25 Burst results for "David Livingston"

The Most Dangerous Fruit in America

Gastropod

05:55 min | Last week

The Most Dangerous Fruit in America

"To start our watermelon adventure, we called one of the world's great watermelon. Harry Paris he has worked on watermelon science per years as part of Israel's agricultural research. Service. Well, I think the first thing that comes to the first two syllables water right? This is a true rich table. which has a lot of water and which actually probably the first use by people of this particular natural products. Was To quench thirst I've spent summers in Israel, and it is basically watermelon paradise but that's not actually were Harry I fell in love with a watermelon it all started when his dad grew watermelons in the backyard in their home in Brooklyn in the nineteen sixties then Harry gave watermelon farming himself fifteen years old and there was a new variety called Crimson sweets that came out and plans at a few seats in the garden and Lo and behold by the fall we got one nice big sweet high quality watermelon fruit. That we grew in the backyard in Brooklyn and from then on I was just hoped. Harry was well ahead of the local war hipster curve in Brooklyn but the watermelon is neither from Brooklyn nor from Israel, in fact, its origins are a little bit of a mystery. One of the big headlines was back in the mid nineteenth century when the British explorer David Livingstone went to the southern African deserts and low and behold. It was the year in which there was more rain than average and he found a large areas just covered with wild watermelons. He's wild watermelons were hard but does the name says have water say to pound them and so on and so forth but you could squeeze the water out of them David Livingston was searching for the source of the Nile. But apparently, he was also as a side hustle looking for other sources like the source of our sweet watermelons and people thought he'd founded the wild ancestor but Livingston was wrong about the source of the Nile and as it turns out now. We know he was wrong about those wild watermelons to now that scientists can examine the DNA of melons. They found that the Kalahari desert wild melon that Livingston came upon is not the ancestor of our sweet watermelon. But DNA is just one of the tools that scientists are using to try to figure out where and when the watermelon was domesticated, you can't just use one approach. You have to use an archaeology approach you have to use clients science you have to use. Linguistics you have to go into literature some of it'll some of an ancient. And even more than that. Of course, with the latest that we know genetics and genome can assist us first of all the plant Science Livingston was at least on the right continent because there are wild watermelons of various different species all over. Africa. So the wild relatives watermelon their fruits are smaller and rounder not elongate. They have often perfectly round it small fruits the outside looks like a watermelon like little, green and white. But inside they all have this extremely bitter and usually white. Whitish pulpits azan Renner is a professor of biology at the University of Munich and she's another one of the world's watermelon expert Suzanne's as you could boil these Super Beta watermelons for jam or you could use them medicinally as kind of a purge to clean out your insides. Basically, the wild watermelon wasn't a tasty thing to eat raw at all. So where the desert watermelon comes from, there are two things that have to happen to these bitter wild melons to turn them into the watermelons. We love today to specific genetic mutations. The first one is a mutation. That switches off the production of bitchy chemicals and so this mutation occurs in nature as bad for the plan because the plant of course has this bitterness to defend itself not eaten so that the fruits would not be yeah for the plan is better to lose the bitterness but for us, it's good and we can only imagine that native people every once in a while tried one of these melons maybe for what may be hoping for something to chew on and found some that wasn't bitter Suzanne's scientists know what that mutation is and how to find it in. A melon they just to look and the second mutation is the one that turned it red inside rather than white the red colors also well understood this is well studied and it's a completely different set of teens. This is and other scientists know exactly which two mutations they're looking for. Those mutations aren't common and wild melon. So when did they happen? When were watermelons domesticated Harry says the place to look for those clues is archaeology in ancient Egyptian tombs. Archaeologists have found paintings of whole watermelons on a platter there oblong and striped watermelons today not round like the. Wild bitter ones but did those ancient Egyptian watermelons taste like the ones we eat did they have the mutations for sweetness and maybe for the red color the painting can't really tell you that. But fortunately, some other watermelon evidence has showed up in a four thousand year old Egyptian tomb complex the seeds and leaves from the tomb ended up at the q Royal Botanic Gardens in England Suzanne wanted to find out if those remains held any clues about whether the watermelon had already been domesticated by them. So she wrote to mark Nesbitt who coincidentally starred in our tonic. And who runs the economic botany collection at Q. and she asked if she could borrow a watermelon leaf from the tomb, it was in a glass box encased in a box and he opd mark opened it, and he said it hadn't been opened since eighteen seventy one or whenever singles arrived there then and her colleagues analyzed demand the leaf and I they were thrilled the watermelon leaf DNA did in fact, have the mutations that would have made the fruit sweet and read but then when you see fourteen Dating for this material that we had received for Mark Nesbitt, it turned out it was much younger than we thought it turns out the watermelon material in the two had been left there by a later visitor carbon dating showed it was from the late eighteen hundreds huge bummer.

Harry Brooklyn Israel David Livingston Suzanne Mark Nesbitt Harry Paris Science Livingston David Livingstone Kalahari Q Royal Botanic Gardens Africa Harry I LO University Of Munich Azan Renner Professor
The Most Dangerous Fruit in America

