18 Burst results for "David Ortega"

"david ortega" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"david ortega" Discussed on KCRW

"Considered from NPR news. Is it egg gree GIs or just good egg economics. The price of eggs skyrocketed during the pandemic, and now some states are suing AEG companies for price gouging Stacy Vanik, Smith and Cardiff Garcia from our daily economics podcast, the indicator from Planet money, tell us exactly what's going on with egg prices. We eat a lot of eggs in this country. The average American eats almost an egg a day and during the pandemic, we really got excited about eggs. Grocery stores were ordering six times more eggs than normal and a lot of store shelves were still empty. Yes, so demand for eggs went crazy and the supply could not increase right away because there are only so many egg laying hens in the US and you know that in prison, a man will lead to a rise in prices. That is David Ortega. He is a food economist at Michigan State University, and David says it's all about supply and demand. A spike in demand, plus a fixed supply pushes up the price. And the price went way up nearly 200% in March, and now a bunch of states have responded by suing AEG companies for price gouging. Thes states included Texas, West Virginia in Minnesota, and they also included New York, where the attorney general accused egg company Hillandale Farms of taking in $4 million in revenues from overcharging people for eggs and with egg prices. Here is where things get tricky. I mean, Did eight companies commit a crime by charging more for eggs. Were they just being good free market citizens? Also challenging really happens when you purposefully set the price of a commodity, you know, significantly above the traditional price level that incorporates costs and other forces, David says. Part of the issue here is that costs went up for eight companies to labor transports. Supplies were all hard to get and often expensive in the early days of the pandemic, But did those costs go up? By three or 400%, like their prices did that is the question being hashed out in courts now, and it's kind of complicated and part of the issue. Here, of course, is the egg itself, right? I mean, if I scream prices or caviar prices or wine prices or something like that went up by 200%. It probably wouldn't be a legal issue a price gouging accusation. But the idea here is that eggs are a staple in a stable that really vulnerable people count on, especially in a crisis, and this idea that companies were profiting off of vulnerable people in time of crisis makes it seem kind of wrong, David says. It's especially tricky here because there was a time when pretty much all food prices were going up. In fact, between March and April, food prices saw their biggest jump in 46 years. But you know it's really difficult to draw the line as to what is a appropriate price response due to the shock versus what isthe sort of This type of illicit behavior that's trying to take advantage of the situation, David says. We will have to see what the courts decide about egg prices and whether it was price gouging or just, you know, faire economics or maybe unfair but legal economics. Stacy.

David Ortega AEG companies Stacy Vanik NPR US Cardiff Garcia Michigan State University New York Texas Hillandale Farms attorney Smith Minnesota West Virginia
"david ortega" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"david ortega" Discussed on KCRW

"It egg gree GIs or just good egg economics. The price of eggs skyrocketed during the pandemic, and now some states are suing AEG companies for price gouging Stacy Vanik, Smith and Cardiff Garcia from our daily economics podcast, the indicator from Planet money, tell us exactly what's going on with egg prices. We eat a lot of eggs in this country. The average American eats almost an egg a day and during the pandemic, we really got excited about eggs. Grocery stores were ordering six times more eggs than normal and a lot of store shelves were still empty. Yes, so demand for eggs went crazy and the supply could not increase right away because there are only so many egg laying hens in the US and you know that in prison, a man will lead to a rise in prices. That is David Ortega. He is a food economist at Michigan State University, and David says it's all about supply and demand. A spike in demand, plus a fixed supply pushes up the price. And the price went way up nearly 200% in March, and now a bunch of states have responded by suing AEG companies for price gouging. Thes states included Texas, West Virginia in Minnesota, and they also included New York, where the attorney general accused egg company Hillandale Farms of taking in $4 million in revenues from overcharging people for eggs and with egg prices. Here is where things get tricky. I mean, Did eight companies commit a crime by charging more for eggs. Were they just being good free market citizens? Also challenging really happens when you purposefully set the price of a commodity, you know, significantly above the traditional price level that incorporates costs and other forces, David says. Part of the issue here is that costs went up for eight companies to labor transports. Supplies were all hard to get and often expensive in the early days of the pandemic, But did those costs go up? By three or 400%, like their prices did that is the question being hashed out in courts now, and it's kind of complicated and part of the issue. Here, of course, is the egg itself, right? I mean, if I scream prices or caviar prices or wine prices or something like that went up by 200%. It probably wouldn't be a legal issue a price gouging accusation. But the idea here is that eggs are a staple in a stable that really vulnerable people count on, especially in a crisis, and this idea that companies were profiting off of vulnerable people in time of crisis makes it seem kind of wrong, David says. It's especially tricky here because there was a time when pretty much all food prices were going up. In fact, between March and April, food prices saw their biggest jump in 46 years. But you know it's really difficult to draw the line as to what is a appropriate price response due to the shock versus what isthe sort of This type of illicit behavior that's trying to take advantage of the situation, David says. We will have to see what the courts decide about egg prices and whether it was price gouging or just, you know, faire economics or maybe unfair but legal economics. Stacy Vanek, Smith. Cardiff Garcia NPR news

Donald Trump NPR El Paso Joe Biden Texas official California
Egg Prices Skyrocket During The Pandemic

