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"david remnick" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:42 min | 2 weeks ago

"david remnick" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Welcome to the New Yorker radio hour I'm David Remnick over the last week we've seen some remarkable headlines about cities and states promising real action on police violence and racial justice promises that would have seemed impossible just a few weeks ago Hey George Floyd's funeral in Houston the Reverend al Sharpton said he was encouraged by how white people have responded with demands for change well it could have been anybody but the reaction was not anything because somewhere I read in the bar the guard said he would pour out his spirit among all flesh and that's why when I heard them talking about they never thought they'd see young white margin like the margin that all over the world has seen grand children of slave master tearing down the slave masters back here over in England and put it in the river while my spirit upon all flesh I've seen whites walking past curfews straight black lives matter and no justice no peace among all finish it may be that the shock and horror of Floyd's death before our eyes on video has finally shaken millions of white people from years of drift and complacency for a long time Suzanne plastic has been talking to white people about the reality of entrenched racism she's a trainer with the racial equity institute and a co founder of that group Suzanne plus expo but the new Yorkers Dorothy Wickenden so I want to put our cards on the table right away and point out that you're a white woman from the south and I'm a white woman from the north and that will that will inform our discussion how did you become engaged with this kind of work it's very difficult to really capture what all the touch points were about to be a little white in a linear I can tell you essentially I've found early in my life a a real sadness for people who were hurt who were harmed who were living in poverty after the birth of my children that came into sharper focus and as they enter school it came into still sharper focus as I saw they they contrast between what was available to my children and what was not available two children of color often not always often so it seems to me at that time that's the way we dealt with the child who came to school and flip flops in January was to provide shoes and it seemed to me at the time that provision of needs was very very important and it is important is not unimportant but as you do that you soon realize that you have done nothing to prevent those needs from occurring again so I moved from that very charity approach into our policy needs to be changed we have got to do something in a larger way to get at the root causes of course you don't do that very long before you realize that even one policy changes that there's something in our culture a narrative that continues to pull back those successes that you have and I had the great gift of coming to a training that explained to me that this one was found by the people tested at the time that that thing was racism and then we decided to form the racial equity institute and to to do the work of bringing an analysis to people that would make them more effective in the work they do many companies offer diversity training but but but you know those sessions you have almost no effect if any on how white Americans go about their lives so maybe you could talk a little bit about what makes the tactics and mission of the racial equity institute different yeah we don't do diversity training we don't do prejudice reduction all those things have their values I'm sure but even if you were able to make people more sensitive and and reduce prejudice and bigotry and and certain racial prejudice you then send them out into a world that is operating from a structure that promotes the supremacy of white people that ensures that whatever you do is gonna disproportionately advantage white people even when that's not your intent and that division is just it continues to work well because we don't understand we don't understand where it's coming from and we continue to put it in the context of of mean spirited racially charged people and statements and acts those things are by they're incredibly bad and wrong but it's important to understand that racism happens and this is the biggest lesson of my life without my intent that we are set up for it to happen and so I have to understand that I've been a fit from that whether I want to as a white person or not I have to further understand it doesn't make me a bad immoral person it makes me a beneficiary of a system set up hundreds of years ago to benefit people who have come to be called white it can you give us an example of how a well meaning organization you've worked with determined to pursue racial diversity and all of the best values has been taken aback by what you have to tell them well I think most of them are taken aback but we recall some years ago to a public private partnership a school actually that had been created to be a multi cultural school they have all the very best intense they however we're having a very difficult time recruiting and retaining students and faculty of color so the night before we did our training the core of the school all white took us out to dinner and they began to tell us all the things they had done to become multi cultural and it was a long list they would bring in one of their favorite things was to have what we call the international day you know to bring in people from men the cultures and and have them share their culture and their cultural ways and that you know they would they brought in everybody in addition to that they did many things that they thought would be appealing to people of color they would do spoken word they would do to stepping that you you name it they did it and are very wise director Deena Hayes Greene said to them at the end of this let me so what did you do for white people and their job dropped because you see the culture that was keeping them from attracting and retaining students and faculty of color was the one culture they had not examined.

David Remnick
"david remnick" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

12:21 min | 3 months ago

"david remnick" Discussed on KCRW

"The New Yorker radio hour I'm David Remnick we're in a time now of the terrible uncertainty in just about every aspect of our national life not least in our politics with the pandemic brings us to a greater sense of common good really remains to be seen some of the business community and on the right are now arguing that widespread death may be preferable to the economic depression that follows from containing the virus and president trump meanwhile is insisting that the country be brought back to work by Easter and all through this there's a presidential primary race still going on and we have no idea how the pandemic will affect the November election to get some insight on all of this I called up the new Yorkers Washington correspondent Susan Glasser Susan hi hi David now you've called this crisis the most clarifying of Donald trump's presidency what do you mean by that well look I mean all crises reveal and what we're seeing is the man in full with all of his limitations his character quirks and the strengths and weaknesses of his administration and by sort of waging war on the institutions of government as we know it for the last few years creating and constructing a White House that runs or doesn't run eight unlike any other of any Republican or democratic presidents those are the tools that he brings to this most unusual battle and you couldn't imagine a president personalizing a crisis with a virus but somehow that's that's where we are that's where we are the trump show applies even to the pandemic what do you mean by personalizing this crisis well look at one of these days me press conferences that he's now been holding in the White House briefing room and what do you hear you hear the word hi an awful lot and you you hear a president whose dramatizing this as if it's something that is affecting him and him alone he talks over and over again about how awful the corona virus test was that he had to take which is literally consists of a swab it was shoved up his nose and you know the same thing with the economy I had the best economy it was a growing great it was the best in world history can you believe this happened nobody nobody expected this to happen and on and on and on it goes and it's this sort of very narcissistic kind of stream of consciousness approach to a crisis it's really well documented that the president played down the seriousness of this pandemic for a long time and do we have any sense of why that is you know this week was the one month anniversary of the president's first substantive treat about D. corona virus on February twenty fourth he said essentially this is not coming to the USA in a big way and we're all going to be fine and it's it's not going to really happen here February twenty fourth that was more than a month after his own government had been warning him that steps needed to be taken that weren't taken so there might be in the future some sort of a nine eleven style commission to look at why that was but I think you know with trump sometimes the answer is pretty transparent and in this case I think the answer is pretty transparent he didn't want anything to interrupt his reelection campaign plan which entirely hinged on the strength of the US economy and also the strength of the U. S. stock market which it hit its highest point in February and that's the risk of personalizing government where his overwhelming need for our personal political resurrection after his impeachment and trial absolutely over where the increasingly dire warnings that it seems he was getting from inside his government work outside this kind of reaction which may be understandable for an ordinary citizen at least temporarily seems to me inexcusable for the leader of a of a of a country that he rather than face the facts of a growing hurricane of cases illnesses death the shortages in hospitals reacts the way he is by saying we're going to be back by E. stor and this has to be enormously confusing to so many people in the United States and is likely to cause behavior that leads to tragic consequences David that's the essence of it that's so striking is that in the end when the catastrophe came and hit trump it was one that had to do with public health and where his slim Flannery and narcissism and insistence upon creating constructing and projecting alternate realities would are colliding with armed you know empirical reality in such stark way you know the masses the mass look at those charts look at those numbers X. number of people are sick two weeks from now three weeks from now X. number of people are going to be suffering and dying we have X. number of ventilators and so I think that really hit home for many people this Tuesday when the president in the face of that overwhelming scientific and empirical reality was simply declaring we'll for a walk I insist that you know I would like to reopen the country by Easter and how people packed into pews and up it's it's painful to watch it because it gets to the essence of trump and why he's different than all other presidents of yours in my lifetime it's not about ideology it's about the unique flaws in his character and and for me that's what makes him so potentially dangerous in this particular kind of a crisis we've got truth tellers whatever flaws you may ascribe to the overtime but you have truth tellers like Anthony Fauci and Andrew Cuomo we're speaking straight to the president how is it from your understanding of what's going on inside how are their conversations with the president going are they reaching him at any level does he just ignored them does he push back how was how those conversations going well it seems to be almost a radic in the extreme based on the accounts that you've heard from Sauchie and Cuomo in various interviews they both claim that the president does listen at times that you know the the sort of abrasive attacking personality that when you when I observe in his public performances is not always the case in private and you see about with trump who has a sort of love hate relationship with Cuomo right he often speaks of the fact that well we get along really well and then ten minutes later he'll attack him publicly and suggest that New York state is going to suffer in terms of federal aid because they're not being quote nice to him and again they have the problem of needing to speak the truth maintain their own credibility with the public and with their own teams but at the same time we all know that if you alienate trump too much you know that is a real risk both throw you out the door well and again the public safety New York state in the case of Cuomo and the country in the case of Sauchie to a certain extent involves them not having some catastrophic rift with the president and so that's a very very delicate line that they have to tread and it it really is so worrisome we've already seen the president publicly attacking numerous governors mostly of heavily democratic states you know he went after governor Pritzker in Illinois he's gone after Cuomo and various points he he's attacked many figures who are crucial to the actual on the ground response to the pandemic and this is one result in terms of the pandemic there's another in terms of public opinion Gallup released a poll which found that the president had eight forty nine percent approval rating which is high for him with sixty percent approving of his handling of the crisis what what's driving his number so high assuming that everything that you've said is true well that's right it is a remarkable phenomena SO two things we've seen since the beginning of the trump presidency number one news about Donald Trump are remarkably fixed and immune to almost any kind of external changer shock and so no matter what trump is said and done over the last few years you know he's had this core of a little bit more than forty percent of the country in these opinion polls that have supported him and then a small group of waivers and now what you're seeing in that Gallup survey is remarkable essentially the people who have gone back and forth on trump that small number of people who remain undecided have swung back to approving of his conduct in office last year's you don't see Democrats changing their mind about the president and I think that's the other thing as far as the politics of this moment go that is notable which is that you have essentially blue America and red America very partisan and divided country right now there at least initially experiencing the pandemic in a very different blue state red state way and so you have the big cities that are predominantly democratic on the two coasts are being hit first and hardest by this and trump seems to be exacerbating those divisions that already exist in the country with how he's talking about this and some of his rhetoric about wanting to return to normalcy and how it's not really that big of a deal essentially are playing almost overtly too small less populated states in the middle of the country that so far have not been hard hit he actually mentioned the other day yeah Brasco and Idaho on you know they can go back to work and so you see the president clean off of those political divides in our country in a time when others would speak of national unity he seems to be speaking and encouraging division are there any Republican senators were breaking with the president we see Lindsey Graham in a in a sense Lindsey Graham arguing with this approach that the cure can't be worse than the problem yes but to me what's striking as it has been throughout the trump presidency is V. deafening whack of public pushback from Republican senators Republican house members I think that's the most remarkable thing where you are hearing some rumblings and some pushback is among Republican governors and officials at the state and local level whose job it is to actually protect the public safety so governor Mike DeWine in Ohio governor Larry Hogan in Maryland there's been two of the loudest and most effective Republican state officials in terms of there are clear eyed response to the Pantanal one implicitly their behavior and their public statements have been a rebuke to trump almost every day in fact Larry Hogan the other day when Donald Trump said he wants to bring the country back to work by Easter Sunday Larry Hogan just came out and said this is fate this is an imaginary timeline and no that's not gonna happen yeah that may be true and it is but the lieutenant governor of Texas Dan Patrick suggested on fox news on on Tucker Carlson's show that senior citizens shouldn't put their personal safety from corona virus ahead of the health.

