17 Burst results for "David Pogue"

"david pogue" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

04:50 min | 6 months ago

"david pogue" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

"And it was four and two in the first two quadrants with a quadrant three loss until Miami murdered North Carolina on Tuesday night and jumped in the net enough to make that home loss to the hurricanes that duke suffered a quad two loss instead of a quad three laws. I think duke's good. If you told me to put together a list of teams, you know, 6, 7, 8 deep that can win the national championship. I would have duke on that list. But this deep into the season as we've talked about a million times, I'm mostly gonna rank you based on what you've actually done. I'm not trying to outsmart the results of games. Like, you played a bunch of games. Have you done? And they've done well, but not as well as 5 other teams in the country. Ten other teams in the country. Maybe not even 15 other teams in the country. Again, three and two and quadrant one one and one in quadrant two, so four and three in the first two quadrants. I'll tell you what was concerning to me and it has become a trim with this duke team is they don't rebound the ball at all. I mean, Florida state grabbed 19 offensive rebounds against duke. Miss 47 shots grab 19 offensive rebounds. That's an offensive rebounding rate of 40.4. That's outrageous. Now Kentucky leads the country in offensive rebounding rate at 40.2. So what Florida state get against duke is better than what Kentucky has done against its schedule and Kentucky leads the nation in offensive rebounding percentage. So Florida state was awesome against duke, but some of it was duke was terrible against Florida state, as has been the case for much of the season. Duke's defensive rebounding percentage is 29.8. I know he's never don't mean anything to some people, but for some context understand that ranks 237th in the country. It's a flaw. Perhaps a fatal flaw. Because what it led to last night is Florida state grabbing 12 more offensive rebounds than duke. And then additionally, Florida state turned it over ten fewer times than duke. And that led to a deal where Florida state took 18 more shots than duke. 73 to 55. And the seminoles also took 7 more free throws than duke. 25 to 18. So if you're wondering how Florida state one, despite shooting just 35.6% from the field, while duke shot 49.1% of the fail, that's it. The civil said way more scoring opportunities. Like in a 40 minute game, if you're going to take 18 more shots than your opponent, your opponent is going to have a hard time beating you. And that's what happened a Tuesday night in Tallahassee and that's something that duke's got to get cleaned up. They can still be really good despite these things. They have been. But with those things, I think it becomes difficult to be elite consistently and avoid courting like the one they endured last night. My closing thoughts on this are have to give it up to rate one Evans who hit just a phenomenal running off the glass layup to even get this to the bonus session and then actually Evans Bond up hitting the clinching foul shots to secure the wind for Florida state. But he's a really solid player. And I know F is two fans are quite familiar with how important he's been in spots across the season and last. But yeah, that shot to even get it over Mark Williams and to get this game to OT was such a tough shot in a really, really good one. And then duke loses because that goes in and we get it to a bonus session and then Wendell Moore just didn't have a great shot. Ben Carroll didn't even get it to Ben Carroll in the final possession. I don't know if that would have made a difference or not, but Ben Caro, you know, the more he's involved the better they are, they had been Carol feeding Williams, you know, from 16, 17, 20 feet out a couple times last night and I thought that was really successful there. So good on that for you. You're in the conversation. Plenty of work to do. I don't know for sure if this team's going to the tournament or not, but I do know you need to win that game against duke to really give yourself a chance and now they got a chance. Next up for Florida state, Thursday's game. They're stepping out of the ACC to get a game with north Florida. Next up for duke, Saturday's game with a Syracuse team that's now 9 and 9 on the season after Tuesday's win over Clemson. If anything has got a chance of solving the world's problems, its science and technology. And every breakthrough was the result of somebody doing the breaking through. I'm David pogue. This is unsung science. The.

Florida duke Kentucky Ben Carroll North Carolina Miami Evans Bond Duke Wendell Moore Tallahassee Ben Caro Carol feeding Williams Mark Williams Evans north Florida ACC Syracuse
"david pogue" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

01:59 min | 8 months ago

"david pogue" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"Thank you, Scott. What is it like to see him today? It kind of takes my breath away Scott. Does that helps to bring some closure and some help? Help, for heroes, has been the mission of the Carnegie fund for 117 years. It has bestowed 10,000 medals and awarded $40 million. And back in 1904, Andrew Carnegie sensed what science has now confirmed. Heroes, he said, can not be created. They act on an impulse. A mysterious gift to the few. Now, an update on a story we first reported in 2018. Sharon alphonse looked at how a plastic plague was turning oceans into vast garbage dumps. A young Dutch inventor buoyant slat created a device meant to clean up the notorious great Pacific garbage patch. The eventual goal of this cleanup is to get to a 90% reduction by the year 2040. The combination of pipe and nylon netting collected more publicity than plastic. But slots organization the ocean cleanup has developed a new design. In tests, this summer and fall, its successfully collected some 63,000 pounds of ocean plastic. I'm John wertheim. We'll be back next week with another edition of 60 minutes. If anything has got a chance of solving the world's problems, it's science and technology. And every breakthrough was the result of somebody doing the breaking through. I'm David pogue. This is unsung science. The untold creation stories behind the most mind-blowing advances in science and tech. Presented by CBS News and Simon and Schuster. You can listen to unsung science wherever you get your podcasts..

Carnegie fund Sharon alphonse Scott Andrew Carnegie John wertheim plague David pogue CBS News Schuster Simon
"david pogue" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

01:59 min | 9 months ago

"david pogue" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"This is the takeout with major Garret. This week on the checkout environmental photographer Jim balog, the human element is his book. It is a time capsule from the Anthropocene 200 years from now. People will look back at our era when everything's changing so much and they'll go for God's sake. What happened? They're gonna live in a world that's really, really, really different, and they're going to wonder what we were thinking about and what we were experiencing in our time. For more from this week's conversation, follow the take out with major Garrett on Apple podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. With the death of general Colin Powell this past week, America lost one more of its dwindling supply of wise men and wise women. Washington hands with seasoned perspective, who could tell a president when he is wrong. Like general Powell, they weren't always right, but could be trusted to hold the nation's interest above personal ambition. Sam none, Olympia snow, and George Mitchell came from the Senate, Jim baker was an establishment lawyer. A few were from Wall Street, or like general Powell, from the military. Last Sunday on this broadcast, we heard from another, Robert Gates, who rose through the national security and intelligence communities. Most of them are now retired or gone. We can only wonder if the present state of American politics is capable of producing their successors. I'm Bill Whitaker. We'll be back next week with another edition of 60 minutes. If anything has got a chance of solving the world's problems, it's science and technology. And every breakthrough was the result of somebody doing the breaking through. I'm David pogue. This is unsung science. The untold creation stories behind the most mind-blowing advances in science and tech. Presented by CBS News and Simon and Schuster. You can listen to unsung science wherever you get your podcasts..