All Things Considered

03:12 min | 1 year ago

Egg Prices Skyrocket During The Pandemic

"It egg gree GIs or just good egg economics. The price of eggs skyrocketed during the pandemic, and now some states are suing AEG companies for price gouging Stacy Vanik, Smith and Cardiff Garcia from our daily economics podcast, the indicator from Planet money, tell us exactly what's going on with egg prices. We eat a lot of eggs in this country. The average American eats almost an egg a day and during the pandemic, we really got excited about eggs. Grocery stores were ordering six times more eggs than normal and a lot of store shelves were still empty. Yes, so demand for eggs went crazy and the supply could not increase right away because there are only so many egg laying hens in the US and you know that in prison, a man will lead to a rise in prices. That is David Ortega. He is a food economist at Michigan State University, and David says it's all about supply and demand. A spike in demand, plus a fixed supply pushes up the price. And the price went way up nearly 200% in March, and now a bunch of states have responded by suing AEG companies for price gouging. Thes states included Texas, West Virginia in Minnesota, and they also included New York, where the attorney general accused egg company Hillandale Farms of taking in $4 million in revenues from overcharging people for eggs and with egg prices. Here is where things get tricky. I mean, Did eight companies commit a crime by charging more for eggs. Were they just being good free market citizens? Also challenging really happens when you purposefully set the price of a commodity, you know, significantly above the traditional price level that incorporates costs and other forces, David says. Part of the issue here is that costs went up for eight companies to labor transports. Supplies were all hard to get and often expensive in the early days of the pandemic, But did those costs go up? By three or 400%, like their prices did that is the question being hashed out in courts now, and it's kind of complicated and part of the issue. Here, of course, is the egg itself, right? I mean, if I scream prices or caviar prices or wine prices or something like that went up by 200%. It probably wouldn't be a legal issue a price gouging accusation. But the idea here is that eggs are a staple in a stable that really vulnerable people count on, especially in a crisis, and this idea that companies were profiting off of vulnerable people in time of crisis makes it seem kind of wrong, David says. It's especially tricky here because there was a time when pretty much all food prices were going up. In fact, between March and April, food prices saw their biggest jump in 46 years. But you know it's really difficult to draw the line as to what is a appropriate price response due to the shock versus what isthe sort of This type of illicit behavior that's trying to take advantage of the situation, David says. We will have to see what the courts decide about egg prices and whether it was price gouging or just, you know, faire economics or maybe unfair but legal economics. Stacy Vanek, Smith. Cardiff Garcia NPR news

David Ortega Aeg Companies Smith Cardiff Garcia Stacy Vanik United States Stacy Vanek NPR Michigan State University New York Texas Hillandale Farms Attorney Minnesota West Virginia
"david ortega" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"david ortega" Discussed on KCRW

"I think it's important as Faras socialising. I think it's a big part of growing up and I think they need that. He's also concerned about social justice, black lives matter and the whole racial being going on. I think it's very point that they All right, guys that during the president's cast, another has not decided who he will vote for yet, But after a tumultuous summer he's ready to pay attention to the presidential race for NPR news. I'm Angela Cochair guy in El Paso. You're listeningto all things considered from NPR news. Is it egg gree GIs or just good egg economics. The price of eggs skyrocketed during the pandemic, and now some states are suing AEG companies for price gouging Stacy Vanik, Smith and Cardiff Garcia from our daily economics podcast, the indicator from Planet money, tell us exactly what's going on with egg prices. We eat a lot of eggs in this country. The average American eats almost an egg a day and during the pandemic, we really got excited about eggs. Grocery stores were ordering six times more eggs than normal and a lot of store shelves were still empty. Yes, so demand for eggs went crazy and the supply could not increase right away because there are only so many egg laying hens in the US and you know that increasing demand will will lead to a rise in prices. That is David Ortega. He is Food economist at Michigan State University, and David says it's all about supply and demand. A spike in demand. Plus a fixed supply pushes up the price and the price went way up nearly 200% in March and now a bunch of states have responded by suing AEG companies for price gouging. Thes states included Texas, West Virginia in Minnesota. And they also included New York, where the attorney general accused egg company Hillandale Farms of taking in $4 million in revenues from overcharging people for eggs and with egg prices. Here is where things get tricky. I mean, Did eight companies commit a crime by charging more for eggs. Were they just being good free market citizens? Also challenging really happens when you purposefully set the price of a commodity, you know, significantly above the traditional price level that incorporates costs and other forces, David says. Part of the issue here is that costs went up for eight companies to labor transports. Supplies were all hard to get and often expensive in the early days of the pandemic, But did those costs go up? By three or 400%, like their prices did that is the question being hashed out in courts now, and it's kind of complicated and part of the issue. Here, of course, is the egg itself, right? I mean, if I scream prices or caviar prices or wine prices or something like that went up by 200%. It probably wouldn't be a legal issue a price gouging accusation. But the idea here is that eggs are a staple in a stable that really vulnerable people count on, especially in a crisis, and this idea that companies were profiting off of vulnerable people in time of crisis makes it seem kind of wrong, David says. It's especially tricky here because there was a time when pretty much all food prices were going up. In fact, between March and April, food prices saw their biggest jump in 46 years. But you know it's really difficult to draw the line as to what is a appropriate price response due to the shock versus what isthe sort of This type of illicit behavior that's trying to take advantage of the situation, David says. We will have to see what the courts decide about egg prices and whether it was price gouging or just, you know, faire economics or maybe unfair but legal economics..

