little good plan there. Like, you know three nights a week for tips which was a huge deal for me. This is not seventy two or something. Call my dad and I said, you know, I don't instead of coming back to school in the fall. I wanna stay down here and do this, and he said, okay. That was probably the biggest turning point my tire. What became my career because he gave you permission to be eventually I needed to have his permission. And we were talking about that, like it's important for kids to have at least one or someone they don't wanna disappoint doesn't have to be one of your parents. But somebody, you know that you don't want to support them. You know, so that was my dad for me. So, you know, and then another big turning point after that it's when you get your first development deal, and you must have thought tell it, and you must have thought I my I'm there made it I was on cloud on. Yeah. Well, there is a God RCA at the time, and he really liked me. And, you know, Saul something there. So they used to do this back to they call development deal. And this was an eighty five I guess they give you enough money to live on for six months or something. That was, so I headed up for the first time I didn't have to work a day job. And all I do is write some songs. And then they send you in studio to do a demo tape and hopefully they sign you. After that. There were some great songs on that demo tape same ones that are ended up on the rough trade out passionate kisses, and crests. At city hall, and passionate kisses was the first song that you wanna Grammy. Yeah, that was Mary Tapie carpet years later, not four, but the Grammy. So she recorded you win for best country one country song of the year. That was kind of a funny thing. It was really because Merite recarpet or was being marketed in the country. Arena. She picked at song recorded it and at the time her label or ever was in charge. You know, we don't want that to be the single, it's not country. Enough. As she stood her ground. And they put it out as a single and won a Grammy for countries song of the year, and so wins a Grammy for your, but it was on that first demo of yours that you did. Pick up right? Gratify got passed on every by. Yeah. Gratifying later on to win a grand long. They didn't pick. I mean, you couldn't get signed for anything. I mean because at the time back in the mid eighties. There was no Americana. There is no alternative country. There's no, you know, a whole this, so they didn't know I literally fell when the cracks courting to them between country rock. But in terms of music, people give a lot of credit for having a lot of integrity. Oh, your sound which I certainly understand. But you think sometimes that that's how fear it was a lot of it was just, you know, when I was first starting out, I was terrified of being over and all of this, because I had seen other folk blues, heroes KARN of, of mine, who had made these horrible. Horrendous albums, like the seventies disco thing came along. And all of a sudden, you know. So I think of you as one of the great erotic poets of our time. And, and it seems like you're really comfortable and really uninhibited as well as really brilliant writing and saying about sex is that you feel like yes, I liked the truth is to push peoples buttons a little bit. Uh-huh. I say this for growing up, as you know, with my dad a poet and all the poets and everything. I mean they didn't censor themselves and that was one of the things. My dad taught me about writing don't censor yourself. You know, so that's the way our protest song rocking. Although I like to do it in a certain elegant, some what? You know, it's not like a punk thing. That's a whole different thing. You know. So I don't wanna like cram it down people's throats. Yeah. You're trying to make people feel something you're not trying to salt them. Yeah. But just maybe it is sort of punk wasn't their thing where a woman, sort of you're playing essence. There's a woman at a show spontaneous. God's it in sex. Fervor the house of blues, the New Orleans, and it was after Hurricane Katrina, so there is early on energy. In the, you know, you could feel it in the whole city really kind of three kind of subliminal angers and things you know. Anyways, always there with the ban we played essence in the places packed. And I didn't see it witness it. But apparently, there's a woman who was there who is masturbating. Are they call the cops? And apparently she was kicking the police because she wasn't finished yet or. Totally understand. So I don't know. She was on ecstasy. I don't know what they hell. That it's. This kind of old about, you know, like. I mean, that's pretty gutsy not ballsy. I hate saying that about where it's warm, and I hate that. Anything changed about the way you write songs. I feel like a more confident now I feel like I'm actually riding more. I used to just barely have enough songs for one album. But in the beginning, I mean I was just so painfully shy, and I was just kinda looked down like this. And you and I still get nervous but it helps to have a great band behind you. You know, and have that connection, Phil secure and. I started out. I really didn't think myself is terms of via great sing, or, I mean so that's one reason. I decided to learn how to write good songs was it Emmylou Harris Harris was another one, but who said to you. She said, one time, you know, your limitations or your, your strength, your limitations, become your strength, and all speaking of great songwriting, great vocals. Let's have a big round for Lucinda person..

