17 Burst results for "David Ramnik"

"david ramnik" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

08:17 min | 1 year ago

"david ramnik" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Go. Forward dot com. That's go forward dot com. I'm david ramnik. And each week on the new yorker radio hour my colleagues and i unpack. What's happening in a very complicated world you'll hear from the new yorkers award-winning reporters in thinkers jilani cobb. On race injustice. Jill lepore on american history vincent cunningham and gm tolentino culture bill mckibben on climate change and many to get the context behind the events in the news. Listen to the new yorker radio hour on spotify today from radio lab one of if not the biggest butterfly poaching and smuggling rings in american history. One man's journey to save a tiny little butterfly. Butterfly was going extinct on my watch. We miss this up to disappear forever. That's it for the butterflies entirely upturned his idea of life and death and destruction join us for of bombs and butterflies find radio lab. Where every you get podcasts. The supply chain crisis has plenty of holiday. Shoppers starting early this year even though it's not yet halloween. It's already christmas stocking stuffer time now. If kids are on your holiday list you might notice. The things are looking a little less pink and blue these days in recent years some parents and advocates have pushed to break the binary when it comes to our kids toys last week. Lego the world's largest toymaker announced it would make its toys more gender neutral and earlier this month. The state of california passed a law requiring large retailers to display toys and childcare items in gender neutral ways i spoke with elizabeth sweet assistant professor of sociology at san jose state university and i started by asking whether she surprised by legos. Recent decision it is a little surprising in that even just five years ago. The toy industry was really resistant to making these kind of changes. They were really interested. More in running the categories for boys for girls rather than deconstructing them so. It is a little surprising to see them. Make this commitment but on the other hand. I think it's not surprising that we look at where society is and the conversations were having about gender. You know. I think the toy industry is only playing. Catch up and recognizing that it's not really profitable anymore to rely so heavily on gender stereotyping So it's a kind of a yes and no. Let's talk about gender stereotyping toys because this goes to the heart of your research. And i think it's one of those things that we think of as always true right just always true that there were girls toys and boys toys but you actually show that there's change over time. Yeah absolutely so in. My research examined toy catalogs on from the twentieth century to try to understand how toys marketed historically particularly in regards to gender but also regards to raise and so What i found in this research that historically toys were a lot less gendered than they were in the twenty first century and also that there was a lot of variation over time the extent of gender marketing in in the ways in which gender coating accomplished but as we see today those historic shifts in gender marketing were really connected to larger ships that were happening in society in terms of cultural beliefs about gender and in the structures of gender inequality in the adult world. So i think you know now. We're in a moment where there's a lot of contestation around gender so that doesn't surprise me that we're seeing this play out in the world of children's toys but people tend to think this is something that's always been this way and that's just really not the case. Historically toys were much less likely to be gendered than they are today as a parent. And i've got my eldest is nearly twenty now and i gotta say over those two decades. One of the phrases. I've picked up. Is you know before you're a parent. You're sociologist and you think that it's all about how children are reared and after you have children your geneticists and you're like nope. They just showed up like this this one. This one may be much less than my control than i think so. Help me to understand what what's at stake here. I mean i just will say my nephew is gonna pick up anything and turn it into a sword even if you never give him a sword to play with. It's really hard to tease out. The effects of any one thing on kids when kids are born into a world where everything is gender coated gender. Categorization is one of the most primary categorisations that we make as humans. And you know all of these categorisations carry this heavy set of cultural beliefs and stereotypes around them. So you know by the time kids or three or four. They have been exposed. They've been swimming in the sea of gender stereotypes so when we look at a child and see them. Kind of responding to these stereotypes. Perhaps it's not surprising. But there's a lot of really excellent work in the field of developmental psychology that finds that kids preferences and interests really are shaped by these products. And if you label something for boys or for girls it affects how kids feel about it. And whether they think it's appropriate for them. Is it surprising that girls tend to prefer pink when everything all their products or paying. If you give people one choice. They're gonna choose that right so But but i think what you what we find. Is that if you give kids a much. Broader selection of choice and if there aren't heavy social costs and Potential social benefits choosing particular traces. Other than kids are much more likely to. You're you're much more likely to see the diversity of interests that kids have also noticed. There is maybe this is as you just pointed out the issue of social costs that gender fluidity engine neutrality across toys and play interest. seems to be sufficiently well or maybe not sufficiently but it is rewarded or at least not punished for girls who make gender-neutral or what we would think of as gender fluid choices into preferences we tend to think of as males so you know my seven year old really liking blaze and the monster machines. Everybody's down for that. No problem plays in the monster machines for the seven year old girl but the gender fluidity from male to female the idea of my nephew wanting to carry around a baby doll. Oh that gets police and people will take the doll out of his hand. The line between Sort of girls toys and everything else has always been much sharper than the line between boys toys and gender neutral in fact historically like boys toys in gender-neutral really hard to distinguish. Sometimes you know in terms of color schemes and things like that But i do think that boys are sanctioned much more heavily for transgressing those on gender norms and and that's a really big thing to worry about because you know the toys that promote social skills that promote empathy and carrying those are marketed. Almost exclusively two girls. And yet you know go onto. Parents bay You know compassionate care are just human characteristics that are beneficial to our society so relegating those characteristics only girl is problematic. And you know in the same way. I think toy lines that have tried to expand femininity. You know making stem toys. Pink for girls That's problematic to because again. It suggests that girls are fundamentally different and incapable of just doing science sciences not gender so why the gender it to appeal to two girls what moves corporations to to make these kinds of decisions Is it legislative action. Like the recent bill in california or is it marketing pressure from parents and caregivers.

david ramnik jilani cobb Jill lepore vincent cunningham elizabeth sweet bill mckibben toymaker san jose state university Lego gm california swimming
"david ramnik" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"david ramnik" Discussed on The Takeaway

"And affiliates price and coverage match limited by state law. I'm david ramnik in each week on the new yorker radio hour my colleagues and i unpack. What's happening in a very complicated world you'll hear from the new yorkers award-winning reporters and thinkers jilani cobb. On race and justice. Jill lepore on american history vincent cunningham jia tolentino and culture bill mckibben on climate change and many to get the context behind the events in the news. Listen to the new yorker radio hour on spotify. Today.