David Ortega AEG companies NPR Faras US president Angela Cochair El Paso New York Michigan State University Texas Stacy Vanik Hillandale Farms Cardiff Garcia Minnesota
"david ortega" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"david ortega" Discussed on WTOP

"Of changed over the past few months and among the many things were missing right now is a chance to watch some very happy panda they're especially hungry right now and they love getting tender shoots of new bamboo which spread out all over the area this time of year the national zoo which is closed to visitors because of the pandemic says its giant pandas can go through a hundred pounds of the stuff in a day not to be outdone the zoo's red pandas love to devour the shoots to John Aaron WTOP news last month the U. S. all the largest spike in food prices in decades in one expert says that is far from being over in April Americans pay two point six percent more for groceries when compared to the month before the largest monthly increase in nearly fifty years but it makes sense because demand went up as restaurants closed in more people started buying in bulk David Ortega as a food economist at Michigan State University people are increasingly honestly that they purchase an anyone given trip to sort of avoid exposure to the virus prices went up for things like eggs meat cereal and milk in our ticket says meat prices will likely go even higher as the supply is interrupted by some companies shutting down plants due to corona virus concerns neckline Elie WTOP news and still ahead after sports remember when we used to plan for going to the beach on Memorial Day that's just one of the things that's changed as well it's eight fourteen if you don't know PPC if you don't know S. C. O. if you don't know O. T. T. if you don't know targeted display social media man website development mail marketing you don't have to all you need to know he's twenty sixty digital we can help you with the digital marketing your business needs but maybe doesn't understand or have time to execute twenty sixty digital is a Google premier partner that may not mean a lot to you but when you consider that only three percent of digital advertising agencies carry that designation it should if you're in charge of marketing for business you likely have digital marketing questions and at twenty sixty digital.

David Ortega S. C. O. O. T. T. partner John Aaron WTOP Michigan State University Elie WTOP Google
"david ortega" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"david ortega" Discussed on WTOP

"They're especially hungry right now and they love getting tender shoots of new bamboo which spread out all over the area this time of year the national zoo which is closed to visitors because of the pandemic says it's a giant pandas can go through a hundred pounds of the stuff in a day not to be outdone the zoo's red pandas love to devour the shoots to John Aaron WTOP news last month the U. S. saw the largest spike in food prices in decades one expert saying it is far from being over in April Americans paid two point six percent more for groceries when compared to the month before the largest monthly increase in nearly fifty years but it makes sense because demand went up as restaurants closed in more people started buying in bulk David Ortega as a food economist at Michigan State University people are increasingly honestly that they purchase an anyone given trip to sort of avoid exposure to the virus prices went up for things like eggs meat cereal and milk in our ticket says meat prices will likely go even higher as the supply is interrupted by some companies shutting down plants due to corona virus concerns neckline Elie WTOP news your world is changing so is ours normally this time of year we'd be telling you the Memorial Day travel forecast but not this year the data that's normally used to create the triple a forecast for travel over the holiday weekend has been undermined by covert nineteen even having more information now about eight states re opening plans is mired in confusion because some counties like prince George's and Montgomery will stay under lockdown orders triple a says it does have a hint about the future though online bookings at its travel site have been rising modestly since mid April suggesting travelers confidence is slowly improving the great American road trip will be.

David Ortega prince George Montgomery John Aaron WTOP Michigan State University Elie WTOP
"david ortega" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"david ortega" Discussed on WTOP

"They're especially hungry right now and they love getting tender shoots of new bamboo which spread out all over the area this time of year the national zoo which is closed to visitors because of the pandemic says it's a giant pandas can go through a hundred pounds of the stuff in a day not to be outdone the zoo's red pandas love to devour the shoots to John Aaron WTOP news it is four thirteen at W. T. O. P. at something police don't look for every day the town of Louisa police department that's in central Virginia those are looking for two people stole items from a store while wearing hollowed out watermelons on their head they cut holes for the eyes detectives say they're asking anyone with tips on their whereabouts to give them a call in reference melon heads when you call last month the US saw the largest spike in food prices in decades and one expert says we'll likely see more increases soon in April Americans paid two point six percent more for groceries when compared to the month before the largest monthly increase in nearly fifty years but it makes sense because demand went up as restaurants closed in more people started buying in bulk David Ortega as a food economist at Michigan State University people are increasing the amount of food that they purchase an anyone given trip to sort of avoid exposure to the virus prices went up for things like eggs meat cereal and milk in Ortega says meat prices will likely go even higher as the supply is interrupted by some companies shutting down plants due to a coronavirus concerns neckline Elie WTOP news in your soon breakfast or brunch encounter some technical difficulties today the video conferencing service says trying to figure out what caused widespread outages early this morning and then around the noon time the company apologized for the outages and says it will only prevented a limited number of users from hosting and joining meetings it is four fifteen A. W. T. O. P. end time for sports sports.

Virginia US David Ortega John Aaron WTOP W. T. O. Louisa Michigan State University Elie WTOP
"david ortega" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"david ortega" Discussed on WTOP

"The ceremony was online due to the corona virus pandemic Patricia Karachi vice president of alumni relations told the grand she's proud of them if anything the fact that you're here today despite the challenges and obstacles that a relentless virus has thrown your way says something about you you are strong and tenacious you have persisted and for that I salute you grants to all the grads this is the first in the region to Montgomery County high schools will offer a new electives students will be able to take next spring the new pilot course will focus on the history and culture of the LGBTQ plus community school board member Patricia o'neill says she's proud of the board and its commitment to equality I don't want to ever let go of the civil rights implications for LBGTQ students I'm very proud that this will be offered as an elective the course aims to bring student acceptance and support of all sexual and gender identities each other Montgomery County schools plan to offer the pilot course the following school year the board unanimously approved the decision opening it up to juniors and seniors who have taken American history Andrea Cameron WTOP news be ready for more price hikes at the grocery store one expert says the supply chain for meat isn't working demand for groceries went way up last month with restaurants shut down and people buying in bulk this is sort of a short term shocks to the supply chain David Ortega her food economist at Michigan State University not all food prices are increasing at the same rates are at the same level he says the next big increase will likely be in meat prices as the supply is interrupted by some companies shutting down plants due to corona virus concerns last month overall prices for groceries went up by two point six percent the largest monthly increase in nearly fifty years neckline Elie WTOP news zoom is investigating the cause of outages that apparently affected some users ability to host enjoying in meetings there's a limited number of users were affected a website that tracks disruptions in tech services says the problems appear to have peaked around five this morning with another spike around noon zoom apologizes for any inconvenience and says it continues to assess and.