general Powell Jim balog Garret Sam none Garrett Jim baker George Mitchell Bill Whitaker Olympia Apple Robert Gates Washington America Senate David pogue CBS News Schuster Simon
"david pogue" Discussed on Red Blonde Fox

Red Blonde Fox

08:32 min | 1 year ago

"david pogue" Discussed on Red Blonde Fox

"Back lake law. I'm visiting. I'll wait With her own word. You david pogue on the gaza thinking now. The spray flew to will me. How can you world meet me your us your view. A the only year the the utah he he he he leave. Yes were the you got the places golden word word my heart view he slide. You're right that and they will not g's make sense that talk you. Weather loggers his up wall. A logging all means deputy since june always do arise on next nora owen. World community are all on. Yeah policies John you ian Back man or failed all we are using our weight. Grace thankful all problem league rose. Thank you will die. And a can't nine zero will give you that. Are we not only masterpass. Fills the niche on.

"david pogue" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:13 min | 1 year ago

"david pogue" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It could be open at both ends. The so called dog trot layout. Toe breezes could blow through and they had high ceilings and it wasn't just Lot of space for you. It meant that heat rises. And so the heat rises up above your head level and keeps you cooler on Dove course ceiling fans. Cost a tiny fraction of the amount of electricity of a C but they can cool you off by a few degrees just is equally Let's go to Courtney Online. Nine in Peaks Go. Hi, Courtney. Thanks for calling all of it. Hi. This is Kourtney from Peekskill. Thanks for having me on. Um I like a lot of people. I have the vegetable garden. I drive the electric vehicle I compost and all that, but I realized that all of that requires money, and not everyone is in a financial position to do that, so we really need to change the system so that everybody has access to renewable heating cooling. Electricity, etcetera. And as many people know, New York passed the steel c p a that Climate Leadership Community Protection Act that said, all these lofty goals for getting up getting us off fossil fuels. But one thing that folks can do and actions that they can take is that right now, our New York State Public Service Commission has been tasked with making the actual road map of how we're going to meet those goals. And they were supposed to come out with that back in August of 2020, and since then they've just been delaying and delaying over and over again. Wilmore Focker feel infrastructure gets built. All across New York. So a bunch of organizations from all over New York 130 organizations with 190 elected officials have called on the Public Service Commission to basically put out that plan and get us the rapid and equitable transition. So we're having a virtual rally and press conference on ground Hog Day. The second of February at noon, and we would love it. If folks who really want to see us change this system joined us. You can find all the information at renewable heat now dot org's Or search for hashtag. Get off gas on Twitter. Thanks, Courtney. They're doing that for the shadow. We really appreciate it. My guess is David Pogue. How to prepare for climate change a practical guide to surviving the chaos. This is a big, thick book. There's so much information in here. Something I thought was kind of interesting given some of the headlines of today is you write about investing What are some ways to engage in the stock market? The way you can invest ethically invest if that's the way you want to go about helping this issue. Yeah, And you know this ties in beautifully with Courtney's called just now Climate change. Study after study has shown hits low income areas and communities of color, worse, um, long list of historical reasons for that, Um, so this this chapter on where to invest Profit from climate change adaptation was a long conversation with my editor is, is it Tasteless and elitist to suggest that people can invest. In businesses that will do well in the climate change era. And the answer, according to the experts I spoke to is yes, because in effect, you're helping the problem. You're backing and investing in companies. They're trying to make it better for everyone. Better to invest in, You know something that's going to make the world cleaner than in let's say a fossil fuel company anyway. So the answer The question is e mean the obvious thought is Oh solar power. Oh, wind power. Those actually aren't fantastic investments. Or the simple, wonderful reason that they've gotten really, really cheap. I mean, the price of solar power and wind is So cheap this year, 72% of all new electrical production facility in the United States will be renewable energy, mainly from solar and wind. That's why they're not a great investment. It's kind of a race to the bottom. Better ideas or to think of who will profit. From the solar and wind industries. A bunch of states now have mandates to get a certain amount, including New York to get a certain amount of their power from renewable sources. And they have to buy that power from electrical utilities. So the utilities that get most of their power from solar and wind are the ones who will do well. Companies like Nextera and Excel Energy. Also, you know, we know that the world is going to electric cars. General Motors incredibly announced that they're going to be an all electric car. Yeah, Company within 14 years. Um, So how do you think strategically upstream? Well, they all need lithium ion batteries, and there's only four companies that make them They're all Asian cos there's LG Electronics and Panasonic and so on. And all those batteries require lithium, and there are very few major lithium mining companies, but one of them is American. All tomorrow. It's called, and there's a chill and company too. So it's a matter of sort of thinking upstream from who is going to supply all of these technological solutions to climate change. The name of the book is how to prepare for climate change A practical guide to surviving the chaos thanks to everybody who called in and thank you to David Polk. Thank you so much. Up. Next we'll hear from writer and director Rose Glass about her debut film ST Madi, truly terrifying psychological horror film about a troubled hospice nurse and her patient more after the break. Support for W N. Y. C comes from Amazon Studios presenting one night in Miami from director Regina King and writer Kim Powers inspired by true events that took.