"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"I can't. He wasn't meaning to be rude to me. He wasn't dismissing me. We were having an earnest discussion. All of us But i think the unfortunate thing is that if you ask that question i'm convinced of ninety percent of americans you would probably get the same answer this notion of invaders you know in the context of of the shooting and no posso particularly you know in a state where latinos been there for generations centuries right and so As you said the shooting is is the deadliest representation of these stereotypes and and this gaps in the narrative kind of entail right and going back to the meeting that you referred to just now. So you've met with studios talent agencies. Publishers major media outlets What has shopped you from those conversations over the years and as a mexican american. What is it like to be in those rooms demanding answers. We'll i've tried to use my platform in congress I to get in the room because unfortunately These studios in corporations over the years have sometimes locked out a advocates who've worked for many years to change these dynamics and have ignored them or cast them aside. Tried not to take them seriously. And so i knew being in congress that we could get in the room and push this issue and especially after what happened in el paso. I wanted to do that. And i think for the most part. The industry is at a point where it acknowledges that there's a deep problem and so our first thing we were trying to get out of these folks is transparency is to get a clear picture of the exact numbers on representation for example at a particular studio or Publication or media outlet and then from there once someone is transparent with the state of affairs then moving onto working with them to hold him accountable into setting targets for improvement of that representation and some have been better on both those scores than others q. Feel that changes materializing. Have you been in touch for example with the publisher that you mentioned again. You know Who is doing this right. Yeah i do think that That there has been more change particularly over the last year and a half. I will say that. The murder of george floyd was a reckoning for corporate america including the media in terms of how they portray and how they cover different communities And i think things have accelerated not only for the african american community after that. But also for the latino community and hopefully others as well And you know it's hard to find any particular company that is doing an excellent job You don't really find people who were beating the numbers in other words. Latinos are eighteen percent of american society or nineteen percent and the company You know employs nineteen percent of latinos in front of him behind the camera for example or as journalists But there are some that are succeeding and committed to change more than others representative. What he castro. Texas speaking with stefan toiletry more in a moment this new yorker. Podcast is supported by kindle kindle designs builds manages and modernizes the mission critical technology systems that the world depends on every day working side by side with their customers they imagined things differently by forging new strategic partnerships. They unlock new possibilities. Creating a world powered by healthy digital systems alive with opportunity oxygen to innovation and energy to change the world kindle the heart of progress this new yorker podcast is supported by bollandbranch started by a husband and wife team that wanted to create a textile company that cared about the details that would make their products last scott and missy tannen treated their own super soft and expertly crafted signature sheets. The cloud wait super soft. Cetane we've offers uncompromising comfort and are crafted to the highest standards with the perfect balance of weight and breathe ability to pamper warm or cool sleepers through any season to experience an entirely new standard of comfort. Visit bollandbranch dot com. Get fifteen percent off your first set of sheets with promo code. T. n. y. that's b. o. L. l. andbranch dot com promo code. T n y this. Is david ramnik. Every week. i look forward to bringing you the new yorker radio. But i'm also hoping that you will subscribe to the new york and get everything it has to offer. Becoming a subscriber is the best way the only way really to make sure you don't miss the pulitzer prize winning reporting and some of the best writing in the world from jane mayer and ronan farrow and politics two. Go tolentino eighty smith on contemporary culture to subscribe. Please visit our website. New yorker dot com or new yorker dot com slash radio hour to get home delivery of the magazine and unlimited digital access to everything including daily cartoons. Crossword puzzles are vast archive of ninety five years of issues. And thank you. Thank you for listening and thank you for reading. Your helps make possible everything we do talking about. Data tell us about the two reports on the under a presentation of latinos that the government accountability office will issue Can you share any of its main findings with us. Yeah i mean we've just gotten a preliminary sketch of what their overall findings will show but it's clearer in the title of their report. That latinos are underrepresented in american media. And that there has been almost no change since two thousand fourteen and Where you do have a more of a concentration of latinos It's in the service sector positions within the media industry Rather than as anchors for example or as directors and film or television And so it remains deeply problematic. This challenge of american media Really committing to change and the irony about some of it is hollywood for example considers it and i think most americans consider it a liberal place and a liberal industry but the essential irony there. I think they're they're individuals in hollywood. Who are individually progressive but the system as a whole is actually quite regressive and pretty conservative and And hollywood is actually very exclusionary in fact at least from the data i've seen Hollywood is Less diverse than the oil and gas industry in texas in. So it's got a long way to go in terms of self reflection but also in terms of moving towards actual change in meaningful change right and it's striking to see that there's been very very little change in the past few years but that actually the numbers for for the latinos who work in the service sector have actually increased right. Those are the. That's the only figure that seems to be changing over time. No that's right. And a latinos are still being left out of what many see as the main roles as the front and center rolls the decision making positions The c. suite positions where somebody could really get in there and effect wider change within an organization. And what can we expect from from the report. That will come out in the spring of next year. What's the difference between both. what.