vice president David Ortega Michigan State University Patricia Karachi Montgomery County Patricia o'neill Andrea Cameron WTOP Elie WTOP
"david ortega" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"david ortega" Discussed on WTOP

"A petition demanding airlines begin issuing full refunds to passengers instead of vouchers for cancelled flights Consumer Reports a nonprofit U. S. public research interest group are behind the move the group say after taking billions in bailout money airlines are still holding on to passengers money or making it difficult to get a refund legislation that would make refunds for cancelled flights in cases like this mandatory has also been introduced the groups have also reached out directly to airlines urging them to change their policies Melissa Howell WTOP news the Nigerian prince scam kind of cliche by now but now there's a new scam out there these online scam artists have been attacking U. S. unemployment system scamming state governments out of millions of dollars in payments meant to keep the economy at least somewhat propped up the feds say the attackers have used a detailed information about U. S. citizens in several states such as social security numbers that may have been obtained from cyber attacks from years past to file these bogus claims the attack from Nigeria has exploded state unemployment systems at a time when they're straining the process a crush of claims from an unemployment crisis on match to since the Great Depression but when the scammers are giving states the right info it's hard to determine what's a real claim and what isn't last month the U. S. all the largest spike in food prices in decades and one expert says we're likely to see more in April Americans paid two point six percent more for groceries when compared to the month before the largest monthly increase in nearly fifty years but it makes sense because demand went up as restaurants closed in more people started buying in bulk David Ortega as a food economist at Michigan State University people are increasing the amount of food that they purchase an anyone given trip to sort of avoid exposure to the virus prices went up for things like eggs meat cereal and milk and are taken says meat prices will likely go even higher as the supply is interrupted by some companies shutting down plants due to corona virus concerns neckline Elie WTOP news as much as I'm sure you love your parents about the being stuck at home with them and playing board games or watching tiger king on TV is not exactly how you envisioned the last few months so you're so your your dad jokes and hope that's what Barack Obama offered in his message to twenty twenty high school graduates the former president spoke during the graduate together ceremony last night which was hosted by lebron James in the former president had three pieces of advice for students graduating during this unprecedented crisis number one don't be afraid number to build a community and number three do what you think is right doing what feels good what's convenient what's easy that's all kids thank unfortunately a lot of so called grown ups including some with fancy titles important jobs still think that way which is why things are so screwed up I hope that instead if you decide to ground yourself in values that last Obama also reminded students to thing not just about themselves but about each other as the country navigates a post pandemic world WTOP news time nine fifteen sports.

"david ortega" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"david ortega" Discussed on WTOP

"Have closed the U. S. immigration so tightly only to people seeking asylum at the southern border have been leading since March twenty first The Washington Post got a hold of unpublished US citizenship and immigration services data the administration has suspended most of due process rights for migrants including kids and asylum seekers it's kicked out more than twenty thousand unauthorized border crossers the feds say they're doing this to cut down on the number of people in border patrol holding cells where corona virus easily spreads critics say those fleeing persecution or gang violence now have no place to go five eleven Maryland is getting more money for corona virus testing it's a two hundred five million dollar check that will help the state expands has sting efforts the money was scored by Maryland's congressional delegation currently about twenty percent of tests come back positive health experts say ten percent is a safer level for re openings it is five eleven a bleak warning from the fed chairman today unless the government keeps up its coronavirus spending the country could face long term economic damage his warning comes a day after the house came up with a three trillion dollar plan to help states and essential workers and sent another round of direct payments to every American let's talk about it with politico co founder John Harris so John and Jerome Powell calls the crisis the biggest shock our economy has felt in modern times and Wall Street choked a bit closing down more than five hundred points the Dow did how will Powell's message land with folks in the White House well Powell's not a great favor it as you'll recall of president trump and president trump is saying that he's joining Senate Republicans the same right now we don't need more stimulus we need to know what the results of the first multi trillion dollar stimulus packages go through some I think it might land on a little bit on deaf ears deaf ears at the White House in the meantime I house speaker Nancy Pelosi is trying to push through a new three trillion dollar plan Republicans are little summers publicans are a little skeptical about it what elements are controversial well progressive in the democratic caucus in the house wanted to do more and of course the US Senate Republicans say look at now is not the time for more stimulus you know we've all been waiting for a return to normal in one sense or you could say this is it because early in this crisis you had huge almost unanimous votes in favor trillion dollar spending packages what we're seeing now is much more traditional wines it of washing debate how do you expect this to move forward John it it clearly they're still going to be a push from some in Congress to get more and more money it will this be a battle over lines the lines be drawn over this well we are in uncharted territory precisely because of what chairman Powell said we really don't know how severe and how long term this recession is going to be clearly what center policies pushing now and I think the votes coming up on on Friday that's mostly symbolic we know that that three trillion dollar package isn't going to pass right away but if this economy stays in free fall that's not a so called B. recovery we are going to be seen government intervention on a scale that we haven't seen in decades John thanks so much really appreciate a good talking to you thank you thanks bye bye John Harris co founder of politico it's five fourteen food prices took a steep jump last month one expert says they'll probably jump again because the meat supply chain is under stress demand for groceries went way up last month with restaurants shut down and people buying in bulk this is sort of a short term shocks to the supply chain David Ortega her food economist at Michigan State University not all stock prices are increasing at the same rates are at the same level he says the next big increase will likely be in meat prices as the supply is interrupted by some companies shutting down plants due to corona virus concerns last month overall prices for groceries went up by two point six percent the largest monthly increase in nearly fifty years neckline Elie WTOP news and we have breaking news from Maryland the governor is going to lift the stay at home restrictions at the end of the week effective this Friday.