Courtney New York Courtney Online Peaks Go New York State Public Service Um Peekskill David Pogue Public Service Commission Wilmore Focker Nextera writer
"david pogue" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"david pogue" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Doing. Emily. Thanks for calling in. Let's go to John in Morningside Heights Online to Hi, John. Thanks for calling all of it. You're on the air. Hi. How are you? I'm doing great. I like this point You're gonna make 00 you do? Oh, good. I'm so glad you know about because nobody knows about this. So any type of you know, climate change scenario past to include hydrogen feels all economy. Sorry, kind of nervous, so it's OK but John Kerry has, you know mentioned it the last couple of days. You know, once in his press conference in No once yesterday on the national TV, I think was racial metal show, but, um, yeah, I mean, you know, California has about 9000 cars made by Toyota, Honda and Hyundai. That are running around the roads there, but they really need the stations and every car manufacturer right now has a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle program. It's just, you know, battery and battery electric vehicles of sort of I hate to say suck the oxygen out of the the atmosphere. And so it's tough for hiding. Sort of, you know, get a foothold but 18 countries right now. Have a hydrogen, you know, plan or road map that they're gonna pursue, including China and a bunch of company countries in Europe. As well. So it's really important that we get on board with this and And you know they're Toyota and Honda in hundreds. Waiting to buy cars. In the Northeast. They've been trying to for five years. There's actually almost 12 stations. Up and running right now, so and really good news coming out of the Boston area in Boston Fire Department, which is has approved these cars on the bridges and tunnels and we're just waiting for The Port Authority in New York, New Jersey to get on board, too. Thanks so much for bringing that into the conversation. I really appreciate it. My guess is David Pogue. We're talking about how to prepare for climate change a practical guide to surviving the chaos. So in your book, you talk about something that not everybody can afford to do right now, which is Moving and leaving areas that are affected and maybe going someplace else. So the thing is, though, if you're moving, you probably live in a place that climate that's climate vulnerable. How have we seen climate change affect the real estate market? Um, Yeah, well, Miami is is the key poster child for this principle. Um, you know, Miami is going to be underwater. There There is. I mean, people are saying by late this century, it's It's just gone low lying. You can't build a sea wall around it. The sea levels are rising. And you know when the when the international Intergovernmental Panel on climate change says that we're expecting sea levels to rise. You know 3 to 8 ft. You might think what's 3 ft up. But what you have to remember 3 Ft up means, you know, 1000 ft in landed it czar businesses in our homes in our basements in our first floors. So, um, you're right. Not everyone can afford to move. Not everyone wants to move considering you have a social network and so on, But You know, my point in the book is that 40 million people in America do move every year anyway for retirement. They're marrying or divorcing or getting a job or getting out of the military or school. Ondo. Sometimes, increasingly, the climate change haven principle is AH, guiding force in these decisions. And you know, the West Coast is wildfires. South Coast. It's hurricanes. The East Coast is super storms. The South is baking heat. And in the left half the West half they We have huge water shortages that not many people are talking about, yet they're more or less in a permanent state of drought. On do There's no easy solution to that. So so really the answer to where to move If you have a choice for long term climate protection is the Great Lakes. It's the great old Rust Belt cities. You know, Cleveland loose Burlington Madison, these air cities with unlimited amounts of clean fresh water to drink. And no wild fires and no hurricanes. And they're great places to live, You know, low cost of living and diverse population, well educated airports, hospitals and so on. Duluth, actually really cool town. It is very cold. It's just very, very cool. Little City. I'm sure cares if you think you know. Obviously, this book was written before the pandemic, do you Do you think that pandemic will change this people may not want to live in cities. Anymore, and we know that work is possible now. Yeah, That's right. Um You know the pandemics been sort of interesting because a two beginning of it. We witnessed the greatest drop in greenhouse gas emissions in recorded history. The United States saw a 10% drop in greenhouse gas divisions. I mean, it's for a terrible reason. It's that nobody was working and all the factories were sitting close and the businesses were closed, but it did give everybody sort of Ah glimpse Of what could be possible and the opportunity to do a reset. And as you say, I'm sure Ah, lot of these zoom meetings, zoom rehearsals. Zoom dates on some of this stuff is going to survive after the pandemic is over. And all of that is one example of a way that The pandemic taught us Ways to decrease Our emissions and you know, in a more complex way the pandemic was part of what got Biden elected a man with Who Who's Who's number one or number two priority is climate change, so in an indirect way it was responsible for bringing into office. People who really cherish science. And really want to do something about the problem. My guess is David Pogue. The name of his book is how to prepare for climate change a practical guide to surviving the chaos. We'll talk about affordable solar panels. What about rain catching rain? We'll talk about the air conditioner conundrum and maybe why getting rid of your lawn is a good step, and we'll also take more of your calls after Break. This is all of.

