17 Burst results for "David Linden"

"david linden" Discussed on The Plastic Podcasts

The Plastic Podcasts

05:54 min | 4 months ago

"david linden" Discussed on The Plastic Podcasts

"And i think it was. it was a combination. It was an alchemy. Downs that went on this event so there was sometimes literally born darts in happening I think some people may be in that kind of teaching it and it was also just the way for people to meet each other and meet people from the locality as well And then there was also traditional. Irish starts in on sometimes irish music being played and sometimes people just listening to music that live on the recording again. Just an opportunity for people to socialize. Apparently my dad arrived at this dance and within seconds of say my mom turned to his friend and said if i'm not married about women within the next few years there's something wrong in the world after that thing that they call them holocaust this thing that people used to do many many moons ago courting coating after a while of quoting yet he obviously popped the question. Mom said yes and yet they got married on the twelfth of december nineteen fifty nine What is it your parents did. Oh gosh at the time of my birth. My dad had. I think i typically says laborer and i think my mom was working in canton somewhere. I used to think that she used to work around. The time of my birth at paddington green police station in the cancer. But my mom over. The is has corrected. Me said you're right about di- did once worker paddington green police station in the canteen. But it wasn't around the time that you were born. So i i for some reason. I still have this memory around the time with my birth. There's nothing on the birth certificate about my mom is doing Is quite patriarchal and through the male line. My best of as as with most of us But yeah i just get the sense. That mom was the the work in hand saying. Or maybe you know. Sometimes mom would make ends meet by doing cleaning in a kind of work of them You're christened anthony. David s right Those those family names yet. I'm still seeking the david my been although there is a broader that still with us. Cool david so there is a david lennon But around the time of my birth years. Before david would have been born. I'm not sure who the other david would have been in the family line But yeah i was definitely born is definitely what he's saying. I difficult anthony david linden. It seems that your dad had a kind of almost romantic view of the way that He and your mother got together. You know that that sense that somehow they fate to be And that was a a couple of years of tig until this thing that everything was done in that very almost story storybook salt away from. I understand not only my mom and dad.

paddington green police statio christened anthony canton david david lennon cancer anthony david linden David
"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"And that. And you can hear that a trait is heritable in two different populations and it might lead you to believe that the difference between the populations is therefore heritable. Let me give an example body mass index. How fat you are is a fairly heritable trait about seventy percent heritable and people in the United States now on average people in France have. Smaller, body mass indices than people in America, is that because of heritable genetic differences between? France. People and people in the USA. No, it isn't. It's because people in the USA more caloric foods and exercise less. So even though that trait is heritable, the difference between the groups is not heritable and that's the thing that I would like to leave your listeners. Question on that David. So if we assume that eating habits and exercise habits are collated. BMI. So. So if your dad and Grandad cad does, let's say it's called them bad habits then you are at risk. Regardless of your as. Yeah. Well, you only have some ability to change this. In other words. BMI is seventy percent of the variation and BMI is heritable. So you know if you are battling with losing weight, you have an ability to affect that up to a certain point. Right. But at a population level, you know you, you know you're you're kind of stuck with your. With your genetics. Some degree. So I think what people take from. This is compassion. Right in other words, a lot of people look at people who are overweight and they say, well, that person has no willpower right? If they tried harder, they could lose more weight and so there's no reason for them to be out and I think if we look at the heritage ability of be am I. What is revealed is that you know that's that's really not the right attitude to have. It's not biologically supportable. East hugely important. So seventy percents, big number and as you know Vehicles related to type two diabetes, hypertension expensive disease states, and so the interventions that that via suggesting the medical arena, he's said really considering the fact well, I mean I think the interventions can work up to a point in other words most people you know depends how what, what wait they're starting out but a lot of people who are overweight and looking to wait to lose weight, they can lose ten percent of their body mass and keep it off but they're probably not going to be able to keep off more than that in other words they might be. Able to lose twenty percent of their body mass. But their chance of being able to sustain that weight loss is is very, very low because the brain is like a thermostat home static mechanism and it will do everything to turn down your metabolism and make super hungry to make you try to hit that that weight set point again. So I don't want to be utterly pessimistic and say that nobody can ever lose weight and keep keep it off but you know one in for most people, the ability to do that is limited to a certain degree of weight loss. On average for most people looking to lose weight is about ten percent. Right. Excellent. Yeah. It's a it's a fascinating book. And yet thanks so much David for said, well, thank you was lots of.