"david ortega" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"david ortega" Discussed on WTOP

"About finding your possible visit UTC dot EDU slash possible Dave told on WTOP traffic well Mike Stanford joins us now from storm team four I couldn't ask for a better day to come to work on yeah it is a gorgeous day across the region nice weather will continue through the evening hours so nice evening to head out for a walk Oct after supper later tonight there was an increase in cloud cover will be after midnight as a warm front comes our way I was mid forties to lower fifty S. could be a couple showers tomorrow morning many across the western suburbs this is not to be a widespread of enforced by tomorrow have been behind the warm front partly to mostly sunny highs near seventy partly cloudy skies breezy and warm on Friday will preview some with a bit of humidity in after thunderstorm I've been a little bit eighties the weekend looks on settled thanks to a slow moving cold front scattered showers after thunderstorms on Saturday AT our high low to mid seventies on Sunday with the risk of showers and possibly a storm gives bird sixty eight Frederick seventy run a shop it's sixty nine Reagan national all right thanks Mike we've got four twenty one on WTOP in the latest now on the corona virus here in our region the rest in Virginia is set to enter phase one of its re opening Friday but Virginia governor Ralph Northam sophists as hard hit northern Virginia will stay in phase zero through at least the next couple of weeks in addition to a limited reopening of churches and some nonessential businesses some DMV locations outside of northern Virginia will offer select services beginning next week as part of phase one that will be by appointment only DC mayor Muriel Bowser has extended the district's stay at home order through June eighth the original order directing residents to stay home set to expire Friday Maryland governor Larry Hogan will announce details about re opening in phase one later on next hour in fact with the potential for certain small businesses opening along with outdoor religious services in car washes resuming service but some of the hardest hit counties like Montgomery prince George's will likely keep their restrictions in place for now about two in three American adults they gatherings of ten or more people will not be safe until July or later this according to a Washington post university of Maryland poll for twenty two maybe a notice on your last couple trips to the supermarket last month the U. S. all the largest spike in food prices in decades and one expert says will please see more on that soon in April Americans pay two point six percent more for groceries when compared to the month before the largest monthly increase in nearly fifty years but it makes sense because demand went up as restaurants closed in more people started buying in bulk David Ortega as a food.

"david ortega" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"david ortega" Discussed on WTOP

"For their industry from Congress organizes tell me so far about ninety percent of their business has been wiped out Melissa Howell WTOP news twelve oh five last month the U. S. saw the largest spike in food prices in decades and one expert says we'll likely see more of those increases soon in April Americans pay two point six percent more for groceries when compared to the month before the largest monthly increase in nearly fifty years but it makes sense because demand went up as restaurants closed in more people started buying in bulk David Ortega as a food economist at Michigan State University people are increasing the amount of food that they purchase an anyone given trip to sort of avoid exposure to the virus prices went up for things like eggs meat cereal and milk and are taken says meat prices will likely go even higher as the supply is interrupted by some companies shutting down plants due to corona virus concerns neckline Elie WTOP news disappointed kids aren't bad enough many parents are dealing with the frustration of learning summer camps and sports leagues don't plan to offer refunds for activities affected by the coronavirus camps are so expensive and many people secured their spot for the kids months ago but N. B. C. for consumer reporter Susan Hogan says unfortunately your registration fee may have already been spent on securing a location and supplies but that doesn't mean that you'll lose your money a lot of sports camps are seasonal and offer after school leaves in the fall the winter spring so ask if they would Kerry over the costs to a future camp for you and if you really truly need a refund she says explaining your finances have changed because of the corona virus and you'd probably want to show some proof of your hardship be a log in steam WTOP news coming up after traffic and weather what college kids are saying about heading back to campus it's twelve oh seven I'm showing her some with WTOP's community call out our ongoing commitment to provide relevant announcements and information that will help you with code nineteen these messages will update you on the different ways local businesses and organizations are helping their community on the right.

Congress David Ortega Susan Hogan Kerry WTOP Melissa Howell Michigan State University Elie WTOP reporter
"david ortega" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"david ortega" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Enter fiance David Ortega said they pulled their seven year old daughter from terrorist elementary after staff members repeatedly kept putting her on a bus when she should have stayed on campus for the after school program one time they put her on a bus and apparently both candy and her fiance were out of town and day I put this girl on a bus took her home gets off the bus and nobody's there and she's left there in the cold there also claiming also that a few other times that. they didn't see candidate it day and see the mother waiting on kid at the bus stop and that the so they put her back on the bus and took her back to school four times barely them as old as the kid is traumatized to the point where she throws up on herself before school that kind of thing now they have been a private school same as ever lawyer saying that their human rights violations here for example I'm just thrilled to get a human rights were violated and I give it at at worst case it was adults that made a mistake the kids okay right well no verily the kid is not well the safe yeah but the compare Lee the kid was traumatized a little boy were she throws up are so I think it's silly yeah I think it's a silly lawsuit well the law listen to this I mean he's saying that the family's attorney argue in the lawsuit that ran our chi SD violated the girls of Stansted since that substantive constitutional rights of life liberty privacy bodily integrity and happiness all pursuant to the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment liberty they were in good idea man they were inconvenience that's about it yeah..