Gastropod

05:00 min | Last week

The Most Dangerous Fruit in America

"Start our watermelon adventure, we called one of the world's great watermelon. Harry Paris he has worked on watermelon science per years as part of Israel's agricultural research. Service. Well, I think the first thing that comes to the first two syllables water right? This is a true rich table. which has a lot of water and which actually probably the first use by people of this particular natural products. Was To quench thirst I've spent summers in Israel, and it is basically watermelon paradise but that's not actually were Harry I fell in love with a watermelon it all started when his dad grew watermelons in the backyard in their home in Brooklyn in the nineteen sixties then Harry gave watermelon farming himself fifteen years old and there was a new variety called Crimson sweets that came out and plans at a few seats in the garden and Lo and behold by the fall we got one nice big sweet high quality watermelon fruit. That we grew in the backyard in Brooklyn and from then on I was just hoped. Harry was well ahead of the local war hipster curve in Brooklyn but the watermelon is neither from Brooklyn nor from Israel, in fact, its origins are a little bit of a mystery. One of the big headlines was back in the mid nineteenth century when the British explorer David Livingstone went to the southern African deserts and low and behold. It was the year in which there was more rain than average and he found a large areas just covered with wild watermelons. He's wild watermelons were hard but does the name says have water say to pound them and so on and so forth but you could squeeze the water out of them David Livingston was searching for the source of the Nile. But apparently, he was also as a side hustle looking for other sources like the source of our sweet watermelons and people thought he'd founded the wild ancestor but Livingston was wrong about the source of the Nile and as it turns out now. We know he was wrong about those wild watermelons to now that scientists can examine the DNA of melons. They found that the Kalahari desert wild melon that Livingston came upon is not the ancestor of our sweet watermelon. But DNA is just one of the tools that scientists are using to try to figure out where and when the watermelon was domesticated, you can't just use one approach. You have to use an archaeology approach you have to use clients science you have to use. Linguistics you have to go into literature some of it'll some of an ancient. And even more than that. Of course, with the latest that we know genetics and genome can assist us first of all the plant Science Livingston was at least on the right continent because there are wild watermelons of various different species all over. Africa. So the wild relatives watermelon their fruits are smaller and rounder not elongate. They have often perfectly round it small fruits the outside looks like a watermelon like little, green and white. But inside they all have this extremely bitter and usually white. Whitish pulpits azan Renner is a professor of biology at the University of Munich and she's another one of the world's watermelon expert Suzanne's as you could boil these Super Beta watermelons for jam or you could use them medicinally as kind of a purge to clean out your insides. Basically, the wild watermelon wasn't a tasty thing to eat raw at all. So where the desert watermelon comes from, there are two things that have to happen to these bitter wild melons to turn them into the watermelons. We love today to specific genetic mutations. The first one is a mutation. That switches off the production of bitchy chemicals and so this mutation occurs in nature as bad for the plan because the plant of course has this bitterness to defend itself not eaten so that the fruits would not be yeah for the plan is better to lose the bitterness but for us, it's good and we can only imagine that native people every once in a while tried one of these melons maybe for what may be hoping for something to chew on and found some that wasn't bitter Suzanne's scientists know what that mutation is and how to find it in. A melon they just to look and the second mutation is the one that turned it red inside rather than white the red colors also well understood this is well studied and it's a completely different set of teens. This is and other scientists know exactly which two mutations they're looking for. Those mutations aren't common and wild melon. So when did they happen? When were watermelons domesticated Harry says the place to look for those clues is archaeology in ancient Egyptian tombs. Archaeologists have found paintings of whole watermelons on a platter there oblong and striped watermelons today not round like the. Wild bitter ones but did those ancient Egyptian watermelons taste like the ones we eat did they have the mutations for sweetness and maybe for the red color the painting can't really tell you that. But fortunately, some other watermelon evidence has showed up in a four thousand year old Egyptian tomb complex the seeds and leaves from the tomb ended up at the q Royal Botanic Gardens in England

Harry David Livingston Brooklyn Israel Harry Paris Suzanne Science Livingston David Livingstone Kalahari Harry I Africa Q Royal Botanic Gardens LO University Of Munich Azan Renner Professor England
Eating the Wild: from the lost primeval forests of Europe to Robin Hood

Gastropod

08:10 min | 3 months ago

Eating the Wild: from the lost primeval forests of Europe to Robin Hood

"Used to be covered in these dense wet deciduous forests which is very different from what we see today where really hardly any of this primeval force exists anymore for her book feasting. Wild jeanneret actually visited one of the last tiny slivers of European primeval forest. It's in Poland. And it really is just a shadow of its former. Self Europe's forests were so vast that actually we think that the root of the word wilderness came from descriptions of these places the roots of the words wild and wilderness. I'll go back to untamed animals. The forest was a place. Teeming WITH ANIMALS UNGOVERNED BY HUMAN HANDS UNGOVERNED BUT NOT UNTOUCHED FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS. Europeans would go into the forest to find dinner day all kinds of animals wild boar venison there is something called the RMC which is the precursor to domesticated cattle. There was for a spice in moves the animals so abundant here. That really there was no form of hunting restriction it was abundant but it was also really valued killing a huge wild animal and then being able to share it was a sign of how wealthy and powerful you are. King said to have lots of wild game. At all their banquets. Animals would be breezed in rosewater and spices. Sometimes they would be covered in gold leaf and brought to the table hole and kind of carved up in front of the guests so while it was very much a form of status for kings so by the Middle Ages Those Morris. Were already starting to shrink between one thousand. Ad and thirteen hundred thirteen hundred. Europe's population grew by about fifty million people and all of those people needed to eat so there was increasing. Need to cut down the forests in order to grow grain and various crops and then also would was used for everything it was used for building houses and making carts by the fourteen and fifteen hundred. Europeans began sailing around the world. They first set forth to trade and then to stake their claim on foreign lands is colonialism spread across the globe. There was demand for very large old growth trees to create the ship. Masts that were needed and as early as the eleventh century The demand for wood was really threatening the forest where these kings went out and hunted the game meat that was so important to their diets and their status. Gina races that originally European forests had mostly being treated as common land. Anyone could hunt there. But as far back as ancient Rome the elite had sat down laws saying yes anyone could hunt but only as long as they weren't trespassing sort of by Default European kings and noblemen were the ultimate owners of the forest so as European king started to see their game meat being threatened by the need for Forest Land Day set out some very similar conservation measures whereby the king really restricted access to hunting in his forest. This is really the beginning of modern conservation lives whereby people were kept out of the forests. It's weird to think of royalty preserving their hunting grounds and keeping out the poor folk as the blueprint for the conservation movement. But jeanneret says these laws were really some of the earliest forms of environmental legislation forests. Were no longer for everyone to use as they pleased they were just for the Kings. They had very large administrative networks to manage this for so the forest wardens would they would hand out hunting licenses. They would make sure that game. Animals didn't starve winter or in times of drought. Sometimes they would prepare the venison for royal feasts and they would mete out. Punishments punishments were usually for poaching and they were definitely not just a slap on the wrist. If you ignored the game laws you could have a trial by hot iron and if you were found guilty then your eyes would be torn out or you were castrated. So poaching really big deal. The kings went to great lengths to prevent people from poaching and this had an impact on how people related to the natural world around them. The forest said always been wild in earlier centuries in Europe. They'd even been places of spirituality. But at this point the forests started to become scary rather than sacred. The authorities deliberately painted a picture of forests filled with outlaws and rebels dangerous rule breakers people who posed a threat to society with the stories. The authorities told a violent outlaws in the forest. Some of those were based on reality. There were people breaking the rules in the forest but they were breaking them because they thought the rules were unfair and they were hungry for poor people. This was one former getting food. And any time there was an economic downturn hunting would rise poaching would rise in the forests and so people did find it as an active resistance against the sort of forms of power and some of the rebels who broke the rules and hunted in the forest. They actually became folk. Heroes like Robin Hood and his band of Merry men. So Robin Hood was stealing from the rich and giving to the poor but this also came out of this idea that the force were not necessarily landscapes that poor people were allowed to access or use the resources of and so it wasn't active resistance to go in there and to get in game animals and feed yourself on one level. This is a story of power who could hunt and eat the wild game and wendling European forests and who couldn't that it's also the story of the impact that split between rich hunters and bore poachers had on how Europeans thought of wild food and the whole concept of the wild and wilderness. This is a very particular way of thinking of wild meat. As game to be hunted for sport by the elites and otherwise off limits and this is a template that the Europeans took with them as they colonized countries around the world so when the first European colonists arrived in the Congo Basin they sort of carried this cultural baggage of seeing forest as these dark empty wastelands without people so even though there were a long history of human habitation and numerous groups living in the Congo Basin forests. The European comments kind of didn't see them and there was this real sense of Europeans thought of this landscape as Darkest Africa. Take David Livingston. He was a Scottish missionary and explorer. Who is obsessed with finding the source of the Nile? He did a an exploratory expedition across the Congo wilderness. And he described Congress for us as suffocating wilderness and people waste that seem to have an oppressive silence so in May of eighteen eighty five. The you know quote unquote international community. Which is England France Germany Belgium and Italy? They recognize King Leopold the second of Belgium as having a sovereign claim over much of the Congo and five years later these same countries created what was effectively the first international conservation law this lowest passed in the early nineteen hundreds and it was called the Convention for the preservation of wild animals birds and fish in Africa. Local people couldn't hunt or trap or fish in certain areas of the country. The law was modeled. After the way European forests had become protected game reserves for rich people rich people in particular but of course just like in Europe the forests in Africa weren't actually pristine empty wildernesses before there were plenty of people who depended on them. There were a lot of different groups. Living in the Congo forest somewhere. More nomadic hunter-gatherers others were farming communities living within the rain forest but for all of these groups wild meat provided a very essential source of food. So there were all kinds of animals being eaten everything from various kinds of antelope to forest buffalo wild boar monkeys. You know just hundreds of different animals that communities ate in the forest there were cultural. Taboos around eating certain species particularly ones that were long lived and slow to reproduce like elephants which could and did occasionally provide a lot of meat was considered a sacred act to kill an elephant similar with eating bonobos which are great ape. That's very similar to us. There were beliefs that there is a direct link to that ancestral spirit world so all of these cultural beliefs had an ecological basis to really help conserve animals that had large social complex social groupings or were slow growing and thus thunderbolts over