posso george floyd stefan toiletry congress bollandbranch missy tannen L. l david ramnik el paso ronan farrow american society castro jane mayer tolentino pulitzer prize america
"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Com. This is david ramnik. Every week i look forward to bringing you the new yorker radio. But i'm also hoping that you will subscribe to the new york and get everything has to offer. Becoming a subscriber is the best way. The only way really to make sure you don't miss the pulitzer prize winning reporting and some of the best writing in the world from jane mayer and ronan farrow in politics two g tolentino zadie smith on contemporary culture to subscribe please visit our website new yorker dot com or new yorker dot com slash radio hour to get home delivery of the magazine an unlimited digital access to everything including daily cartoons crossword puzzles and our vast archive of ninety five years of issues. And thank you. Thank you for listening and thank you for reading. Your support helps make possible everything we do. This is the new yorker radio hour on david remedy as we continue looking at the american withdrawal from afghanistan and the long shadow of a twenty year war. The new yorkers longtime contributor robin wright joins us on our podcast politics and more. She'll join editor. Dorothy wiccan to talk about the reemergence of isis. That's on politics and more a podcast from the new yorker now to wrap things up this week. I'm joined now by my friend and colleague. Liz means i'm zodda. The new yorkers puzzles and games editor. Liz hey david a couple of weeks ago you may well remember. We played around of namedrop. Our new quiz and i frankly had a humiliating loss to our colleague. No me not that. I'm going to hold a grudge. But but i'm out of the hot seat now because two of our listeners are joining us to play namedrop today. Steve westoff leonie's moses so welcome and thanks for coming to you bo. Thank you for having us. Thank you for doing this. You guys are courageous. David kind of helped us out janet jackson. I won't be so i e exactly. I'm still having you know post traumatic stress syndrome from the last time we played this game. But we're going to go forward. Liz is going to read out a series of clues describing a notable personality in either history or or in contemporary times. And when you know it you're gonna say i got it. Don't say your answer. Say i got it and write it down on a piece of paper then then put your pin down your pencil. Whatever you're writing with liz. You ready okay. Should we do this. Ready round one. This is for six points as part of a nine hundred ninety. Eight april fools day segment on npr. I announced my plan to become an accordion player. Terrible plan anyone five. I can be heard on the soundtracks of crouching tiger hidden dragon and master and commander the far side of the world upkeep gone since two thousand six i've served as united nations messenger of keys a title. I currently share with. Jane goodall stevie wonder and ten others. You're killing me. you're killing me. I think i picked exceptionally just wanted to make a dramatic three points in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine after playing at carnegie hall. I accidentally left my two point five million dollar instrument in the trunk of a cab. David is pantomime clue ear. I think i think i know who it is. Give it a guess the in are you committing not committed. No good keep going okay for two h seven on the recommendation of pablo ca. Sol's of virtuoso of my instrument. I performed at a televised benefa- attended by president kennedy eisenhower. Okay and here's the last clue i've recorded. More than one hundred albums received eighteen grammy awards and recently toward the world performing box. Six solo cello suites on six continents. Go ahead steve. Go ahead steve. I'll guess yo. Ma got it guest right right feel like i should be a little older to play this shot. That's a shot across. The battle is okay. You know somebody who failed miserably. Not not not that. I bring it up very often in conversation only once every five minutes who failed miserably at this game with my colleague last week. How how are you guys feeling you doing all right now. No i feel like i need a rematch. You need a rematch. I don't lose. This is this is luck as much as anything else right now. Really all right here. We go so the next one go headless round two for six points though. I'm not primarily known as an actor my screen credits include a troubled teen on as the world turns and an elevator operator in the steven soderbergh film king of the hill for five my debut solo album which opens with a ringing school bell features interludes in which educator roz baraka who later became. The mayor of newark talks with students about the nature of love for four points that nineteen ninety eight album much of which was recorded at bob. Marley's tuff gong studio in kingston jamaica was the first hip hop record to win the grammy for album of the year. I can tell. I can tell the you're getting the i can see. She's she's closing in on them. I can see it okay. I sampled the ten clans. Can at all be so simple in my song. X factor which in turn was sampled in both drake's nice for what encarta got his. three giant. smile is cutting across the face of ladies. Thank god and how about you are you in ya. I thought i had it with the ninety eight album. And now i mean i keep going okay. Here's for two. I was a founding member of the fuji's along with wycliffe john pros michelle and i sang lead vocals on killing me. Softly are cover of a. Roberta flack hit. Okay steve's got for two years for one my only solo studio album to date which is titled the miscegenation of me has sold sold.

david ramnik ronan farrow tolentino zadie smith Liz Dorothy wiccan Steve westoff leonie traumatic stress syndrome jane mayer robin wright pulitzer prize Jane goodall stevie david president kennedy eisenhower janet jackson David afghanistan new york npr carnegie hall liz
"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

The New Yorker: Fiction

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker: Fiction

"It's an hege. Choi my companies in takanaga. So it's a quick taxi right. She said she gave me a doubtful. Look do you think there's a connection between me not remembering my name and losing my license. I quietly shook my head. I couldn't exactly bring up the story of the shinagawa monkey no. I don't think there's a connection. I said it just sort of popped into my head since it involves your name. She looked unconvinced. I knew it was risky but there was one more vital question i had to ask by the way. Have you seen any monkeys lately monkeys. She asked you mean animals. Yes real live monkeys. I said she shook her head. I don't think i've seen a monkey for years. Not in a zoo or anywhere else. Was the chicago a monkey back to his old tricks or was another monkey using his mo to commit the same crime. A copy monkey or with something else other than a monkey doing this. I really didn't want to think that the shinozuka will monkey was back to stealing names. He told me quite matter-of-factly that having seven women's names tucked inside him was plenty and that he was happy simply living out his remaining years quietly in that little hot springs town and he'd seemed to mean it but maybe the monkey had chronic psychological condition. One that reason alone couldn't hold in check and maybe his illness and his dopamine were urging him to just do it and perhaps all that had brought him back to his old haunts and shinagawa back to his former pernicious habits. Maybe i'll try myself sometime on sleepless nights that random fanciful thought sometimes comes to me. I'll filch the id or the name tag of a woman. I love focus on the laser. Pull her name inside me. An possess a part of her all to myself. What would that feel like. The no. that'll never happen. I've never been deft with my hands and would never be able to steal something that belonged to someone else even if that something had no physical form and stealing it wasn't against the law. Extreme love extreme loneliness ever since then. Whenever i listened to a bruckner symphony i ponder that shinto monkeys personal life. I picture the elderly monkey in that tiny springs town in an attic in a rundown in asleep on a thin futon. And i think of the snacks the keke and the dried squid that we enjoyed as we drank beer together propped up against a wall. I haven't seen the beautiful travel magazine editor. Since then so i have no idea what befell her name after that. I hope it didn't cause her any real hardship. She was blameless after all. Nothing was her fault. I do feel bad about it. But i still can't bring myself to tell her about the xinqiao a- monkey that was rebecca. Curtis reading confessions aficionado ago. A monkey by a rookie mara murakami translated from the japanese. Philip gabriel. the story appeared in the new yorker in june twenty twenty and was included in murakami story collection first person singular which was published by canopic earlier. This year don't don't. This is one of old hollywood's wildest scandals a story about my grandparents film producer welterweight singer and actress. Joan bennett. i'm vanessa hope and i'm karina longworth together with vanity fair and cadence thirteen we'll tell this untold story. A film noir played out in real life. Introducing love is a crime tune in at listen dot vanity fair dot com slash. Love is a crime. Or wherever you get your podcasts. This is david ramnik every week..