David Ortega Lee attorney seven year
"david ortega" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"david ortega" Discussed on KCRW

"Will be building from scratch the infrastructure is gone so building roads building people's homes you may make it will need to be done Georgia Lou is the director general of tourism for the Bahamas thank you very much for joining us today you're very welcome the trump administration imposed new terrorists this weekend on more than a hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese imports the targets include chocolate sweet biscuits and chewing gum the import taxes highlight the evolution in the kind of products China sells to the world and here Scott Horsley reports on America's growing appetite for food from China. maybe it's no surprise that China exported eighty nine million dollars worth of green and black tea to the United States last year but apple juice yeah almost three hundred million dollars worth the US also imported nearly four hundred million dollars worth of frozen to Lafayette from China and in case the fish was a little bland we also bought forty three million dollars with the Chinese garlic agricultural economist David Ortega of Michigan State University says China has grown into the third biggest supplier for and food to the U. S. behind Canada and Mexico so when the trade war turns into a food fight the indigestion cuts both ways it's not just American farmers that are missing opportunities to to send products to China but then we also have farmers in China whose livelihood depends on products coming here and and likewise we hop you know consumers are both and that are being affected in terms of of prices from these terrorists much of the to the US buys from China requires labor intensive processing giving the country's low wage workers an advantage China's emergence as factory to the world is well known but it's growing importance is farmer and fishmonger gets less attention Tony Corbell who's with the environmental group food and water watch says it's easy to overlook the Chinese peace and spinach in the frozen food aisle war that river of Chinese apple juice not only are you talking about the Jews itself at the commodity but apple juice is used this week are all sorts of other foods China still recovering from a series of food safety scandals more than a decade ago involving tainted baby formula toothpaste and pet food Darcy better who is the chief agriculture negotiator for the US trade representative says since then the country has imposed more rigorous oversight China has tried to respond by really upgrading it to take you live to changing the regime that still something that's a high priority for them many Americans are still wary though during the George W. bush administration the U. S. open the door to cooked and processed chicken from China but all. if the birds themselves raised in the U. S. Canada Chile Corbeau says only one shipment ever made that circuitous journey why did the chicken cross the Pacific twice it was a hundred ten pounds was exported to the United States but that's been it because the costs such a big controversy at the time given given so the national fisheries institute says a lot of to Lafayette makes the opposite journey raised a fish farm in China but exported to be cut and packaged in this country that's something that fuels jobs here in the U. S. its facilities in Minnesota and Pennsylvania and Ohio and Illinois they do that given says by relying on farm raised fish from China midwestern processing plants can operate year round without over fishing here at home but fish imported from China is already subject to a twenty five percent tariff and that set to go to thirty percent next month given says that makes it hard to compete with domestic chicken beef and pork for Americans dinner plates when it comes to seafood and terrace you know we're really collateral damage in this trade war we get hit coming and going America's lobster fishermen have already been feeling the pain of China's retaliatory terrace wore the year now Darcy better the former trade negotiator worries much like the food safety scandals of a decade ago the trade war will do long lasting damage in both China and the U. S. leaving a bad taste in consumers malice that no amount of imported chewing gum we'll take away Scott Horsley you're listening to All Things Considered.

three hundred million dollars four hundred million dollars eighty nine million dollars forty three million dollars hundred billion dollars twenty five percent hundred ten pounds thirty percent
"david ortega" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"david ortega" Discussed on KQED Radio

"May make it will need to be done jointer Lou is the director general of tourism for the Bahamas thank you very much for joining us today you're very welcome the trump administration imposed new tariffs this weekend on more than a hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese imports the targets include chocolate sweet biscuits and chewing gum the import taxes highlight the evolution in the kind of products China sells to the world and here Scott Horsley reports on America's growing appetite for food from China. maybe it's no surprise that China exported eighty nine million dollars worth of green and black tea to the United States last year but apple juice yeah almost three hundred million dollars worth the US also imported nearly four hundred million dollars worth of frozen to Lafayette from China and in case the fish was a little bland we also bought forty three million dollars worth of Chinese garlic agricultural economist David Ortega of Michigan State University says China has grown into the third biggest supplier for and food to the U. S. behind Canada and Mexico so when the trade war turns into a food fight the indigestion cuts both ways it's not just American farmers that are missing opportunities to to send products to China but then we also have farmers in China whose livelihood depends on products coming here and and likewise we hop you know consumers are both bands that are being affected in terms of of prices from these terrorists most of the to the US buys from China requires labor intensive processing giving the country's low wage workers an advantage China's emergence as factory to the world is well known but it's growing importance is farmer and fishmonger gets less attention Tony Corbell who's with the environmental group food and water watch says it's easy to overlook the Chinese peas and spinach in the frozen food aisle war that river of Chinese apple juice not only are you talking about the Jews itself at the commodity but apple juice is used this week are all sorts of other foods China still recovering from a series of food safety scandals more than a decade ago involving tainted baby formula toothpaste and pet food Darcy better who is the chief agriculture negotiator for the US trade representative says since then the country has imposed more rigorous oversight China has tried to respond by really upgrading it to take you live to changing the regime that still something that's a high priority for them many Americans are still wary though during the George W. bush administration the U. S. open the door to cooked and processed chicken from China but only. if the birds themselves raised in the U. S. Canada Chile corpus as only one shipment ever made that circuitous journey why did the chicken cross the Pacific twice it was a a hundred ten pounds was exported to the United States but that's been it because the costs such a big controversy at the time given given so the national fisheries institute says a lot of to Lafayette makes the opposite journey raised a fish farm in China but exported to be cut and packaged in this country that's something that fuels jobs here in the U. S. its facilities in Minnesota and Pennsylvania and Ohio and Illinois they do that given says by relying on farm raised fish from China midwestern processing plant can operate year round without over fishing here at home but fish imported from China is already subject to a twenty five percent tariff and that set to go to thirty percent next month given says that makes it hard to compete with domestic chicken beef and pork for Americans dinner plates when it comes to seafood and terrorists you know we're really collateral damage in this trade war we get hit coming and going America's lobster fishermen have already been feeling the pain of China's retaliatory terrace wore the year now Darcy better the former trade negotiator worries much like the food safety scandals of a decade ago the trade war will do long lasting damage in both China and the U. S. leaving a bad taste in consumers malice that no amount of imported chewing gum we'll take away Scott Horsley NPR news Washington. you're listening.