Kings Europe Congo Forest Robin Hood King Leopold Congo Congo Basin Poland Africa Rome Jeanneret RMC Darkest Africa David Livingston Gina England France Germany Belgium Belgium Congress
Are gun shops 'essential' businesses during a pandemic?

Morning Edition

01:04 min | 4 months ago

Are gun shops 'essential' businesses during a pandemic?

"County sheriff's tasked with enforcing the state shelter in place order are at odds over whether gun stores qualify as an essential business KQED suki Lewis reports gun rights advocates are fighting attempts to close gun stores during the cove it nineteen shut down this week the governor said it's up to local sheriffs to decide whether gun stores are essential or not in Contra Costa county sheriff David Livingston says he's come learned about the inconsistency this creates across the state he is seeking input from legal counsel and the county health department Rick Travis the head of the California pistol and rifle association told his YouTube audience that his organization is pushing back against counties like Alameda which have moved to shut down shops down last twenty four hours in California have been a battlefield to keep your gun stores opened during disco good nineteen crisis a spokesman for the Alameda county sheriff said his office isn't worried about legal action from gun advocacy groups it's focused on public

David Livingston Legal Counsel Rick Travis Alameda California Kqed Suki Lewis Contra Costa Youtube
"david livingston" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:58 min | 11 months ago

"david livingston" Discussed on KGO 810

"The world into space David Livingston doctor space of the space shuttle this is hotel Mars episode at. this is the John Batchelor show KGO eight. seven seven guys. one nine eight seven seven cars is K. E. R. red cars. one eight seven seven cars is donate your car to day. you've trusted cars for kids with your cars for over two decades cars for kids can now help you with your property donations to donate any kind of real estate a cars for kids dot com and receive a tax deduction for the full appraised value. they are. one eight seven seven. and your card to. I was in the United States Army for twelve years and if we had a stressful time if you say Hey let's go smoke a cigarette the further I got away from the military in corporate environments and it not being as prevalent in around smokers I would become the odd man out the first time I actually tried to I was surprised at how similar it was to a cigarette Chris made the switch in two thousand eighteen to make the switch visit J. U. U. L. dot com jul leads compensated this individual for the time expenses in providing this testimony warning this product contains nicotine nicotine is an.