BMI United States David France America USA.
"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Then you have a slightly higher chance of being attracted to men. When you grow up and? It's a small effect, but it's a statistically reliable effect that's found all over the world likewise, we know that. That women who in Utero were exposed to unusual levels of antigens that is masculine is in hormones are more likely to be attracted to women when they grow up. So there are biological factors involved that are not. that are not heritable but the truth is there's still a lot of Mr remaining. It's not like we have a complete explanation for a what accounts for variation in sexual orientation. Yet, so under the complex interaction, genetic biological experience and Weinvent right there. So we cannot really backtrack just looking at the output. Will right and I think another thing that's important is that this is actually kind of different in men than women. and. So if you talk to most men, they'll say, yeah, you know as soon as I was aware of having sexual or romantic feelings, they were this way I was gay straight I was by and then it didn't change for the rest of my life and ninety nine percent of men will tell you that story. And if you ask women on the other hand, it's way more complicated in other words. There's many women who will be the same thing always knew I was always knew I was straight. I always knew I was by, but they're actually a very large Significant fraction of women who actually have a more fluid kind of sexual orientation and it's not necessarily the sexual orientation changes but something more complex than that. So for example, you might have a woman who's been straight and and attracted to men her whole life. You know I'm not attracted to women, but I fell in love with this one particular woman. Right or likewise, you might have some woman who's always been attracted to women. She says, well, no, I'm not interested in guys generally, but I fell in love with this one particular guy and there's a terrific book called female sexual fluids ain't..

Utero Weinvent
"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Store new memory for facts and events. From the time of the surgery on were they also had a small retrograde Amnesia going back aways for facts and events but. H. M. could still learn for example to. to improve at a sport like Ping Pong, or tennis. Could still learn to a right by looking in a mirror, which is very hard thing to do and so in that sense, we know that the damage to the brain to the temporal lobes that h. m. sustained seems to spare at least some forms of non declared a memory and We know that that there are damages to other parts of the brain that seem to impact non-declared memory banana declared memory. It's not as if there's a perfect map and there's lots of overlap and interaction between the two and we don't entirely understand it but there you. There's at least some distinction of the level of brain regions between these two general. Memory types. In Chapter about the sexual sells you talk about Perhaps it's misconception that sexual preference caz No component do it well so I think there's one thing that's really important to to make a distinction. The Chapter Sexual Self is actually not about sexual orientation it's it's actually about It's about a your identification who feel yourself to be right and these things are entirely separate right who you feel yourself to be and who you're attracted to. Our are separate issues with separate biology separate genetics if we are to talk about sexual orientation. What we see in a in a in twin studies is that there is a, there is a partial a hereditary component. So for for males sexual orientation is about forty percent heritable and for females. When I say females, I mean cisgenders, females, and six gender males is about only twenty percents heritable so that that means that there's a whole I mean the this twenty percent forty percent are important, but they're far from the whole story. And so then the question becomes well, what's the rest and I think most people would guess will, Oh, it has to do with how you're raised. This is the surprising thing. It doesn't appear to be at. All right. There is no aspect of child rearing that seems to have any influence on your sexual orientation. Whatsoever I mean there are cultural ideas who might be raised in a home the disapproves of it so you may not want to express early in life you might try to repress, but in terms of what you actually feel inside doesn't seem to matter. What how your parents raise you I think. The important thing to realize is that there are biological factors that can impact a trait like sexual orientation that are not heritable in other words. They're not what you what you inherit from your mother and your father but percocet random random occurrence not entirely around macron. So for example. If, you have all a man who has older brothers..