Lou director general three hundred million dollars four hundred million dollars eighty nine million dollars forty three million dollars hundred billion dollars twenty five percent hundred ten pounds thirty percent
"david ortega" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"david ortega" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Will be building from scratch the infrastructure is gone so building roads building people's homes you may make it will need to be done jointer blue is the director general of tourism for the Bahamas thank you very much for joining us today you're very welcome the trump administration imposed new tariffs this weekend on more than a hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese imports the targets include chocolate sweet biscuits and chewing gum the import taxes highlight the evolution in the kind of products China sells to the world and here Scott Horsley reports on America's growing appetite for food from China. maybe it's no surprise that China exported eighty nine million dollars worth of green and black tea to the United States last year but apple juice yeah almost three hundred million dollars worth the US also imported nearly four hundred million dollars worth of frozen tell Lapeer from China and in case the fish was a little bland we also bought forty three million dollars with the Chinese garlic agricultural economist David Ortega of Michigan State University says China has grown into the third biggest supplier for and food to the U. S. behind Canada and Mexico so when the trade war turns into a food fight the indigestion cuts both ways it's not just American farmers that are missing opportunities to to send products to China but then we also have farmers in China whose livelihood depends on products coming here and and likewise we hop you know consumers are both and that are being affected in terms of of prices from these terrorists much of the to the US buys from China requires labor intensive processing giving the country's low wage workers an advantage China's emergence as factory to the world is well known but it's growing importance is farmer and fishmonger gets less attention Tony Corbeau who's with the environmental group food and water watch says it's easy to overlook the Chinese peace and spinach in the frozen food aisle war that river of Chinese apple juice not only are you talking about the Jews itself at the commodity but apple juice is used this week are all sorts of other foods China is still recovering from a series of food safety scandals more than a decade ago involving tainted baby formula toothpaste and pet food Darcy better who is the chief agriculture negotiator for the US trade representative says since then the country has imposed more rigorous oversight China has tried to respond by really upgrading it could take you live to changing it they take the regime that still something that's a high priority for them many Americans are still wary though during the George W. bush administration the U. S. open the door to cooked and processed chicken from China but all. if the birds themselves raised in the U. S. Canada Chile Corbeau says only one shipment ever made that circuitous journey why did the chicken cross the Pacific twice it was a a hundred ten pounds was exported to the United States but that's been it because the costs such a big controversy at the time given given so the national fisheries institute says a lot of tilapia makes the opposite journey raised a fish farm in China but exported to be cut and packaged in this country that's something that fuels jobs here in the U. S. its facilities in Minnesota and Pennsylvania and Ohio and Illinois they do that given says by relying on farm raised fish from China midwestern processing plants can operate year round without over fishing here at home but fish imported from China is already subject to a twenty five percent tariff and that set to go to thirty percent next month given says that makes it hard to compete with domestic chicken beef and pork for Americans dinner plates when it comes to seafood and terrace you know we're really collateral damage in this trade war we get hit coming and going America's lobster fishermen have already been feeling the pain of China's retaliatory terrace wore the year now Darcy better the former trade negotiator worries much like the food safety scandals of a decade ago the trade war will do long lasting damage in both China and the U. S. leaving a bad taste in consumers malice that no amount of imported chewing gum we'll take away Scott Horsley NPR you're listening to.