"david livingston" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

11:05 min | 11 months ago

"david livingston" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"John this is John about social hotel Mars episode and David Livingston doctor space joins me as my colleague and co hosting co pilot and we're off to Russia Roscosmos which has great ambitions it is the most important and the most famous of all big space programs and helping us understand the Russian space program is at a totally Zack of the website Russian space web dot com it is available for insider content to all of you for subscription it takes you to the illustrations and diagrams that demonstrate rushes recovery from the difficulties of these last years have ended with quality control and also they're translating their program from the bike in our cosmic drum of Kazakhstan to bus stops me in most eastern Siberia this will take longer than if they were well finance but then again I remind you the US has struggles with financing NASA's elements of for example the James Webb space telescope is taken up all of big astronomy at NASA the shuttle program no longer exists the ambition for the SLS program Anna Ryan and a manned effort into either says lunar orbit or the moon or beyond it remains a question mark delayed for years the SLS doesn't exist so NASA today is pretty much on the reputation of its robots whereas rush is going forward with a robust manned space program we depend upon it to reach to I. S. as in return at a totally a very good evening to you the first news that I find on your site and there is a link to insert content as well for the the subscription audience is this lunar gateway element for Russia row. mine please what is this lunar and what is Russia's contribution to the plan good evening to you hello John and that's very good question so essentially the sea floor station or a gateway is not the cold with a future in now is this small space stations similar to the international space station in terms of team which is now supposed to build it but it's a smaller outposts Ford for the crew for around four people which will be sort of by the Iran through you coal and that's station will be on like the international space station which is in low earth orbit that station will be a flying around the moon in the very unusual orbit orbit around the moon Dennis will use that that you will be used to what will eventually is being designed as a gateway to the lunar surface and eventually also for flights to Mars and **** essentially advocates in this as a kind of the first step into deep space for human space flight and what is Russia's participation in the project or ambition for the project so this is exactly similar to the international space station arrangement where all the other agencies which have parking on site now in the international space station when they supplied they're more deals and their transport spacecraft and their expertise and their aftermath as well and Russia will be one of them in the and brush or just after some break in some sort of file soul Searchin on its role in this program it's now back is we here behind the scene into the fold into this negotiations which are going on in that will supply one of the major pieces of their of that station and the lunar orbit David. hi Anna totally couple things the Angar rocket system is getting more and more news when one justice system I believe there's three components to it actually start operations do they know that and also when they're having a new grand strategy for rocketry and Russia does he and Gaara play a big role in that is is that going to be pivotal because they've got a lot of other rockets as well. yes absolutely the I'm gonna is absolutely critical in in fact because it's so close to reaching the launch but in fact if you flew out several years ago and not enough of that Russians have huge production program since they beat it what is it find organize the new production line for this vehicle they they had a lot of problems financial and technical at the same time and now they deals in the new launch pad for this vehicle next to those so you know a new launch pad and in Siberia in fire in the Russian Far East and death is very important days so right now the president Clinton just visited this had a major meeting was already in the city leaders and they promise that this this new launch pad for I'm gonna will be already full of twentieth twenty three right now in the year twenty twenty three and a right after that they will be more defined that they will be by Dusan several I'm great so destructive in order for it to be competitive with SpaceX and with other place with the Europeans and was all other players which are common to the market including chain needs as well saw so in the Russia will kind of be back into the commercial markets as well but it also will have a role in a few months space flights will cater the cruise and it will also have scientific and military of roles as well so it's very important program for the Russian space program I want to explore explore the politics of this lunar because this is where the gateway project because as we've seen these last years of the conversation between Washington and Moscow has broken down almost entirely with accusations being thrown back and forth reminiscent of the first Cold War when the two space programs NASA and Roscosmos were in direct competition to your reading and you follow this extremely carefully as the Russian space probe. stayed apart from the geo strategic competition and harsh language the threats and sanctions is it exams from all of this bad acting that we've seen on both sides these last years or has it been caught up in the of the blame shifting and the and the sanctions regimes. it's a difficult question to answer but god what does the weight I I would approach this I would say that the content of the program is continuing right we still getting the cruise with skilled launch and the Russians essentially one could use to the international space the Russians are the only way to and from the ISS that's it that's Anderlecht yes yeah in depth continued unabated the the the all the problems which wearing an even larger Gelles package of cold and political field they did not affect that day actually that's sad there is always a question for any future projects because the international space station will end at one point or it will it will need some kind of new face and every time they they try to plan for the new phase they have very. Sirius strategic and political questions where to go next and to what extent to collaborate and to what extent the will alone and of course the blue one major issue my major component of this question this course will they have enough money to around forty independent program yeah very often they come to the conclusion increasingly as they come to the conclusion that Russia will probably will not be able to around forty independent way aggressive kind of being human spaceflight project so if you've got the rations and similar consideration sound I'm not saying the US side so so even though to the Wessex and because of course United States have Parkinson's Japan and Canada in the European Space Agency and for us it's also very important factory because if it saves money ultimately especially for such a very expensive project like gateway in the lunar orbit David along the same lines in a totally they just returned to earth their robot the door if I'm saying that correctly and NASA has had robots on the station before too what is their objective with this update thinking of replacing cosmonauts with the robot what what's going on there. so so I see some of the the the purpose of the soul but is still sound if so to the exterior of the station and to do all kinds of repair work to sensually not too different look anyplace Kaufman out of state yeah in the crew but they play someone the most dangerous aspects of the war and from what I've seen and what other experts who looked at this program sought if if some this program is very very far away from this point where this product will be out on with this sound to the to the exterior and to do really pairs so that the experiment is they've done out I am extremely radio kind of early stage of development where the robot was able only just barely move the scans and connect maybe a couple of wires and maybe more with a screwdriver but the talking about you know saying to the to the to the exterior work was like bundles of cable for complex technology this is really I think far far away from from from where we are right now so it's a way to kind of thirteen usual experiments were speaking with Anatoly Zack he keeps the very helpful and critical Russian space web dot com I on Roscosmos the famous Roscosmos which struggles with quality control with financing with ambitions that exceed their ability to put it together in time very similar to other big space programs when we come back we're going to turn to what we know of the quality control problem a problem problems these last years not only for the new rockets and cholera but that is been consistently a concern for proton which is a at work cores for the Roscosmos and for this use rockets that are used for the manned program to and from I SS and it's always that keeps Russian space web I remind all of you for to follow the raw. that's because most closely it's in English but that is all Anatoly has the Russian and the insider content which is by subscription translates all of the Russian information into an easy to understand form for those of us reading it in English I'm John badger with every living seven doctors space this is hotel Mars..

John David Livingston Sirius
"david livingston" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"david livingston" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"What about the volatility in the world today all the potential impacts on me even thinking about investing money is I'm thinking China thinking Greece, I'm thinking even Puerto Rico? What why should I not be so fearful to invest money? Well, there are many concerns in these uncertain times, China the currency what's going to happen with Greece. And the like, but that's not a reason to stick your head in the sand like an ostrich. It's a a reason to be proactive and not reactive because the person who plans is going to be better than the one. Who doesn't have a point securities offered through American portfolios financial services incorporated. Member FINRA SIPC advisory services offered through wealth quarterback American portfolios and wealth quarterback or unaffiliated entities. Investing may involve the risk of loss of. Capital? Now back to the John Batchelor show. WABC? I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. David Livingston's here, Dr space, and this is hotel Mars, the real thing. We're on the surface of Mars. That's the Mars one mission plan. There are alternates to get there. And this plan does not speak to the launch capabilities or how much need is needed to transfer. What needs to sustain a human colony on the surface of Mars that is for another day at another study? But I mentioned David that the falcon heavy that.

John Batchelor Greece China David Livingston Puerto Rico WABC
All-UK customs Brexit deal report is 'speculation': PM May's office

Hope in the Night

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

All-UK customs Brexit deal report is 'speculation': PM May's office

"Prime Minister Theresa May's office dismissing speculation reports that Britain and the European Union were close to striking a divorce deal. After reaching a compromise on the intractable issue of the Irish border, dining state has denied the Sunday Times report claiming a deal was imminent because the proposed agreement had been reached on future customs arrangements at the island Northern Ireland. Boorda labeling has speculation. However, May's deputy David Livingston said recently that negotiators. We're very close to an agreement. An Irish deputy prime minister, Simon cove, knee said I think it is possible to get the deal in November Brinson this GT to leave the EU on March the twenty nine th but London and Brussels have not reached an agreement on their divorce times, the stalemate has heightened fears that the UK might leave without a deal in place leading to chaos at ports and

Prime Minister Theresa May Prime Minister European Union Sunday Times Simon Cove Northern Ireland David Livingston Britain Brussels London UK
All-UK customs Brexit deal report is 'speculation': PM May's office

WBZ Afternoon News

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

All-UK customs Brexit deal report is 'speculation': PM May's office

"Close to striking a divorce deal. After reaching a compromise on the difficult issue of the Irish border has denied the Sunday Times report claiming a deal was imminent because the proposed agreement had been reached on future customs arrangements at the island Northern Ireland Buddha labeling aids has speculation however amazed deputy David Livingston said recently that negotiators. We're very close soon agreement an Irish deputy prime minister, Simon cave, knee said, I think it is possible to get the deal in November Brinson leave the EU on March the twenty nine but London and Brussels have not least on that divorce times, the stalemate has heightened fears that the UK might leave without a deal in place leading to chaos at ports and economic turmoil. Karen Tamas London WBZ news time, five twenty one. A wilmington.