John Kerry David Pogue Toyota Honda Morningside Heights Miami Great Lakes China Boston Europe Duluth Cleveland Northeast West Coast
"david pogue" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"david pogue" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"70 to 80. You can always go to social media as well. You can tweet to us at all of it. W. And why see? So David? Why did you want to write a book that focused on measures that individuals could take? It's funny. John Holdren was Barack Obama's she science advisor and he he said, this thing in 2007. It's become sort of a classic line and climate circles. We have two ways to cope with climate change. There's mitigation, which is trying to stop it. And there's adaptation which is trying to cope with it. And from my perspective. Literally. Everything I've ever read about the steps you should take about climate change has been in the first category. It's fly less and use public transportation and don't eat red meat. And you know that's all very important and definitely on a believer and a follower. But it's no longer enough. I mean, we have changed the climate and we're only beginning to see the effect. It's going to be even if we stop burning fossil fuels. Tomorrow, we would still be seeing these crazy hurricanes and heat waves and droughts and Wildfires so My question is what about the second part of Holden's formula? The adaptation and that is is you've noted that something that governments are doing and corporations and industries there. You know, building the big you around the southern tip of Manhattan to protect it from sea level rise and so on. But no one's talking about what individuals and families could do. So that's that's what this book is meant to address. What's so funny? Any time we do a segment like this, there's always someone who pipes up and says one person doing one thing isn't going to change anything yet. You really do encourage people to do things like track their carbon footprint. Why do you think Personal contributions like that. Are a good way to think about the environment and why they're good for people at us as human beings. Well, I mean, in some ways, those objectors are correct. I mean, the 100 companies are responsible for 71% of all emissions, so Yeah, To think that replacing your light bulbs of l E. D s is gonna make it dense. Yeah, You're crazy s O. If you are going to take some action, the most effective thing you could do involves getting together with other people join Climate group get involved with one of the climate movements online or above all vote for for people who care about the climate. But there is a secondary effect that that's really kind of cool. It's the social norms, effect or social contagion. I've heard it called. They've done studies where In a certain neighborhood, the number of solar panels that go up Directly affect the rate of other people putting solar panels on their roots. So people see your solar panels and that catches on it. It's the same reason that You know, Now it's more people stop smoking because they see other people stop smoking and or or if you go to a restaurant with three friends, and they all ordered the salad. You're not going to order a cheeseburger, it Z. There's a cumulative effect of what you see around you. The more people that take small steps. More that will turn into a wave affecting more people. In the book, You start a bit early in the book, talking about the psychological effects of climate change, how we need to think about how climate change affects us mentally. How does it Um, you know, it's It's funny. My my my editor calls this a big anti anxiety pill. Um, it turns out that from a psychological standpoint. Depressed in is not just feeling like your situation is terrible. It's feeling that your situation is terrible, and you can't do anything about it. The act of taking some steps, taking some action in this case, preparing for climate disaster that actually does two things. Yes, it makes you ready or when extreme weather comes your way. But it also makes you sleep better at night. It it makes you feel better. That you've you've done something to take control of your situation. And you right, Let's talk about a couple of terms. It's important to make clear you right for the record climate is not weather. That's right. Well, remember, remember the senator, Senator Inhofe, who walked into Congress a few years ago with a snowball said, You're telling me the world is warming up? Yes, climate is not weather weather is something that changes From day to day or even our to our climate is on a much longer scale. And also I mean, I'm also trying to make the point in this book that client that global warming Is a terrible term. It's super misleading. Yes, the planet is warming, but it's really climate chaos that results there. These Domino effect these ripple effects. I mean, it's It's raging wildfires and torrential rains. It's severe drought. I am a freak snowstorms its heat wave. You know, and pick investigations. It's a bunch of stuff that you wouldn't expect to be related to simple warmth. In fact, there's some really nutty things that are secondary and Tertiary effects, You know, smaller goat. Maura, expensive chocolates. Lower P s A T scores more bar fights and they're seeing all kinds of really wacky secondary effects of of the changing climate. Is that why you bring up the term and I've heard this term before Global weirding. I much prefer that global Weirding is much more descriptive of of what's happening. Yeah, Global warming is just It's addressing the underlying problem, but none of the effects. And I think when you're trying to express a complex scientific principle To the public. I think they're doing us a disservice. By the way I feel the same way about the greenhouse effect. I think you know, 1% of Americans have been in a greenhouse and know that it's you know, 20 degrees warmer than outside. I think we should call it the dog in the car effect. Because in a hot summer day, you know how the car heats up. Ridiculously hot inside were the dog. My guest, David Pogue. The name of his book is how to prepare for climate change. A practical guide to surviving that chaos. We've been asking you listeners to call in and tell us what steps you've taken to adapt to the changing climate. What have you stopped doing? What have you started doing? Let's take a couple of calls David. Emily is on line three. Hi, Emily. Thanks for calling all of it. Hi. Thank you for having me. I've never called him before. This is called. Thanks for doing it. So I Wow, you're you're getting crafty, according to my notes. Definitely. Yeah, So it kind of started when I was reading an article a couple months ago, and I don't know how true it is. But I saw that some really horrible things that there we could reach a point where we can't reverse climate change like within, like the.

Climate group David Pogue John Holdren Barack Obama Emily Manhattan advisor Senator Inhofe Holden senator editor Weirding Maura Congress
"david pogue" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"david pogue" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Morning. Jane Pauley is off today. I'm Lee Cowan and this is Sunday morning. As summer is winding down. The school year is winding up, and with it lots of questions, the threat of covert 19 is throwing many school re openings into confusion, leaving parents wrestling with school matters large and small. David Pogue will report our cover story. Some students with masks and some without some schools, re opening and some teaching over the Internet. Good morning, Marvin right Elementary as the new school year begins, That's the scattered state of education in the cove. It era. We can't live our lives in fear. I don't want to hear. That students are sick. Or they have gotten the apparent sick. The desperate search for a workable lesson plan. Ahead on Sunday morning. Our Sunday profile this morning is of wheel of Fortune veteran Vanna White, who you might call letter perfect. She's talking with our more aka For 37 years. She's been revealing letters at this famous board. Now, Vanna White is revealing. Mohr. I remember before I became famous. I saw a couple of famous people who were Not very nice to people, and I thought if I ever become famous, I'm not going to treat people that way. Solving the puzzle of Vanna White later on Sunday morning. Journalists and contributor Mark Whitaker discusses the fight for racial justice with best selling author Tallahassee coat. Plus Steve Hartman and John Dickerson, looking ahead to this week's Republican National Convention. All that and a lot more on this Sunday morning, the 23rd of August 2020. We'll be right back after this. It's a program that improves the mental and physical health of people in custody.

Vanna White Jane Pauley Marvin right Elementary Lee Cowan David Pogue Steve Hartman Mark Whitaker Mohr John Dickerson Tallahassee
"david pogue" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"david pogue" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Six bucks a month less And that's for up to five terabytes, which is a lot of storage. I also like it cause I drive is kind of a complete back of solution. It does local backups and cloud backups. It even does snapshots, which is the feature you need. If Ransomware is a problem, because a snapshot says, Oh, yeah, I can go back to the day before that got bit. That's the good data. And I can restore that Data. PC magazine says he will not find a better overall online backup service that the full featured. I drive, especially for the price, and I'm going to make it even better right now, 90% off for the whole first year. You go I dr dot com and use my name Leon, 90% off. That's really a good deal for a full year. I dr dot com Don't forget to use my name Lee. Fall in Rancho Cucamonga, California. Hi, Paul. Hey, Leo, How are you doing? I'm great. How are you? Wonderful, wonderful, long time that I still have the the video, the VHS video how to build a PC with you impassive. Oh, favorite keeping. I haven't. I'm looking at it on myself. That thing is so added eight. Well, I'm glad you have it. That's awesome. Thank you. Yeah. Yeah, That was my experience building PC using that video. Wow, That's really fun. I've made a few videos on how to build a PC. I don't think I'll be making any more, though. Probably not the best use of time. What can I do for you? Okay? Yes. Well, I was recently in just posted today. Eric Whitaker. Virtual Choir six. David Pogue. Talk about it this morning on according Well, you're in that. Yeah, well, along with 17,000 other singers, it's not that exclusive, but still Yeah, it's wonderful, you know, Symbol of unity and everything. If you want, I can drop a police. It's all on YouTube. I've seen it. It's really, really great stuff really needs. Awesome. Awesome. And so, yes, I wanted to kind of give a shout out that for everybody to watch this great, But I wanted to ask since I was in that, and I kind of wanted to get more into doing this on my own. And I've heard a few, You know, I mean, if you could be here How to make zoom out how to remove as much latent. See if you can see that's the trick. That's what Eric's doing. That's so interesting, and so tell me when you're on the in the choir on the call. Does your all by yourself? What are you hearing? Well, that one worked that way That won't work. It's all pre recording. He does those all pre recorded like he said. All the tools and we get the score, and he even does rehearsal videos like mean End. But how do you do the tempo? Does he send you a click track or a veteran home or something? Oh, it It's actually pretty ingenious. He plays the video, and he says he claps. And he does everybody clap at the same time clap and that lines everybody at 3 to 1.