David Remnick
"david remnick" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:56 min | 4 months ago

"david remnick" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm David Remnick we have had twenty eight Democrats vying for the party's presidential nomination just over a week ago Bernie Sanders seem to be the clear front runner after three very strong primary performances then came some prominent withdraws from the race and the resurgence really the resurrection of Joe Biden in last week's primaries what will happen next is entirely up in the air Joe Biden could keep writing this new wave of momentum or we could be headed for a contested convention something that we have not seen in many decades Amy Davidson Sorkin is a political columnist for The New Yorker and she's going to help us with a little civics refresher course you know there's a lot of states left the road and you've thrown up the nomination when you get one thousand nine hundred ninety one of the pledged delegates when you cast your vote in a primary you're not really voting for the candidates so much as you're voting for a delegate who's pledged to that candidate as long as that person is still in the race when the convention comes and then things can get really complex you guys then convention with a certain number of delegates were pledged to you so everybody gets the convention and they vote if nobody has a majority then there's a second ballot but on that ballot there's another factor at the super delegates they don't get to vote on the first ballot they get to vote on the second ballot the super delegates are democratic insiders members of Congress senators higher ups in the party there are nearly eight hundred super delegates at the convention and if they get to vote it's a whole new ballgame no it doesn't go without saying that the super delegates are going to be N. greatest proportion on the side of Joe Biden as opposed to Bernie Sanders if it was today but who knows what might happen on the campaign trail what could be revealed what could come out you know a lot of people who are the super delegates they voted in a sense I had of super Tuesday by coming out and endorsing Biden getting their local networks activated for him club which are decide to apparently in Minnesota she didn't just say that she wanted people to vote for him she helped get out the vote so it's not a conspiracy or is that a party acting like a party and saying you know we know this person we have this sense of how it's going to have this effect on races in the state we're making a judgment about what the party stands for as well well in your view is it part of democracy or anti democratic in some way I mean how purely democratic is it bad for the states that were in different ways not entirely representative of the whole country had so much say a word New Yorker is the word it might be this might be settled by the time it gets to us so there are a lot of ways that the democracy here is in perfect what's the last time we had a contested convention I believe it was nineteen fifty two for the Democrats nineteen forty eight for the Republicans but you know both of those nominated candidate on the third ballot so it was contested but it wasn't an epic contest with like a Fletcher Knebel novel that goes to the fill out that there is a right the classic the one that you know people dream of in this entered the realm of contested convention legend is the nineteen twenty four democratic convention which went to wait for it a hundred and three ballots and neither one of the the front runners got it what happened who is who is running against him back into versus Al Smith and for a lot of lot of issues you know prohibition all a lot of other issues but the thing that broke the convention was the Ku Klux Klan mac could do one of the clients support and he basically killed an anti Klan plank in the party's platform and that because the chef where there are people who are opposed to him but might have reached some sort of deal became just posed to him on principle and rightly so and they just kept going until they finally both of them withdrew won the nomination how did it end up in the general John Davis congressman from West Virginia who lost badly to tech Calvin Coolidge but it was probably better for American history that the Democrats didn't coalesce around somebody who was sort of cozy with the clan you know even if you're gonna go into the election divided but believing something you actually believe and that's worth it and he seemed to say that that's not the case with any of the candidates on the democratic side right now it unless you really really really really feel strongly about democratic socialism they're not the party is not at a point where the divider like so so existential so much about the fundamental values of the party Biden argument is I'm the guy they can unite the party bring in independence when those counties that went over to trump I can do it because I'm a basic Sanders's argument if the case is I will expand the electorate then I will bring in new voters many of them young what do you think of those two cases both of them have a have thanks recommend them I would I wouldn't mock either of them even in states that that Biden one significantly Sanders said the route was with younger voters and those are going to be the voters who inherit the parties they can't be alienated Biden is gonna have to make some choices about how he talks about about Bernie remember he's can we propelled forward possibly by a lot of money from Mike Bloomberg a man who on that debate stage called Bernie akin to a communist and a threat to that was ridiculous yeah right so is that what he wants the ads that are going to be in every state paid for by Bloomberg to be saying that the choices how does by can now talk about democratic socialism you know just it's not gonna be enough now to just be the decent kind human being who you'd rather have in the White House and Donald Trump this is not gonna be an easy election because the hideous and ugly yeah and it's just we're still not quite uncertain period I think this is not just going to be cruising along until November and then people decide whether they like the excitement of trump or the niceness of fighting because in a more fundamental way to what people want from.

David Remnick Democrats Bernie Sanders
"david remnick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:24 min | 5 months ago

"david remnick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is the New York radio hour I'm David Remnick Tyler fog it has a wide range of interests recently she wrote about J. secular one of the trump lawyers in the impeachment trial who also happens to play drums in a classic rock band if you like that sort of thing and Tyler knows all kinds of weird stuff and she's always got interesting things to recommend Tyler welcome please surprise me so I recently saw this movie called the cure it came out in nineteen ninety seven it's this Japanese horror film directed by kyoshi Kerr saw and the reason why I went to go see it is because I saw bong joon host parasite and I really liked it and I read an article where bomb was talking about how cure was his all time favorite film to east by the other Carissa our right of course so is there a classic filmmaker from from Japan who we all know this is the other guy exactly yeah on this one is about I thank you for like fifty years later yeah but yeah so the the movie is basically about a string of what seemingly unconnected murders I'm taking place in Tokyo oral quickly do that sort of starts off as like a police procedural who done it type film but they tell you who did it pretty early on and on to convince running in the US open in this particular scene the detective and suspect are having a conversation where in which the suspect says that he sort of feels a kinship with the detective and you can kind of see reality break down and it's actually unclear whether the conversation is even happening or whether it's an active sat on the only KKK okay the conversation went from conversation to throw against the wall yes yeah there are a lot of mood shifts in this movie which is also how I I see it as being kind of similar to to parasite let's move on let's go to you the second thing that you're up to what have you been listening to me yeah so it's a remix of Kanye west's song say you will which was originally on his two thousand eight album eight awaits and heartbreak and in twenty fifteen he came out with this remix of the song that just like completely different where he collaborated with Caroline Shaw she's a Pulitzer Prize winning musician the youngest musician ever to win a Pulitzer Prize and she is really interesting because she has this coral technique where it's sort of like her voice singing layered on top of it like over and over and over again so it's like a one person choir almost and then and then and then and then and then and then and then and then the well she may cause a blue yeah I remember this and then and then and then and then and then I absolutely love this song I listened to it almost every day now he's sort of known for his whole Sunday service thing which is three matching all his old songs as gospel tunes and a lot of people don't really like it either because they don't like gospel music or because they think it's sort of indicative of a.

New York David Remnick
"david remnick" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:18 min | 5 months ago

"david remnick" Discussed on KCRW

"This is the New Yorker radio hour I'm David Remnick one of the marquee issues of the twenty twenty democratic campaign has been taxes not tax cuts but higher taxes on the wealthiest Americans that issue is a cornerstone of the Warren and the Sanders campaign but these days you don't have to be a socialist to talk about income inequality is a severe problem this is a meeting that took place a couple of months ago in San Francisco thank you for being here today and taking part in this incredibly important conversation it's time for America's millionaires to start stepping up in tackling inequality head on Morse Perl who's at the Mike here is not exactly your stereo type of fired up leftist he is a really rich and he's not shy in admitting it being rich is great I've done it I recommend you all try it it's a lot better than the alternative and I'm not here to talk to you about al trooper was the chair of a group that calls itself the patriotic millionaires any spoke recently with she'll call had Kerr who reports for us on business and the economy the patriotic millionaires really tap into several things that I'm obsessed with right now income inequality of the political debate over how to address income inequality and the ways that some wealthy people and successful business executives are struggling over how they might play a part in solving this problem to see a group of these people really sort of publicly advocating for policies that would potentially cost them money at least in the short term I thought was really interesting and not something you see very often the main issue we're trying to address is the fact that this growing inequality this having a country the few rich people not to poor people he's not going to work in the long term that's Morris pearl he's the chairman of the patriotic millionaires having no middle class doesn't work for the rich people we make money for investments when there's millions of people paying their bills on time every month so that's the over all rubric we're trying to address that with three policy areas one is progressive taxation were in favor of rich people having higher tax rates the regular people not the other way around were in favor of higher wages for working people we think that people who work full time make enough money to live on an argument you typically here around this issue is that it will hurt small businesses that small business owners can't afford to pay employees more they can afford to pay sick leave if a small business people are thinking about the minimum wage they should also think about their customers getting raises and so if you look at a small business like a restaurant having the customers with more beer money in their pockets on Friday nights is a lot more important it makes a much bigger difference than how much weight is the one guy standing behind the bar pouring the beers making that were in favor of higher minimum wages and we're also wanted to reduce the influence of big money in politics we would like to take money out of politics especially my.

David Remnick
"david remnick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:51 min | 6 months ago

"david remnick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is the New York radio hour I'm David Remnick Russia has always maintained an outsized role in the world its economy is smaller than Italy's Russia has the GDP of roughly Texas and yet it's expanding its sphere of influence all over the world all the time and let's not forget that Russia successfully interfered in a presidential election here in the United States despite economic problems and repressive regime Vladimir Putin seems to be untouchable the popular at home Josh we offer is a Moscow correspondent and he's written a book called between two fires truth ambition and compromise in Putin's Russia the book explores how people of principle living in an authoritarian world navigate their day to day lives and Josh writes about the role of television in maintaining Putin's grasping power particularly channel one the state on channel channel one was for a very long time the dominant TV channel in all of Russia and Josh describes it as a combination of fox news and Disney it's run by a peculiar and pivotal character in Moscow life name Constantine errant's Josh knows the Soviet TV in the old days was absolutely state run and it was wall to wall political propaganda channel one under Constantine Aronson the Putin era is somewhat different house so I think there's a few key distinctions between Soviet era propaganda and the much slicker more post modern propaganda of Putin's Russia so we propaganda was essentially about convincing the viewer of a single truth at the expense of some other truth and that in the later days of the Soviet Union reached a real state of thirty announcers on state television every time a high ranking Soviet functionary would die there would be a funeral on Red Square a big pompous well attended occasion broadcast on television and for years the person who died there their coffin or casket was placed under the ground of Red Square and the announcers would narrate exactly that though with time the space under the Kremlin became scarce and a high ranking Soviet functionaries began to be cremated and there urn with the ashes was placed inside the wall of the Kremlin though the voice over continue to talk about a coffin being lowered into the ground this led to an obvious clash between what people could see with their own very eyes on television and what the voice over was telling them and a group of Soviet linguists these were not dissidents are insurrectionary is this was a commission of the state linguistic institute and the Soviet Union appealed to the politburo asking with all due respect here maybe we could think about updating the language just so it matches the action on screen and we don't have this dissonance between word and deed and amazingly the polit bureau declined to the suggestion propaganda like that could really only work for so long and would certainly never survive into the kind of information and media age we have today and I would say what channel one dozen other Russian state media outlets is first and foremost they appeal to a kind of truth that viewers are already inclined to believe it you know as as one of your predecessors as Russia car spun then for first the wash imposed on the New Yorker I knew a lot of these people who worked in Soviet state television and then and Russian state television after nineteen ninety one after the Soviet Union fell and their relationship with the Kremlin and Kremlin leadership was extremely close and they took orders and if they went too far they really heard about it now Constantine errands comes with a background of non news so much as show business and how is that background played itself out why is that important in the projection of putting doesn't tell me a little bit about Constantine errant's and what he brings to the party I think what makes constant earned so interesting and so good at his job is exactly that backstory you alluded to he came of age during perestroika the convulsions of the time led him toward art toward music toward film and he was really a kind of counter culture not quite hippy than someone certainly consumed with this new flood of information and the and the new cultural opportunities and he developed really art house off beat impulses one of our inst most beloved projects from the mid nineties was a musical variety show called old songs.