retrograde Amnesia H. M. tennis
"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"So the fact that memory is dynamic and that it is rendered changeable. When you're recall, it degrades the fidelity of memory, but in most cases actually increases the usefulness of memory. Yes isn't gonNA isn't there some sort of a deceased David that that makes you really memorize all the details you know in great detail. So so there are a few cases in in the literature of people who have a so called identity memories. That is to say memories where they remember every every detail of their own experience and You know we don't always have a way of fact, check up, but it seems to be pretty true. It's very, very rare and there is a famous example There was a book by the Soviet neuropsychologist Luria the described one of these cases but I think the thing you might think, oh, well, that person's going to be a genius will know. That having a perfect memory for everything that ever happened to you is not that useful actually at your, you know it's it's like you're trying to find facts here in this library with too many volumes in your in your scientists search around. So you know the people with identity memories you know that are generalized often times have a problem. They don't actually do very well. Making their way in the world sometimes, people have identical memories for certain things like there are a number of of people who can you know upon one hearing remember every piece of. Music. That they've advert can imagine that that could actually be useful sometimes right. Yeah. Yeah absolutely. So so you got the tax army here all long term memory and you make good distinction between explicit memory. Memories of evens plaques and concepts at implicit memory. You say a quiet and used without conscious attention. Those. Skills and habits associated learning. sort of procedural memory and so a mechanistic perspective do these things happen very differently in the brain will they they seem to involve different parts of the brain so for example, there are places in the brain where if they're damaged you. You really impact memory for facts and events. So many people have heard about the famous neurological case called H. M. which was someone who had surgery to to to the temporal lobes to control intractable epilepsy, and aside effective this was they couldn't.

Luria David H. M.
"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Soviet. Back SO DAVID I want to go to the next chapter in the book. entitled. I. Forgot to remember to forget you. This is all about memory. The brain is a funny thing. It seems to fill in. Lord of the missing information it makes you believe things You have a case here off at Homa bombing, right Timothy McVeigh and and how. They were caught. Well yes. So so in the Oklahoma City bombing Timothy. McVeigh was was the was the person who Who who drove a bomb in the truck and left it to to kill one hundred people and many children in Oklahoma City and and he was caught rather quickly because his getaway car have no license plate and the police pulled. Pulled him over but It turns out that he had He had rented his u-haul truck from. A nearby truck rental place, and when they went to interview the people in the truck rental place. One of them the mechanic. One of three people who had witnessed Timothy McVeigh do the rental say Oh, you know there was another guy with Timothy McVeigh. At the time and they said Oh. Okay. Well, we'll get a sketch artist here and you can do a drawing of him and so they did a sketch artist and and your listeners who were around at that time will remember this face. It was a rather heavy heavy jawed muscular looking scowl face and he was called John DOE number two, and this was the cause of the biggest manhunt and FBI history everybody thousands of agents were mobilized hunting for John DOE number two, all kinds of tips poured in people say, Oh, they saw him here they on there they saw him in this bar. Driving down the road they saw him with toothed with Timothy McVeigh running away from the car and Oklahoma City are. But no one could ever find a John Doe. Number. Two and The FBI investigated further and they found out that the day before hand there was a guy who came in to rinse a truck and he looked a bit like Timothy, McVeigh and the guy he was with was a dead ringer for the sketch of John Doe number two, and so the mechanic. Had done. something. That's very easy for us to do I. Don't I don't want to to complain about him because this is something that anyone could happen to. He had taken the memory of one day of I wasn't Timothy McVeigh with John Doe with John DOE number two looking guy and he had. Mixed together with the memory of Timothy McVeigh coming in by himself in order to create a blend of memory and that's what gave rise to the entire mythical John DOE number, two waste of manhunt, and this is something that happens to us all the time were extraordinarily bad..