Eric Whitaker PC magazine Ransomware Leo Rancho Cucamonga David Pogue California YouTube Leon Lee Paul
"david pogue" Discussed on The Great Fail

The Great Fail

06:38 min | 2 years ago

"david pogue" Discussed on The Great Fail

"Following that skydiving Stein. When Google unveiled glass to the world it was soon considered the must have gadget for everyone from the nerds to CEOS and celebrities of all sorts. Vogue magazine did a twelve page feature. The Simpsons dedicated an entire episode to glass. And it made its way into circuits of morning. Talk shows and late night. Television Lady Gaga wore a pair and sudas Samuel Jackson Oprah beyond say Bill Murray from President Obama to Prince. Charles the type of exposure. It received was a hype and hysteria. Unlike any other and one of the most notable moments was two thousand and twelve New York fashion week when Diane von Furstenberg Sentra models down the runway with them in various colors. What could be more sexy than supermodels wearing cyclops looking frames and matching couture von Furstenberg? Who was desperate at that? Time to draw attention away from a week. Spring collection was able to turn her show into a media success and take credit for the day that she helped quote. Reveal Google glass to the world. It was in all fairness quite a stunning technological achievement. This device that essentially served as a computer in front of your eye for those of you. That haven't seen the product it was made with titanium band that was worn over the years much. Like a regular pair of glasses without lenses and attached to the frame on the right side was a plastic casing that included a processor camera and display beyond. The camera was a touch pad and other electronic components with the display that would be activated by a thirty degree tilt of the head or by tapping the touch pad. You can give simple voice commands like glass. Call mom or glass. Take a picture. Google envision this would be used for taking photos or videos making calls texting email navigation. Basically everything you did with your smartphone but now in a pair of glasses but beyond the brilliance of this innovation would soon find out. There's more than the I. You see unbeknownst to the outside world. There was an internal battle forming between the Google X. Engineers about the most basic functions of Google glass where one side debated that it was a product that should be worn all day long like a fashion piece. While the other side argued that it should be worn only for specific functions regardless both sides were able to agree that the prototype was well a prototype with pretty big crinkles to iron out. So let me take you through some of these issues. The small screen that was located at the angle above her. I made it hard to look at videos or read for long periods of time the battery life while that was very limited sometimes lasting for only a few hours it would also misinterpret voice commands which oftentimes will get lost in noisy settings. The earpiece was uncomfortable and the wink to take a picture. Didn't work that well but Sergei the man behind the project knowing. That glass wasn't even close to a finished. Product decided to do something bold. Instead of working out. The very major kinks. He decided to launch the product as is to a group of highly selected consumers called glass explorers. These glass explorers basically paid fifteen hundred dollars for a chance to become the early adopters. Who would then test? The product provide feedback and help improve the design and functionalities of glass. Initially the accolades came pouring in Tech Evangelist at Microsoft and blogger author. Robert Scoble wrote quote. I would never live a day without them. And David Pogue noted in New York Times blog quote glass is an absolutely astonishing feat of miniaturization and integration. The possibilities were endless for those seeing. The potential of what glass could do for example? A trauma surgeon realizes how glass would help her. Transmit a live video of the operation to a remote expert for real time help of reporter can use glass to capture moments of breaking new seen without having to assemble a full camera. Crew likewise most glass explorers found the devices navigation to be quite extraordinary. I had the chance to speak with one of the original Glass Explores Robert Hernandez professor at the University of Southern California's Annenberg School of Communications. Whose background has been in emerging tech. Here he talks about how he won the chance to become an early adopter and so I saw Google had a contest. Where if you tweeted out what you would do with Google glass. You could win the podcast when what you win. Is the right to buy expensive device. I thought I'm really did a twitter. Let me go to tweet something out and so I tweeted that if I had google blache I would use it. To explore contextual storytelling through augmented reality. And this wearable device. Professor Hernandez taught a course back in two thousand fourteen as he explored the possibilities of glass looking through the Lens of journalism and Pov storytelling so we put the device on people with different perspectives. One being a really great. Ls Shah a prominent drummer. Another one was a magician. Who made this magic trick? Kinda like from his point of view but he did tricks. You really phenomenal gymnast. Who doing work on the ranger. We had to kind of dump it on his head to do that when we tried some other type of experiments of different types of storytelling included long-form tax in Google glass so a lot of experimentation. But it was really diverse students coming together to try to figure out what this technology could off but the hype alone could do only so much to mass limitations of these classes which were made to be just a prototype and what. Sergei thought was going to be a brilliant marketing strategy would soon have him walking.

Google Sergei Diane von Furstenberg Vogue magazine Lady Gaga Stein Simpsons Obama Robert Scoble New York David Pogue Charles Microsoft President Professor Hernandez twitter Samuel Jackson New York Times Robert Hernandez
"david pogue" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"david pogue" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Nadler I support this resolution because it is a solemn duty the Congress to investigate the serious allegations against the president but house minority whip Steve Scalise says the process it is illegitimate if the chair chooses that as well they can literally kick out the president's legal counsel totally unprecedented this is Soviet style rules this was not a vote on impeachment itself but on rules guiding the inquiry forward bill Rakoff CBS news Capitol Hill also the White House in a statement calling the probe a sham impeachment and house speaker Nancy Pelosi responding to this saying it is necessary to defend our democracy says what is at stake in all this is nothing less than our democracy right one seventeen on the south shore police say Marshfield man yesterday said a boat on fire in the middle of the south river still another boat to try to get away from the scene fire chief John Murphy says they got there just FOR six AM to upon arrival we had a boat that was basically fully involved fully informed the flames or mooring at around one forty one fifty block of homework on Central Avenue now that both just burned and burned eventually so badly it sank right to the bottom of the river police say they used a plain some boats in a drone to track down the suspect David Pogue onus of Marshfield it's a they found him in that stolen boat in the north river right by read three now it's got a list of charges against him including malicious someone damage defenseman of property and larceny over twelve hundred dollars no end in sight unfortunately for those fire weary residents of California brand new wildfires breaking out overnight right near Los Angeles that's city under siege by high Santa Ana winds hurricane strength at times and low humidity to homes are burning and residents are scrambling this is a review that isn't a bad smell smoke people started screaming down the street everything else so we came out and started when things down and things get is what downhill from.

