4 Burst results for "David Mccullough Doris Kearns Goodwin"

"david mccullough doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"david mccullough doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Comes from European sleep works to and support for KQ we do this warning comes from shepherd mall on a global law firm with nine hundred lawyers handling corporate in technology matters he litigation and complex financial transactions for companies in the bay area and beyond shepherd mall and we put clients first Comcast business offering internet voice and video solutions designed to help businesses maximize performance so the focus can remain on employees and customers learn more at business dot com cast dot com the announcers and technical staff of KQED radio or affiliated with the national association of broadcasters ploys and technicians CW way local fifty one AFL CIO I'm Dave Freeman Cynthia mark she is here KQ reading news taking over pledge today with Lilly Jamali Brian want some of our journalists and reporters from KQED news and the California report they are here thanks to your continued support during our fund raising drive if you have donated thank you very much if you haven't yet we have some fantastic thank you gifts at one eight hundred nine three seven eight eight five zero volunteers are here to take your contributions and and and and answer your thank you give questions or you may pledge online at KQED dot org slash donate and support for NPR comes from Simon and Schuster publishers of the American story conversations with master historians by David Rudenstine and featuring David McCullough Doris Kearns Goodwin Walter Isaacson another's available where books are sold a sauna work management platform for helping teams plan organize and execute all the work they do together so everyone can focus on the work that matters most learn more at a sauna dot com and progressive insurance offering a way to buy a home insurance with their home quote explorer tool custom quotes and rates are available online and.

"david mccullough doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"david mccullough doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Helping with the herd fight you need a sun roof for that but that's what it's called a pickle how that but the the the spikey helmet I try also I realize in and I thought about this with the recorder to be compassionate with the past to cut the past some slack because I think that there's a tendency to disqualify people from the past and I talked to here's a a name drop I'm happy to deal with the name drops with David McCullough Doris Kearns Goodwin for peace that will re air soon it was preempted on the east coast a few weeks ago but Doris Kearns Goodwin she sad she lit up when I brought this up and she said my god she said after your he should have allowed more Jewish refugees in the country that in turn meant of Japanese Americans was a terrible thing spot he brought us through World War two he brought us through the Great Depression and you know she said this is similar things about Abraham Lincoln so I err on the side of generous and I think maybe that's also the influence a Sunday morning our colleague merry luteal who actually got in Charles Kuralt also right yeah and yet it of course he did but and but it's it merry living had and I did not get to meet him but Mary Lou said that Charles Kuralt's had you know it's okay to like the person you're interviewing and and and that's I feel like I lie like all these the people in this box and that's the joy of Sunday morning to not we can do that right we can do that Morocco CBS Sunday morning at the National Archives discussing his book more which you worries with Rita braver of CBS well we have this great audience so we promise to take some of your questions there's microphones and the only thing I would ask is to come up with questions not speeches the.

David McCullough Doris Kearns Abraham Lincoln Charles Kuralt Mary Lou Morocco National Archives Rita braver CBS
"david mccullough doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:15 min | 2 years ago

"david mccullough doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The story of America with David McCullough Doris Kearns Goodwin and others available now where books are sold it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin the Attorney General William Barr has turned out to be one of president trump's most loyal defenders he was out in front again yesterday after justice department inspector general report found that the FBI had adequate reason back in twenty sixteen to open an investigation into the trump campaigns ties with Russia in a statement bar push back saying the FBI launched an investigation on quote the thinnest of suspicions when bar was nominated a little more than a year ago many speculated he would be sort of moderating force within the administration instead Barr has embraced many of the most of this of aspects of trump's agenda Marie Brenner writer at large for Vanity Fair wanted to better understand lean bar by looking at his past and she tells me she did that in part by talking with many of his former classmates one thing that struck me was the absolute recall that his classmates had about house so deeply he believed in the power of the constitution an executive authority from the time he entered Horace Mann in high school now I don't know what you were like at fourteen but certainly when I was going to high school in the middle of the Vietnam War I wasn't debating the president's power to be able to declare war without going through Congress right that was that something that was happening in his kitchen table late that was happening at his kitchen table and they were a family the bars of contrarians they were you know absolute you know doctrinaire Goldwater Republicans at this period in this world of a sort of a larger liberal culture that liberal culture was playing out at both Columbia University where William Barr was attending college and at the progressive Dalton school where his father Donald bar served as head master runners as two key moments at those schools influenced Williams career defining outlook outlook on executive power and the fierceness toward progressive politics what we're seeing now is an extremely interesting cultural moment that is being re translated during the late nineteen sixties and early seventies Donald bar began running afoul of many of the parents of the Dalton school because he became progressively more conservative and really double down on a lot of the students who were the straight a students at the Dalton schools desire to be out pro testing for the Vietnam War so with what you see I believe in William Barr at the justice department is a kind of re filtering of the protests that started against his father bill Barr was in high school and college when the Dalton parents and trustees began an immense pushed back against what many of them called the captain queen who was running the Dalton school and so he watches and absorbs his father being criticized quite publicly in The New York Times in New York magazine in the early nineteen seventies as he goes into college for his father's doctrinaire conservative views one of the things that so interested may have been learning about his early education wise our our current Attorney General attended Columbia University and he entered in nineteen sixty eight that is the time that the during his freshman year that the campus erupted into this large protest and quite fascinating way he was against all of this and has told people very close to him that he was barred from entering the Columbia University library to pursue his Chinese studies work and because these anti antiwar protest civil rights protests wrapping he you know he thought that this was anarchy and at the same time his father was riding quite tough really all in retrospect pretty shocking editorials and essays in vogue and in my calls saying that these were kind of limousine liberal protesters who would go to these protests by taxi you know at one point going after the growing black power movement this this kind of language and this kind of dinner table conversation you can only make a match and having a certain imprinting on a sun when William bars father was really fired from the Dalton school I mean he was allowed to legally to resign but there's this was for a young man who had just graduated from Columbia this had to be a kind of emblematic moment and you always wonder you know is this score settling one of the teachers I interviewed who would taught act the Dalton school through the Donald bar ten year said when I watched Billy testifying before set the Senate in may I thought this is his father we visited Billy has a score to settle when you spoke with several of bill bars for friends from from childhood I mean did you talk about today with them and and do any of them see the same man heading the justice department today that they knew back then the belly bar they went to school with they admired they found him so decent they found him never be little laying anyone he was a really good guy and what really struck me was their disappointment you know one of them said to me it's an American tragedy you start off in one way in life and you're going along and you veer into another and it becomes a very dark and I did want to say that did they say that because they just don't share his political leanings or are they pointing to something that they see changed from say the first time he was Attorney General to the time now that he is serving under the trump administration what no they'd see a change no because many of them said to me that when he was first appointed under bush as the Attorney General that he was obviously take a conservative but again a very decent very moderate thinking strict constitutionalist and when trump appointed him they believed that we would have a surprise you know that he would be operating on that high level when he first started under trump they were again mystified Marie Brenner is a writer at large for Vanity Fair she writes about the Attorney General William Barr for the magazine's December issue wearing thanks for sharing your reporting we push it thank you Rachel this.