Timothy McVeigh Oklahoma City FBI u-haul
"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"I was wondering also David Duty Caveney data on the Kobe mortality against but. No. I mean well, I mean there is some data for. Cova. The incidence of Cova. in time of year that's just starting to come out. Now you know with an increased incidence yeon in in winter know as you know similar to what happens with influenza I, think to me the more interesting question comes from a has to do with pregnancy, and this comes this is inspired by a observation of women who were pregnant during the nineteen eighteen, nineteen, nineteen pandemic flu women who were pregnant over that winter that when we follow their children, they have a fourfold higher incidence of schizophrenia. So the incidence of schizophrenia goes from about one percent up to about four percent that's very large effect. Even though the expression autism really wasn't prevalent at that time. We now know that the same is true for autism. And These are these are mothers. So the letters were infected, but the increased incidence is in the in the child they were carrying. Right and we don't know entirely how this happens. But experiments in mice suggests that what happens is that as the woman, the mother is fighting off the viral infection as part of the of fighting that off see secretes a immune signaling molecule called interleukin seventeen, a and interleukin seventeen can cross the placenta enter the brain of the developing fetus, and if the the fetal brain development is exactly the right moment, it can influence the development of the neo cortex of the brain in a way that seems to increase the probability of autism and. Schizophrenia now, what we don't know how this relates back to your question about Cova we don't know if this is going to happen with other infections as well. In other words, it seems to happen with bacterial infections too. If a mother's fighting off bad bacterial infection during pregnancy, there's also the same problem. So you know the MOMS who are pregnant and who get infected with covert will their children over the years have a higher incidence of schizophrenia autism. We don't know yet and we'll take many years. To find out, but it might be unfortunately..

Schizophrenia Cova Cova. David Duty
"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"So that well, maybe people who can tolerate the heat better have more sweat glands over their body. And that turns out not to be the case that's not true. But if they carefully they see they have more sweat glands that receive nerve fibers from the heat regulating heart of the brain, and that's important because those are the ones that help keep your body cool on a hot day that can command. Command sweating and they found that they were truly more of them in the Kyushu soldiers, southern soldiers than in the Hokkaido northern soldiers and so the classic genetic explanation would be oh well over many years in a cold place, it's been selected for you have to have fewer innovated sweat glands and in a warm place you'd have more. But when they looked into this carefully, they've found that that wasn't true at all in other words if you had soldiers that came from long-standing northern families, but their families moved to the south right before the soldier was born that soldier would carry the southern sweat gland phenotype with words large. which is good for for heat tolerance and vice versa. If you had a long standing southern family that moved to the north and then their child was born that child would carry the northern phenotype and so what it means is that this isn't a genetically encoded trade at all. It's actually determines by the ambient temperature in the first year of postnatal life. So just the first year markle. That, really differentiates that. You have a broader. Picture here You'd say some diseases significantly more prevalent in people born in particular seasons, and variety of diseases that you You indicate here like, adhd, hypertension Ostlund Salon. And and so so these are statistically A significant that if you're born in, let's say Let's say for your chance of getting violent sections. Well. I don't have memorized actually going to the figure in the book. Yes. That's right. And of course, the fall means the seasonal fall. So it's going to be a different time of year whether you're in the northern or southern. Hemisphere. So you know atherosclerosis is more likely in spring births as atrial fibrillation acute bronchiolitis, more likely with fall births as our viral infections. So this is work that was done by Nicholas Tanzanaia's lab at Columbia University. Medical Center and what's Nice about it is that they just went in and looked at enormous numbers of medical records with about a thousand different diseases as categories, and they had no preconceived ideas about the relationship between time of year of your birth and amp disease. You know they just went in random lynn this. What is IT GONNA turn out to be and they did this four specifically for people in New York City But here has since been been replicated in number of other places. In the World Ams the interesting thing is that it's only a handful of the diseases that have these seasonal. The they have. Of One, thousand, six, hundred, Eighty, eight conditions only fifty five were significantly influenced by birth month. That's a small fraction but of that small fraction. It's important and you know we don't always know the reason right you can make stories about environmental allergens, for example, temperature. But in many cases, we don't honestly know we only know the epidemiological correlation. You know. I grew up in India and astrology. There's a big connection between your birth date than happened to you. it many religions it encounters there..