"david pogue" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"david pogue" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Despite all the craziness and the drama around the fact is I got the bottles and we filled the bottles and to my whole thing is this is America it's going to be a way Jackie Megiddo make up artist knowledge Turner there we can only do this series helps out you know so please share your story with us the marketplace to learn a little trick the other day from an article I read The New York Times if you Google fan knows you know that big purple villain guy from the vendors and you click on the image of the glove with all the jewels on it comes up but just try it school trust me anyway that's what we call an Easter egg it's a hidden treat coded into a product piece technology for people to find David Pogue wrote about the history of him in that article in The New York Times that I mentioned David welcome to the program six so let's serve the not so secret history of of Easter eggs the first one was like forty something years ago forty five years ago right yeah the story goes that this young game programmer name Warren Robinett was working for Atari which got bought by Warner and he didn't like the way the new New York suits were treating him so they didn't give him credit for his work so he took revenge by planting a credit screen a tribute to himself deep within one of his most popular games Segway Ted today Ayrshire and as we all know this offer developers are you know king of the land actually wind hen are they still doing these Easter eggs if not for credit cause they get credit all the time yeah that's true you know it's interesting Easter eggs are no longer a counter culture move nowadays they're put in there for fun for for the entertainment of the programmers to boost morale or they're put in there to delight the customer or they're put in there as come ons for potential programming talent by a software company in other words if you can find their Easter egg you're clearly good enough to work there but tell me about that last one it's you're referring to this company called automatic founded by the guy who did wordpress right is my name is Matt Mullen way right that's right if you look at a certain job description more than a few times a message pops up and says Hey you keep clicking this why don't you apply already so he's in and there are others too he he mentioned that there's one Easter egg on the automatic dot com home page that fewer than a dozen people have ever found and he's hired almost all of them and he wouldn't tell you what it is right because you want to keep using it as that as that you know job test discriminator thing right exactly exactly right so all right so I have a question so the on the online version this story New York times has a video of the Tesla model X. doing the I mean I guess **** at a dance right the headlights flashed through doors go up and down in the windows filled and all that jazz that took developer time and energy and resources for Tesla to do a company which is famously sort of struck struggling how come they're doing this that comes up quite a bit in the comments yeah you know like maybe you should spend less time writing fun Easter eggs well the story goes that these test engineers went out in December twenty fifteen to see a trans Siberian orchestra concert and at brunch the next day they were like you know we have everything they had we have lights we have speakers we have motion control we should do something like that in the car so they built this thing on evenings and weekends just for fun and didn't show it to you on must until it was all finished and he's like I love this so so it typically that they're done off hours as moral crusades for fun let's get back to the top of this and Warren Robinett and I'm I'm kind of proud of myself because I wrote this in my notes even before I got to your item about it in the story warm Robinette and ready player one the Spielberg movie based on the book of course he featured prominently that Easter eggs like the key to that whole story it is I mean Warren Robinett planted that Easter egg in hopes of getting a little credit right and now he's he's like a prominently they name him three times in the dialogue of this otherwise completely fictional movie about you know go to a computer software world and yes the hero saves the day at the end by actually playing this nineteen seventy five Atari console game and unlocking Wharton robin that's original Easter egg in twenty eighteen David Pogue.

America forty five years
"david pogue" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"david pogue" Discussed on KCRW

"Despite all the craziness and the drama around it the fact is I got the bottles and we filled the bottles and my whole thing is this is America it's going to be a way Jackie mosquito make up artist now Turner there we can only do this series helps out you know please share your story with us to learn a little trick the other day from an article I read The New York Times if you Google fan knows you know that big purple villain guy from the vendors and you click on the image of the glove with all the jewels on it comes up but just try it cool trust me anyway that's what we call an Easter egg it's a hidden treat coded into a product piece technology for people to find David Pogue read about the history of him in that article in The New York Times that I mentioned David welcome to the program six so let's serve the not so secret history of of Easter eggs the first one was like forty something years ago forty five years ago right yeah the story goes that this young game programmer name Warren Robinett was working for Atari which got bought by Warner and he didn't like the way the new New York suits were treating him so they didn't give him credit for his work so he took revenge by planting a credit screen a tribute to himself deep within one of his most popular games Segway Ted today and as we all know this offer developers are you know king of the land actually why are they still doing these Easter eggs if not for credit cause they get credit all the time yeah that's true you know it's interesting Easter eggs are no longer a counter culture move nowadays they're put in there for fun for for the entertainment of the programmers to boost morale or they're put in there to delight the customer or they're put in there as come ons for potential programming talent by a software company in other words if you can find their Easter egg you're clearly good enough to work there but tell me about that last one it's you're referring to this company called automatic founded by the guy who did wordpress right as mine is name is Matt Mullen way right that's right if you look at a certain job description more than a few times a message pops up and says Hey you keep clicking this why don't you apply already so he's in and there are others too he he mentioned that there's one east rag on the automatic dot com home page that fewer than a dozen people have ever found and he's hired almost all of them and he wouldn't tell you what it is right because he wants to do using it as that as that you know job test discriminator thing right exactly exactly right so all right so I have a question so the on the online version this story New York times has a video of the Tesla model X. doing the I mean I guess **** at a dance right the headlights flashed through doors go up and down in the windows filled and all that jazz that took developer time and energy and resources for Tesla to do a company which is famously sort of struck struggling how come they're doing this that comes up quite a bit in the comments yeah you know like maybe you should spend less time writing fun use race well the story goes that these test engineers went out in December twenty fifteen to see a trans Siberian orchestra concert and at brunch the next day they were like you know we have everything they had we have lights we have speakers we have motion control we should do something like that in the car so they built this thing on evenings and weekends just for fun and didn't show it to you on must until it was all finished and he's like I love this so so typically that they're done off hours as moral crusades for fun let's get back to the top of this and Warren Robinett and I'm I'm kind of proud of myself because I wrote this in my notes even before I got to your item about it in the story warm Robinette and ready player one the Spielberg movie based on the book of course he featured prominently that Easter eggs like the key to that whole story it is I mean Warren Robinett planted that Easter egg in hopes of getting a little credit right and now he's he's like a prominently the name him three times in the dialogue of this otherwise completely fictional movie about you know go to a computer software world and yes the hero saves the day at the end by actually playing this nineteen seventy five Atari console game and unlocking weren't robin it's original Easter egg in twenty eighteen David Pogue.

