6 Burst results for "David Jerusalem"

"david jerusalem" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"david jerusalem" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Is that the case CVS editor's desk case CBS news time is two fifty one a member of the Berkeley city council has rejected an invitation to appear on Tucker Carlson show on fox news KCBS reporter Keith Menconi spoke with the bay area political analysts about the fraud politics of fox invitations it all started earlier this week when a vote by Berkeley city council to remove all gendered language from the city's code drew national attention longer fire man or policeman so firefighter police officer no man holes now it's a maintenance holes Berkeley city council member Rigel Robinson who cosponsored the ordinance says following the vote he received hate mail and an invitation to appear on fox news commentator Tucker Carlson show an invitation he turned down proudly and publicly I asked KCBS political analyst Larry Gersten the pros and cons politician supportive of liberal policies face when considering went to appear on fox news they have to make this decision do I really want to go to what they might consider the enemy territory but he says sometimes we need to take risks would you take risks to see if we can break down barriers and the and the less we're trying to do that the higher the Berrier seem to get councilmember Robinson tells KCBS he doesn't feel his views would have been given a fair hearing on Carlson show fox news objects to the decision by Robinson to make a private correspondence public keep Menconi KCBS time to talk food this early Sunday morning within our see David Jerusalem artichokes are showing up in the stores now and they're delicious we really love them at our house you know it's an interesting root vegetable first of all it has nothing to do with Jerusalem has nothing to do with artichoke it turns out that early settlers to America found them and thought they resembled the flavor of artichokes that as for the arctic chill comes from secondly the Latin name is generous soul turning to the sun it's kind of a wild sunflower native to North America by the way and so generous souls seems of gotten corrupted into Jerusalem well in recent years they've started calling them some chokes because people were really confused with I'm not sure that some choke his headache better the Jerusalem artichoke some loud sounds like it's something that's going to choke you well beyond that it's a a two burner grows underground like a potato the starch and it has a different impact on people who have died leaders because it has a low glycemic index and so in many instances it's used in place of potatoes frankly we really like and pickled wrong just take any recipe you have for bread and butter pickles wash and scrub the jays really carefully cut a manta nice size pieces put him in a jar and fill it with your vinegar solution to put in the refrigerator and let it sit for a couple of weeks there crying she just absolutely delicious as an accompaniment almost any kind of food now I see David Casey B. S. a coastal butterfly that is been endangered for decades is experiencing a growth in its population we get the story from Margaret Carrero with radio dot com news station K. an axe in Los Angeles while its numbers are still quite low more el Segundo blue butterflies you're showing up along the southern California coast that's thanks in large part to groups like the palace Verdes peninsula land Conservancy which has been restoring the habitat necessary for the butterfly to thrive we prepare site by you know removing the weeds and then we plant the host plant that the also going to be a better fight relies on the sea cliff buckwheat conservation director Chris Robbia says last year's plentiful rainfall didn't hurt that's helping to bring the the number of plants that are naturally occurring on the coast to fruition the el Segundo blue butterflies range stretches from palace Verdes to the bio no wetlands Margaret Carrero reporting it's back to school shopping Susan here's what's different this year I'm Jeff Cole the fortune magazine with inside business back to school as America's second largest.