takanaga shinagawa Choi chicago mara murakami Philip gabriel Curtis Joan bennett rebecca murakami karina longworth hollywood vanessa david ramnik
"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Support helps make possible everything we do. This is the new yorker radio hour. I'm vincent cunningham. Sitting in for david ramnik. We've been talking today about summer reading. And if you don't have a good book to dig into let me recommend a story that just published in the new yorker. It's called the mom of bold action. By george saunders who is one of the truly great short story writers working now the mom in the title. The mom of action is dealing with an incident. Her son was roughed up on the street. Knocked down by an older man. So here's a scene right by george saunders where the families just into the police station but the sun couldn't identify the suspects. Three of them sat. There are bitten a ticking car. I know i wasn't supposed to be downtown. Derek said i just wanted to try it. Fair enough key said such a good dad. Reasonable man gearhart always fine with well everything. Even this apparently fine. With derek breaking his promise find with some random creep assaulting their kid and walking away scot free. She felt if she was being totally honest. That back at the station keith. Had well not failed them exactly she. She wouldn't go that far but had there been a time back in the old days. When keith the powerful man of the house woulda pulled aside the other powerful man the cop and between them but deal would have been struck and the two freaks would have been quietly outside for a little talk and oops while out there. Had the living shit beat out of them both of them just to be sure well. That wasn't the best that wasn't you know fair or whatever the cheese neither one of those losers was exactly hitting the ball out of the park for the sake of argument. Let's say that keith. The cop choosing to air slightly on the side of proactively had lightly performed lee. Roughed up those two folks. The one who done it wouldn't do it again. The one who hadn't done it well. If in the future he ever considered doing something out of line which he probably would given the life he was leading he think twice net result a safer church street down which a nice kid like. There could walk derek in her mind. Amlie down this old timey church street wave to an elderly couple drinking iced tea on their porch. Go round back lad. Used a tire swing on the old apple tree. The husband said his wife was up. There knitting here reminded us of our own sun now a successful doctor. She said and dropped her yarn ball. Which roll off the portion. The old guy made a joke about his back as he hobbled down the stairs to fetch it. Good people salt of the earth but church treat did not belong to them or to derrick. It belong to those two freaks. Who because freaky or somehow the most powerful players in the whole idiotic deal. My were rejects running the show seriously. It was all backward because nobody wanted to hurt anybody's feelings. Nobody was willing to say what they really thought. Nobody cared enough to take a bold stand for what was right and things kept spiraling downward. They walked to the porch through a pile of leaves which is no fun not today. Today was one more thing they had to do to get to the next not fun thing. Which was dinner. This had happened. A guy had attacked her kid and suffered no consequences whatsoever and was.

george saunders vincent cunningham david ramnik keith gearhart derek Derek lee derrick apple
"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"We end up where we are now I think what was so gallingly obvious. Was that everyone in the. Us government knew exactly what we're talking about here. They knew they they knew that. The afghan government was predatory. They knew that it was a criminal state. They had a name for it. They called it. They called it vice. Vi which stood for vertically integrated criminal. Enterprise that was the name that the pentagon gave to the afghan government. They knew and and yet the thing did not get fixed. And so what was that. And i i guess ultimately it was a lack of political will. It's it's it seems interesting. Where ironic that one of the major american politicians who earlier We'd get up in meetings of the in the situation room and say we just don't have. We don't have a possibility of victory. Here we should get out is joe biden the person on whom the burden of the withdrawal falls and and you can easily argue. Who's responsible for the titanic. Titanic and tragic Screw up at the execution of that withdrawal but if you look at biden's voice in the arguments in the within the obama administration he's a voice telling obama don't listen to the generals don't have a surge get out and now it lands on him. What what has been biden's role in this epic all along. Well i think you're right. I think biden from the beginning was deeply skeptical of the the united states. Attempting anything ambitious in afghanistan. I think he he did believe the president obama got rolled by the generals intimidated by the generals in two thousand and nine. When when obama did the surge. I think there are there are moments where where binding and i think in this case. He was confronted by by richard holbrooke. The special envoy who said we can't we can't leave in even hurry you you understand that mr vice president back in two thousand ten and vice president biden essentially saying out. Get out. we're leaving. i don't care. I don't care about all the on the ground there. Don't bother me with this. The i don't care is Leave a hideous taste in the mouth of history for a long time to come here we are. You know a lot of people say that you know in the end. This will not hurt. Joe biden politically in places like scranton because people who bear the cost of this war who've always borne the cost of this war are in places like scranton and they're happy not to send their kids there anymore. That's right i that that's that's that's that's true. It's a this war was was fought in the war in iraq was fought by nineteen year olds But but i don't. I don't know i anyone watching on television. What has unfolded over. The past week cannot be pleased with the way it was done even if they believed strongly that we needed to leave. And i think that that's gonna stick the the the callousness and the the unnecessary cruelty with which with which the withdrawal was done. I think that'll stick with virtually everyone. It just didn't have to happen this way. Dexter filkins thank you so much. You can read dexter reporting on afghanistan and much more at new yorker dot com. I'm david ramnik and that's our program. I want to thank you for joining us. See you soon. The new yorker radio hour is a co production of wnyc studios and the new yorker. Our theme music was composed performed by merrill barbas of tune yards. This episode was produced by alex. Barron emily boutin ave correo rianne. And corby cala leah. David krosno go fan. And buthe weli louis mitchell. Michelle moses and stephen valentino the new yorker radio hour supported in part by the torino endowment fund..

afghan government biden obama administration Joe biden obama mr vice pentagon scranton richard holbrooke Us afghanistan Dexter filkins david ramnik iraq wnyc studios merrill barbas dexter Barron emily boutin correo rianne corby cala leah
"david ramnik" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"david ramnik" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