sweat gland acute bronchiolitis Kyushu Hokkaido Nicholas Tanzanaia New York City Medical Center India Columbia University
"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"So a haired ability estimate comes from twin studies, but it's only valuable for the population which measured. And the other thing that's that's really important to us about twins is that if you look at Mono Zayas twins, the ones that people call identical and common speech. If you look at them even as newborn babies, they're not identical right they don't look exactly the same. They don't have the same temperament. If you talk to parents, Manosalvas, twins, they'll tell you. and. They have their different even though they have the exact same DNA and even though they developed in Utero line right next to each other. So how is that? How does that come about? Well, it comes about through the pseudo random nature of. Development. So your DNA isn't a precise instruction for every cell in your body where it goes where it migrates what it connects to. Rather, it's a set of rather general instructions for. So for example, a population of neurons in the brain. Might get the general instruction. Hey, grow towards the top of the head for a couple of millimeters crossover the mid line to the other side of the brain keep growing up to the top of the head and the rest of you cells grow laterally out towards the year and warm identical twin. Maybe forty percent of the cells across the mid line on another one, sixty percent will because the instruction is not absolute. The genome is not a blueprint even though there's a book with. As its titled It's not. It's not a blueprint it's not a schematic diagram. It's a set of general instructions and so if we are to go back and modify our expression nature versus nurture what we would really come up with something that's more cumbersome to say but which is much more accurate, which is if Individuality is produced by heredity interacting with experience experiences. We said being very broadly considered and filter through the pseudo random nature of development. It's not as fun to say as nature versus nurture, but it's more accurate..

Utero Manosalvas
"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"I wouldn't even want to say it's the end outcome because who knows maybe there's little change. This experiment is still going on as a matter of fact, if you want to buy one of these domesticated foxes, you can send nine thousand dollars some people in a Rut shop and bring it over Florio. Have One pet on the people in North America do but. It took longer it took but still in the in the scale of evolutionary time thirty. Is Not. Very many. So so what I was getting. So there's some radical changes. In the in the population, and then they'll basically selecting waters. What is good for you we seeing justice selection effect or is there more sort of imposing effect. You know by by spending more time with people at like well These researchers were very careful tune to not interact with the Fox's beyond what they had to do to select them. After that it's not like they took the you know the Fox's for that they were going to breed the next generation and cuddled them. You know, have them have lots of human contact so presumably, it's this this election effect, but I think what you bring up a really interesting point in other words in order for selection to work, there have to have been some slightly tame foxes in the population to read for the very first time in other words. If all Fox's they had available to them were completely untamed there'd be no way to get started and that's what happened with zebras because people tried to domesticate zebras. So, for example, in certain parts of Africa, they're sleeping sickness spread by seed see flies and horses can get the sickness. So you can't use horses very wellness parts of Africa but Zebras Earth Moon. So people said we'll zebras kind of like a horse. Let's. domesticate zebras, and then both solve the problem. But the problem is there were no slightly tame zebras to start with to breathe together. So the project failed..

Fox Africa North America
"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"I don't have a problem with nature house up sort of medical poetic expression to mean heredity too mean the genetic influence but the idea that everything that isn't heredity is nurture is not true. Nurture means how your parents Inter community raised you or they failed to or how the abuse to and I think. What's important to realize is that? The non. The non hereditary things that influence your individuality are much broader them out it's experience not not. So social experience and not just the sort of experience that can be written into memory but everything from the diseases your mother was fighting off all. She was carrying you in Utero to the average temperature in your first year of life to the bacteria that colonize your guts. Experience broadly considered should replace nurture in the nature versus nurture. Expression. Okay. Okay. So in in the fuss chapter the book you have a very interesting experiment. So dogs game from world's dumbest wolves, and this is a much more reason experiment in Soviet Union attempted to domesticate fault. Yes. That's right. This is this is a very interesting experiment because it's extraordinarily hard to do. It takes it takes many tens of years, and so what they did is is that the you know, Fox's are are are grown on farms in the Soviet Union to harvest there for for garments and So the infrastructure already exists but some scientists there decided. Well, we want to see can we can we make dog like foxes? Can we through a small number of generations by picking those Fox's that are the TAMEST and breeding them together Can we can we? produce a dog like Fox and so you know what they what they what they did is they I looked at the Fox's that were there were already there in the for farm and they tried to identify the Tamest ones and you know they would do things like put their gloved hand in the cage and see who didn't buy it or who didn't cower and they would take those Fox's and breed them together and then they take the offspring amines. You're the TAMEST ones and breed them together and and after about four or five generations, they already started to see behavioral changes. In the Fox's within thirty generations they had. foxe's that were as loyalist and as tame as as any dog interestingly while the only criterion, they were used this Fox brooding was Thomas other traits. Came along as well curtails. The ability to patches of of different colored for on the face and a what some people think is what you are actually selecting for when you're selecting for taming us is the arresting of development of an early stage. So you get a sort of playful young Fox. In its in its. In its characteristics. Interestingly, people have known for a long time that there's a domestication syndrome. So turning straight tales curly and getting. Patches for on the face that happens not just in this Fox experiment but in all kinds of of domesticated mammals. Is. Furious selection effect David or or is it something something more systematic on a so just five generations? Already getting to the to the end outcome that you're looking five generations didn't get you entirely to the outcome. Five generations got you to seeing something in the behavior that you could measure it took thirty generations or more to really I mean..