editor Berkeley city council CBS
"david jerusalem" Discussed on Knowing Faith

Knowing Faith

09:09 min | 1 year ago

"david jerusalem" Discussed on Knowing Faith

"Beautiful and David sent an inquired about the woman, and one said is not this Bethsheba the daughter of Elliot the wife of your eye of the Hittite so David sent messengers and took her and she came to him, and he lay with her now, she had been purifying herself from her uncleaned cleanness than she returned to her house and the woman conceived, and she sent until David I am pregnant. Okay. So David Jerusalem. His armies are out at battle David goes up to his roof. He sees a woman bathing and a lot of times particularly in sermons on this passage, and we're in talk more about this. How this passage it's preached in a little while. But what happens here most most people are going to stop right here and their first points gonna be this woman is flaunting her business. Okay. Is that really what's going on here? Well, actually, I think what we're seeing here is that she says she had been purifying herself from her unclean nece, and so it's interesting. Why is that in there in this parenthetical statement, and obviously it's going to establish for us? This means that she's completed her menstrual cycle. And so she is she is actually demonstrating righteousness in that she is abiding by the requirements of the law, but it also stablishment that she is not currently pregnant, and so, but but the fact is the first thing that we see a best Sheba is this. She is observed. Int- of Israel's law, but why? But like some okay, I'm sorry. I'm playing devil's advocate here. I want to be really really clear. Sometimes these questions people are like man just seems to be really attack mystic. But why is she not in her private bathroom like mini bedroomed house? We we aren't told we don't know why this is taking place on the roof. But you know, the thing that is interesting is many of the commentators will acknowledge this. I think it's pretty obvious in the text the language of how this plays out is very much the language of Genesis chapter three. There is a seeing. And then there is a desiring. And then there is a taking that are happening here in the text. And so I think that should inform the way that we read this portion of the story and also the way that Nathan is going to confront David about this moment. And what we don't say. When we read the Genesis account is that eve saw the fruit on the tree. And the tree was real through was really trying to sell itself. You know, like the fruit was turning this way. And that to make sure that if it and the fruit was, you know, the fruit was tempting eat it is not the fruit. That is tempting eve it's the the fruit is. Is is passive the fruit is acted upon in the story. JT widen. What invest she would just say just say no at the row at the risk of sounding crass. Yeah. Because I've heard I've heard a literally appreciably the righteous for bashing. But what would have been just say no at that point. I mean the power dynamic between somebody who's bathing in the king's sitting on his roof is universes apart. She's not an position to say. No, she's in a position to be taken advantage of. And that's exactly what's happening. There's injustice objectification dehumanisation. She's just not in a place where she feels that. She can say no, this is a grave injustice being done by David. So David doesn't look at her as another daughter of Israel. He looks at her as merely an opportunity to say she had this desire that he feels with right? Yeah. I mean, not only that. But if you look at the language, there's a there are other clues here that are given to help us understand how to read this and one of them is that she's the daughter of Elian, which we find out further on the text makes her the granddaughter of a hit the fell the gala night. Right. Who is a Canaanite? And then she's married to your riot the Hittite who has also Canaanite. And so not only is she a woman bathing on a roof. But she is married to a person of little consequence who has an outsider, and she herself as the granddaughter of person who is an outsider. And so she with a picture that's being not only that. But he's on the roof looking down and that that's illustrating. Even just the the social stratification of the whole thing that he is high and lifted up, and she is the the least in the lowest the SUNY times already on this podcast in the teaching the bible. Studies is wicked kings take take. That's right. Took her. And it's specifically put in there to curious to think back to Samuel in the words that he had this was not an offer of would you like to come to a bedroom? It was taking. Yeah. And you hit on this minute ago. JT something we have talked about I think we've talked about on the show before. But there is a lot of times we read the bible in these stories is if they're happening in vacuum. But there is a very real power dynamic on display here. And I think that particularly there is there's an uncomfortable among the Christian community to ignore. How some times people in the bible characters in the bible who we want to behind noble abuse that power dynamic for their own gain. But they do that they do that just like other people in the world do that. Just like we as Christians do that. Right. So it's not just that. Like, David's the only one who's ever abused power dynamic. But he. He is one who has one of the things that's interesting here. I don't wanna get too far off topic. But we've just done a podcast recently on humble Calvinism and attendant of Calvinism is total depravity. But for some reason in some reformed communities were only comfortable talking about total depravity as it relates to individuals, not systems of injustice or power dynamics. There wouldn't be some kind of a system in place. That would itself be totally depraved is something that the reformed communities should be entirely familiar with engine wanting to be repentant of, but for some reason that isn't readily acknowledged, but I think something that we see here is it's not just that David is totally depraved. He is. But he's also taking advantage of a system. That's depraved. Also, where the strong good stronger and the Rico week are taking advantage of and that's not God's righteous way. No. But it isn't abuse of that system. That's right. It's an abusive power. And so when we're thinking about the full breadth of David's wickedness here because oftentimes this story is really just trivia. Allies into and I- trivialized adultery is a very serious thing and the bible condemns adultery. And and says that Daltry is wrong. So you don't need to ask does the bible adultery is a positive thing. The bible is unified view that adultery is wrong. But a lot of times the take on this story is just David committed adultery. That's the thing. It's that David and Bethsheba committed adultery. And and I think there is a desire to romanticize David into row, and because he's going to marry best Sheba in our minds that means and they lived happily ever after that. That's what's going on here is this adultery. Yes. It is a dull -tory in the sense that when we find Nathan coming to David and telling him as sin, we find that David has adulterated what was a pure and happy marriage. So it is a dull tree, but we have cultural baggage around the term adultery to where when we hear adultery. We think a fair we. That two people who were equally had equal agency in the matter looked at one another and thought that the other was attractive, and then broke up their marriages to begin a sexual relationship. Is that this story? No equal agency. That's helpful like that term. Yeah. Freeze while the because just this should be disagreeable to no one. But David invest Sheba were not equal. No, I'm at the risk of just pointing out. What we've obviously stated they are very David holds the highest position in Israel in Bethsheba as jenner's pointed out is marginalized by at least three different things. Right. Like, the who her father was who her husband is? And then just her status in Israel, and she's a woman gender gender too. And and the thing that's interesting to Texas. Also, queuing us to her objectification by the fact that she's named by someone other than David in verse. Three when he goes to enquire who she is. And then after that she is not named again. Until after this whole thing has played out. She's referred to as the woman. So like she like the act itself is the stories like tell you like, she's she becomes nameless. They're they're there. I think that the narrator is asking us to see her the way that David sees her. She is a category. She is a commodity instead of she is a human with a name Jin. Is there anything here? In tile you too. Obviously, this is a highly sexualize story. Yeah. Not taking away from that. At all. Is there anything here in terms of David's desire that also relates to him by his own means and effort trying to bring about the promises of God? With the sun. Yeah. So like, it's