"Afghans endanger. He right american effort with focused much as that have been throughout the war on saving american lives not afghan ones and you say that the same discounted value of afghan lives compared to american ones. Have been an effect even during your confinement when your life was considered more valuable than those of the afghan menu are with. Can you talk about how you've seen that division manifest over the years as well as today. Oh it's been you know obvious. And the taliban the afghan see it the amount of security around american basis The amount of risk that like american officials are are willing to take and i don't blame individuals at all in this and then i i'm grateful to for the diplomats and soldiers have been soldiers obviously took enormous risks. But it was. You know it's been clear for twenty years that you know saving american lives. Were more important that the effort to go into afghanistan was about preventing another nine eleven In the top on used that you know they showed afghans. Talk to them about how the american care about. Afghan lives and that play is playing out right now at at at the airport in kabul where where people are desperately to get on the planes there was the horrific scenes of people climbing onto the landing gear some of whom were killed hung on landing gear and their bodies were crushed and this is these are human beings and it will come back to haunt us if we continue to discount at afghan lives in this way. Who will want to be an american ally if this is the way we're going to treat these afghans who helped us for twenty years. Wnyc studios is supported by forward. Know what's crazy waiting months for a ten minute. Doctor's appointment healthcare is backwards but forward is clearing things up by offering primary care that's both surprisingly personal and refreshingly straightforward using the latest tech like in-depth genetic analysis and realtime bloodwork. Their doctors create highly personalized. Easy to understand plans aimed at improving your long term. Health move your health forward today at go. Forward dot com. That's go forward dot com. This is david ramnik every week. Look forward to bringing you the new yorker radio. But i'm also hoping that you will subscribe to the new york and get everything it has to offer. Becoming a subscriber is the best way the only way really to make sure you don't miss the pulitzer prize winning reporting and some of the best writing in the world from jane mayer and ronan farrow on politics. Two go tolentino. zedi smith on contemporary culture to subscribe. Please visit our website new yorker dot com or new yorker dot com slash radio hour to get home delivery of the magazine and unlimited digital access to everything including daily cartoons crossword puzzles and our vast archive of ninety five years of issues. And thank you. Thank you for listening and thank you from reading. Your support helps make possible everything we do. You spent months trying to help your afghan friends. And despite all of your contacts and connections so far to hear his wife and children remain in kabul what can other individuals do if they want the help afghans during this crisis how can they put pressure on the administration or otherwise. Show their desire to support. Afghan people either has been a great outpouring From just strangers. Since i wrote this story. I think there is sort of growing pressure i think most americans want the us troops out of afghanistan. But there is a sense of shame. At how this withdrawal is is being carried out I i don't know. And i'll give you like a the latest update the after. I wrote the story and you know tie here was also trying to contact people in the us embassy in kabul. So i'm not sure what triggered it put. The story runs And then there's an email. The here receives. He gets wednesday morning Again he's living near washington and it's the embassy saying that his family should go to a certain gate at the airport that day And present this email is a pass and if they can get to that gate and presents this email as a pass. His family will be allowed onto the airport We were both elated. The seemed to be a a finally a chance to get into the airport and get on a plane. It was finally a us citizen. You know tech here being able to get the assistance of the us government to get his family out of kabul. His family had been in hiding in their house. The fear all along has been neighbors would inform the taliban that that that house belongs to the journalists who helped the american journalists escape. There've been taliban patrols walking around on the street outside so his family you know gets in a truck. They go to the airport. They make you know close. They have to get out. They walk nearly a mile through these huge crowds. There's taliban gunman the taliban are firing their rifles in the air beating people to control the crowd. They make it they get to atoll on checkpoint. I'm getting these kind of live updates. And here's intermittently talking to his family. They make it through the taleban check point. They aren't identified and they finally get to this gate the gate the american embassy told him to go to an a huge numbers of people waiting and waiting and they wait and at roughly six o'clock. The gate is closed. His his family is calling us and and we managed to to hear actually through you know we managed to get their cell number into some An american who's inside and a translator calls the family and says you know the gates close. You should go wait nearby. They talk about a specific kind of place to wait nearby and the family walks back a mile. They're all exhausted. It's it's you know it's young children and they go to that spot and they wait and they start calling the translator because he doesn't call back you know. They were told that someone would see they would be called and then be brought into the airport and over time they realized that the translators not answering your phone calls and they wait and wait finally. It's nine o'clock at night and taleban curfew has taken effect. It's been about ten hours. I think since they had started and they i agree and we decided that they should go home. It's too dangerous to stay out at night and they go home and so now they're terrified. Their neighbors have seen them leave. They don't trust the americans they you know. Frankly don't trust me. And i'm you know we're going to work at this. We're gonna do everything we can i. I'm touched and amazed by the number of people who've reached out. But i'm just astonished at you know the poor planning poor management of this by our government and they are good individuals in our government. You know who. I think are trying to help but this is just a a debacle. Have they had any more contact From the people they were speaking to at the state department since they were essentially stranded at the airport. No there was no phone number on that email. It was a mass email. There were other families that have been told to go to the same place but you know as the time passed you know one family after the other gave up and left last night so potentially the state her yesterday told all these people to pack their bags expose themselves to their neighbors. Go to the airport.

taleban kabul Wnyc studios david ramnik ronan farrow zedi smith afghanistan jane mayer tolentino pulitzer prize us new york us government american embassy washington
"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"The santa says saturday night because when i started realizes that there's an evil i might be jewish. Might be goals role. Might be my specific family. There is a darkness that the hangs pretty intensely and I want more out of my life. And i wanna i wanna break into the next phase of my life and that's weird so i kept seeing these images of a doorway and there's all this hope enjoy on the other side right frustration anxiety of like sometimes it's literally your holdings baggins like you can't take it all through. It doesn't work. I do not get through this door with all this shit. I know that i wrote songs called. Like how dare you want more we. I'm just going to ask you about this very dead song. That song came from letting some anger towards My parents because i found some things out. And when i started to really look at their relationship in our home life and you know nothing horrible but just stuff which i'm like god you put this crap on me and i got to live with it. It's the reason why i've always traveled. And you know. After some time. I started to say no. These are human characters who want more you know and i'm not talking about money not talking about a bigger house. Obviously i'm talking about more. You know more out of your life in the things you really desire so much darkness wrapped up that for people. There's no amount of sort of work success that that ever that ever makes one feel better about these big rubs in their personal life. They're just separate and and they're two separate. You worked with bruce springsteen on one of these songs and he is talked about. I mean lateness careers. Talked about battling with depression for year after year and comes and goes but he's he didn't really confront it until middle age Is that useful to you to talk to other musicians. Who are older than you. Not just about the music but about the experience of this seeming ideal creative life successful creative life and the realities of when you come home from the performance. Remarkably important to me. I would i would call it. Like soul. saving. Bruce patio credibly of touched on a little bit here. And they're incredibly important vigors in my life because you know there's a lot of people who have great careers and there's a lot of people who have really kind of like great robustly vulnerable personalise. There are very few people who can hold both and if you're out there trying to have both Which i which i am. You know certain shame that even comes in saying that. How do you want more menu. Better find some some some people to believe in. I'm talking with jack. Antonoff and his new record is called. Take the sadness out of saturday night morning. This is david ramnik every week. I look forward to bringing you the new yorker radio. But i'm also hoping that you will subscribe to the new york and get everything has to offer. Becoming a subscriber is the best way the only way really to make sure you don't miss the pulitzer prize winning reporting and some of the best writing in the world from jane mayer and ronan farrow and politics..

santa Bruce patio vigors bruce springsteen depression Antonoff david ramnik jack new york pulitzer prize jane mayer ronan farrow
"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"I'm david ramnik jack. Antonoff is a very busy man in the midst of the long pandemic antonoff co wrote and co produced. Not one but two albums with taylor. Swift and one of those folklore won the grammy for album of the year. Antonoff was also hard at work producing other albums. For lord lana del rey and claro all of which are out this year and the producer also has a record of his own coming out. The album is called. Take the sadness out of saturday night. And it's his third with the ban bleachers. It's the kind of music you want from jersey.