David Remnick Russia New York
"david remnick" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

11:47 min | 6 months ago

"david remnick" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"This is the New Yorker Radio Hour. David Ramnik the holidays are over. So it's back to work or whatever else you've got going on and to cheer you up a little bit. We're going to feature today. None other than Terry Gross Terry and I spoke at the New Yorker Festival about her very first time hosting a radio show. was that first show. Like what was your voice like. My voice was kind kind of like that like it was really high because when I was younger too because when I get nervous my voice tends to get high and that was especially true before I understood how my voice worked. How did you do that in other words? How did you listen into yourself training yourself and make it the voice that we hear every day and love? Well when I first heard my voice voice it was really a horrible experience. I don't know if that's true for people now because people have cell phones and you can record your voice on it but but I hadn't heard my voice and so you know the way our voices sound between our ears is very different than they sound on tape so when I heard it on table it was like Oh my God. Do I sound that way and I tried to speak more slowly. I try to not sound kind of like this. But it's hard you know. It's hard but one of the smartest things I did. I think I take Alexander lessons. which is a posture? Did you know about it. Oh It's Alexander Technique and its posture. Lessons don't judge my posture. Because I'm still not very a very well postured. But it's British actors take Alexander Technique lessons and a lot of musicians do too because you get tendonitis like if you hold your wrists wrong and you're playing guitar piano or any instrument so they teach you like how to hold things in alignment alignment so that you don't hurt n. b. just so everything is aligned and and part of that. If like if you're talking like this talking I like that. It's going to affect your your vocal cords. So teach me. I need to sit up straight. Well antion read from the diaphragm like a singer like a singer. Roy and I was talking to a friend who WNYC and she said you know the thing you have to understand about a career. Like Terry Gross is that it was made possible possible by the fact that public radio paid so poorly. That women came to public radios. So cokie Roberts it's Susan Stemberg and the rest of that the whole all things considered crew which was quite female compared to the rest of radio. Yeah true okay. There's probably some truth to that because men could get higher salaries. Public radio was brand new. But uh-huh early seventies right something like that this was in the early seventies but there's other reasons for it. One of the reasons named bill seem ring because bill ceremony the first vice president for programming or I head of programming was I mean he was just had feminist values and he hired Susan Steinberg and he hired other women he wanted women on the air and he was told. You're making a big mistake. Then he knew he wasn't and he set the tone. There was the voice of authority from New York. Male voice reading reading the news not really hearing from people that are talking about. They weren't women on the air. I don't think already hardly any people of Color on here so I believe that if you have the diversity of the country reflected on here you have a diverse audience if people hear their own invoice their own perspective being acknowledged they will pay attention. But another isn't why is public radio. NPR The talent allowed of it came from the local stations stations like WBF. Oh and buffalo where I worked and because feminism was so active on college campuses then that was like ground zero for most of the feminist movement mm-hmm and a lot of ways so feminists like me were coming to their public radio station on the college campus and getting their are start there. You know there was so like it was the start of the new wave of the women's movement and you were hearing hearing that on the local public radio stations and it helped feed. NPR CASSATT talent was coming from. You once wrote this. I often ask. It's my guests about what they consider to be their invisible weaknesses and shortcomings. I do this because these are the characteristics that define us no less than our strains grants what we feel sets US apart from other people is often the thing that shapes us as individuals. What do you see as your own invisible usable weaknesses especially be severe professional life Well because I don't see any. I met him perfect now. Now since you asked a discussion. I think I've overcome this but I was an inherently shy person and in like the microphone. Kind of liberated me to ask things and to have a power that I never felt that I had And it was hard at first. I didn't know how to do it at first but I enjoyed it immediately. You got off on it in a certain where well it was like. You know I like theater but I'm not an actor. I like reading but I never got to talk to authors. I love movies and I never got deducted people make them and this was way of doing things like that permission. It's permission and it's permission and you know I grew up socialized to be liked. You know from the generation of women. Where would be nice be liked? Don't create a problem uh-huh and like suddenly like no. It's not about being liked it about doing your job. Holding people accountable. Asking asking asking probing questions asking sensitive questions. I is there any relationship between conversation and therapy. Have you ever. Have you ever gone and through therapy and edited at all. I'm in I see a therapist and I love therapy because it's a really really different relationship but I'll try to define the difference like when you're in therapy. The therapist job is to help me right to so help me understand myself and get through life in as painless as possible. Ideally yes and to help help me think through matters that are very perplexing and that are Making it hard for me to move forward but the job up of the interviewer. I'm not there to be your life coach or to to help you solve your problems. I am there to help. You clarify her thoughts to help you. Express his thoughts to help shape the narrative that I'm going to try to move through and to ask. Ask questions that I think might be helpful in maybe even in framing some new thoughts and perhaps in seeing something in a different way but but but probably not. But that's the best possible scenario. You seem uniquely able to get people to unburden themselves or be honest about themselves. So as I look back to an interview that you did with great artists Maurice Sendak and his capacity to talk to you about issues An these are issues that you that are run throughout your interviews about mortality an illness and dying which are not easy to talk to about anybody much less a stranger stranger dedicated line. It's it's astonishing tears flow because to rates rates. Great friends died Close together all husband at a wife who've been everything I'm having to deal with that and it's very very hard very recently. Yes she died about SCO. He died that they before yesterday and I was except for her son a live person. Just be if it was my publisher of I loved. Ah loved her. You the point where you feel like you've outlived a lot of people who of course and says I don't believe in another world and another life that this they die. They're out of my life. They're gone forever like life like I'm not afraid of you. Have any theory of why you become this receptacle. That kind of Maurice. I mean had been interviewing them over the years so I wouldn't say they were friends but we were interview buddy by that point like oh we'd been through it before but I think I kind of learned as an interviewer and as an interviewee view we that the way to get somebody to speak honestly and openly isn't to flatter them or to show off. Its it's to ask questions that show your comprehension. If you can of the work that they've done and show through your questions that it has deeply affected you that it that it matters to you. Terry thank thank you and thank you. I'm Terry Gross. The host of fresh air since nineteen seventy five. We spoke at the New Yorker Festival in October. Twenty nineteen special. Thanks is to radio. Diaries and Joe Richmond interviewed the NPR Pioneer Bill. Seamer this is the New Yorker Radio Hour. I'm David Ramnik. Thanks for joining me today now. Hope you'll join US next time. The New Yorker Radio Hour is a CO production of WNYC studios and the New Yorker. Our theme music was composed and performed by Merrill Garbis of tune yards with additional music by Alexis Corato. This episode was produced by Alex Barron. Emily Boutin Gene Ave Korea. Rian Corby Karen from it. Cala David cries now. Caroline Lester Louis Mitchell. Michelle Moses and Stephen. Valentino this week's episode was produced with help from Rhonda Sherman and David Ohana of the New Yorker Festival. The New Yorker Radio Hour is supported in part by the Tarinah endowment find..

Terry Gross Terry Terry Gross David Ramnik US NPR Maurice Sendak Alexander Technique Alexander tendonitis New York Cala David Rian Corby Karen bill Caroline Lester Louis Mitchell Roy Alex Barron CASSATT Merrill Garbis WNYC studios
"david remnick" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

03:42 min | 6 months ago

"david remnick" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"What you're about to hear happened in Miami Gringo and I sitting on the beach now there was security of your life where you're kind of as I understand it a little on the directionless side? I think the Amish would call it a room spring when you you. You're in your early twenties when you go to sort of shed your identity from sheep's Head Bay a little bit. You were in a Hippie commune in my right well to be precise when when I was in college we called it. A collective not commun- In the sense that like for at least for a long period which share our money and cooking and the cleaning and all that which I think is a very sensible. You know arrangement have And then we did something really silly. We spent the summer on professors land living in tents and when it would really storm we'd go to the Dunkin donuts and that would be my favorite part. I was so not cut out for like living intense. You know you you wouldn't have done well at Woodstock. I don't think I went to Woodstock. Yeah what did you think you were going to do with your life. You're in buffalo and I studying to do to teach you. You were a teacher for a little while I was a teacher. I got fired within six weeks because I was that good. That's that's a bad teacher. How'd you get fired six weeks? Well it was kind of easy. It was eighth grade English rush junior high in Buffalo. New York's toughest inner city junior high. When someone from the board of Ed came to like observe? Observe me a AH. My students overturned the bookcase as if to send a direct message. Like she doesn't know what she's doing I didn't I didn't know how to keep them in the classroom. Let alone to teach. It seems harsh though to get it was six weeks short. Then like I'm short now and and you know I wasn't much older than they were and I. I really didn't know how to be an authority figure. They needed structure. They needed security. Those were the things that they often didn't have at home or in the streets and I didn't know oh how to give it to them so you go back home in defeat. Maybe doing some typing. I think to work. The temp agency is where I got criticized for when there was no work to do reading. Yeah so you decided to virtual visiting terrible terrible thing but so radio came to. It seems to me in a in in a pretty odd way if there was a feminist radio station or feminist radio show radio show at the college station and which I've been listening to add another Dr. I had which was typing. The Buffalo State College Casualty Policy Manual. So work doesn't get more interesting than I had on. WBF Oh The station on the college campus in the background. Like oh go. The shows were so good and when my job at the faculty policy manual was over. Cassette type. Everything Efficient I ended up having a roommate back in the house. That was not a Commun- who was going to be on the feminist show and it turns out that she came out on the show and then her her girlfriend was moving to the lesbian feminist. Show opening up a place on the feminist Michaux purchased the right which is long story. But I ended up taking that place.