Lucinda Williams Williams Grammy New Orleans Ariel Levy Miller Williams David remnant Sondra university of Arkansas Bob Dylan Thala g Hake Saul Emmylou Harris Harris Tom petty CEO staff writer Mary Chapin Hopkins
"david remnant" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"david remnant" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Robert, Karen, I'm David remnant. Join me may. I seven for a live taping of the New Yorker radio hour at McCarthy in Princeton, New Jersey. I'll talk with Carro about working his latest book, which covers his process of writing these munya mental biographies. Tickets are available at WNYC dot org slash events. WNYC's? Supporters include renovation matchmaker. Sweden Sweden matches people with feted general contractors and monitors their project until it's completed more at S W E E T E N dot com. You're listening to new sounds. You can do that any night of the week here at WNYC FM ninety three point nine in New York, but you can hear us anytime anywhere on our website as well. New sounds dot org. Includes our audio archives. Playlists with details on what you're hearing. Our videos are Sam checked podcasts free downloads of live in studio performances. And of course, the new sounds twenty four seven radio stream all of that. At new sounds dot org. Let's listen next to Alex wiser, he's a New Yorker, and he has an album out called and all the days were purple most of the album is devoted to a song cycle of that name, which seems to be very kind of New York based with poems in both Yiddish and English. But there is an outlier a piece called three epitaphs which was composed earlier and features excerpts from the poetry of William Carlos Williams, Emily Dickinson, and the secular epitaph pretty famous piece of text, and it appears music as well from ancient Greece, and these three epitaphs are some here by Elisa bag who is a member both of the rock band Pablo Pablo and of the splendid contemporary music group roomful of teeth rounding out the Unsan believe got a string trio, piano and percussion here are three. Epitaphs music that responds to the the poetry of three different writers on this edition of new sounds..

New York New Jersey David remnant Alex wiser Pablo Pablo Sweden Sam William Carlos Williams Robert Princeton Carro Emily Dickinson McCarthy Greece Karen Elisa Unsan
"david remnant" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"david remnant" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"With James Carville longtime Clinton ally and Enviro confident of Jeb Bush, Republican strategists, Greta van Susteren from Fox News and the editor of the New Yorker, David remnant. Welcome to all you James. Let me begin with. You heard you laughing. The Democrats are having second thoughts. But what is the Clinton can't take away? Well, first of all we're going to follow bomb eight hand concerns. Okay. Let's get serious. What is the latest in a continuation? And if you take it all, and you put it together, and you subtract three point one four one five from you left. What not very much and at the end of the day sort of can't pass a budget. We got another investigation. Just like we had the whitewater just like go through to file you go through Travelgate you go through seven eight different congressional committees. And you wonder why the public is not following this because they know what? It is. It was something that she did. It was legal. I suspect she didn't want Louie Gohmert rifling through emails here that it was legal. It wasn't. I suspect she didn't want Louie Gohmert rifling through emails or what professor Johnny Smith said. She did not want to have to abide by. Foia requests and had she had her information on that publicly accessible server. She felt Hillary did the time that, you know, these dastardly Republicans with someday subpoena all sorts of records, and this way she'd be able to control it. And you wonder why the public is not following this because they know what it is. It was something that she did. It was Neagle. I suspect she didn't want Louie Gohmert rifling through emails, which seems to me to be a reasonable position for someone to take. Well, Chit is in Roseville. California chapter on the Larry elder show. Thank you so much for calling. Yeah. Believe that, you know, different your your propaganda machine. UN Sean Hannity, he makes a little bit more money than you. You're all expelling the same lies, and no it doesn't matter. How you cut it? Right. If you listen to what John dean said today, he said this report was more damning than the Watergate. So you can dilemma would you like to would you like would you like to hear what age bar said about the report? It doesn't matter. I know. I know I know I know it doesn't matter. John John dean is more relevant to you than than the g who said, there's no collusion. No conspiracy. No coordination. No interference on the part of the president no assertion of executive privilege. Sorry. No. Thing. Sorry. Sorry chit. They just didn't prosecute. Well, it seems to me after two years check chat. Don't don't leave come on. It seems to me after two years twenty two months all the money spent all these investigators all these witnesses. It ought to be overwhelming. Here's what bar said about collusion. But again, the special counsel's report did not find any evidence that members of the Trump campaign or anyone associated with the campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in these hacking operations. In other words, there was no evidence of the Trump campaign collusion with the Russian government's hacking. Don't you think after Adam Schiff says that there's evidence of collusion? Chris Cuomo scissors, tons of evidence of collusion. Contact with the Russians by some members of the Trump campaign, not illicit purpose? Not to steal an election. No collusion. No corruption. And remember the whole thing started because of collusion. So now, you have some people convicted of processed crimes or crimes having nothing. Whatever you do with the original purpose of the investigation. Sorry chat, which I can help you out. Here's what your and said about relief factor. It has changed. My life is the only thing I can say been exercising for years. My shoulder isn't bad bad shape. It swelling. It hurts. It goes numb during the night. Well, I heard about relief factor on the radio and I've been hearing testimonies for a couple years heights..