America forty five years
"david pogue" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"david pogue" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Morning on the radio for centuries. Astronomers looking at one of our closest neighbors have been seeing red. Now space exploration advocates say see a path to sending humans to the red planet Mars within just a few short years. David Pogue will report our cover story. Mars is captivated our attention for yawns brighter. Little better than the other lights in the list, you'll spirit early when we looked up at the sky with telescopes who saw roadways canals. We've never really lost this idea that maybe Mars was alive headlines coming up on Sunday morning. Getting ready to go to Mars. Shouted surprise is common enough greeting for the unsuspecting guest of honor at a party. But does it have a place at one of the most consequential ceremonies of all, surprisingly, yes? As Luke Burbank will show us. Summer is here. Which also means wedding season is here. Where did this idea for a surprise wedding come from? Brides talk about how stressful letting planning was. And I just I have no time or care to deal with any of that. We've heard of surprise birthday parties, but a surprise wedding. We're at one and it's about to get started later on Sunday morning. I have questions this morning for Garry Trudeau to his fans. He's a beloved cartoonist while to me, he's a beloved husband who recently passed the most significant milestone, you feel very Garry Trudeau began drawing Doonesbury half a century ago. It was more or less than accident career. All these years later, he still added. And so are we. Meshing even now audience watching this go really. She married a cartoonist. She cut that so much better. The anniversary of comic strip classic ahead on Sunday. Morning. We'll have those stories and more when our Sunday morning on the radio continues. Some people are just born geniuses when it comes to business. Some people listen to Bloomberg BusinessWeek and don't tell you where are we.

Garry Trudeau David Pogue Bloomberg BusinessWeek Luke Burbank
"david pogue" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"david pogue" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"That's a heavy heavy costume. And he's a champ. I was watching from behind and don't they call like Likud show, isn't nickname scooter or something like that. I don't know. He's got he's got a nickname that alludes suicide quickness. And dude so has quickness because he started off of that stage and onto this it was far away. I mean incredible production college game day. And then I saw a clip on Twitter of just at some point. I think like in the middle of the first round course, it was just like all right? I'm done with this and he just left and they replaced it. He was just like I'm done Billy. Do you have any Denver? The last night fact, no. Did you see the did you see the old clips like before the draft of David Pollack late when he was getting ready for draft, man? He's a big dude, they helix great now. Now that he didn't look great before. But I did not know that David Pogue was so big before Pollock was a really good player. A really good player Georgia and then neck injury. He was a linebacker. But he was like us, basically. I think he was like an edge and Wikipedia is much more handsome. Now is what you're saying. Like he looks. No, he looks the same. But now it looks like exactly the same his faces. Exactly the same. Yeah. The traps are insane. The thing is this when I think of David Pollock. I think of when college game day was here, and I saw David Pollack walking in a bathing suit to go jump off of the high tide at UM. How is that? How I imagine David Pollack. That's how I always see him when I saw him as a football player getting ready for the draft was like what how did this happen, man? They just football guys. They just they get out of the league. And they just I mean, he wasn't the neck injury sort of changed his lifestyle a lot. Yeah. I didn't know he had an no career ending. It was a very scary injury for David Paul. His head was was wearing one of those halos for awhile. Chris feel free to go ahead and walk into the ocean. Oh. To no one's excited about Christian Wilkins. I mean. Yeah, he's the white ranger. What do we been excited this whole day? He did this split. It stinks though, Mike when you've got the quarterback on the board who threw for fifty touchdown passes. He drops to you in a surprise because Gilman's gonna Gettleman and what you end up with is one of three defensive lineman. You would have wanted from Clemson this one slipped. So you feel better about it. But the fact they didn't get a quarterback. I think dolphin fans are done with interior linemen and interior defensive linemen. Like, I think they're just done with that being the answer every year and they're wrong every year. Yeah. But you don't you're not this like huge advance scout when it comes to a college football players, but you know, Wilkins's he looks like a professional town to me. And I love his personality..

David Pollack David Pollock Christian Wilkins David Pogue football Likud David Paul Twitter Denver Billy Georgia Chris Clemson Wikipedia Mike Gilman Gettleman
"david pogue" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