Buffalo Commun Woodstock Ed Buffalo State College Dunkin donuts Head Bay Miami Michaux New York
"david remnick" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

08:47 min | 6 months ago

"david remnick" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"I'm David Ramnik. I've got a little confession to make when I first started doing this program. I was more than a little anxious. I've been in a print journalist all my life a writer and an editor but talking to you in my own voice on the radio or podcast felt a little alien so to prepare myself. I decided to study the great ones and at the very top of that list has got to be Terry. Gross gross has been the host of fresh air for nearly forty five years and over that time she's interviewed thousands and thousands of guests from Ray Charles to Hillary Clinton too. I don't know any summary of her. Big Gets doesn't actually do her. Her Justice Terry is perhaps the best interviewer of our time. Let's strike the. Perhaps she is TERI gross. Join me in October. Twenty nineteen at the a New Yorker Festival with a crowd welcomed here Mica Rockstar. The Terry I'm basically going to steal tips from you. I don't really care about them. I WanNa know how you do it because you go into an interview it is. It's it's it's obvious to me and I think all your listeners from the get-go that you are so grounded in what the knowledge that's necessary to have for extended real conversation. I'd like to know about a process what goes into your week. How does it work? Well do the research the afternoon and the night before and and then in the morning I write up the questions my interviews often at ten in the morning so I don't have a lot of time to do anything really And and then after that I'm reading a copy to introduce gas while the show is actually on the air so to speak. I'm in the studio Just in case as but I've tried to prerecord all the all the introductions and I'm writing copy for tomorrow show our show is on and then back to the route you don't do it all yourself that God God knows I I even on our modest show. I have a team of people that works very hard to research and and book people and all the arrest who you've had the same some of the same people for a very long time. We have a great generational mix on our show. People are in their twenties thirties. Forties fifties sixties. We we try so hard to keep up with pop culture. It's not possible anymore. There is just too much to keep up with so they go to the film festivals and watch all the netflix stuff stuff. That's coming out and all the screenings and TV shows and then they'll give me like little little film festival things like they'll show show me scenes from earlier movies. I'll see the new movie and maybe I've seen some of their old movies already but then they'll show me seen firms from movies or if it's one of those twenty episodes they drop at the same time kind of things the producers will watch the episodes. Give me a good sense of the highlights. Show me scenes but when it comes to the book like with few exceptions I will be the one who reads the book and read the research and and do all the processing of that one of the distinguishing features of your show and being on it is that we're never in the same very rarely in the same room with you. I've been interviewed a lot of people than Yorker have and what they do. is they go to a public radio studio and they put on headphones and sooner or later after the usual what did you have for breakfast to get sound levels you come on and you welcome us and you give us a few rules are there. Okay the advice I always give. Ah The bill of rights that I read to people and I told them that since we're recording. They should feel free to take advantage of that. If at and you point in the middle of an answer of they feel like they're not what they really want there to say or they just thought of a clearer better more concise way of putting it and they want a second crack at it they can back up to an earlier part of the answer and say it again but if they do that they should start at the beginning of a sentence so we can make a clean edit and if I asked them anything too who personal they should let me know move onto something else and I'll also tell them like if I make a mistake. Interrupt me and correct me that way. I can say it again and get it right. We can edit out the error and prevent it from going on the air and prevent it from being on your wikipedia page forever now. I I think you probably know what's coming next I. I was raised in print journalism. And if I were interviewing Henry Kissinger and it slipped out of his mouth have tomorrow. I'm going to bomb Cambodia. And then he said wait a minute. I didn't mean that I wouldn't and we were on the record. I wouldn't give them a back sees. I wouldn't let them Redo. I understand it completely for lots of other fields of endeavor but particularly particularly political conversation consequential yes And I do not do that with politicians. So who would you not do it with anybody. WHO's in elected office or running for elected office? Would you but you interview them anyway. So you don't like doing politicians to you know because for two reasons one is I feel like they walk in with their talking points. No matter what you ask them that's what they're going to tell you and the other thing is. I think if if you're interviewing a politician you owe it to your readers to your listeners. To know the difference between the Bullshit and the truth and if you're not following them I'm on a regular basis. You're not going to necessarily be able to catch that if I'm doing. Say like three hours of researcher. Even if I'm taking off off a day just to prepare for that interview I'm not GonNa know enough to know when they're just being hypocritical or did nine nine an action covering up an action if you're following them if you're covering them on your beat you will know the difference and be able to catch them in that so I feel like unprepared and therefore inapt at doing that. I just don't I take politics too seriously. Salihi to be in a position where I'm letting somebody get away with something. How soon into an interview do you know? This is going to be good or this is going to to be not so good. Sometimes I feel like I know in the soundcheck sometimes. Somebody is so kind of grumpy and just like Oh they made me be here. It says in my contract to be here to promote an here. What do you want from me and you could just tell? Sometimes you get past the first few questions and suddenly you hear shift and you hear like somebody's Kinda were clicking in and engaging and that's it's great when that happens and there's an advantage to being in Philadelphia by yourself be. It seems paradoxical to make you would think as in the conversation we're having now despite despite the fact that there are all these other people we have physical cues we have things that are is work or hands or something to indicate confusion or ask me more or back off or something. You don't have that but maybe you're listening better. I don't know well well. I was thinking the best of all possible worlds since we're both just hearing each other though. were making better radio because everything has to all the queues have to be in our the voice and whether that's actually true or not in terms of being effective I don't know but there is something incredibly surprisingly intimate about having somebody's voice just fed into your ears directly into your head in your brain tear. You grew up in Brooklyn. I grew up the New Jersey. Same Radio area if we're being honest with ourselves in when we were kids and you're just a little older than me. There were no women on the radio. The Allison Allison for the night for W. W. FM kind of purring into the exactly into the microphone. The the night will sue you like a tender mother full new against a soft person and hiking. You from the home of the world in this brief our you a massive all well hi ways and the universe nestles in yourself so come.

Terry TERI gross Ray Charles David Ramnik netflix Hillary Clinton New Jersey Cambodia Henry Kissinger Allison Allison writer Yorker Philadelphia editor Brooklyn researcher W. W. FM
"david remnick" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:08 min | 7 months ago

"david remnick" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm David Remnick if you've seen the movie the Irishman you're familiar with the character of Chucky o'brien the young assistant and friend to Jimmy Hoffa almost Hoffa's surrogate son in the film it's a Brian who betrays Hoffa playing a crucial role in his disappearance and presumed murder a new book about Chucky o'brien has just come out but it's not exactly the mob thriller you might guess it's by a prominent legal scholar named Jack goldsmith so pause and not for a second gold Smith is a professor at Harvard with books on international law and regulation of the internet he ran the office of legal counsel for a time under George W. bush goldsmith is often called on to discuss legal theories of executive privilege which is very much a subject of the day but the story of Chucky o'brien seems like a different kind of business altogether but Jack goldsmith comes to it from a very specific and personal angle he was a Brian step son his new book is called in Hafiz shadow and staff writer Isaac shot or sat down to talk with them about it Jack thanks for joining us thank you so much for having me I want to start with that with your stepfather how did he come to know Jimmy Hoffa and how did he come to be your stepfather he came to know Jimmy Hoffa when he was nine years old his mother came from crime family in Kansas city his dad left when he was seven and half for whatever reason took a huge shine to them and they were so close that people thought Jackie was Hafiz illegitimate son to check you sort of have involving opinion of him or was he pretty consistently in your mind loyal towards him and find him yeah no no he was extremely close I mean intimately close for literally twenty five years you know they spend evenings together we can together talking did all his errand forum and half eyes as they looked out for Jackie they did have a falling out about six months before the disappearance and this is one of the reasons why suspicion came on Jackie the reason for the falling out was in part because Jackie realized that he didn't have a future in the teamsters union to top I had no power and the teamsters union but mostly because my mother came into talkies life they fell in love and wanted to get married and that meant he had to leave off on half was not happy about that so yeah I talk a little bit about your feelings towards Jackie sure I was twelve years old when he entered my life I it had father and stepfather neither of whom were very good fathers I was very close to either one of them and very suddenly at age twelve I had this new stepfather and he was an extraordinary father I loved him deeply my mom was suffering from mental and physical health issues and Chucky before and after the office prince he came into my life about six months before the Hoffa disappearance just showed me extraordinary love and attention and gave us a stability and really just help us get through some very very difficult times even though he was himself going through a very difficult time so I actually changed my name which was Jack goldsmith to Jack o'brien when I was thirteen and I just adore him for my teenage years I'm you write a check in the books that quote Chucky and have a two different linguistic and conceptual universe than I what what did you mean by that I'm in a lot of things by that first of all I mean his his nickname for me when I was a young man was the educated idiots and that kind of captures the differences between us he viewed me as having lots of book learning which I do and lots of degrees which I do he got his degree on the street as he said he's not an intellectual he's not widely read he's very smart he's very insightful he also we have different conceptions towards truth I think it's fair to say when writing this book my main concern with to try to figure out the truth the truth after his involvement in Hoffa disappearance which is always been accused of the truth of what happened the Hoffa and basically puncture the layers of misinformation that has surrounded the Hoffa disappearance for forty four years Chucky on the other hand while he was trying very hard to help me figure out this truth he had a different truth and that was the truth of America the code of silence so he really struggled a lot with what he could tell me how you could tell me he wanted to try to help me he told me a lot of things but he also held a lot back one of the themes of the Irishman the Robert De Niro character who in the film is responsible for office death it portrays his daughter in the film as looking at him suspiciously realizing he's up to no good realizing he surrounded by mob figures did you ever have that sense that maybe there was something not quite right and did that ever not you so I agree with your take on that part of the movie I thought it was very powerful and the answer is no I had something of the opposite reaction when I was a teenager I knew a bunch of monsters I mean I we we hung around with them Anthony Jack Loni an anti problems on our to high level mob guys in New Jersey in Detroit who were also in the film these are my uncle's Tony and we used to hang out with them and I was completely under Truckee's world view and what that meant was I was kind of thought the government was full of it and cutting corners and saying things that weren't true my experience of these mobsters who are described an FBI reports I later read as terribly violent people was it they were fine upstanding gentleman they were nice to me they were well dressed they lived in nice homes and they treated me well and they were part of my family you know I read the newspapers but I kind of discounted matic convenient world view that was basically Chucky's worldview it wasn't till I got to college and got some distance from it started reading books and thinking about it that I came to understand the truth do you think accuracy matters for a film like this number one and two what did you think of the movie apart from its potential issues with the truth I think the accuracy of the story matters to me personally for one very important reason the book on which the movie space and the movie put my stepfather Chucky in the car picking up off and taking them to his.