Louie Gohmert John John dean Greta van Susteren James Carville Hillary Clinton Russian government Jeb Bush Chit Travelgate Sean Hannity Chris Cuomo David remnant Adam Schiff Fox News Neagle editor California UN
"david remnant" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"david remnant" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Two four three El Dorados. Let Larry know what's on your mind there from buddy, I just can't take it anymore. You know, this is why Trump won the election because these Charlotte, but Boone lip tarred who all they talk about is illegal alien, then the homeless and the poor, and blah, blah, blah. It's always about somebody else or some group that catering to. But about me the guy who stop. Stop working fifty sixty hours a week. Paying thousands and thousands of dollars in taxes by tech is about forty five hundred bucks due to the fact cannot write off unreimbursed employees. But so not real happy about that. But anyhow, I'm tired of it. This is why the Republican that Trump won. Because they're talking about everybody else picked up the forgotten, man. The keep up the good work, buddy. Love your job and preached. Triple eight nine seven one eight G triple eight nine seven one seven two four three Larry elder dot com. Studio wanna remind you about what James Carville? Former aide to the Clinton said as to why Hillary had the basement server. I'm sure Carville regrets having said it, but when this thing I busted, here's what he said. Let's say this now with James Carville longtime Clinton ally and Enviro confident of Jeb Bush, Republican strategists, Greta van Susteren from Fox News and the editor of the New Yorker, David remnant. Welcome to all you James. Let me.

James Carville Trump Larry El Dorados Greta van Susteren Clinton Jeb Bush David remnant Charlotte Boone Hillary Fox News editor Enviro eight nine seven one eight G fifty sixty hours
"david remnant" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:29 min | 2 years ago