David Jerusalem Israel Bethsheba Nathan Genesis SUNY times Samuel Elian Jin Elliot Daltry Rico Texas jenner
"david jerusalem" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

15:23 min | 1 year ago

"david jerusalem" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Geraldine brooks. What does that song? That is the wonderful song by route has dick Leonard Cohen. May his name be remembered for a blessing as we say in Jewish tradition. And. It's it's a case of music connects to my novel the secret code, obviously gave me the idea for the title. Leonard Cohen was drawing on the old mid rash. That King David's music was so beautiful that only he could play this chord that was pleasing to the is the divine, which is such a poetic idea. And and the song became especially meaningful to me because when my son was eight years old he decided that the one instrument he was interested in learning to play was the concert hop, and that seemed like a very strange choice for an eight year old boy that's turned out to be a great choice because if you play the harp you can't make a bad sound, even when you playing quite badly. It still sounds. You don't get the reaction that you get when you screeching on a violin making us black with a wind instrument. The halfway sounds good. So the kids to play it get a lot of positive feedback. Anyway, he he he became quite good at it. And when it was time to his Asia. Because tops. Much in the Hebrew bible. He decided that he would play something. And he played a beautiful arrangement of that. Leonard Cohen song. So you had not thought about the book at that point. You know, I was a one of my majors in college was fine arts, and I had been incredibly intrigued I was interested in the period between the renaissance and the moderns which involves mannerist and baroque and. And I loved all the diverse depictions of king, David. So you have the very famous Michelangelo. Have a crumby and Fitch model version, the strong young warrior, the idealized male form, and then you have a various feet almost effeminate sculpture of a very reflective young David by Donna Tella, completely different men. You have Caravaggio 's David who looks like a street thug that you wouldn't want a Nate on Adat night and on and on and on and this character is so capitus that out have felt able to project their own vision onto him. So I was interested in that element. But it was it was well nice son was studying for his going regulated temple. And and I was reading, you know, the story of David again at I realized how much is in it. It's really the first political biography. We have from soup to nuts. We need this guy as it. Child and we follow him to his deathbed and extreme old age and India tween everything happens to him. Every amazingly good thing that could happen to you. And then being the love the professional triumphs. The attic triumphs and every nightmare. The worst things you can imagine having your children kill each other. Having a child turn against you a beloved child losing and child living in our own integrity, doing something so evil and then having to recognize that you betrayed your own beliefs. So he's got it all that everything that you could want to explore about the human condition is in that life, who's a narrator. So the narrator of the secret code is the prophet on. And that was suggested to me by two lions ones in the book of chronicles. Where it says the acts of David king first and last atolls in the book of Nathan. Oh, wait on have the book of Nathan. It's a lost book that Nathan is his most famous management in scripture is when he confronts David about his sin confronts him dot having sent the non he called it to certain death at the forefront of the battle era and David wanted to sleep with your eyes wife Shiva and Nathan is the one who gets into confronted sin. And I thought what's the career path that guy? You talking that? They've done the wrong thing. You don't get to say many things to the gang after that. That's what I love about David. Because apparently at that point. He drew Thanh close on. Why do we know that because it's an attack on his there on David's death bed? Arranging this accession to make sure it goes to the right son to Solomon. But Silva son of that show? So it's an incredibly tangled tale because that Shevess relationships dots with David in the worst way imaginable. She's dragged from a home in the middle of the night. It says in the bible he sent men to fetch. That's not polite invitation, that's. Presumably armed men to bring her to a relationship, otherwise, which she would have no power to say. No. And yet out of that she somehow managed to build. A life in which her son is the one who's going to be king? And then he becomes the king. Who redeems everything comes down to us is the by word for wisdom and good, governance and tastes. So. But also you. Well, first of all at the end in the afterwards. Again, you see I believe that David live. Yes. So his, you know, it's a question because. It was a pre literate time for the most part, but they were literate. Societies surrounding the Hebrew tribes. Dave is the one who follows the Hebrew tribes into a nation in the first place. So there wasn't you wouldn't expect a lot of state archives from that time was very chaotic time. But the big civilizations necessary Tameer and Egypt that surrounded you'd think if there was a king of the statue of David we would have heard something about him in other texts or references. All there is one stone inscription that was dug up at Tel Dan mentions, the house of David, and that's all we've got outside the bible, but what we have inside the bible is to me compelling, and it was a British historian his said, David must've existed because no people on earth would make up such a flawed character as a national leader. Geraldine brooks. What's the importance of lamentations which play throughout this book? First