Antonoff david ramnik jack lord lana del rey grammy claro taylor jersey
"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Radio hour. I'm david ramnik some years back. During the obama administration. I spent a lot of time interviewing secretary of state. John kerry for a profile that we published at the end of two thousand fifteen. He was trying to talk down. Tensions between israel and the palestinians and to broker a peace in syria. Carry seem to relish. Jobs that others might think absolutely impossible. He is considered relentless. I wrote in two thousand fifteen sometimes to a fault. There's no concealing his eagerness to make a deal to a critic. His style is reminiscent of the.

david ramnik obama administration John kerry syria israel
"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"The new yorker radio hour co-production wnyc studios and the new yorker. Welcome to the new yorker radio hour. I'm david ramnik. We just had the primary election for the mayor of new york city and the winter. The very likely next mayor is democrat. Eric adams he's the borough president of brooklyn in a former state senator but most importantly in this race adams was for more than two decades a police officer and perhaps no debate in our society. More divisive than questions about policing and here adams holds a truly unique position his youth. He was beaten by police when he joined the nypd himself. He was a firebrand in an advocate for black officers. But now he's a sympathetic figure to the police department. A kind of law and order candidate he rebuked other candidates who spoke of severely cutting police budgets and he made the national spike in violent crime. A big part of his rhetoric. Assuming that eric adams wins the general election which is overwhelmingly. Likely he'll take over a city that faces multiple overlapping crises. That my dawn. Any politician. Mr adams you there this i am what you do is you. Go to the voice memo you turn it on you start a voice memo and start recording and just hold the phone up to your ear as if we're talking on the phone number through the interview holding this phone. Call that sucks. Well you know life is hard elected. Man no exactly. You're the one that wanted to be. Have the second heart office in the whole country. Now if you want. I know one woman who'd be pleased.

eric adams wnyc studios david ramnik adams the new yorker new york city nypd brooklyn Mr adams police department
"david ramnik" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"david ramnik" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"Only in this country. Twenty five years ago a week from tonight cova permitting. The tokyo olympics will officially open and next week is the twenty-fifth anniversary of one of the iconic moments and modern olympic history. It was july nineteenth nineteen ninety-six boxing legend muhammad ali emerged in front of an unknowing crowd in atlanta. While already in the grips of parkinson's he was the champ and remained a singular figure in our world that moment and atlanta one of the many that ken burns will explore and a series of virtual events celebrating his upcoming documentary. Muhammad ali can burns remains with us and can talk about the decision to make muhammad ali. A ken burns subject. You know he is just one of the most people. Throw the word conic around. He's mythical he's he's larger than life. He is as american as walt whitman wanted us to be filled with contradictions and undertow. And all of the things that you look for and you know obviously is as he was proclaimed the greatest athlete of the twentieth century. He's seen his life seem to touch on all the major issues in the second half of the of the twentieth century issues. That are still with us. Some of which we were talking about before but certainly race and And civil rights and religion and politics and war and now me to other things he he just seems to be at an intersection of that. It says As interesting a person as i've ever come across now on. Have that dinner party with lincoln and louis armstrong and muhammad ali. In this moment that. You're talking about. Brian is really just so special. Dick ebersol you know. Kept it a secret from everybody. President of nbc sports and pushed it through against some folks that were still a little bit raw about him and it was all presumed. That janet emmons the olympian Would like the torch and she takes it up there and then out emerges this now surprising to us frail and shaking beset by parkinson's greatest of all most beautiful of all athletes and doing it and something was released in the writer. David ramnik in our film says you know that it may be possible that human beings can can change and get better. You know we began. We sort of let go of our whatever we had built up And all was was an outpouring love which matched the love. He had for us all along and had been right about so many of the things all along is one of the great moments in all of sports as difficult as it was to watch. It permitted him to be kind of liberated in the midst of this encasing disease and that helped us liberate ourselves from the kind of binary nasa everything. We do good bad. Oh the war you know. Then he's my enemy or he's for this thing and i'm against it Joint changes religion to the nation of islam. It's a it's a wonderful an utterly american story and There lots really great documentaries. I should say off the bat. And sarah burns my daughter. David mcmahon my son in law. And i we've made a few films like the central park. Five and jackie robinson. We've been wanting to tell a story. That was soup to nuts from boyhood birth than jim crow louisville kentucky to death by parkinson's not that many years ago and all that he represented all that he did and all that he came to me. I mean it's i the film. I just finished. Brian as you know is a ernest. Hemingway and that didn't end to well. This guy dies the most beloved person on his planet which is something maybe all of us should think about tilting towards final question. Can we've talked about How troubled you are about our nation and our world right now. We've talked about mr franklin franklin. We've talked about mr ali Just a quick final question about your process. How many future topics do you walk around with every day on that list. We all keep in our head. How many topics ahead are you normally watching asking for a friend who's still stuck on country music. Well i can get you. They all sing. I'll sing if you want me to brian. We have so many projects already underway. You know if i were given thousand years. I wouldn't run out of projects in american history. I'm not going to give a thousand years. So i'm kind of loading up and we're working on ali and benjamin franklin some of those scary conversations you're having with don and bill. A second ago are echoed in our film that we're editing starting tomorrow on the. You're not starting the editing but continuing it on the us and the holocaust what we did and what. We didn't do what we knew and what. We didn't know what we should have done. All of those horrible questions History of the american revolution. That'll be a real big thing in time for the two hundred fiftieth The first non-american topic on leonardo da vinci. We're doing a history of Emancipation exodus or an african american life reconstruction but what preceded and followed it. Lbj and the great society as we watch voting rights and other aspects of that extraordinary legislative accomplishments Become undone and it's not enough time to do them all and they're all rhyming in the present as twain wednesday you know. There's there's history doesn't repeat itself but it rhymes and it's it's scary and it's fascinating and when you use the word process. I realized that. In some ways i carry still despite these fraught times. I've kind of fundamental optimism because the process the telling of these stories helps take a little bit is. These are unprecedented times. And yet you can find aspects of precedents in in the places that we've been before particularly the difficult places before and we've gotten out and i and i have a kind of faith and confidence in us the us. Thanks for the thanks for the work. Thanks for the preview. Ken burns as a certain network. Likes to say all of his work so much of his work made possible by viewers. Like you can guess tonight. Always a pleasure. We'll do it again. Thank you sir. Coming up for us. It is germany's deadliest national disaster.