Karen Tamas London Sunday Times Northern Ireland Buddha David Livingston Prime Minister Wilmington Brinson Simon Cave EU London Brussels UK
All-UK customs Brexit deal report is 'speculation': PM May's office

The Mentors

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

All-UK customs Brexit deal report is 'speculation': PM May's office

"Prime Minister Theresa May's office have dismissed speculation reports that Britain and the European Union were close to striking a divorce deal. After reaching a compromise on the intractable issue of the Irish border. Correspondent Karen Shamas springs us more on the story Downing Street has denied the Sunday Times report claiming a deal was imminent because of proposed agreement had been reached on future customs arrangements at the island Northern Ireland Buddha labeling aids has speculation. However as deputy David Livingston said recently that negotiators. We're very close to an agreement. An Irish deputy prime minister, Simon Coveney said I think it is possible to get the deal in November Britishness GT leave the EU on March the twenty nine but London and Brussels have not least negligent on that divorce hands. The stalemate has heightened fears that the UK might leave without a deal in place leading to chaos at ports and

Prime Minister Theresa May Prime Minister European Union Karen Shamas Northern Ireland Buddha David Livingston Simon Coveney Sunday Times Britain Brussels UK London
"david livingston" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"david livingston" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"That's why we invoke this sort of antifreeze salty mechanism to keep it liquid. David. What can we do or I should say what can scientists due to confirm that? It's liquid water. What are the next steps or a short of getting people there and some kind of drilling how do you confirm liquid water? Well, that's a real challenge in this case because we talk about remote-sensing. This is remote in several senses. One is that it's. On mars. It's far away. And all we have is robots so far to explore the surface of Mars, also it's removed from the surface. It's you know, it's it's a mile deep, and it's a it's not a simple task to directly access material to see if it is indeed liquid water. I mean the way to do it would be to set up some kind of drilling apparatus and drill that deep now on the earth. We can do this on the the ice sheet in Antarctica or Greenland, for example, but we have humans. We have trucks we have airplanes, we have all kinds of infrastructure available to us to do that on Mars. It's not so easy. So we're looking for other lines of evidence other other reasons maybe from other instruments data that might give some clues as to whether this is in fact, a liquid water or perhaps it's something else. Jeffrey plowed is the project science. Scientists and researcher in the geophysics planetary geosciences group Nasr's JPL he is the project scientists really cool on the two thousand and one Mars odyssey mission Martius, and Sharon and Jupiter, and he's a planetary scientist. And that's why it's a pleasure to explore underneath the surface of Mars until we reach it ourselves. David Livingston, Dr space of the space show. I'm John.

David Livingston Nasr scientist Martius Greenland Jeffrey plowed researcher Sharon
"david livingston" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"david livingston" Discussed on KCBS All News

"And early two thousands it's next stop is the. Pacific garbage patch the architect. Sunrise is tied up at pier nineteen and open for tours. This weekend in San Francisco General lane KCBS seven years of peaceful protests by an, interfaith group, has appeared to, pay off now the group is looking, to bring its vigils. For immigrant rights elsewhere KCBS Scott. Leterrier explains the slow drip of peaceful compassionate activism we have been holding, interfaith prayer presence outside the detention centers seven years and five months since April of two thousand eleven since holy week says. Reverend Debra lead director of the interfaith movement for human integrity it was then when the west County detention center in Richmond under President, Obama signed a deal with ice to detain undocumented immigrants during a phase in the Obama presidency when deportations reached. A record high we discovered that our county jail had opened up a. Contract with immigration customs enforcement to hold, immigration, detainees who were being detained just for deportation. Saturday was there last vigil people were released one of the other results of that over time was. That the sheriff, of contra Costa county David Livingston made the decision to end the ice contract. In, July and is subsequently began moving people out of the detention. Center Lisa's at their work is not done however and it's valid. To bring the peaceful protests to ice headquarters in San Francisco, Scott Latifi KCBS a woman suffered moderate injuries Sunday morning when she fell about forty feet from amount Tamil pious trail into a creek the woman. In her forties was located by CHP aircrew in. A helicopter and by Marin county firefighters a, paramedic was lowered down tour from a helicopter the woman and the paramedic were, then hoisted out of the ravine and flown to awaiting Marin county ambulance just ahead on KCBS another earthquake last night the third one. For the weekend no damage or injuries though Right now we want to check your early morning drive.

Marin county KCBS San Francisco Obama west County Lisa David Livingston Debra Leterrier Scott Latifi Richmond President director seven years five months forty feet
"david livingston" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"david livingston" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"I'm john batchelor this is the john batchelor show hotel mars episode and david livingston dr space the space show my colleague and co host and we explore the virtues of the solar system but never more than mars and right now on mars there's a brave little camper named opportunity part of a twin launch back in two thousand three that landed on mars in two thousand four opportunity and it's brothers sisters spirit where rovers spirit shut down some years past because of dust building up on spirits ability to gain energy it looks at the sun has solar packs however opportunity kept going and right now opportunities endeavour crater the concern is there is a dust storm on mars a global dust storm on mars there's been such a thing before but you will recall the dust troubled spirit so much that it became a weather station and then his dormant right now opportunity is not sending signals back but there's more to this story which is why we welcome bill farren of the opportunity team at the jet propulsion lab jpl watch his opportunity very carefully especially during dust storms bill a very good evening to you so the status of opportunity right now how do you describe it what is it that we're waiting for to happen good evening to you good evening john and david also on the status right now is the opportunity is in a survival mode just commanded to basically shut down all all it systems and to basically wait the storm out until it gets starts getting enough solar energy on its solar panels and then they would do though solar solar array wake up and hopefully phone home so survival mode is that mode is that like a like a a a condition that you built into opportunity hasn't been there before well i guess i'll be crashing little little dramatic only get survival mode it's actually basically in a mode that it's been doing every night since since it landed opportunity landed with one of its heaters stuck on so since the time we landed it we've been putting it into this just basically powering off and then turning on when it gets the sun on on the solar panels and so it's basically in the.