three hundred million dollars four hundred million dollars eighty nine million dollars forty three million dollars hundred billion dollars twenty five percent hundred ten pounds thirty percent
"david ortega" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"david ortega" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Will need to be done Hey joy Jr blue is the director general of tourism for the Bahamas thank you very much for joining us today. you're very welcome bye bye. the trump administration imposed new tariffs this weekend on more than a hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese imports the targets include chocolate sweet biscuits and chewing gum the import taxes highlight the evolution in the kind of products China sells to the world and here Scott Horsley reports on America's growing appetite for food from China. maybe it's no surprise that China exported eighty nine million dollars worth of green and black tea to the United States last year but apple juice yeah almost three hundred million dollars worth the US also imported nearly four hundred million dollars worth of frozen tell Lapeer from China and in case the fish was a little bland we also bought forty three million dollars with the Chinese garlic agricultural economist David Ortega of Michigan State University says China has grown into the third biggest supplier for and food to the U. S. behind Canada and Mexico so when the trade war turns into a food fight the indigestion cuts both ways it's not just American farmers that are missing opportunities to to send products to China but then we also have farmers in China whose livelihood depends on products coming here and and likewise we hop you know consumers are both and that are being affected in terms of of prices from these terrorists much of the to the US buys from China requires labor intensive processing giving the country's low wage workers an advantage China's emergence as factory to the world is well known but it's growing importance is farmer and fishmonger gets less attention Tony Corbell who's with the environmental group food and water watch says it's easy to overlook the Chinese peace and spinach in the frozen food aisle war that river of Chinese apple juice not only are you talking about the Jews itself at the commodity but apple juice is used as a sweetener all sorts of other foods China still recovering from a series of food safety scandals more than a decade ago involving tainted baby formula toothpaste and pet food Darcy better who is the chief agriculture negotiator for the US trade representative says since then the country has imposed more rigorous oversight China has tried to respond by really upgrading it to take you live to changing the regime that still something that's a high priority for them many Americans are still wary though during the George W. bush administration the U. S. open the door to cooked and processed chicken from China but all. if the birds themselves raised in the U. S. Canada Chile Corbeau says only one shipment ever made that circuitous journey why did the chicken cross the Pacific twice it was a a hundred ten pounds was exported to the United States but that's been it because the costs such a big controversy at the time Gavin given so the national fisheries institute says a lot of tilapia makes the opposite journey raised a fish farm in China but exported to be cut and packaged in this country that's something that fuels jobs here in the U. S. its facilities in Minnesota and Pennsylvania and Ohio and Illinois they do that given says by relying on farm raised fish from China midwestern processing plants can operate year round without over fishing here at home but fish imported from China is already subject to a twenty five percent tariff and that set to go to thirty percent next month given says that makes it hard to compete with domestic chicken beef and pork for Americans dinner plates when it comes to seafood and terrace you know we're really collateral damage in this trade war we get hit coming and going America's lobster fishermen have already been feeling the pain of China's retaliatory terrace wore the year now Darcy better the former trade negotiator worries much like the food safety scandals of a decade ago the trade war will do long lasting damage in both China and the U. S. leaving a bad taste in consumers malice that no amount of imported chewing gum we'll take away Scott Horsley NPR news Washington. you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news. what a stunt actors don't feel they're getting the recognition they deserve even when stones are everywhere more and more Hollywood is reliant on big action films for space fantasy his adventures things like that and very often these films require stunts I'm gonna resolve the flight for best stunt Husker next time for market place as.

director general Bahamas three hundred million dollars four hundred million dollars eighty nine million dollars forty three million dollars hundred billion dollars twenty five percent hundred ten pounds thirty percent
"david ortega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"david ortega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"United States thanks very much for joining us today you're welcome. the trump administration imposed new tariffs this weekend on more than a hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese imports the targets include chocolate sweet biscuits and chewing gum the import taxes highlight the evolution in the kind of products China sells to the world and here Scott Horsley reports on America's growing appetite for food from China. maybe it's no surprise that China exported eighty nine million dollars worth of green and black tea to the United States last year but apple juice yeah almost three hundred million dollars worth the US also imported nearly four hundred million dollars worth of frozen to Lafayette from China and in case the fish was a little bland we also bought forty three million dollars with the Chinese garlic agricultural economist David Ortega of Michigan State University says China has grown into the third biggest supplier for and food to the U. S. behind Canada and Mexico so when the trade war turns into a food fight the indigestion cuts both ways it's not just American farmers that are missing opportunities to to send products to China but then we also have farmers in China whose livelihood depends on products coming here and and likewise we hop you know consumers are both ends that are being affected in terms of of prices from these terrorists much of the to the US buys from China requires labor intensive processing giving the country's low wage workers an advantage China's emergence as factory to the world is well known but it's growing importance is farmer and fishmonger gets less attention Tony Corbeau who's with the environmental group food and water watch says it's easy to overlook the Chinese peas and spinach in the frozen food aisle war that river of Chinese apple juice not only are you talking about the Jews itself at the commodity but apple juice is used as a sweetener all sorts of other foods China still recovering from a series of food safety scandals more than a decade ago involving tainted baby formula toothpaste and pet food Darcy better who is the chief agriculture negotiator for the US trade representative says since then the country has imposed more rigorous oversight China has tried to respond by really upgrading it he lives in changing it. and that still something that's a high priority for them many Americans are still wary though during the George W. bush administration the US open the door to cooked and processed chicken from China but only if the birds themselves raised in the U. S. Canada Chile Corbeau says only one shipment ever made that circuitous journey why did the chicken cross the Pacific twice it was a hundred ten pounds was exported to the United States but that's been it because the costs such a big controversy at the time given given so the national fisheries institute says a lot of tilapia makes the opposite journey raised a fish farm in China but exported to be cut and packaged in this country that's something that fuels jobs here in the U. S. its facilities in Minnesota and Pennsylvania and Ohio and Illinois they do that given says by relying on farm raised fish from China midwestern processing plants can operate year round without over fishing here at home but fish imported from China is already subject to a twenty five percent tariff and that set to go to thirty percent next month given says that makes it hard to compete with domestic chicken beef and pork for Americans dinner plates when it comes to seafood and Paris you know we're really collateral damage in this trade war we get hit coming and going America's lobster fishermen have already been feeling the pain of China's retaliatory terrace wore the year now Darcy better the former trade negotiator worries much like the food safety scandals of a decade ago the trade war will do long lasting damage in both China and the U. S. leaving a bad taste in consumers mouse that no amount of imported chewing gum we'll take away Scott Horsley NPR news Washington. you're listening to All Things Considered on W. NYC Jeffrey I've seen died last month as he awaited charges on sex trafficking since then his accusers have been speaking out one of those is chante Davies Davis is one of the women who has come forward to accuse abstain of sexual abuse she says she's not finished in her fight for justice even though F. scene is dead hear her conversation with it also Chang coming up next on All Things Considered right here on W. NYC stay tuned. WNYC is supported by the world premiere on Broadway of Harper Lee's to kill a mockingbird Jeff Daniels is Atticus finch.

United States WNYC Harper Lee Jeff Daniels Atticus finch three hundred million dollars four hundred million dollars eighty nine million dollars forty three million dollars hundred billion dollars twenty five percent hundred ten pounds thirty percent