Fox Soviet Union Utero David foxe
"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"By guest today's David Linden a professor of the Department of Neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His lap because what forbidding use the cellular. Memory storage recovery of function after brain injury at a few other topics. He's the author of full bestselling books on the biology of behavior for the general audience. His most recent book is unique the science of human individuality. Doklam David. Thank you for having me on. Sure. Yeah. So the topic of conversation is your most recent book that just came out. And it's simple. Human individuality. Then I think about humans David. I see eight point three billion people around the world we see do sorta micro segmented ourselves into. An ideal buckets by skin color by language by country be have looted leaders of great democracies reminding us VR in in different buckets. At all the time. So what do you mean by human individuality? Well, what I really mean is all the traits physical. behaviorally emotional cognitive that you can describe about a person them away that I began to think about this. This is about five years ago when I found myself single midlife and I did as people do these days and. I went to an online dating website and I was reading the profiles trying to find woman who I might want to have a conversation with. And worked out very well I met a woman who became my wife She's wonderful. Happy ending. But You know the Nerdy side of me was reading the list of traits that people have their used to describe themselves and wondering how they come about. So you know someone might say, well, I'm five foot eleven and I'm bisexual and I have a Boston accents and I like a bitter beer, but I don't like white chocolate and. I tend to be a risk taker, and so I started thinking well Gosh. How do these traits that make her an individual? Come about. So that's how it all got started. Okay, okay and so So so we'll get into the book in detail, and so you know then I think about sort of human individuality. Yeah..

David Linden Doklam David Johns Hopkins University Schoo professor Department of Neuroscience Boston
"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"david linden" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

"david linden" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"david linden" Discussed on KCRW

"Ah, woman has always been with women Who says Well, I'm not interested in guys generally. But this One particular guy. Yeah, I love him, And in this way, there's something fundamentally and Fascinatingly different. About the sexual orientation of men and women. And I wonder if some of that can help. Just keep us open minded arm or informed about about these conversations, which I know we're just so sensitive culturally well, they are so sensitive culturally, and they're so culturally. Constructed, right? I mean s O. There's there's a famous anthropological case of a group that lived in the lowlands of Papua New Guinea, where young boys the belief there's that they have to receive semen. In order to grow into men. And so the idea is that you have sex with with with mem Ah, when you are young and on all the young boys do it, And then there's a period of time where that ends and you have sex with other women and mount and then most, but not all men. Move on to two having AH, traditional marriage like relationship with one woman and you know, we looked from outside this culture. We can try to put these labels on like Orono, first gay and then your body and then you're straight, but it's kind of useless. It's kind of silly. Because within that culture, those those constructions and those ideas don't make any sense at all. So I think we have to realize that our our categories of sexual orientation are Malleable and they're culturally constructed. Right? Well, I mean, when we add a lot of this up, I wonder what the message is. You would want to leave. Some of our listeners may be those that are bringing up kids or Or just in general. I mean, what? What is this kind of? Where does this take us in terms of telling us or given us more information is to understanding who we are. Well, you know, to me the one of the most interesting things about it. Is that it's not you can here. Oh, my gosh. There's there's genetic influence on this and that and the other thing that's really depressing. We're all autumn. A thons. We're all slaves to our genes. Well, No, we're not. And then you have other people say Oh, well, we are a pure creatures of free will weaken weaken. Taken information. That information is pure unaltered. We can make Unemotional, rational decisions. Ah, about it every time and that's also not true. Everything we know about the brain and actually, my day job is that I'm a brain researcher. Tells us that that is is not true. By the time we're aware of sensations there blended with expectations on demotions, and that's what makes sense. For the brain to do so neither we're not. We're not genetically determined robots, nor with his pure, ethereal creatures of rational free will. We're we're subject to All kinds of biases and spin that our brains and bodies put on the information and and I think knowing that could help us find our way in the world. Yeah, we're kind of driving the bus half the time. Well, David Linden of John Well, David Linden of Johns Hopkins University. This has been a really interesting conversation. Thank you. Thank you for the time. Thank you so much for having me on was fun. Once again that was.