David Remnick Chucky o'brien
"david remnick" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

13:30 min | 9 months ago

"david remnick" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"I guess in the light of history it's not surprising rising and we saw it during reconstruction and the reaction to reconstruction that the election of Barack Obama would produce a reaction and part of that reaction in part of trumpism is a fear of an exploitation of the fear of the other which you can easily interpreted racism so I think that's that's one of them that and and and there are other currents in American life that have been there for many decades if not hundreds of years he's having to do with Zina Phobia what kinds of questions that he brings to the fore ugliness. That's ugly word but ugliness that that have been present for for so long aren't bodied in him and he has certain talents to. He has a real talent for turning arguments on their head talking past his critics. He is not knocked flat. I think considering the no sees he sees like one of those punching bags that just keeps getting up and up and up he plays by the Roy Cohn handbook of attack attack attack and never forgive and never apologize and mistake. Everything Yeah Look I. I think this is an incredibly tragic time that we're living in what we cannot afford board as journalists citizens whatever role you're thinking about is to is to be defeatist it. That's inexcusable. Oh we take a sharp turn jer talk about music. Yeah I was at the town hall when you have your many great interviews and this one was a bruce springsteen that it was fun that was part of the that was part festival. Yeah the way that I once described it was a wide you love. Bruce springsteen and happened to run into John. Stewart not to name drop but I ran ran into him and I told him that the best way that I've been able to describe my affection for Bruce Springsteen was to quote John Stewart who wants that in a show years ago delight joy oy exactly. If you like joy yeah go to a Bruce Concert. How do you explain the residents of you know part of its geographic for me so loving Philip Roth or Bruce springsteen came geographically as well as through other reasons but music for a some people mark their lives through their photo albums or or other aspects of their lives. I my deepest memories. Associative and emotional are via music. I I don't remember a lot of things but I do remember seeing the Beatles on itself and that's a very very very early memory I remember buying my first record albums called best of sixty six and had had on all kinds of corny things like Paul Revere and the raiders and and then it was this guy that I had never ever heard before named Bob Dylan for me the beyond all same with Aretha Franklin and recently I wrote a piece about buddy guy. I've been in bands. I I listen to music all day and all night I fall asleep listening to it but springsteen I I saw in one thousand nine hundred seventy four as a backup yup band a opening act for Chicago at Madison Square Garden and I was. I think freshman something in high school and I thought who the the hell is this. This is like a white guy who's kind of like James Brown mixed with soul mixed with rock and roll and he hated hated the GIG. He was kind of lost in this cavernous place. He famously hated those gigs. Nobody was listening to him. The lights were half on it was a disaster but I loved it and then the following year I think born to run came on seventy five east also so I did a long profile of him for the New Yorker when he I think when he turns sixty two or three I forget what it was. He's already on in years and joyous thing but not just joy this as he aged his concerns aged his battle with depression entered his songs his sense of what it is to be an American entered his songs he grew out of the Jersey turnpike. You know romance that is really for teenagers and people who are very young and and he somebody look most of these acts don't last very long bands don't last very long where they begin to repeat themselves and play the same songs that they played when they were very young like the rolling stones are their own jukebox at this like a tribute band to the rolling stones keeps making New Music Yeah and some of it you love some of it is may maybe you didn't love but he's always trying to do something relatively relatively new like miles. Davis or any great artists. It's a rare thing is he the opposite of elitist well on the one hand yes on the other hand. He's worth hundreds of millions of dollars. He lives a life of private planes and horses and all all the rest so let's let's not you know he's very self aware in the Senate and his Broadway show he said you know I wear my father's close. His father worked in factories and so on and I've never done an honest day's work in my life so he's he's. He's relatively bullshit free yeah. He said I think a line that he added. I saw the show three times yeah and someone told me that that one night he said I've never worked five week my life until until this show when I'm like sixty eight sixty which was I thought a very successful thing he's gotten funnier. I admire him to a certain degree. He's the least cool rock and roll star because he's so guileless. You know piggy pop. He is not David Byrne. He is not he's deliberate. Es who he is he is who he is and I thought that his book reflected that too it was. It was very very naked. I have mentioned already that we're in the same room together. You're not in the studio. We usually use made the trek down to the New Yorker. I appreciate and we are where we are. At One World Trade Center. We were at one World Trade Center in my office overlooks the footprints of of the trade towers when we got here. There's no doubt the first few weeks both people on the staff and people who would come visit you. You'd see them looking out the window and hit them. You know I don't think about it anymore. It's very very interesting to see the waves of tourists that come down here to stand either go to the nine eleven museum or to kind of Look at those fountains fountains those that kind of inverted fountains that are in the footprint of the two towers. It's not like the seemed to come down here and a spirit of morning. Everybody's well behaved but it's rather it's very hard to describe but there is a moment where you're looking out the window and you see a plane. Go over the Statue of Liberty or or the harbor and you get a shiver. I'm not immune to that for certain. What about on the recent anniversary then it's more cute then it's more acute. I mean I thought the magazine performed brilliantly during that period and people remember the cover of the nine eleven issue by Art Spiegelman. which is this black image we it's called the shadow of the towers and you can see where the towers were darker black against black and I independent of anything thing we did? I just remember those days of coming down here and it changed everything it absolutely we're talking before about nineteen thousand nine hundred nineteen ninety-one which was the zenith of American and I think to some extent global optimism and all that turned on its head in two thousand and anyone at least from an American perspective let me end with with a question which level of optimism about America's future well at the risk of being corny. It's it's great. I think we're living in a in an awful political moment and I I think we are facing some crises above all the environmental crisis that we I think we're too who late to stop all of it and we are being far too lax in in forestalling more of it than we. We've been so belated in this way way so I don't I am not naive to our problems with has to guns or whole our foreign policy dilemmas or do radical income inequality that we face space but I have also noticed in the teeth of this trump period that there are institutions. There are individuals individuals. There are civil groups that have behaved with integrity that the system however flawed it may be the constitution however flooded may be has not crumbled in the face of a petty autocrat but the stakes are very high and a continuation of this period would be. I think objectively horrific object objectively because take climate change one example. We have a president who does not choose to believe that it exists who tells the American people people that it is Chinese hoax all the other things and meanwhile not Rome Burns but we all do but I refused refused and I think we should refuse despair because that is an unforgivable sin you know that's that's a biblical directive but I think it's also a civil one David remnant. Thanks for your time really appreciate thank you. The conversation continues for members of the cafe insider community in this week. Stay tuned bonus. I talk more with David Remnant about that. Steve Bannon thing elitism and the one thing about which ramic agrees with trump to listen to the stay tuned bonus and the exclusive weekly cafe they insider podcast try out the cafe insider membership free for two weeks just head to cafe dot com slash insiders yeah so today. I want to end the show by talking about a man by the name of the Dhaliwal. We may have seen in the news for a tragic reason but about four years ago. Cindy Dhaliwal was in the news for a really great reason you see he was a serving police officer in the greater greater Houston area and there was one obstacle to his becoming as full of public servant. He wanted to be you see Cindy was a Sikh whether the news religions in the world and he practices religion faithfully and devoutly in in that religion at which my father is a member you're required to wear and show certain articles of faith including a full beard and a turban and for devout Sikh you cannot remove the turban and you cannot shave your beard but policy on the police force at the time prevented those articles of faith being shown while on patrol so cindy fought to be able to practice his religion and also served the public doc so it took some time but about four years ago in two thousand fifteen the Harris County sheriff granted Sandeep Dhaliwal and anyone of the Sikh religion an accommodation Asian so he could do both things and for that he was a trailblazer across the country as a local civil rights leader said at the time quote with this policy one of the largest sheriff's offices in the country has affirmed that person does not have to choose between their faith and a career of service and so deep Dhaliwal continued to serve protecting the public will also caring for his family for several more years until last Friday September twenty seventh at about twelve twenty three local time officer Dhaliwal was making what looked to be a routine traffic. Stop the person he stopped and get out of the car as officer. Dhaliwal went back to his own vehicle. The driver of the car he stopped came. Mattis's vehicle rushed from behind. That's deep. Dhaliwal shot him in the head and killed him off so Dhaliwal was forty. Two years old father the three children all he really wanted to do was be able to serve the public and serve his own faith. It's heartbreaking and jarring reminder that peace officers around the country country serve a great risk to themselves every day could be their last as it was for some deep volleyball the outpouring not just in the Houston area but around the country entry was enormous the NFL's Houston Texans honored officer Dhaliwal with a moment of silence before their game on Sunday. We own the debt of gratitude not just for his fight for religious freedom officer. Dhaliwal was not just a peace officer. He cared about his community in so many other ways among other things does he help coordinate disaster relief after multiple hurricanes in the Houston area and he also was dedicated to helping at risk youth in Houston.

Sandeep Dhaliwal bruce springsteen Dhaliwal officer Houston Barack Obama Roy Cohn jer John Stewart Bruce Concert James Brown One World Trade Center World Trade Center Philip Roth Statue of Liberty Madison Square Garden Aretha Franklin David remnant Paul Revere
"david remnick" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