"david remnant" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm David remnant in November of two thousand sixteen just a few days after the election of Donald Trump. I went to the White House and interviewed President Obama. The place was like a funeral parlor, and among the big questions on my mind was the future of the Democratic Party with Hillary Clinton clearly out of the picture who would go onto lead who would take on Trump in twenty twenty Obama throughout a few names. We all knew pretty well, senators, comma, Harris, Tim Kaine, and then he mentioned someone I'd never heard of the mayor of south bend, Indiana town of about one hundred thousand people, but Obama couldn't quite remember his name either. Or maybe he didn't dare pronounce it that may have been a self feeling prophecy because now Pete Buddha judges having a moment he's gaining the attention of voters, and he's raising money hand over fist ideologically, he's positioning himself just to the left of centrist like Joe Biden and a few ticks to the right of. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, and he's got a sterling resume Harvard. Grad Rhodes scholar navy veteran. He's also gay and churchgoing pyschopath leeann, but who exactly is people to judge. What does he believe what does he propose to do as the youngest president ever elected? I talked with him at length earlier this week. You said this very recently to the Washington Post. I believe it was Donald Trump got elected because in his twisted way. He pointed out the huge troubles in our economy, and our democracy. At least he didn't go around saying that America was already great like Hillary did now I know you've backtracked a little bit about that latter bit. But you're saying something pretty large there. What is it? Yes. I know that that quotation get circulated a lot something I said last year, and I think appeared in a profile in January and got circulated. Unfortunately, a little bit without context. But the point I'm making here is that the presidency like this doesn't just happen figure like Donald Trump doesn't just become possible unless there's a real sense of broken in our political and economic system, and so to the extent that that we the Democratic Party in two thousand sixteen were perceived as saying that the system was fine. So he was saying. I'm going to blow up the system, and we were saying trust the system a lot of people, especially people in industrial midwestern communities, like mine didn't find our message to be convincing because the system really had let them down in the sense that you know, the rising tide rose just as we were promised it would. But most of our boats didn't much now I've got to ask you, your your your two years older than the the minimum to run for president in the presidential race their lease three leading candidates who are over seventy or close to Joe Biden. Lisbeth Warren Bernie Sanders are they too old to be president not my place to say why or whether anybody else should should run or not. I do think that there's a lot of energy and interest in a new generation putting forward leaders, you know, the the the consequences for my generation of the decisions being made right now are normal. I mean, almost by definition the longer you're planning to be here. The more you have at stake. To be a wise guy by saying this. But that sounds like a polite version of a yes to my question that they are too old in a sense in a substantive way. I don't know that I can embrace that look one very interesting thing, for example, that you saw with Sanders phenomenon is that a lot of younger voters were gravitating toward an older candidate, by the way. Conversely, one thing I've learned in my career from beginning. When I ran for mayor is that a lot of older voters are among the most excited about a younger candidate. So I think somebody of any age can deliver a compelling message. I do think we're in a generational moment. That makes it perhaps more appealing or more meaningful than usual. Most recently. Now, you saw the prime minister of New Zealand who I believe she is younger than I would be when I when I would take office. But but the world is beginning to put forward leaders from this new generation, and it's almost uncharacteristic that America has been slow to do the same. Now, you you talk a lot about the concept of intergenerational Justice. What exactly does that mean in practice and on a policy level? Well, again, climate is a very pressing example of. This. There will be a reckoning for the costs that have been run up by essentially discounting future to the point where you just view it if somebody else's problem, and unfortunately, there's somebody else's us somebody else's generation that's alive today. And we'll be paying the price. So if we were properly accounting for the consequences for my generation and those coming next when it comes to climate, we wouldn't be having a debate over whether we could afford to do a carbon tax we'd be having a debate over how we could possibly afford to do anything. But a major mobilization around this issue. I also think it's a lens that maybe could help us navigate the challenging questions around reparations, which are very much a question. I think of what one generation to another and how injustices or or choices are inequities made in one moment in time can be visited upon the heads not just of others living in that time, but of others naiad born the. You're gonna get it. Every campaign stop at every pain in the neck interviewer. Like may as is your experience so far in in political terms has been to be the mayor of a modest sized city south bend, Indiana, which is just over one hundred thousand people is that adequate experience to be commander in chief in president United States. So I get the audacity of of somebody in my physician talking about the highest office in the land. Although I think it is no less audacious and a little bit of scene for any mortal to look at that office. And and think that they belonged there that they could just walk in. But, you know, Obama used to say you have to be a little bit crazy to think that you can run for that office. Of course, think that you could do it. And yet everyone is forty five people we've put in there has been a human being with a certain set of experiences. I would argue that the set of experiences I have is about as relevant as it can get without having already been president to have the experience of. Managing everything from infrastructure to economic development to know in a very literal sense..

President Obama Donald Trump president Joe Biden Democratic Party Hillary Clinton Indiana Bernie Sanders America Trump Lisbeth Warren Bernie Sanders White House south bend David remnant Washington Post Pete Buddha Grad Rhodes scholar navy Elizabeth Warren Tim Kaine Sanders
"david remnant" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"david remnant" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Find everything they've written on Trump. Russia muller. You name at New Yorker dot com. This is the New Yorker radio hour stick around. The New Yorker radio hour is supported by. Extra hop a cyber analytics company that provides threat intelligence M L, an investigation automation, more information at extra hop dot com. And by progressive insurance with the name your price tool providing information on a range of insurance coverage and price options more at Progresive dot com or one eight hundred progressive now that's progressive. Robert Caro has won the Pulitzer prize twice for biographies of Robert, Moses and Lyndon Johnson. Now CARA was turning his attention to another fascinating American. Robert, Karen, I'm David remnant. Join me may seventh for a live taping of the New Yorker radio hour at mccarter theatre in Princeton, New Jersey. I'll talk with Carro about working is latest book, which covers his process of writing these monumental biographies. Tickets are available at WNYC dot ORG slash events. Support for WNYC comes from Stevens institute of technology in Hoboken, New Jersey, offering more than twenty online graduate programs, including artificial intelligence, computer, science business, analytics and software engineering more at Stevens dot EDU slash online. The Marley Meyerson JC Manhattan's real abilities film festival New York, celebrating the lives and stories of people with disabilities. April second through ninth NY dot reliability star..