john batchelor rovers bill farren david livingston
EU tariffs on US goods come into force

Today

03:50 min | 2 years ago

EU tariffs on US goods come into force

"Kicks in but a deal is yet to be signed with nine months to go bosses frustrated with the lack of progress and says a failure to agree transition period could be catastrophic for the company the aircraft makers parts crossed the channel multiple times airbus estimated could take a financial hit of one billion euros a week if there's no deal the company which is party owned by several european governments says airbus would then have to reconsider its investments in the uk tom williams is the company's chief operating officer become increasingly was lack of quality we had already beginning to press the button on crisis actions and clearly the challenge a went off decision that be a series of significant decisions that will accumulate as we go over the next couple of months six thousand people work at the factory at broughton in north wales the welsh government is said the company's comments are extremely worrying but the u k government says given the progress it's continuing to make in the brexit negotiations it doesn't take expect what it calls a no deal scenario to arise the chancellor philip hammond has insisted that his department is not the enemy of brexit in his annual mansion house speech in the city of london last night mr hammond said he was focused on boosting prosperity by promoting ties with the european union after britain leaves his comments challenge a recent claim by the foreign secretary boris johnson that the treasury was basically the heart of remain our economics editor kamal ahmed listened to the chancellor's speech it was not a particularly coded message sent those including the foreign secretary boris johnson who claim the treasury is at the heart of remain philip hammond said he was simply trying to construct the best deal for britain by securing an enduring partnership with the european union which was britain's most important trading partner that does not make the treasury on my watch the enemy of brexit rather it makes it the champion of prosperity for the british people outside the u but working and trading closely with it mr hammond said it was vital that britain's significant financial services sector was given fair access to the rest of the eu and argued that it was in both sides interest to come to an agreement on both a final deal and they transition period to avoid any disruption to billions of pounds worth of trade the s and p has said that relations between the british and scottish governments at their lowest point since steve aleutian began this morning scotland's first minister nncholas sturgeon will hold talks with the cabinet office minister david livingston her first since she accused westminster ripping up the conventions underpinning delusion the uk set press ahead with the eu withdraw bill despite its rejection by the scottish parliament arrange of american products will be subject to new import duties from this morning across the european union the action has been taken in response to the us trade tariffs on steel in aluminium the president of the european commission jeanclaude yonker has said the eu will do whatever is necessary to safeguard its trade interests his europe correspondent kevin connolly it would be hard to find anyone in the e u who shares donald trump's view the trade between europe and the united states is so unfairly balanced that the europeans are ripping off their american partners that'd be still less support his view the trade wars can be good and easy to win donald trump's tariffs on european steel and aluminium will not be onto the twenty five percent levy on a catholic selected ranger quintessential american products from motorcycles in jeans to orange juice and bourbon prices for consumers should go up very quickly and went come down again until the transatlantic trade deal can be agreed the grip of mp's has concluded that the probation system is a mess and that reforms in england and wales in recent years have worked for years ago the system was partly privatized and monitoring was extended to prisoners who had served short jail terms the justice select committee found that staff morale was an all time low and that support for prisoners leaving jail was wholly inadequate speaking on this program the chief inspector of probation dame glenys stacey said that some private organizations had struggled to provide the necessary support many of them have actually been very ambitious to to do things about to.

Twenty Five Percent Nine Months
"david livingston" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"david livingston" Discussed on WTMA

"Livingston david livingston is dr space the space show and he joins me now to travel to the dwarf planet ceres our guide is dr hannah kaplan a postdoctoral researcher at southwest research institute recently publishing information that brown university her alma mater picked up as well as all of the space news of surface of series showing that magical word organics this is the art of reading a planet and what it means to have organics on the surface where they come from and what is to be done hannah a very good evening to you thank you and congratulations on your work the publication is exciting however we need to understand why we have this information the dawn spacecraft nasa very successful probe to series is still in orbit and lower still all the time however what's important is that you started this research with one particular instrument on dawn vr is the short word for the short shorthand for what is vr and what did you find on the surface in particular places in the northern hemisphere on the dwarf planet series good evening to you bitty evening so vr is the visible and infrared spectrometer which is on the dawn spacecraft and what veered does is it measures sunlight reflected off the surface of series until what we're looking at is energy emitted from the sun at many wavelengths which is then being detected by the spacecraft and some of this energy is being absorbed by the surface in some as being scattered and what we're looking for is where light has been absorbed it at particular wavelengths and so what we're able to detect with the vir instrument and what we're looking for in particular are carbon hydrogen bonds until the that's the organic detection that we see are these absorption due to carbon hydrogen bombs carbon hydrogen carbon hydrogen what does that represent is that is that the organics itself exactly so when we say organics we really mean carbon bearing compounds and so that's you know a really important thing to specify here because a lot of people here are gimmicks and they think oh we've detected life but the planetary scientists that mean something totally different we're just looking at carbon bearing compounds so here is a way in which we're detecting these carbon compounds david i understand something called solans play a big part in this can you help us to understand what that is and why they're not found on earth but they're found i guess everywhere else in the solar system right phil dolan is kind of a general word that relates to organic material that doesn't have a single chemical composition so something like methane for instance has a specific chemical composition it's carbon and four hydrogens dylan's referred to things that have a much more complex structure they have just a bunch of different compounds in there so there's no one way to refer to these can mean organics that have formed in a very specific radiation environment so that's not what we're referring to here we're just looking at kind of these war dramatic commissions of carbon compounds in the in these organic materials you find these organics on the surface of series in a particular place one crater for example i don't know how to say this and it at you you will pronounce it for me correctly and you find these organics as you've been scanning the surface of series in the northern hemisphere in isolated places does that mean that it's not on the rest of the planet of you scoured the whole surface or is this just the first the first place you looked right so the organics are concentrated in this one region around a crater called earner tests and to a really important point here is that i'm not the first person to find these those were found in twenty seventeen by the dawn team published in science really big important finding by them.