David Linden John Well Papua New Guinea Johns Hopkins University researcher
"david linden" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"david linden" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Let's take five with Morgan. This is five minutes in 2015, and I was able to speak with Dr David Linden, a professor of neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. An author of Touch the Science of Hand Heart in Mind. I asked him what happens when your skin is touched. We think of touch as a single sense, but actually, there are many, many different sensors in our skin acting and parallel. There are nerve endings that transducer heat and cold and it's champagne and pressure and vibration and all those different, which is the sensors, sensors everywhere. Sensors everywhere. When you think of it, it's it's a very large array of sensors. If we took your skin off, it would be the weight of a bowling ball. It would be the size of nine large pizza boxes. So it's the biggest sensory array we have in body and it has all these different sensors. But these sensors are combined in a stream of information. That goes to the brain. And so we don't experience all these different touch modalities as as separate signals. They're they're blended together in our consciousness. You say there's emotional touch and sensory touch. Yes, that's true for every kind of touch whether it isa caressed. Or feeling in your pocket for a quarter or pain or sexual touch. There are separate pathways and separate brain regions for the emotional aspect of what we call the discriminative. Aspect. So let me give you an example. If I were Tio hit you on the thumb with a hammer The facts of that which you get your brain very quickly to an area called the somatic sensory cortex would all be about where on your body where you hit? What's the quality of the pain, stabbing, burning, etcetera. And how intense is it? And then there would be another. Aspect to it, which is this is highly emotionally negative. This and we think of pain is being intrinsically emotionally negative. But this is just a trick our brain plays on. So if you have damage to the emotional touch centre of your brain, and I hit you on the thumb with a hammer Instead of going. Yeah. Ow! That hurts. That's terrible. The way a normal person would. You would say in a very flat voice. Yes, that hurts a lot. It's not like being a massacre. Strike massacre ists. Have a big emotional response to pain. It just happens to be positive. So hit me again. Exactly paying a symbolic switch. People have this damaged have no emotional response to pain. And we only have to look to our Everyday language to see this reinforced, so we might say I was touched by the gesture. You hurt my feelings and the idea of touched meaning emotionally affected or my feelings to mean my tender emotions you might think. Well, that's just Not something deeply biological. That's just a trick of modern day English, but it isn't It's actually broadly called cross cultural. If you look in different languages, so let's get to it. It's in scrapped. So which there's been a big debate about it right. Some people have said it is a special, unique sensation that must have its very own kind of nerve ending in the skim, because it's very unique and always provoked scratching pain doesn't provoke scratching itch. Does and other people said no. Which is just a touch of blend. In other words, it's a little bit of pain on a little bit of light touch and you combine those together, and it feels like it. But there's not a dedicated sensor fritch and this argument raged and raged. And now we know that There's atleast one molecularly distinct. Ah, unique sensor for ich that it's not merely a blend and the exciting thing about that is that means that we will now be able to develop anti itch medicines that are way better than what we have right now. As you know if you go get poison oak or poison ivy, and you try to get one of those creams to relieve the itch, even a prescription cream. It's not very effective. This tech nation interview discusses Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Professor David London's 2015 book, Touch the Science of Hand, part in mind..