david remnant cara
"david remnant" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

03:34 min | 3 years ago

"david remnant" Discussed on Channel 33

"To be when you're like throwing this kind of trash out there on TV smile. Does not get you off the hook. All right, David. Let's do the notebook dump very quickly true detective season three ended. Yeah. I was listening to something Chris Ryan said on the watch with Andy Greenwald. And if you haven't checked out, Chris and Jason Kazazi owns all the stuff they did about season three, which is amazing. And also I read Chris and Andy's recap at the at the end, which was also really interesting Chris had this line at the end of the podcast where he said something the effect of all the stuff we looked up on the internet this season wound up not mattering. I think that's that is the journalistic coda to every peak TV show. Yes. All the stuff. We looked up on the internet didn't matter after all it's every that's every show. Yeah. We were talking about this. After after we both watch it. And I think I texted you like the real joy where the things we Google the along the way or whatever the the ancient texts we googled along the way it was it was at your response. I mean, it's really incredible. I remember when treated tech the season one came out. It was my favorite show. I mean, just full stop. I loved every bit of it. And had a one of my good Buddy's. We shared an appreciation of just about everything TV movies books. And I kept trying to get him to watch it. But he was working on Sunday nights or something. And then he finally watch it six months later, and he was like it was okay. And it took me a while going back and forth to realize like ninety percent of my joy of that was like fr- from that show was hanging out on read it and seeing what people were figuring out about the show or thinking they were figuring out about the show and just like deep diving into HP lovecraft as I was watching it. And I think that there's a real I think I don't think that that's a bad thing. I think that just but it is. But it does leave. It does mean that every show is almost inherently disappointing at the I was listening to this week David to Tina Brown's TB de podcast. She was in interviewing David remnant who replaced her as the New Yorker Tina hired remnant as a writer, and then he replaced her as the New Yorker, and she was comparing the challenges that. She faced in that remnant face when they became editor of the New Yorker, listen to this small bit, which has vintage Tina and your role was probably different for mind, your rose to come into nineteen ninety two and waken the thing up, which is an expensive thing to do is politically tough thing to do. It was also so strange because I mean people like Joe Mitchell would suddenly flowed into my office wearing a trilby hat like the ghost of Christmas, pasta or something. And I would think wait a minute. I thought that you would dead. I thought you were dead. This is what I love about Tina because Tina published bushels and bushels of brilliant long form journalism, but Tina does not have the excessively ridiculously reverential too long form journalist Jean Tina Brown will not be appearing in the gang. Gray comments section. Right. Tina brown. And right. Thompson are unlikely to have, you know, a glass of whisky comparing great pieces by Gary Smith, that's not going to happen. And I love that about her. I just love the I thought you were dead. Joe Mitchell old mister flood. She thought he was dead. Yeah. There's a lot of people for whom getting that chair at the New Yorker. We're like the first thing you would do is just to like schedule lunches with the Joe Michels of the world. Right. Dislike who can who? Do. I get to talk to now fish market. All right. Twenty twenty notes David quickly before we go politicos newsletter. Informs us that at least a half dozen of the declared democratic candidates will be at south by southwest next weekend..