Livingston david livingston
"david livingston" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"david livingston" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"Because a lot of scientific instruments so it was taken a little bit more times than they expected and then in the meantime they were afraid they were very concerned that americans will be first so they went ahead and kind of a create sort of temporary experimental very small like you said beeper beep was a beeper right really simple really small and they launch the first because it was just easier to bill so it was kind of standing to be the first to fulfill the political goal of launching satellites i and then of course they used expedience which was with ballistic missiles to launch the dog in and like exactly like you mentioned they had no way over historian once again by lethal political i to launch the first anymore even though again scientific purpose or scientific value of this mission was minimal because of course they want they could measure basic the vital signs of the dog in orbit but they could not return and study after that so of course that was primarily political purpose launch and that's source satellites that was the one daddy journal scientific project which was designed to explore space and all the zaki keeps the russian space web dot com had said subscription side as well as they are as free material on it he's also the author of russian space we'll go to the future when we come back because the russians are planning the moon again the original moon race the americans one out we thought but remember that tortoise i'm john batchelor with david livingston dr space this is hotel mars episode dan newsradio ten forty eight whol balance of nature's fruits.

zaki john batchelor dan newsradio david livingston
"david livingston" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"david livingston" Discussed on WRVA

"Amazon's doing whatever the amazon does changes from time to time see i told you it wasn't artificial intelligence i told you that it's barely barely usable frankly sometimes but i would like you to be able to listen it's our podcast network and i love you to be people listen dave and livingston montana leo laporte the tech dave hello dave it's not dave i'm sorry it's david livingston montana yes it is hi dave all right i'm gonna put dave on hold and i'm gonna go to line four peter in brooklyn hi peter hello peter is it me is it me it might be me peter can you hear me peter fell asleep to try ryan hi ryan anybody in the i have no idea why it's doing that or if that's even normal but maybe in the chat room somebody who we have a lot of people use echo in the chatroom so you use your echo dot you ask it to play something it's paired do bluetooth speaker and it plays normally win fine but when i engaged multiyear amusing and say play everywhere off all the bluetooth connections and it only plays from the individual speakers.

Amazon dave david livingston montana peter montana brooklyn ryan
"david livingston" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"david livingston" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Hello dave it's not dave i'm sorry it's david livingston montana yes it is hi dave all right i'm gonna put dave on hold and i'm gonna go to line four peter in brooklyn hi peter data hello peter is me is it me it might be me peter can you hear me peter fell asleep too i'll try ryan echo anybody in the i have no idea why it's doing that or if that's even normal but maybe in the chat room somebody who we have a lot of people use echo in the chat room so you use your echo dot you ask it to play something it's paired do bluetooth speaker and it plays normally win fine but when i engage multiyear amusing and say play everywhere off all the bluetooth connections and it only plays from the individual speakers dot com yeah i think i've heard this before i think this may be a cat.

david livingston montana dave peter brooklyn ryan
"david livingston" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"david livingston" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"You're constructing and space so your your dispatching a you're transferring equipment people eventually and three d michelle three d printers anything possible to mars do you imagine this as a shuttle service or a one off trip how how can we build the same thing marina in mars orbit and have the robots take it back and forth is that imaginable in your design so in this particular design the ship would would be cycling between mars because the weights constructed in orbits means it cannot enter the atmosphere of mars or of right and because we wanted this to be cost effective it would not be so the design would definitely be put a cycling type of spaceship with refueling obviously now in terms of manufacturing these on my robots today i would say this is a better way i think the first step would be to establish a settlement on march permanent presence of of human mass and from there we can build up to capabilities to manufacture the equipment necessary to keep the the base the base going on and then to look at that will take a long time yes well let's get to the surface of mars because that also is your work with your colleagues this is george lordos who is a doctoral student in the department of aeronautics and astronautics as well as it mit with his colleagues a looking to construct in earth orbit a space station of profit making a i p o profit making enterprise but we're onto the surface of mars with david livingston dr space of the space show i'm john.

george lordos mars department of aeronautics and david livingston
"david livingston" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"david livingston" Discussed on WTMA

"I'm john batchelor this is the john batchelor show hotel mars episode and i welcome my colleague and cohost and copilot david livingston dr space the space show and we're off to mars in our imagination this is the twenty first century and mars is well within reach we see that spacex is speculating about putting a vehicle and unmanned vehicle on the surface of mars certainly were building the boosters capable of lifting the equipment we need for a mars transfer and we're very pleased to welcome george lordos he is a graduate fellow and the mit system design and management program also a doctoral student in department of astronautics and he's part of a team at mit who have devoted themselves these years to developing systems and speculating about how systems will work in the adventure to mars to moon and other planets in our solar system we have to start however here on planet earth george a very good evening georgia's overseas at the moment so we're speaking as if to mars but it's a pleasure to welcome you george and i i want to address what is known as the marina project this is a commercial this is a design management reconfigure inspace nodal assembly from mit's design what is marina what is it meant to do in this in this adventure tomorrow's good evening to you george good evening john good evening david and thank you very much for.

john batchelor spacex george lordos mit georgia david livingston department of astronautics
"david livingston" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"david livingston" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The state yes tell us about the the uh working with a legislature i now been given the authority and some resort she's to actually conduct reviews of all the detention facilities at hold individuals for civil immigration uh uh violations and i and what we're doing is we're going to go to each of those detention facility some privatelyowned some publicly operated and we're going to make sure that we take a close look per the statute that now authorizes us to do so uh richmond was uh an and stanislas canny we've gone and uh we'll continue to go into places and we'll take a look pick but you're right him i have to be somewhat circumspect what i say well i i do too but female detainees have issued complaints about being denied access the bathrooms about complaints on insufficient health care and not getting educational materials there's a whole range of things here is coming under investigation and i should say that sheriff david livingston has the neither of those complaint so cut you were cut out for you here let me go to our callers and let's begin with a caller from fremont kunaro you're on the air good morning good morning um um as painful and as urgent the dakar increase more situation is better than other class of immigrants who are suffering and have been enduring uncertainty for very long time uh some for decades now and they are the legal immigrants and employmentbased backlogs and despite being approved for immigration for decades on long they don't have green cards they've been visiting very patiently in line their spouses will not be allowed to work soon after president trump it has since the rule their children vis gauging out the turin twenty one and have to leave us and they're the people who follow all the laws and are tightened tweet me greatly legally so not one democrat is speaking out for them it is ironic that immigrants especially from poor countries tend to agree more with democrats and their policies but the movie policies that are going to help legal immigrants look like are coming from the republicans like tom cotton kevin your those kind says representative good luck to end president trump so i'd like to think i'd like to know uh attorney general uh what do you think about this thanks for the question a you actually raise a very strong point so but i'll go back.

david livingston turin fremont president representative attorney
"david livingston" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"david livingston" Discussed on WTMA