11:08 min | 9 months ago

"david remnick" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"You live there as you said for a long time I used to you. You still speak some Russian I do. Can you say there was no collusion in Russia collusion. I don't know the collusion. WHAT WOULD COLLUSION BE. It's not illegal anyway. I'd say for a couple years. What should Americans ordinary Americans understand not about the Russian government but about the Russian people wow I have to say when I lived lived in Moscow nineteen eighty eight eighty nine ninety ninety one. This was a crazy time of optimism. I mean I can't can't express you clearly enough. How promising time this was this is a society in which a thousand years of autocracy followed by seventy years of communism was followed by this moment of real promise in in which people suddenly were speaking freely in which they were looking to the West as political example however disappointed they were about to to be in many ways? There was enormous optimism now. Let's say trump loses lips to God's ears trump loses in the coming election trump ism his supporters will not disappear from the face of the earth the effect he's had on American society whether it's the judiciary which will be enormous and long lasting whether it's in the just in the fabric of the way we speak with each other or distrust each other his effect will be long lasting and that's that will have been for years so autocracy and Communism. It's very important shortened understand how much history and historical experience can be ingrained in the people that doesn't mean that those people aren't capable of of progress or change or reform but the tug of history the drag of history the contradictions which we are more sophisticated about when it comes to America with a has to do with race or so many other issues it's profound in Russia profound and I think that's an important thing to understand. I loved living there. I I really did now. Is it privileged character. I was in Moscow correspondent which in the capital I'm not. I'm not a peasant in a poor village in the middle of nowhere and Siberia or something but I loved my time there and I had lots of friends and I miss it when relaxed there about two and and a half years ago. What do you think the Russian people think of the American people these days well. It's very important to understand that ninety percent ninety five percent of of all Russians get their news and their their view of the outside world through television despite them Fox News pretty much their equivalent in other words all Russian television stations are Fox Putin esque Fox. There is no variance from that there is some variance on the Internet and there's some variance it's in the printed page but the predominant way of information and certainly the view of the United States and its politics comes through television so so the view of the United States is Putin's view and Putin's view is that the United States try to take geopolitical political and political advantage of Russia in its moment of defeat. It tried to exploit Russia. It's up to no good in trying to foment revolution in the way that you saw in Ukraine and Georgia Tahrir Square and all the rest. This is put greatest nightmare. It's and it's what he wants to prevent. Most of all trump is a guy who claims to be a billionaire owns. All these properties in Newark has loved to be feted by the richest people around you and he is in a position politically being able to accuse other people of being elitist. Should we retire the word from our dial this I I appreciate that. I think that it's a despoiled word and look. You've got a guy who has and I don't think I'm breaking news here. Who is a very very very wealthy guy whose reputation and businesses as drifter gripped continues in the White House what we don't I need to list all the faults. I think we stipulate over here long form. We're not we don't have time for it. I don't think we should be taking language instruction from him but he's clearly using that as a cudgel. He's he is. He's a prime example of somebody who is trying to this is out of the authoritarian handbook you create the enemies you create others. I lived in Moscow for four years. I'm steeped in Russian history. This is my one of my passions. Stalin used used the phrase enemy of the people. This is not an invention of donald trump. This is just right out of the handbook who enemy the people the press who are the others Hispanics people of Color African Americans and he plays this weird move with uh Jews is he's a kind of file Semitic anti Semite it. This is the creation is a racist yes or no yes yes. Yes yes and you say that unhesitatingly hesitating some people much more evidence. Do we need when was the first time he would have said that unhesitatingly before he was when he put his add in all the newspapers about about kids in central park. I look I'm from here right. Donald Trump did not appear on my radar screen or your radar screen. You know five years ago but back when when he was a figure for spy magazine and the page six and he was a figure in what I would call the New York joke scape he was this kind of if p t barnum figured that unless you happen to be one of his employees and a casino or on a on a construction site he was kinda harmless he was just yet another New York. Dope be guy that would appear on short fingered Gary in Focus magazine. Put it but you know it ain't it ain't funny and it hasn't even funny for a very long time. It certainly isn't funny if you're an immigrant. It's not funny if you're if you're an American citizen either explain something to me. Then you're a man who's been around the block your very thoughtful nine elitist and when I asked You the question about trumping racist. You've used a tone that was of course that's obvious but there are lots of people because some things are true fine. It doesn't go out of the way to disprove housing Barack Obama if asked that question would say flatly might believe it but he wouldn't say flatly Donald Trump. It was a racist. Lots of other people in public life were see would. He's just got a different job than I do so that's what I'm asking. Michelle visit visit but is that good that there are restrictions on what some people can and should say if different jobs rock Obama's job now. That's a very very good question here but Barack Obama's self awareness of the role he plays in American history and African American history and they are they are in so many ways on the same he his self awareness is so acute so I was writing a book between the research for a book that became the the bridge which is a biography of Obama and in large measure. It's a book about race as much as it's about Obama's life before he becomes president and I was interviewing him. It would have been two thousand and eight years just in the White House and I asked him a question about I forget it was a race related question and a lot of things he'd answer. You quite matter of factly talked about Malcolm X. I mean you're sitting in the tournament Malcolm X. It's a weird experience in two thousand eight don't think he'd be talking about Malcolm X. In the Bush White House either either Bush White House or Lyndon Johnson or whatever knocked in the middle. Maybe Malcolm in the middle. We got to a certain question about race and he answered in a very kind of like what you're suggesting. Adjusting a little bit of a mealy mouthed way very hesitant. Obey Mian distanced way INDIV- interview he starts heading down out of the Oval Office toward another appointment in the Roosevelt Room or God knows where but down down the hall and I'm packing up my stuff and the press press secretary. Is You know trying to ease out of the out of the room could get me the hell out. Obama turns on his heel. He comes all the way back and he says to me. Look you've got understand. Maybe about the whole skip gates stuff when he was handcuffed outside his own house in Cambridge his look. You've got understand. When can I talk about race. It's as volatile and as risky as if I were talking about the markets one stray word for me about the the markets can send the stock market going one way or another. The same has to do with race so I don't I'm not I can't possibly possibly lecture Barack Obama whose achievement is becoming the first African American president for not being quite as direct as you want. You seem to want to be but he does come out and say look. Is it really so hard to denounce Nazis. I think we know what he's referring to. Of course. He thinks he's probably a bad example for all the reasons you describe but it's it's interesting to me because when I asked you the question you said he's race because it's the truth and people have different jobs right isn't everyone's job to speak the truth putting aside the special conditions that apply to Brcko. Why is it that in your view so many people who do not have the dynamic that Barack Obama uniquely has in the world I think by Rawson to save us all is is folly wider so many other people who do not have the unique dynamic detaches to Obama so reluctant to say a president trump is a racist. I even think a lot of his supporters think and know that he's a racist. What's bewildering is excusing him. I think a lot of his supporters and we see this all the time you see them interviewed on television. You read newspaper. I've talked to people basically a lot of people thinking okay. I know this guy's a bad ad guy. His character is not of the highest you see with. Van gels these not like they sit there and go well. He's a great man of faith and so on and so forth but they're getting something from him that they feel. They cannot get from fill-in. Whatever Democrat you WANNA fill in so people make a devil's bargains you have written and recently that Donald Trump has done one service and you're smiling so I think you know what I'm about to read. You said perhaps it as a form of derangement to say it but it's entirely possible to donald trump who has been such a ruinous figure on the public scene has at least on the country and unintended service by clarifying some of our deepest flaws in looming dangers in his uniquely Lurid Light Light Water America's deep flaws. We've been just talking about one of them..

Barack Obama donald trump Malcolm X. It Russia president White House Moscow America Fox Putin United States Fox News Ukraine New York Siberia Michelle Newark Stalin Georgia Tahrir Square
"david remnick" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

14:21 min | 9 months ago

"david remnick" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Buddha judge is determined to talk to anybody that will talk to him. He's made this very plane that he is going to have a strategy and a public public persona in which he is completely honest expansive on anything you ask him in. I'm I may be crazy but I think what he's doing. Here and reality will suggest it was we'll see what happens. I we could always be wrong and we've been the wrong so many times is that he's running for next time clearly really he somebody that's on the radar screen but it's very hard to get elected president after being the mayor of a town an it's a college town. It's not a typical mid. Western turn that doesn't make it a real town. No but it's it's you're right. It's but it's the town itself is it's demographics are quite quite different than a lot of other midwestern and yet. I just don't think he's winning. I think he's preparing to he's setting a national but let me ask you this question reputational before an advance and this morning the mayor of the largest city in the country is out of the race bill de Blasio. You know the people to judge still in the race how you count for that the well. I don't think bill de Blasio. It's very interesting bill de Blasio I it's he seems he's a I think he's achieved a fair amount as mayor but he just never clicked with his electorate and quite the way he wanted to the amount of antipathy toward him and not just an conservative quarters like the New York Post or things like that is remarkable arquebuses the reputation his for not working very hard in the gym and all that stuff is really. I think it hurt him and there's a there's a there's. There's an aloofness. There's a there's a resentment is a gap between him and a lot of the electorate just in New York City. Oh Yeah and you know with early. Education crime rates are miniscule although I don't think that's all and build plaza. There's a lot of reasons for that as you know better than I do. You would think there's reputation will be a bit better it isn't and he just so to think that he's GonNa go to Iowa and somehow connect coming into things late and rather abruptly and with an ideology that's already ground taken up by Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders. I don't know what the hell he was hoping for is there self awareness problem and if so how important is self awareness and how self aware was Barack Obama fleeting leading question your honor but I'll answer it anyway the rules of evidence into this show on the podcast world. I think I think he does not quite radiate an awareness of his lack of connection. I think that's fair. I should many pissed about it and I've I find him an interesting figure as a result because to me he's not decidedly decidedly bad mayor but he never completely embraced the whole thing of being mayor of New York he wasn't out and about. It's not that he look. He followed a guy that was adored. Award by the East side right the wealthy people in this town in particular loved Mike Bloomberg and he had Mike Bloomberg for all of my Bloomberg's successes he also was able to buy three elections and this was rarely spoke of and yet so you would think that there would it'd be a place for a more Liberal Democrat to succeed where Bloomberg had not in terms of constituencies and and it didn't work out. I don't see him getting a national stage Bill de Blasio. It hasn't gone well so far. No no just didn't you got nothing so before I leave the topic of the festival yeah. I I feel that I should ask about controversy yeah from last year's your because I think it's actually an important issue sure and I wonder how you think about it. I'm not quite sure how I think think about it and how listeners think about it you ask about. Steve Bannon correct so Steve Bannon. Everyone remembers him a man who sometimes wears multiple shirts for reasons that I don't understand many bite right at him to be in conversation with you so not anyone else but the editor of the New Yorker my presumption is that your attitude towards that as you've said before and since which we're GONNA ask the tough questions. Yeah and people can make their own minds about his views. People freaked out. I'M GONNA use that term. People got very upset. I look I expected some some people to forget what I I. I don't know what I yeah so what happened. Let me say this. I would say this is not my finest hour neither in the rather rather abrupt invitation and also the rescinding of you you. You have to fault me. Either the first or the second and I believe in in journalism efficacy of journalism the necessity of journalism festival is not journalism at some other thing right what uh-huh bunch of people on the staff objected to was that this guy who was the very worst arguably of Donald Trump in terms of native ISM in terms of racism in terms of cynicism that it was very hard for them to stomach not US doing journalism with Steve Bannon because we've talked to him endlessly and written about him endlessly both before and since and no objections to that no none none none at all I think their objection was the idea of him being part of the festival and then having an after party which is invited US paying them. You know completely modest fee as you know I forget what it is a couple hundred dollars or whatever it is and it just just caused such a storm that I decided to live to fight another day right or wrong. That's what I decided in the moment. Do you think there are people like him or others who in the different context from a festival by prominent magazine but I'm talking Cable Television Fox. MSNBC N that there are certain people that cable television hosts should not have on cable television is presumably journalism. It's not always terrific journalism. it's not an ideas festival. It's not it's not. You're not selling tickets. It's different. It's different you know it. It often comes up and forget about this instant often come. Would you interview her name. Your fascist leader well in journalistic context. Yes yeah the truth in journalism you should be in command of the context you set and we certainly are in pieces that we published in the New Yorker. We can put them in context and all the rest. I think one of the things that people fear that somehow that the interview Ooh e will run away with the contest and to disastrous results rightly or wrongly. I think that's that's the anxiety but I'm talking about a subset of people who are potentially problematic apple matic not because they have bad odors views according to some I mean if you asked me would I interview Victor Orban in journalistic setting of course of course who's the autocrat in in Hungary. Let's talk about people who are not terrible people in that regard sure but who are liars and who have repeatedly been shown not to tell all the truth some might say Kellyanne Conway is in that Category Person Corey Lewandowski is in that category person admitted it basically we're talking about in journalistic context in a journalistic realistic context. They'd think you do interview them and then you make damn sure that you are making clear to the reader or listener what in fact is is true and what is not true whether you like it or not. These people are occupying the offices they do this. The Times that we live in you could say the same thing about the president United States. What are you supposed to blackout the President of the United States people say. Maybe we should pay less attention to the crazy stuff afraid you can't. I believe leave me. I we had this conversation all the time. She we rise to the bait every time he tweets these tweets however untruthful however pernicious just however whatever they are presidential utterances of importance that they're being listened to and interpreted and have consequences in Riyadh Riyadh in Tehran in John Yang and to ignore them. What good does that do you just have to do good journalism about that interpretive creative and an investigative and otherwise we talk about the New Yorker itself. I'm GonNa ask you a question that I asked one of your very prominent writers who happens to be a friend and colleague of mine in various ways. Jeffrey toobin sure asked him at a live pocket. Has Anyone actually ever finished reading in New Yorker article you you know if I had a glass of water. I would hurl at you yeah. They have I know that question and that is in this age where everything seems to be quick quick quick and fast editing and nobody has an attention span tweeting is the favored form of communication by a lot of people including the president of the United States America and from what I understand Yorkers is very very successful at the moment as accessible. I think it has ever been what accounts for the success of that long form in this age. You know attention span because I don't believe that it's an age of no attention span. I look I live in the same world you do. We're all in the subway and seeing everybody on their phones. we all have the experience of reading something and in the back of their minds you're wondering what's on my phone is no question that life is faster faster and more frenetic and distracted now than it was and I think the phone and all the comes with it has not to be too dramatic about this has engendered a change in consciousness us the way human beings think from minute to minute is not uninfluenced by the presence of this little black square in front of me and the one that's over there in front of you. There's there's no question about that but I also think that there is an absolute human hunger to know no more deeply your world right now as we sit here taping this to use the acronym stick word outside on the St are thousands and thousands of people demonstrating the warming of our globe now to understand that how that happened scientifically ecologically politically what it means for us what it means for our our futures in our children's and grandchildren's that is an enormously complex topic now. If you're reading the New Yorker beginning in the late eighties very soon after James Hansen and made his famous Senate testimony for the really the first time talking about global warming is a problem within a year The New Yorker published a very very long article their first real real deep on global warming by bill mckibben called the end of nature and some years after Elizabeth with Colbert wrote a three part series called the climate of man expanding upon and deepening our knowledge of this thing that we are facing human beings on this is common earth and there have been many many many such articles since we will continue to do that you cannot learn about your world sufficiently whether it's the world of foreign affairs or the cultural world in little snippets and when I first I started going to kind of meetings and conferences and sessions about this new thing called the Internet there were things is that people said that turned out to be right about the future and things turned out to be nonsense and one of the nonsense things was no one will read anything long on the Internet the attention expensive changed and no one's interested and it's got to be five hundred words or less and on and on and on and that turned out to be nonsense Arabia's the case things can coexist exist. It seems that actually has been very successful and that's basically every morning Alan all that all that stuff and sometimes you want more well you don't only they want popcorn. They're calling axios popcorn political pop but useful. I who doesn't like popcorn I'm being to to I don't don't mean to be pissy about anything much less or snitty or pissy whatever each thing has its own purpose and the New Yorker has obviously has a place for millions of people and I don't think it's decoration you know the old I believe me to this day. I get well. They stack up. I get it and nobody reads the whole New York Times either every day but you know we would be lesser republic without both of them right so who's the audience. It's there for whoever wants it. John Updike once had had a lovely passage in which he was describing the answer to that very question about his novel said he said what I the image that I most prize is not just my sophisticated located readers who went to graduate school or or undergraduate school at are now have some sophisticated occupation or Bubba but maybe a fifteen year old kid in a school library who reaches up and pick up my novela and suddenly is alive to the idea and it happens all the time. 'cause I see it I hear from people that people stumble across work in the New Yorker and then they get it changes them in some way that piece that issue that story worry that to me is a miracle so I think it's yes if you looked at our demographics. It's in a lot of cities. It's probably very coastal with various turban centers in between but that's not all we herald Rosso invented. The magazine said New Yorker is not for the Little Old Lady Dubuque and with all due respect to herald Ross Ross. I'm happy if if the lading dubuque reads US and the same goes for the little kid in Gary Indiana used interesting verb just now he said invented it was a magazine gene invented yeah at a whole cloth Howard Ross who was a western Newspaperman who had edited Stars and Stripes and Kinda bounced around Itinerant Guy and he comes awesome in Hatton these yet another New Yorker who invents himself in New York and he has this idea he saw the New York Times is being in those days especially very boring and official official and had.