Jean Tina Brown David remnant editor Joe Mitchell Chris Ryan Andy Greenwald Thompson Google Twenty twenty Gary Smith Joe Michels Jason Kazazi Gray writer ninety percent six months
"david remnant" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"david remnant" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Green new deal, Fox News sees Benghazi if you wanted to destroy America, what does she do that? I don't miss this week's on the media from WNYC tomorrow morning at ten on ninety three point nine FM. WNYC independent journalism in the public interest ninety three point nine FM and AM HD twenty NPR news and the New York conversation. This is the New Yorker radio hour, I'm David remnant. We've been talking this hour about guns gun regulation and gun rights and the shifting politics that affects so many people's lives. These conversations often focused around the plague of mass shootings, but in many communities across the country gun violence unfolds, not as a shocking horror, but as a matter of awful, routine and gun control possible or not isn't going to change that. People come the Chicago. But they don't really go into the community. You know, you were talking about and all this legislation that that doesn't do nothing for us over here that doesn't mean anything for us because you'll hear about the way most of the guns in this community stolen. This is the real world, you're gonna see. Lupe crews works.

WNYC Lupe crews Fox News David remnant New York NPR America Chicago
"david remnant" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"david remnant" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"And if you listen to shelter, I tunes please live review. Now, we're going to have to improvise the printer isn't working accepted a couple that we have from yesterday Email, and then Michael is going to press buttons. Stay tuned. People in chatter might want to get their cameras out these Tronc -ly reading from Rory and Cleveland, did you see that once Chelsea Jane's announced he was switching gears and covering the two thousand twenty presidential election. There's a bunch of Ingle side residents on Twitter came out of their rocking. Chairs grumbling the equivalent of. How dare you have a baseball beat writer cover complex thing like the presidential raisin. I was privacy. David Aldridge, Barry's for Lugan, some little chime in social media to defend Chelsea, I hope I speak for all Little's and fans of the show to whichever. See the best. I know she'll do a great job on twenty twenty beat. I look forward to reading stuff and possibly having her call into the show with the report we love Chelsea. Yeah. On the net. Yeah. She's great. Ask people do this all the time. Do the name David remnant. I mean, he wanna Pulitzer prize covering the Washington federals team in the US. Glenn winters. Newport, News, Virginia, I always enjoy Jason lockenfora segment on the show, and like all other Little's. I've been rooting for copper out of curiosity. I one on the Google machine. Just now to see what they look like what a surprise. I always imagined Jason will kind of like Frank Sola. But in reality is more of a George Costanza type, which I didn't see coming Estra proper in my imagination. He was asleep athletic labrador retriever. Whereas it turns out he looks like the dog version of a parochial, but I'm fine with that. Because that's cute. Thanks for providing entertainment for my daily walks with my dog joy the wonder beagle. Here we go from John Barnes, Alexandria, Virginia. So so Jews don't own tools. Can I interest you in someone I like to call Noah, he built an ark? And yet how people do that convert Virginia. I hear Gary Williams say that Ray Lewis had his arm around steeper shoddy neck at the ravens charges game. Necessar- those who would be nervous in that situation. Build Kista from. Kensington runaway success of at the movies and chatter on books. I can't wait to hear the next extension of the Tony corner podcast universe. Can I make a suggestion next show would be called men of the people this show would simply be a weekly pod? Where you and we'll bring on some of your salt of the earth, friends and discuss the cities that do and do not have acceptable hotel accommodates. We'll just throw out a pension city and you shout. Is there a rich there? Determine how far where you'd have to stay for the destination in order.