"Tell you how ross most program for launching to and from lowearthorbit and beyond he's also the author of russian space the past explain the we're doing with david livingston space we've tonga's 57 and the docking of the scott docking of soyuz craft in sixty satellite bowel a mission i did not know of until i read it on anatoli site this is earth science fifty years ago naji sixty seven the soviets put up by four kalac to forty four uh uh above the earth what looks to be something that was studying purely science anatoly is that how to read this there destined to be terry use whatsoever to the uh yes this was a clearly a like a st if portugal but uh one needs point two again john nineteen six to seven so the the moon race is essentially up approaching this kind of kgb paya's kgb we shall nicest in the soviet union where i've way actively working on the rockets on on spacecraft beige first uh man on the moon was first would be the winner of the race and one of the issues which where the early one was understood the could be potential problem for also nothing else wasn't the asian and the radiation of course the was uh uh as we know now wait it well it's it's it's essentially the radiation belt so the ends ask name benito space station or in orbit slanj 450 uh 400 abdullah above or that if this station was still below the radiation belt but once you started going towards the moon that's where are you starts actually croatian those for the asian belt and you going into eighty of space where uh this this becomes said he'll program and so one of the um go also this uh high enough where actually actually measured that that's phenomenon and so the space which would go into low orbit like i said like a space station to uh under kolumbuthurai death wouldn't be enough so as they launch the rockets which was essentially was not really a subtle light because it will not uh at each gene jordan or speed was going slow isn't that but that's what it would go very very high with go on the vertical three ejected here.

lowearthorbit tonga kgb paya soviet union david livingston scott benito space station fifty years
"david livingston" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"david livingston" Discussed on WTMA

"I'm john nazis john batchelor show hotel mars episode an dr livingston david's david livingston dr space himself as he has my colleague and copilot and we welcome dr peter ward and pete warden formally the director of nasa's ames research center in california but now the chairman of the breakthrough prize foundation which is the breakthrough initiatives beat a very good evening to you it's exciting to speak to you on these matters and we can presume that are audiences heard at some point about the idea of going to the stars going to other planets but i'd like to begin with your statement as the chairman of the apprised foundation what is the overall mission of all the breakthrough initiatives good evening to you pee uh thank you i just wanted to start with kind of the summary of what we're up to uh the top fations uh has really two missions one is of course we give the largest prizes in science but uh there's seven three milliondollar prizes but uh i think what your listeners are most in interested in is as you said is a breakthrough initiatives the fundamental theme that we're focused on is the question of life in the universe uh and there's really three subquestions or the first one is uh uh is there any life elsewhere in the universe either in our solar system or or beyond it a second to is uh if there is life elsewhere is there intelligent life friend or can we could we detect it uh and the final question is is it possible for us to consider grid we sending probes uh between star system david pete in order to do this does that mean when you're doing your seti project that year actively trying to paying or send a message for seti people out there or life out there i i noticed that getting a lot of new states are you part of that active steady now to deliver a message to trying to find some one on poor actually not uh the uh uh we we did announce initially a third were eventually going to be doing something to think about that question uh when we made our announcement for breakthrough listen which is our seti effort we also announced that two at some point we will be doing something kohl breakthrough message uh which would involve soliciting people's ideas or what you might say if we.

dr livingston david dr peter ward pete warden director nasa ames research center california chairman solar system john batchelor david livingston david pete seven three milliondollar
"david livingston" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"david livingston" Discussed on WTMA

"David livingston that the space shuttle docked to space and sell my colleague can cause copilot we're headed to mars well now check that crossed that out we might be just headed to the moon i say josh because the mars adventure was some take announced spectacularly by elon musk's spacex and other successful enterprises and now jeff faust joins us he is a senior staff writer space news and we're following this story to understand why these switch sometimes called bait and switch of announcing in mars landing as early as twenty eight teen by the very successful space x using its falcon heavy i believe which has yet to be tested we'll discuss that putting its dragon spacecraft on the surface of mars unmanned and now jeff a very good evening to you i want to be sure about the details here moscow announced watch that he is going to do in the near future about mars and then about the mon good evening good evening john uh what you on my said at a conference here in washington last week he was asked by a conflict attendee uh about the future of the dragon spacecraft space x developing uh what they call the version to the dragon that will be i wolf carrying crew and earlier versions of that had suggested death d capsule would be able to land on land bike ending landing lay can firing rocket engine dislosures stop rather than splashing down in the ocean someone asked him about the status of that and my said that did they are not going to pull the leaning leg on the dragon spacecraft aversion to the reagan spacecraft uh because we take guy too much time and effort to go through the nasa certification safety process um so they're still developing the crew dragon but it won't have lain legs which meet the can't land on earth on land and it can't land on mars on land therefore there is no mars mission does that follow logically your did he say that and he didn't explicitly say that what they've been calling their right drag admission which would involve sending a dragon spacecraft to land on the surface of mars had been cancelled but without the landing leg uh on the dragon space craft there would be no way for the spacecraft to land leased land safely um so the indication um needs reputation that most people got from that was that basak is not going to pursue the right dragon concept.

David livingston elon musk spacex jeff faust washington josh moscow reagan nasa
"david livingston" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"david livingston" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"In that gastaut what does that mean to an astor vilages david well let's exciting because as we discussed before uh you know we believe the requirements for life you know as we currently understand them are liquid water and some kind of energy source and organic matter and were basically seeing on and sell it is is a place that seems to have all of those requirements we've known for wild has the water i mean we can see it squirting out into space from these cracks are around the south pole of zealous saturn's little icy moon and obviously has some energy source some things in their melting the water and flexing the surface and now were understanding that the chemistry of that water reservoir is is rich and it's not just pure water is water with interesting other chemicals mixed day other molecules including this methanol is an organic molecule in that you know gets are our wheels turning as astra biologists david livingston given that it's an organic molecule what are the explanation for other then there might be liked there are some short that have to suggest fly perkin suggest something out well organic matter turns out to be fairly common in the universe so i i mean this is one of the things we've learned by exploring the solar system and noxious that but even in the interstellar medium what is that the space between the stars we see this dust that we can determine the respect trust coppee is rich with organic matter so organic match later in and of itself doesn't mean life but it beach raise the kind of chemical environment where life could thrive so in order to examine organics' and and actually detect life from them you'd have to get much more specific and look at the isotopes in the specific mix of organics' an esa kind of thing we might be able to do with the future mission to insult us but this is sort of a much more crude asked say of the chemistry barron at least it tells us hey the right kinds of stock our since there that that that could provide the basis for some kind of metabolism but it doesn't really we can't say that it's betraying the existence of life at this point we identify the methanol molecules with the groundbased telescope we did drive casini through the that.

energy source david livingston solar system perkin