06:05 min | 3 years ago

"david pogue" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"You are back with Jill on money. And if you've got a financial question, we want to hear from you. Okay. We love it, Mark. And I are digging out from last year still. Okay. We're we're I think we're pretty much in December emails. Why are you laughing at me for he's laughing? He's like looking at me like you think we're in December sales, but I still have some from November that are kicking around. But I just well here's one from Linda, and she wrote this on December sixteenth. I love what you're doing. Especially to empower women. Yes. Good. Okay. Here's her question. How many months or years should one have squirrelled away to sustain if necessary in retirement that is such a variable questions? So let's talk about retirement for a second. Right. The way to think about retirement is how much money do I need on a monthly basis. You notice how every single thing. I talk about starts with that question. What a pain in the neck. I am. But that is very much essential to understand what you need to be doing with your money. You must have a very good idea of your needs. Then what you do is you look ahead. And you say, okay. Well, how much social security Magoni get how much pension income am I gonna get am? I lucky enough to be the beneficiary of the big fat trust like Mark. You know, he's an air. All right. Just a joke. That's a total joke. He's not an air. But if you're going to get money, maybe it's from maybe it's from real estate. Maybe it's maybe it is like your trust your beneficiary of a trust you add up all that money. And then you say, okay, social security, pension, any other income does that cover what I need. If it doesn't how much money do I need to save to generate the gap between what I need and what's coming in. All right. How do you do? This don't stress I found this wonderful website. And I really encourage people to check this out because if you don't want to go to a financial planner to do this yourself, you can actually pay a subscription fee to ES planner ES planner dot com, and it's one hundred forty nine bucks. And they'll they'll take you through this whole process. It's very cool. Okay. So you need to figure out how much you have to save. So let's pretend that you need to have two thousand dollars a month. From whatever your investments are. Well, I would suggest that you probably need to have about a million bucks saved by the time you retire because that million bucks will generate about thirty grand. Most of that money is going to be taxable. So you have to pay tax, and then you get down to like, oh at twenty four thousand a year, and that's two thousand dollars a month. And now, I'm okay. Okay. Now, if you are questioning about so that's sort of like, your how much do I need to have squirrelled away question. But if you're saying how much money do I need in safe money. Linda, that's a little bit different. Because you hear me say on the show all the time that what you need is six to twelve months of your general living expenses in the Bank. When you retire that emergency reserve safety net that number has to be more. It has to be that you have your one full year of expenses in the Bank. So if we go back to your original question of, you know, let's say that you needed twenty four thousand dollars a year from that portfolio gears. You better have that twenty four ground squirrelled away. I would even suggest one to two years. People hate that the advice, but I think it's the right advice, really important. Okay. Really important. All right. I hope that helps. Okay. Here's a Janna who says that she and her partner have whole life policies on each other. There sixty nine they've been in place for fifteen years, how difficult if even possible would it be to change the policies to turn policies? First of all why? Let's go to that point. Why why why we do not want you to be converting to term life insurance unless you need insurance? And if you do need insurance for the rest of your lies, then keep what you have don't worry about it. That's the easiest thing in the world to do. Okay. Oh, by the way. Here's someone who listens to me prattling on. Thank you Marilyn. I love you. My new iphone? She says I didn't make a mistake because she, but she got the iphone X arch too. Big at hangs out of her pocket, and the weight of it untie, my shoe. Anyway, she says better camera, and she said, you know, I thought the X was too expensive. She says be sure to armor up your glass backed phone with a good case. I do have that also recommended David. Pose iphone the missing manual twelfth different edition reference for new iphones. Yeah. I love David Pogue. I've met him in the he gets his haircut here at CBS because he comes into the studio some, you know, every so often anyway, so thanks for those emails and thanks for keeping me on the street near usually at to call my friends at c net to get all the infomation. So that is a delightful when I can turn to my listeners to get the information. I need. I am. No, I had no technology wiz. So I'm usually usually I just do like the the latest version but five years late. So I upgraded, but it was so. So much later. So there's that anyway. Doing. All right. How Mark blowing right through all these. If you've got a financial question, we'd love to hear from you. And there's so many things that you can find on our website. Mark is running the website. He does such a fabulous job. So those of you who are.

Mark Linda David Pogue Bank Jill Janna CBS Marilyn partner two thousand dollars twenty four thousand dollars fifteen years twelve months five years two years
"david pogue" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:52 min | 3 years ago

"david pogue" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Alaska the aftershocks continue. I'm Christopher cruise. And I'm Susanna Palmer from Bloomberg world headquarters in the UK Prime Minister Theresa may is preparing to set out where Brexit goes next. His after the overwhelming rejection of her deal week ago. She's due to present a plan to parliament tomorrow where members are already working on plans to take control of the process may holds a conference call with her cabinet today. Trade secretary Liam Fox told the BBC that a no deal. Brexit could happen. The journal doodoo Marsh reports French finance minister, Bruno Lemaire said there are no plans on the table to change the Renault. Nissan alliance. This afternoon Kay reported. The government is proposing an integration that could put the carmakers into a single holding company. Nikkei reported French and Japanese officials discussed integration plans as well as Renault's wished to appoint Nissan's next chairman following the arrest of Carlos gone housing, data and manufacturing data are and focus in the week ahead. Bloomberg's Karen Moskow reports. A report Tuesday may show sale. Have previously owned homes fell into Semper after two months of gains Wednesday. We get the Richmond fans manufacturing gauge and Thursday. We hear from the Kansas City fed US jobless claims are out Thursday as well along with the Bloomberg consumer comfort index if there is a resolution to the partial government shutdown by Friday, we'll get reports on new home sales and durable goods orders. Markets are closed. Monday in observance of the Martin Luther King junior holiday Davos man is richer than ever a decade after the financial crisis poured flat champagne on the World Economic Forum. Gold collar executives set to gather there this week have bounced back, and then some it's a remarkable showing given the economic and political time out of the past decade from Lehman Brothers to Brexit to Donald Trump, the fortunes of a dozen two thousand nine Davos attendees have soared by a combined one hundred seventy five billion global news twenty four hours a day on air hand picked up on Twitter powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries. I'm Susanna Palmer this. This is Bloomberg. It's Sunday morning on CBS News Radio. Good morning. I'm Jane Pauley. And this is Sunday morning on the radio. A college education has long been a key part of the American dream, particularly for young people raised in poverty who were the first in their family ever to attend. But in a cruel twist, the rising cost of college and their own meager finances are leaving many aspiring students quite literally out in the cold Lee. Cowan will report how cover story. You wouldn't know it by looking but on college campuses all around the country are students working to get their degrees. We don't know where they're going to sleep tonight. Where to get their next me. I think the idea that hard working talented people who are trying to get an education are being derailed by homelessness is a crisis homeless and hungry in college. Later on Sunday morning. Singer and actress and all around entertainer. Carol Channing died this past Tuesday at the age of ninety seven she leaves behind a rich legacy of remarkable performances as Martha Tosh ner will remind us. Carol Channing could pull off a feather hats. The sounds of a house. Every role. She played she owned with those is. Dash. With that voice. She'll be missed ahead. This Sunday morning a fond. Farewell. Unheard of and on her just a few years ago podcast are just about everywhere. These days this morning, David Pogue takes a look inside the podcast phenomenon. While Morocca will be calling our attention to one podcast in particular. Spotty Mikdad chewy gooey.

Bloomberg Carol Channing Brexit Susanna Palmer Theresa Bloomberg world Renault Davos Alaska Nissan Christopher cruise parliament Jane Pauley Prime Minister David Pogue UK Martin Luther King Liam Fox Cowan CBS