America David McCullough Doris Kearns ten year
"david mccullough doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

10:19 min | 2 years ago

"david mccullough doris kearns goodwin" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Of people at the library Congress for program that I've started that I have my own book coming out on and this is a book which is called the American story I'm not promoting it now will be out to October after the book festival but are about five or six years ago I decided be a good idea to educate members of Congress about American history and so I decided with Jim Billington down and now Carl Hayden have a program where where I was sponsored at the library of Congress we're we invite members of Congress only to calm that they could bring aghast and we would have them come to reception where Democrats Republicans or talk together then go down have a nice dinner and then I would interview an author about a very important book in American history so we've now done about forty five of them and the first book that I have coming out about that the American story being published by Simon Schuster will interview what it contained the interviews of of some of the people were in some of the best of the interviews I've done so far the David McCullough Doris Kearns Goodwin John Meachem Ron churn out Robert Caro among other well known authors yeah and I've got an advance copy of the American story and I did want to ask you when you look at the list of the historians. ninety nine percent white male does that affect how we're telling our American store well no doubt it dies we tried and we do have some women who are authors and they're like Cokie Roberts was an author that's in this book and we also have another one that are not in this book African American authors as well I interviewed Lani bunch about what he's on the American the African history culture museum we've also had some white authors who've written about black related subjects of the civil rights movement for example the author that I interviewed was was actually white but now he's written a definitive book on that subject yes so all right we try always to get more women and minority authors and we're we're striving to do a better job than we've done but there's no doubt that many of the best historians to date have been white males now Doris Kearns Goodwin not a white male is in is in this book and did a great job when we talk about several for books and she's appeared at the national book festival of course as well. David Rubenstein there's a literary award named after you as well what is that. well it's a literacy ward here's what it is I as a young boy I went to library near my home in Baltimore you could take out the your first set of books I think when you're six years old I got my library card the take out twelve books a week and that's all you can do so I'd read in the first day and I have to wait the next week to take out twelve more I love reading I came from a very modest background blue collar background my parents were not high school or college educated but I was able to through them get the love of books and books have been very important to me sadly sadly are not that many people in the United States are really can read as much as I think should be the case so for example fourteen percent of adults are functionally illiterate. roughly thirty two million Americans cannot read past the fourth grade level if you can't read at all you have a pretty good chance of being in our federal criminal system so something like two thirds of the prisoners in the federal criminal system are functionally illiterate meaning they can't read past the fourth grade level two eighty percent of those in our juvenile delinquency system are functionally illiterate so if you are functionally illiterate you're not going to get a great job you're probably going to be involved in some things that are not wonderful and so I thought it was important that we do more to promote literacy now there's a lot of great organizations that are doing this United States so I simply thought the Liber Congress should do something in that regard as well so I put up some money to enable the Liber Congress to select our award winners each year for literacy thing organization of done wonderful things for literacy and we we try to get some attention to only give you some money but that's a drop in the bucket compared to what's needed but that's what it really is is about and in fact all the proceeds from my book will will go to that literacy fund and who are some of the past winners well I'll give you one reading is fundamental is one that's well known it's organizations been around for a long time started by Mrs McNamara the wife of our Robert McNamara it's a terrific organization it gets books into the hands of people otherwise wouldn't get them are there many many good organizations around the world that we've we've honored as well one organization for example is that does something I thought was quite unique we gave them an award a couple years ago if you learn how to read very often children learn how to read by a parent teaching them how to read a reading to them I should say at the age of three or four you're reading to your children well if you're in the military in United States sometimes you're not going to be home to read your child so this particular organization had a very clever idea which is getting a video screen and having the father or the mother who might be over station overseas reading a book to the child and the child is now able to hear from their parent I had read this book so that's an example of the kind of things that we that we've tried to support and try to give them some words and. attention. what are your current reading habits. I love reading and it's I try to read a hundred books a year that which is an obsessive amount