muhammad ali Ken burns parkinson Dick ebersol janet emmons atlanta David ramnik sarah burns David mcmahon walt whitman louis armstrong Brian olympics mr franklin franklin boxing tokyo mr ali olympic nbc jackie robinson
"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Things you write about is how at various times she tried to get an attorney. But that law was somehow disqualified and the judge said that britney spears doesn't somehow have the legal capacity to hire her own councils. What what happened there. This is one of the most striking facets of the story when we assess this question of you know. Does she genuinely want to be out of this situation. How much autonomy does she really have. How high functioning is she. What we've seen from almost day. One of this conservative ship is britney. Spears has fought to get counsel other than the coin of court appointed lawyer that she has and she has done things like you know jumping out of a car and running into a hotel to rendezvous with someone who would give her a phone so she could call an attorney. She's had a secret meeting that. We chronicle in the steam room of a different hotel. Where a contact pastor a cell phone in a ziplock bag and then she tried to use that to get to lawyers and on multiple occasions she's been thwarted in that case Jamie fears her. Father became aware of that. Contraband phone and the phone was taken from her. Ronan farrow and gm tolentino. Our conversation continues in a moment. Wnyc studios is supported by an is next. One hundred series celebrates big thinkers and creative problem solvers. Who engineer ambitiously each week. They're publishing something new about the technology shaping our future and the engineers behind it all. You can explore the series at anti dot com slash perspectives. This is david ramnik every week. Look forward to bringing you the new yorker radio. But i'm also hoping that you will subscribe to the new york and get everything has to offer. Becoming a subscriber is the best way the only way really to make sure you don't miss the pulitzer prize winning reporting and some of the best writing in the world from jane mayer and ronan farrow on politics two..

ronan farrow britney spears Wnyc studios Spears britney david ramnik Jamie gm new york pulitzer prize jane mayer
"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Support for the new yorker. Radio hour comes from wise. The smartest way to move money around the world. If you send money abroad with your bank do you know what exchange rate. You're getting chances are. It's not the one you'd see on google banks and other providers usually markup the rate to make extra money with wise. It's different you always get the real midmarket exchange rate when you send money to eighty countries the wise account. Also lets you hold up to fifty five currencies and convert them instantly join over ten million people and businesses and try wise for free at wise dot com slash radio our wnyc studios supported by health. Pass by clear remember when your workplace was full of energy and employees. Now there's a way to safely get your team back together and back to business. Health pass by clear. paper vaccine. Cards are flimsy and insecure. Health pass by clear allows your team to securely and easily linked their vaccination information directly in the clear app. Clear can help get your employees back together. More safely easily and quickly learn more at clear. Me dot com slash health. Pass clear me dot com slash health pass. This is david ramnik. Every week i look forward to bringing you the new yorker radio. But i'm also hoping that you will subscribe to the new yorker and get everything it has to offer. Becoming a subscriber is the best way. The only way really to make sure you don't miss the pulitzer prize winning reporting and some of the best writing in the world from jane mayer and ronan farrow in politics. Two go tolentino zadie. Smith on contemporary culture to subscribe. Please visit our website. New yorker dot com or new yorker dot com slash radio hour to get home delivery of the magazine and unlimited digital access to everything including daily cartoons. Crossword puzzles are vast archive of ninety five years of issues. And thank you. Thank you for listening and thank you for reading. Your support helps make possible everything we do there. She is hi guys. good morning. Good morning david. Nomi fry writes about television in social media and pop culture in all their infinite forms and lately. She's been writing about what's happening on reality television. So we're gonna talk about reality. Tv in general and it's got kind of brought an interesting history. What was the one. That i grabbed you. Probably you know the very the very first one was when i was a young teen and it was probably the real world which you know. Grab everyone i think and was on. Mtv and it was the first show that kind of took the premise of let's put of these. You know these seven strangers As famously seven strangers pick to live in a house and have their lives taped and it was. It was fascinating so yeah so that was the first show that grabbed me and now here we are today and actually we've just hit a kind of historical milestone in the history of reality television. Which is that. The kardashians after twenty seasons has finally come to an end the last episode aired just about two weeks ago and i do want to talk about the credentials because they were probably the most influential reality television show To present to us the gambit that everything is worthy of documentation. There's a lot of talk about salads and there's a lot of talk about and i feel fine. My cell phone. Where's my cell phone. There's a lot of discussion about that. Yes there is something calming good. And i think this is generally true of reality television but certainly of the kardashians of kind of letting go of your own dramas intentions stresses and turning to someone else's right so if i'm watching cooking video on youtube that's doing that trick for me while this is doing this for you and for that there. Another very beloved show In the great british baking show known as the great british bake off. Everybody is so nice is so nice to each other. There is a very kind of By now famous moment where one of the contestants because quite upset because his baked alaska didn't set he throws in the trash known in england of course as the been and everyone is very shocked. He threw it in the bin. Say this guy has fantastic hair to his name is c. Let's let's click on that. Did you ever put me. They'll sponge no no. Did you have a problem with the ice cream yes. So where's your sponge in that we could have tested that. I know i didn't cope with the situation very well. I think you know that it got the better off you. It was just a moment of your life that you want to forget. Regret it because you know we all make mistakes and we would have liked to see that sponge. We would have liked to have seen the sponge but he threw it in the been devastated devastated. It was devastating moment. What else should. I take a look at it. The real housewives franchise. It's going on fifteen years now. It's incredibly successful and it's just It's just a cornucopia of you know rich ladies who clyde each other right. I have a theory though on house. is it it. It seems to me because everybody misbehaves in the screaming. each other. pull each other's hair and do things that seem pretty atavistic. And it seems like a way to watch something so that you feel superior to them that they're acting very badly and then therefore you feel okay. I'm i'm not that i'm not doing that. I'm behaving better than that. I think it's i think that's definitely true of reality. Television in general of a lot of reality television where. It's probably not the nicest thing to admit that this is something that we would like to see but yeah but it's like going to see like a bach. It like going to the boxing ring right going to see the fight. Like what's that about right fair enough fair enough. I mean just you know but there's also sympathy there david there's also sympathy barich. Not just i think so. Yes there's there's you find yourself feeling identifying yourself would some of them so a good way. I think to enter into this universe. Is the real house of salt lake city air during the pandemic and my colleague doreen saint felix wrote a really excellent Tv column on it and one of the things she pointed out in it which i agree that it's it's interesting to see how the real housewives franchise has kind of like marched with the times right so there are some kind much more kind of oh karate discussions of race that are starting to enter into the show which is quite interesting and okay so there are two characters. One is a black Pentecostal woman and she is a leader in her church. And her nemesis. The season is gen. Shaw who is polynesian and muslim and the clip. We're going to listen to john. Shaw is recounting the skirmish they had to her husband. Who is black.