of all what is limitation? Lamentation is just a cry from the hot to God to ask for solace to a turn for misdeed. And I think that when you're dealing with history. There's a lot to lament. And certainly in David's life. There was a lot to lament that what what set similar hot. I think is that he was lady who when confronted with his misdeeds accepted them. What do we see that in contemporary leadership? I cannot think of one example where somebody has actually end up and said, Yep. I Don at effect cop. And I'm sorry. I'm gonna what to repair the damage. I've done. I was blaming somebody else. But at the same time in the secret cord, David doesn't always own up. He might do it because it's politically expedient to do whatever is necessary as you, right? Well, yes. But I think in the end he does and he has to pay grievously. You know, he's paid back. I think it's really felt you know, he he has Nassif losses for fall in his later life. And and I think that. He accepts that destiny. And and then he really does do the right thing in making sure that. That Solomon will be the one put on the throne while he's still alive, which is something for a powerful man to do to save power to the sun to the right son to the son who's going to do the right thing. Maybe I missed it. But I don't think in the text at all as the book progresses, you never name the city of David. Jerusalem. Well. Is that on purpose? I have I've used the Hebrew. Okay. So I've used Hebrew all the way through. So you shall I am would be the Hebrew name. And I can't remember if that's in that on not at this point to be honest surly purposeful function Athens, such but. David the city of David was what it was known as at that time. So I've probably just stuck with that. But you shall I am is the Hebrew. Yeah. Let's hear from Phyllis and Carmel, California. Hi, fellas. Thank you book notes. My question is what role does historical novelists playing recording our history. Phyllis. I like to think of myself as the gateway drug to history. Just like we were talking earlier about one of my big influences teenage Rada was Mary Renault books about -ancient grace that sent me to read history of ancient Greece because she intrigued me about it. So what I hope from my books is that if you get intrigued by some aspect that readers will go to the history and learn more about it because I really believe in the importance of understanding our history and how it tragically repeats itself. We were talking earlier about the tragic repetition of the need to demonize, the other whatever that might be at the time like in Spain. Spain was a powerful and wonderful force the cultural progress during the condidential when Muslims Christians and Jews were living side by side. Creating and sharing intellectual advances together. And then, you know, the demonization started and it started with Muslims. Muslims were expelled and that set the patent and then the Jews were expelled. And you could say that Christians hasn't recovered its former greatness to this day from that Arad idea that only one kind of people worthwhile. So, you know, that's that's where I think it's important to study history. And they're a million other examples of how we get tricked into war time after time how we gave up on diplomacy Tueson how they might be other ways, but the war drums, always drown them out. Kirsten's in elk grove, California. Go ahead Kirsten, you're on with Geraldine Brooks. Thank you so much Peter and thanks for having a fiction edition of in-depth this year. I've loved it. Geraldine such a thrill to talk to you. I wanted to ask you I had this idea to write about a significant event in history that I know absolutely very little about. And I was just wondering for you. Is with the right versus bright. What you would like to know kind of or how you get inspired to write about a particular time streets, and have you ever written about that you knew very little about ethnic giving most of most of that very little about at the beginning, saying courage, you dive, and I think right? What you know is great advice that you can use what you know, in ways that direct is what I know from being a foreign correspondent for all those years when I write about ancient warfare. Obviously, I need to research the weaponry. But the effect of those weapons on the union buddy hasn't changed. And you know, unfortunately, I saw those effects on battlefields during the war between Iraq, and Ron and in the Persian Gulf laws that I covered for the Wall Street Journal. So you can use what you know and apply it to areas that, you know, less. And and I think also another important piece of advice is right. What you know that right? What you care about. You know, right. What you care about what you want to know because you care about it. And then you'll have that passion that'll drive. You fall it on the bad days. Did you hear about how to make paper back in the sixteenth fifteenth century, I guess there's a very vivid description of how we have how to make paper I love books. I in a house is is gonna fall down under the weight of the books that we have in. I've always loved them. It's something that came from my parents. They were book lovers. We didn't have a lot of discretionary income, but we would go to the library every Saturday, and we'd all come back with our full of books, and then I got absolutely hooked on an in Latin children's series called the adventure series and the library only had one in the series. And then I saw in the kids pages of the newspaper that somebody was advertising the rest of the series physio. And I mentioned it to my parents. And I knew we didn't have you know, abundant funds. But. They taught me that books as something like food and school uniforms that you find the money for and they bought those books, and and I remember the day they arrived. And I lay the not on the dining room table, and they're beautiful.