Chelsea Jane Virginia Little Jason lockenfora David remnant Chelsea Rory Twitter Ingle side David Aldridge Pulitzer prize baseball Michael Washington federals Glenn winters Google George Costanza Newport
"david remnant" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"david remnant" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"I'm David remnant. Every year, we invite some of the most interesting people in America to come talk with us at the New Yorker festival writers musicians, inventors leaders in government and policy. The men and women who are shaping the world. We live in. Sorry to bother. You has been described as the most original movie of last year, at least by some critics, and it may not be Oscar bait it's sort of science fiction absurdist and definitely very satirical. The movie is about a guy who's down on his luck and takes a telemarketing job where he learns to use a white voice. A perfect facsimile of how white people are apparently supposed to talk and as his career takes off. He's forced to pick a side in a labor dispute as trenchant as the movie is about race and identity sorry to bother. You turns out to be an extremely sharp critique of capitalism, the movies writer director is boots Riley Riley spent more than twenty years as a musician working with the hip hop group. The coup he's forty seven now and sorry to bother. You is his first film project, the New Yorkers during Saint Felix asked boots Riley what inspired it in the first place. All I knew was that it was going to take place on telemarketing floor. It was going to take place in the world of telemarketing. And there was going to be a struggle that he had to decide what side he was on. I didn't know there was going to be anything fantastical in it. I was thinking about story the whole time didn't start thinking about the aesthetics of it. And till I had the story is there any autobiographical element in the cash if green character, obviously you worked at the telemarketer in the past. But sorry to bother us the story that could have been told from so many perspectives where you making a very conscious choice to make the protagonist fee. This black man who starts to debase himself like who is scab as someone who, you know, you don't like scabs that's not part of your if you don't choices to eat you make the choices too easy. Like what? They're just going to have a debate about it. And you know, you're right. You know, I have to have to make I have to bring people through that thought process. Right. And so that that's part of it. Also, all of the characters. Yeah. There's autobiographical elements ended in the sense that I didn't try to pick characters that I needed to research to figure out how they would respond in this conversation. I just wrote all of the conversations all of the lines were me talking to myself millions of dollars when these walls just to make sure that douses of calls can go out and at the same time GM. Studied the script. Clark in don't be lazy. I won't have to be an asshole make sale. This like goes on you do real good. Eventually, you might even be able to be power caller power call where the call is all within make the. They even have their own elevator. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Saw stick to the script..

Riley Riley David remnant director America Saint Felix GM Clark writer twenty years
"david remnant" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"david remnant" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Hour, I'm David remnant sorry to bother you. It's been described as the most original movie of last year, at least by some critics, and it may not be Oscar bait it's sort of science fiction absurdist and definitely very satirical. The movies about a guy who's down on his luck and takes a telemarketing job where he learns to use a white voice. A perfect facsimile of how white people or apparently supposed to talk and as his career takes off. He's forced to pick a side in a labor dispute is trend is the movie is about race and identity. Sorry to bother. You turns out to be an extremely sharp critique of capitalism, the movies writer and director is boots Riley Riley spent more than twenty years as a musician working with the hip hop group. The coup he's forty seven now and sorry to bother. You is his first film project, the New Yorkers Doreen, Saint Felix asked boots Riley what inspired it in the first place. All I knew was that was going to take place on telemarketing floor. It was going to take place in the world of telemarketing. And there was going to be a struggle that he had to decide what side he was on. I didn't know there was going to be anything fantastical in it. I was thinking about story the whole time didn't start thinking about the aesthetics of it until I had the story is there any autobiographical element in the cashier screen character, obviously worked telemarketer in the past. But. Sorry to bother us a story that could have been told from so many perspectives. Were you making a very conscious choice to make the protagonists fee? This black man who starts to debase himself. Like who is a scab as someone who, you know, you don't like scabs that's not part of your if you don't choices to eat you make the choices to easy like what they're just going to have a debate about it. And you know, you're right. You know, I have to have to make I have to bring people through that thought process. Right. And so that that's part of it. Also, all of the characters. Yeah. There's auto biographical elements in it in the sense that I didn't try to pick characters that I needed to research to figure out how they would respond in this conversation. I just wrote all of the conversations all of the lines were me talking to myself millions of dollars into these walls. Just make sure that calls you out. And at the same time. Why? Studied script. Clark in don't be lazy. Make sale on. Real good. Eventually, you might even be able to be power. Power. Even have their own. Oh, yeah. Stick to the script..

Riley Riley David remnant writer Saint Felix Clark director twenty years
Kavanaugh heads into Supreme Court confirmation hearings

Chad Benson

00:23 sec | 3 years ago

Kavanaugh heads into Supreme Court confirmation hearings

"When congress gets, back to, work tomorrow the Senate Judiciary committee will, open, confirmation hearings for supreme court nominee Brett Kavanagh's stakes couldn't be higher and judge Brad Kavanagh knows it completing at, least two full day mock hearings peppered with. Interruptions by fake protesters and Democrats are making it, clear they will not go easy. On the president's supreme court

Steve Bannon Gordon ABC Jim Ryan Abc Slidell Louisiana Slidell Brad Kavanagh David Remnant Supreme Court Brett Kavanagh Louisiana Colin Kaepernick Katrina Nike Denver Alex Stone Senate Judiciary Committee Manhattan NFL