US New York City bill de Blasio president Steve Bannon New York Post The Times New York Times Bloomberg The New Yorker Elizabeth Warren Buddha Mike Bloomberg Barack Obama MSNBC John Updike Jeffrey toobin Kellyanne Conway Donald Trump
"david remnick" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

11:58 min | 9 months ago

"david remnick" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"The smartest way to hire David Remnant. Thanks so much for being on the show. It's great to be here so we're just a couple of Jersey guys yes exactly Friday afternoon the great pleasure of my life as I can look out my window and I can if I squint I can see my hometown right across in your hometown is Hillsdale. New Jersey. Mine is Eaten Town New Jersey and we both a lot about Asbury Park because we're gonNA. WE'RE GONNA get to Bruce Yes. I can how to guys like us not talk about talk about Bruce Geezers from Jersey. Speak for yourself I will so let's start off with something that I know is on your mind before we get to some of the things going on America in the world and trends towards peace or chaos as the case may be. You're the editor of the New Yorker for a while now great magazine which I should also say that disclaimer although I don't know that it's we should call it a disclaimer. The New Yorker is a supporter of this podcast. Oh thank God no wonder sure. I got no wonder I got. This has nothing to do with that. I have you on you have festival coming up. We do the New Yorker Festival's twentieth the Year of this twenty. I can't believe it look I was available. You've been are there but not in a couple years. Life is law so right life his long. That's okay so the festival is over Columbus Day weekend October Eleventh Eleventh Twelfth and Thirteenth. I'll tell you twenty years ago I just started as editor of the magazine and a woman named Rhonda Sherman who did all kinds of things for the magazine. Did all kinds of events came into my office. I I think I was the editor for about three and a half seconds instead. I have an idea what's your idea. The ideas that we have this thing called The New Yorker Festival and it'd be three days and it reflect the magazine and all its dimensions fiction reporting cartooning everything humor current events all the rest of and I was too inexperienced to say we know which is you know that the early that early euphoric period of doing something new you say yes very quickly to what's the seems like good ideas. Sometimes it turned and a great sometimes they turned out otherwise this turned out to be fantastic and I o enormous thanks to run the Sherman who's been running this thing for for a long time so people can come and see people talk. They can come and see people talk this year for example Nancy Pelosi the speaker of the House will be in conversation with Jane Mayer. been a guest on the show who no doubt and and at the same time you have you know people like Zadie Smith will come rock and roll people like I'm going to be in conversation with Patti Smith which I've have done before and the last time we spoke at the festival. I'm afraid to say I backed her up on guitar. She sang because the night eight which is a real aberration with with springsteen and I brought along my little fender telecaster and Miami and I'm afraid to tell you I was her backup. MUSICI- how'd that go. I would say that it went without incident. We didn't rehearse. We didn't realize the kind of review that any any rock and roll so terrified I it's like it's like your performance on stage and also an arrest. Oh my God heard without incident things happen. You Know Nasty Asti lawyers calling you up in threatening about stories in all kinds of things can happen. This was the moment of terror and I so I we arranged by texting that we would do this. I gave few songs to do that choices and she chose actually the most complicated one because it has a little bridge in it which for me me is complicated and I said. Can we rehearse beforehand. I don't have time I thought we'd be able to go in and Futz around with it and see how fast a player how loud or this that the other thing and the only instruction she gave me was play it really loud that was it and she was fantastic. I'm sitting there. My stupid brooks brothers the shirt behind her with my guitar and she was Patti Smith and she just knows how to put over a song. Even with a horrible backup musician like me still tickled by your description. You may know this but when I would track arrests when I was the attorney the email that you wanted to get early in the morning at six fifteen six twenty in the morning particularly if if there was going to be the arrest of someone who thought to be violent began case remark case the email that everything was all clear always said something like the defendant so and so was taken into custody acidy without incident. It's it's good that you have that parallel for the festival. You're going to be in conversation with Smith and also a couple of other people people. Terry Gross Terry Gross because Terry Gross is the interviewers interviewer yes and so. I thought it'd be a guest guest. It's a little bit like taking a you know a violin in less than from from Yasha high fits or something. I WanNa see how she does. It and she's been doing this for so long every day. We should do it by telephone. What you're referring referring to is that if you get interviewed by Terry Gross you never meet her. She sits in Philadelphia and you go to a studio in New York. You would go to forty third street. Where are the New Yorkers old offices were and it you hear this disembodied voice and I think now having done this myself for a long time. Both on radio and you know with a pencil and paper. I think there's a certain advantage in it. Yeah I do both we should let listeners know that you and I are in the room together yeah but when the person is out of the room you can be maybe less distracted by whether they seem comfortable. They seem happy. Just listening to the voice and you're having I think terry gross says this and I appreciate it now that I've done for a couple of years. You're having as the interviewer the host the same experience of the listener who also doesn't see us and is not in the room so it's just pure audio explode well the dynamics of a live conversation. I think journalistically are the best. I don't think I'd WANNA. Do you know I find that the level of information that I get as a journalist I is way better if I'm in a room and nobody else's around and it's quiet and the other person has the confidence that had whatever agreements you make with them will be Keppler. I find this business of lots of interviewing being done by email or text or the rest and maybe this is my the age. I don't trust it as much because the other person first of all writing is different from speaking right and I just the level of confidence is not the same Pinkett is different and I went asked about interviewing techniques since I can use this as a tutorial for myself because I'm a little bit newer to this at least in this context just the other advantage of of live those few minutes before you go on air when you're in person to meet someone they could address your team. You can have small talk. You can mention people so you have in common crack a joke break the ice all that sort of stuff. It's much more difficult especially interviewing someone remotely who you've never met before and depending on what their line of work is to get on the phone. Everyone's ruins read. The engineers are ready to go and you start. The interview grilled that I don't like very much well. I imagine that your your previous career and interrogations would I try. Not I try not to do that. You know we have adopted a softer approach. Well how many how often do you have an interview. That's innately hostile. Not that often yeah yeah yeah. I disagree with folks and I disagree firmly but this is not about combat. This is about finding people out and also educating the public public on stuff. The best thing I ever learned about interviewing and this had to do with print was I'm not sure it would work on radio or podcasting there like it was a great great New Yorker Kerr writer named. Aj labeling who was who is really a dominant figure in during the Second World War in the fifties and so and he died in the mid sixties and he did all kinds of work city reporting he was the greatest boxing writer who ever lived he wrote about food and great man about town a really outgoing going person but his interview technique was just to begin interview to sit down and you would be the subject and he would begin like this pure silence almost the psychoanalytic technique of of the analyst and the other person if it worked out well would rush in and fill the void as you sometimes have in a human encounter a date or something like that obviously silence on the part of the interviewer is an incredibly important technique that everyone talks about journalists. Bob Woodward talk about it the best investigators. FBI agents that I worked with also you ask a question. The person answers. Maybe it's not a fuller answer you keep. I've never heard of starting that way. So since I have have you you give me some pointers already. Maybe the next interview of sitting senator or presidential candidate will begin by not saying anything but luckily virtually walk and walk out the door. For what advice do you have for people who are trying to get information from folks in non-combative way. Well you mentioned one. I think that anybody buddy who had the experience of listening to themselves interview. Somebody else always comes away feeling the same thing if they're new at it. I talked too much. I interrupted too much. I wasn't listening carefully enough to follow up well enough because I I wanted to make witty remark or score the point we've all seen that take place on television or heard it in podcasts and at the end of the day there's a certain kind of journalism you trying to elicit information or get to that person's humanity or what they're about. That's the goal. It's not for me in any event. It's not a performance of how smart and witty and sparkling. I am what about preparation with the right amount of preparation. And how much do you do. Oh well. I if I'M GONNA go out on a story and talk about my thing that I'm that I've been doing for a long time not short life in in radio. The key is to read and read and read and read and read before you go anywhere and to talk to as many secondary and tertiary people as possible not necessarily on the record just for your own education and edification and then you go out into the field then you go out into the world and at the point where you think you have the story. That's the point at which you're beginning now. This is the great luxury of doing it at the New Yorker where you have time to do it. I know when I lived in Moscow in the late eighties and early nineties the first year. I wasn't any good at it. I was just getting up to speed in the midst of what turned out to be an epochal revolution but I was just getting up to speed on the city of Moscow and how people talked and what the gossip was and all the rest so I am sure that if if I went back and looked at my clips in nineteen eighty eight there were infinitely inferior to what may have been in nineteen eighty nine ninety ninety one. You're just getting up to speed so you have to have the modesty of what you don't know and in life that is an infinite space so one of the other people are you interviewing at the festival is Democratic presidential candidate people to Judge Mayor Pete. Who's also been a guest on the show right. We're GONNA ask him about well. I think Buddha judges media strategy is is the opposite of say Bernie's Bernie Sanders Bernie Sanders is exactly the same this independent of their policies or ideologies. My impression is that Bernie Sanders who does actually relatively modest amount of interviews compared to some is almost the same in an interview as he is on the stump he does not he does not ratcheted down and become conversational he's already doing so better orcas a little bit that way too he is he is and I think it I think to his detriment into it doesn't work for Bernie. Bernie Sanders is great appeal. I think to a support as as the sincerity of his convictions which have been the same for for decades..