jane mayer ronan farrow doreen saint felix david ramnik david Shaw ninety five years england new yorker Nomi fry fifteen years eighty countries two characters youtube google wise dot com One john polynesian fifty five currencies
"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"david ramnik" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Welcome to the new yorker radio hour. I'm david ramnik will back this hour. At the protests of last summer and the ways that america has changed or not in the year since in the weeks that followed the killing of. George floyd the new yorker published an essay about another uprising. One that followed another tragic death and it took place more than fifty years ago. We grew up in a two story house. In the brownsville section of brooklyn the house had a balcony and then the summer we were able to seep out on the balcony in the cooling hair. The essay is by hilton. All's a staff writer and a winner of the pulitzer prize hilton's essays called my mother's dreams for her son and all black children. The brownsville summer of nineteen sixty seven was like every other brooklyn summer. i'd experienced stultifying. Relief was sought at the nearby betsy head pool and that the fire hydrants. That reckless boys opened with giant wrenches. The cold water made the black asphalt blacker in the black knights gossip floated down the street from our neighbors small front porches and from stoops flanked by big concrete planters full of dusty plastic flowers nursing a beer or pepsi. The grownups discussed far off places. Like vietnam so and so son had come back from there all messed up and now he was on the methadone. Then the conversation would shift to the kids. Every kid in our neighborhood was everyone else's kid prying caring is where everywhere. Sometimes the conversation stopped but just for a moment as girls in summer. Dresses past men and women alike looked longingly at those girls for different reasons as they amble down the street pretending to pay no mind to the fine built boys who call to them from a distance. Hilton you grew up in brooklyn with your sisters and brother and your mother who had immigrated from barbados. Can you tell me about that environment and your mother. She was politically active right. Yes Even though i don't think she would ever say that she was a activists she just kind of was active She was a person who to the found political in the everyday meaning believed very strongly in the possibility of the black family and doing better and having better. My mother was a proud member of mary. Mcleod bethune 's national council of negro women and attended martin luther king junior's nineteen sixty three march on washington. When she reminisced about that march it was with vividness. That made her children feel shy sometime in the long ago. Ma had been part of history non-violent organization picket lines and marches all these strengthened a mother's conviction that inclusion worked that civil rights worked that the black family could work especially if welfare officers and other professionally concern people journalists and sociologists say paid attention to what a black mother built rather than to how she failed hilton in nineteen sixty seven. Something happened. that really changed the neighborhood. There was an uprising or what was then called riot and it started in a way. That was all too familiar. what happened. There was a I the demonstration then A riot When a young boy named richard ross was shot in the bat By as it turned down a black police officer because it had been thought or soon that he had mugged an older white man and that event that murder precipitated a two day period of discord and sadness standing by my mother's living room window. I tried tentatively to ask her why our world was burning burning. She gave me a forbidding. Look boy be quiet so you can survive. Her eyes seem to say. Did i want to be another richard. Ross one of the hundred thousand. Richard roth out there so many questions. I could not ask among them. Had our desire for community also been reduced to rubble and ash the chaos that night it would last two days before life. Went back to normal was more vivid. Burgeoning writers mind than what i could not see our mother's vivid memories of king's promise of a promised land. Where was the.

Richard hilton david ramnik George richard ross Ross washington two day brooklyn richard last summer Mcleod One two days barbados hundred thousand vietnam council Hilton two story house
"david ramnik" Discussed on The Agostinho Zinga Show

The Agostinho Zinga Show

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"david ramnik" Discussed on The Agostinho Zinga Show

"That was an issue as well so that might be part of the problem that might be of what it is big shakeup. It could just be because you know defending the heat and he kind of wanted to be seen to performative who knows but regardless interesting Last bits here says the further permission of miss winter. Seventy one comes. After she was chris. Berman of own style for fostering a workplace silent we would have color the move also comes as a risk by two years of whispers gossip columns that industry standard parties that she would be leaving folk was. She's never gonna she's gonna die on that table offense godwin. She doesn't anytime soon but she's definitely going to have to be pulled out there against a worse as he had rubber reggie lynch the condense chief executive many support clear statement on tuesday saying emma's appointment represents a pivotal moment for as ability to stay ahead of in connecting with a new audience while cultivating mentoring. Some of today's brightest talents in the industry has made one of the world's also i wanted to dismiss distinguished executives. Dhanuka is one of knesset publications. That is no windows purview. David ramnik that we don't care about new yorker So yeah who's this step down. Shortly after the corporate construction all the is winter free powerful additional let the company see already angelique chunk. I'm the head of oh china. Two decades step down last tuesday vote. China has been one of top former titles won the rare. Us media brands has gained luckily in china. Soon after mccain's exit Christina op the head of vote. Germany announced her departure. Also this month. The head of vokes spain. Eugene de la torre. there are toriente of said that she'll be leaving the company so plus free big people there right. Vogue china jemmy vogue spain. Edison's all step down to did. Changes come as a company grapples of declining sales and stuff. On risk of issues of diversity and inclusion the company has also had to contend with the shaking the shrinking base of print readers which has led to layoffs and paycuts yet but anna winter. Sorry i didn't get paid that. She bet she did not by interesting to see how that goes on. I'm sure there are some who have been you know have got who benefited greatly from the shakeup of us. Who haven't benefited at all and some who could be continue to be looked over. Overlooked some respects because fashion is a hell of an industry to make in but again interesting Shakeup abi inches to see how this evolves over time. Okay mic sunless. Whilst we have here is interesting. Stories is from page six. I just saw this this morning as the f. in is going on here..

reggie lynch Dhanuka David ramnik angelique chunk Berman godwin Eugene de la torre china emma chris spain anna winter Christina mccain Vogue Edison China Germany Us