Johns Hopkins University Schoo Dr David Linden professor somatic sensory cortex bowling Morgan David London
"david linden" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"david linden" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Able to speak with doctor David Linden a professor of neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University School of medicine and author of touch the science of hand hard in mind I asked him what happens when your skin is attached we think of touch as a single sounds but actually there many many different sensors in our skin acting in parallel there are nerve endings that transduce heat and cold and if chin pain and pressure and vibration and all those different which is the sensors sensors everywhere sensors everywhere when you think of it it's it's a very large array of sensors of we took your skin off it would be the weight of a bowling ball and would be the size of nine large pizza boxes so what's the biggest sensory array we have in body and it has all these different sensors but these sensors are combined in a stream of information that goes to the brain and so we don't experience all these different touch modalities as a separate signals their their blended together in our consciousness he said there's a motional touch and sensory touch yes that's true for every kind of touch whether it is a caress war feeling in your pocket for a quarter or or pain or sexual touch there are separate pathways in separate brainy regions for the emotional aspects of what we call the discriminative aspect so let me give you an example if I were to hit you on the phone with a hammer the facts of that we should get your brain very quickly to an area called the somatosensory cortex would all be about where on your body were you here what's the quality of the pain stabbing burning it cetera and how intense is and then there would be another aspect to it which is this is highly emotionally negative this and we think of of pain as being intrinsically emotionally negative but this is just a trick our brain plays on so if you have damage to the emotional touch center of your brain and I hit you on the phone with a hammer instead of going all that hurts that's terrible the way a normal person would you would say in a very flat voice yes that hurts a lot it's not like being a massacre straight **** have a big emotional response to pain it just happens to be positive so hit me again exactly pain is symbolic switch of the people have this damage have no emotional response to pain and we only have to look to our everyday language to see this reinforced so we might say I was touched by the gesture you hurt my feelings and the idea of touch meeting emotionally affected her my feelings to mean my tender motion to might think well that's just not something deeply biological that's just a trick of modern day English but it isn't it's actually broadly Cole Sprouse cultural if you look in different languages so let's get to it it's and scratch so each there's been a big debate about hitch right some people said it is a special unique sensation that must have it's very own kind of nerve ending in the skim because it's very unique always provoke scratching pain doesn't provoke scratching each does some of the people said no it's just just a touch blam in other words it's a little bit of pain a little bit a light touch you combine those together it feels like it but there's not a dedicated sensor for edge and this argument rage and rage and now we know that out there is at least one molecularly distinct our unique sensor for it should it's not merely a bland and the exciting thing about that is that means that we will now be able to develop anti itch medicines that are way better than what we have right now as you know if you go get poison oak or poison ivy and you try to get one of those creams to relieve the itch even a prescription cream it's not very effective this technician interview discusses Johns Hopkins school of medicine professor David Linden's twenty fifteen book.

David Linden professor Johns Hopkins University Schoo
"david linden" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"david linden" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Called landlord next thing. They're like ten minutes into the landlord and the fire department show up to that. I think the guy ever talked to me again, which is fine. But and I don't ever call the outcome. I just remember going to work on. Okay. Have a nice day. But the dude poured gasoline or maybe it was about to gasoline behind the sink to kill aliens. That's fantastic. Five one three seven four nine seven thousand found found seven hundred eighty hey, L critter stories. What do you got? Well, I didn't lose any lives or anything. But it could have been closed last year. I was sitting doing my glacial backyard isn't really, yes. Yes. It was mostly the dark, and my gentleman's gun dog goes through the backyard something about I thought it was Christmas. Tamir boy brings Rigby bring the bisbee. He doesn't do what he's about halfway out in the backyard. So why go out there and the dog and teach him and the low behold, he's got a puff. Well, I getting dropped the problem. I says about reading down there. Boston's dead. Got those garbage cans reached down thinking you've ever heard a playing possum. Double and low, and behold, guess what wasn't there when I got back. The possum pick that awesome up. He probably would have went up and down my arm like a window. Yeah. He would aid it like I don't like like one of those characters. On Warner Brothers cartoon, probably. Yeah. You don't touch a positive, even if you think it's dead. I wouldn't. Animal or anything. Yeah. But dogs are fairly. That's something love Jason. Those kind of my my two puppies. Have no idea is a possum, they had cornered the backyard, and I'm like looking at it. My wife is like, well, which just leave it alone. It's going to go away. It will fall over dead. And then ten minutes later, it'll be gone. So and sure enough that's what happened appreciate the call. Thanks again critter. So we had the great raccoons story this week critters you've dealt with Iraq Coon skunks possums, five one three seven four nine seven thousand Carl David Linden, Jerry room for you. We'll get to your next right after this update. Brian combs on seven hundred WWE Cincinnati..

Rigby Carl David Linden Warner Brothers Brian combs Boston bisbee Jason Cincinnati Jerry room ten minutes