I recognize that but I I'm not reading for the week I'm sorry to me but I'm not reading I'm not reading physics text books I'm not reading books that are outside of my area of expertise and I therefore tend to read biographies history business books and political books as subjects I know something about so I can go through them reasonably well and I also have a a mechanism to force me to read books which is I have a lot of programs that we're I'm interviewing people shudder entering the person you've got to read the book so the national book festival on how to prepare for that at the library Congress program I referred to I prepare for that I have another program at the New York Historical Society right interview authors and that is one that also requires me to read the books I think if you are interviewing somebody about a book you have you should give them the courtesy of having read the book and so I actually do read the books but some of them are not easy I'm reading now I have to interview an author soon Jill a port who's written a terrific book on American history but it's almost a thousand pages from about halfway through it rushing to get through a before I have to interview her and another in a couple weeks who are you interviewing at the national book festival the national book festival I'll be interviewing people some of whom I've interview before site I'm familiar with their box so Doug Brinkley is written a book called moon shot about the effort to get to the moon that president Kennedy really launch and it's really not about the actual Apollo eleven that got us there but actually what led to the effort to get us to do they happen to go to the moon by the end of the decade in the nineteen sixties I'm also interviewing Michael Beschloss on his book our presidents of war and that's a book that I've interviewed him about before but I I think it's a quite good book and I look forward to doing that as well again with Michael I'm also interviewing David books on his new book second mountain no I haven't interviewed him before on that book so that's a book that I am looking forward to doing and I'm interviewing. into Roberts about his book on Churchill which is maybe the definitive one volume book on on on our church I've interviewed him before about it but I have a chance again to do it here and I'm interviewing a fuel to other people about economics related things one about Asia and what about the US economy and so I'm looking forward to that to do that. Rubenstein you've interviewed several Supreme Court justices over the years about their box do you find that there's a uniqueness to that group I've interviewed the Chief Justice not about his book but about at his life I've interviewed tries to sort of my your I've interviewed justice Ginsburg will do so again shortly at the at the ninety second street Y. in New York I've interviewed died justice prior of one point not about a book but just generally and recent interview justice Thomas the Supreme Court Historical Society event all of these justices are obviously very intelligent people who love the law and live the law and they really are quite articulate and they really are quite good interview subjects I I was also interviewed justice Kagan one time for a an event at the library of Congress I should have added that so I I you have that for my book the American story I interviewed the Chief Justice and let me describe that I've gotten of the chief recently well because I currently serve as the chairman of the Smithsonian or institution the Smithsonian's chancellor is the Chief Justice so I get a chance to interact with him from time to time and I thought it would be a good idea for the program I have at the library Congress to interview somebody who maybe was not an author but who somebody who could be an interesting person for members of Congress I've done that twice now at in that series one is with Bill Gates who came in and interviewed and one is without the Chief Justice and the Chief Justice was a person told a very interesting story went through his life but in the story in which is recounted in the book. I said well did you always want to be Chief Justice the United States he said no I had no interest in that did you wanna be a justice of United States Supreme Court now did you want to be a judge no did you want to be a lawyer now what do you want to pay my one of the historian that was my great love I really love the English in American history I told my father that's what I want to do and he said well okay but it's not something that's going to make you a very prospers person is not a lot of money to be made being a historian but John Roberts the young Dr Robert said I don't really care I want to do this because I really love history so sure enough he was a good student he went to Harvard and he majored in history our eyes it was coming back I think from a sophomore year from home in Indiana he landed in the Logan airport and in Boston and got in a cab and said the cab driver can you please take me to Cambridge Massachusetts and the cab driver said are you going to Harvard yes are you a student harbor yes what do you study at Harvard I'm sorry history the cab driver said well that's what I study when I went to Harvard so John Roberts so maybe this is not as lucrative a professional I thought actually did not changes major he did continue to make her hate history but he took some courses that might help and prepare for law school. how have your reading habits and the books you've read contributed to your personal success. I.

Congress David Rubenstein Cokie Roberts United States Harvard Doris Kearns Goodwin David McCullough Doris Kearns justice Ginsburg justice Kagan United States Supreme Court African history culture museum John Roberts Robert Caro Lani bunch Simon Schuster Carl Hayden John Meachem Michael Beschloss Supreme Court