Bernie Sanders Bernie Sanders Terry Gross Terry Gross Patti Smith New Jersey editor Rhonda Sherman Bruce Geezers terry gross Jersey Moscow America David Remnant Asbury Park Hillsdale Zadie Smith Nancy Pelosi Miami Judge Mayor Pete
"david remnick" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

02:08 min | 9 months ago

"david remnick" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

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"david remnick" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

10:11 min | 9 months ago

"david remnick" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"From cafe welcome to stay tuned. I'm pre- BERRARA. I even think a lot of supporters think and know that he's racist. What's bewildering excusing him. We see this all the time you see them interviewed on television you read it in the newspaper. I've talked to people basically a lot of people think think okay. I know that this guy's a bad guy. His character is not the highest but they're getting something from him. So people make Devil's bargains that's David Renwick a journalist and author. He lived in Moscow for years covering the dissolution of the Soviet Union for the Washington Post Remnant got his start at the New Yorker Nineteen Ninety two and in just six years got promoted to the top job editor of the magazine as they gear up for the upcoming annual New Yorker corker festival. I joined remnant at his studio. In the World Trade Center. We talked about his experiences interviewing Obama and the White House the discovery of the New Yorker why it's pointless to block got the president's communications even tweets in which news outlet is a form of political popcorn but first. Let's get to your questions. That's coming up. Stay tuned this fall. Stay tuned is going back on the Road Denver. Atlanta Minneapolis and Detroit tickets available right now at cafe dot com slash tour November fifth will be in Minneapolis. The Great State of Minnesota joining me is former former marathoner city Councilman Civil Rights Attorney Mayor Jacob Prai. You're not gonNA WANNA miss this rising star in addition to Minneapolis Atlanta with Sally Alliot in Denver with Shannon Watts and in Detroit with Attorney General Dana Nessel to get tickets and details of all these upcoming live shows head to cafe dot com slash a tour. That's cafe dot com slash tour. This is from Denver and I will be gone when you my wife and I will be joining you in Denver. when you interview Shannon Watts here in a few weeks anyway. My question is looking at all the trouble that trump is and here. I was wondering how do we as American citizen you to be the prosecuting attorney against president in trump on his impeachment trial fly free love listening to you can't wait to see you on October twenty four x by Chris from Denver. Glad you're coming into the show. It's only three weeks away. There's still a few tickets left so people should if you're in the area are going to be in the area snapped them up and one more thing we will soon be announcing an additional gas to the surprise guest at the October twenty four th show in Denver so stay tuned for that so I appreciate the vote of Confidence I'm quite busy doing a lot of things and no one has called me but I do take the point to these new words suggesting it that you know the House committees would be well served by bringing in one or more people from the outside some of which has has already happened we saw noted criminal defense attorney Barry Burke to a very good job of questioning Corey Lewandowski at the end belong session before the house a few weeks ago so there are lots of great people who are already on the committees there are lots of great people that they can call upon and I hope they will use the expertise of folks who have spent a lot of time in court and a lot of time examining planning difficult witnesses getting through the nonsense cutting through the garbage because I think that would be illuminating helpful for the impeachment inquiry and also for the American public typical. This is Joe Halpern from New York City longtime. I I'm Holler with the recent whistle blower event along with all the contempt. That's been happening things for the house. How easy would it be to have those in contempt arrested or forcibly made to come before the house. I'm hearing lots of threats. It's no action and just curious. If maybe that action just isn't really possible Joe. Thanks for your question. As you know. In millburn I discussed at great length the issues with the gathering momentum Mendham on impeachment one thing. We didn't talk about as much as we might have. Was this issue that you raised in your question if someone refused to testify or becomes obstructionist whether which would usually on your someone else what are the options for. Congress and there is an option that I've heard members of Congress discuss on television in newspapers called inherent contempt kept which technically gives the congress the right to hold an individual who's being difficult in not responding to duly issued subpoenas and and requests for information whether testimony allows them the right to hold them in inherent contempt and the same way that a judge when holding someone in contempt can enforce that contempt order by presumably causing the rest of that person and detention until such time as as become compliant now in the case of the House of Representatives presumably that could be done on by the sergeant at arms who is responsible for various things including protection of the members of the House and would be the law enforcement adjunct to the house in connection with enforcing its requests for information so people have been talking about it. It's there historically I don't off the top of my head. Remember the last time that was invoked and used in the serious way. That's been described as a theoretical matter. I think it's a worthwhile thing to be talking about. A members of Congress should consider implementing it. The problem is I talked to folks that given the timetable on which they're trying to proceed with impeachment. There's really no procedure set down for how you exactly enforce through inherent contempt. It's easy to say well on her contempt. You send the guy out with handcuffs in a gun and bring someone to jail which I don't think exists and has not been constructed and would cause also all sorts of drama drama and headache and divisiveness so you know. I don't expect necessarily to see it. I think it's a good thing for people to be talking about and as we go forward with this this investigation and potentially other investigations covers have been so supine flat on its back on a lot of things relating to oversight and I think lots of people have thumbed their nose at requests from Congress that I think they need to revive but I don't think based on what I'm hearing and thinking about the pragmatic realities of it this might disappoint some people that they can't overnight overnight figure out a fair and just an appropriate mechanism to all of a sudden after having this power be dormant for so long all of a sudden exercise their inherent contempt apt power. I think they got to come up with some rules and procedures and a facility and then. Maybe we can see if that works. I know some people want expect members of Congress to put the cuffs on folks if they're not responsive. I think that's not going to happen. Just yet as I said an milligram and I discuss all of these issues much greater length this past week and will in in future weeks for a free two week trial to the cafe insider podcast go to cafe dot com slash insider high pre john from Tucson Arizona. I WanNa you and your show are an inspiration to me or my question is this why are so many people including those most notably in the media or pundit class afraid used the word lie or liar and instead they say untruth or falsehood especially when referring to our politicians. Thanks Free John from Tucson. Thanks for your question and it's something that's been on people's minds for a long time. Although I think that the standard operating procedure you for various news outlets has changed as the president's lying accumulates and as it seems to accelerate so I don't think so monolithic view I think part of the reservations that's a media. The allies have is that you know it's a pretty stark word and it's not a word that is generally used to describe things said by the sitting president of the United States and people have have been operating under sort of old normal rules and I believe it's been essentially a norm on the part of the press to shy away from certain words and use use less pejorative language like false statement or false claim or untruth because that's how it's been but now you have a president who himself violates norm after norm after norm so I think the question is well put in. I think takes on some urgency at a time when there's so much lying going on you know it's an interesting thing in court you have people who who testify and they claim to tell the truth and sometimes they lie prosecutors and other folks who participate in the trial process have to be really careful about calling calling something ally which can be justified if you're careful and calling someone a liar so the distinction between false claiming lie is a blurry one and I I and I take your point on that but there is a difference at least in a court of law when you're trying not to overly inflame a jury in a judge call you out on it if you refer to a witness as a liar her that sometimes will not fly further to what I said a second ago as I was walking to the studio today on Wednesday I saw on twitter that the president had made some statements and the reporters reporters who were covering the statements and one just as one example John King of CNN literally went on television right after literally went on television right after trump made his the statements from the Oval Office and said quote the president constantly and repeatedly lies so some people are saying it. Some people aren't the bottom line. Is We all know what it means. When the president repeats over and over and over again false statement that shows intention -ality it shows he's doing it with full knowledge and doesn't correct himself so some of the things he says I certainly lies and I think you're seeing more people call him out on my guest. This Week is David Remnant the journalist author editor of The New Yorker. He's got his own show the New Yorker Radio Hour and the interview's headline guests at the New Yorker Festival but we'll get to that with remnant at the helm the New Yorker became the first magazine to win a Pulitzer Prize and a peabody award early in his career. He spent four eventful years in the late nineteen eighties covering the fall of the Soviet Union as Moscow correspondent. I got some interview tips from David and we talked about what Americans can learn from Russia whether we live in a no attention span era how he won't hesitate to call trump a racist and why it's essential to refuse despair. That's coming up. Stay tuned. Stay tuned is supported by.

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"david remnick" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

03:26 min | 10 months ago

"david remnick" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Shot and sweet hesitate to ask what was the result. They were married so in the end. It's not a tragic salt now so far so oh good now everything worked out a better than expected so you you made it big with this band. Alabama shakes and you've got three partners in that band. How do they feel about you going so low I won. I told them I had really been marinating it on on it for a while because I was not re. The songs run aren't coming to US and when we were getting together. It was really hard to felt stuck. Yeah felt very stuck in in specially mean you mean the guys would be like what's going on like why can't we we get anything done and just wasn't receiving anything. is it on you. It happened to work out that way yeah yeah after San and color you know at you're the person people know well. Well just like a creatively. It's usually the way that things went is I would have ideas and we come into rehearsing but I wasn't getting any ideas for for this and some of the ideas I had just it wasn't the right like ingredients. It wasn't working now so eventually in probably after like a year and a half of this House I guys that you know I think I'm going to do my own record and I was met with like a lot of confusion and disappointment but then we said they're angry. I'm not sure if there were angry. They're more like surprised but we sat down and we talked about it for several hours. Santa Circle and it was just like you know. It's been hard yeah yeah yeah. No it was like well. I'm just GonNa go do this a- At the end of the conversation and everybody's like okay we understand we did it gave me their blessing to go on and find what I needed to find or create what I needed to create today in the back of their minds or do you get the sense that they felt that was the end of the Obama shakes. Probably yeah is it. I don't know wherever creativity ativity leads. My ship can't force it. That's the thing like once I start forcing it. I'm GonNa be no good anyway. You know now you you came up awesome new collaborators and some remarkable collaborators like Robert Glassberg who's infected on the show whose whose talents range from well all over the place he has he has an album them of miles. Davis covers and he's he's worked with some of the biggest people in hip. Hop and now with you why bring on somebody like Robert Glasser. What did he gives you an ornate Smith. Who's also a jazz musician. haven't watching rob since he made at Miles Davis tribute record. I was like wow this do so cool. He did a Song Erica by do that. I really really like when I was like. I'm GonNa Watch his career 'cause that. That's what I do. Musicians I really respect musicians and I think their their careers matter I think musicians just they matter where does rob glass fit and what where's his influence most powerful on this album with songs songs thirteenth century metal funny story behind him so before then rob. I was just kinda telling him like here right here. In this section you know you can do like this and right here in the section house thinking more like this but on thirteenth you know he walked into the room and just starts playing..

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