King David Geraldine Brooks dick Leonard Cohen David king Solomon David Asia California Nathan Caravaggio Spain Fitch Egypt Jerusalem Athens Thanh India Silva Dave
"david jerusalem" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"david jerusalem" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"What is what is this saying to you because you know to me it says a lot and i didn't even know which one you would read but just you're you're talking here about king david's jerusalem you're reading you're reading something was one of the first to to create the city of jerusalem and his son solomon built the temple that later was destroyed but he built it so this is a very amazing family i guess it wasn't it wasn't a build up jerusalem before but this is a made certain buildings that went up from what i understand and he he just saw israel is being a place where people dwelling piece i mean part of the name jerusalem has a minute which means peace you know you you talk about the temple by the way and i don't know if you saw earlier today andreas lem day there was a large number in fact i think one of the largest since israel's founding of jews that went up to the temple mount to the holiest judaism yes but on the other hand the problem is that the jews who go up there aren't allowed to pray and so you had some juice who simply sang songs in favor of jerusalem and the walk the islamic custodians who sickeningly control the temple mount had them booted off and that's been in the news today so that's the other side of this is that when donald trump was the embassy to jerusalem i also wanna prompt a conversation about what is jerusalem because it's not just any city it's not just the capital city of israel it's also something much more special and in that specialty takes place especially on the temple mount and i think the next step really needs to be enough with this ridiculousness where the muslim custodians can say jews and christians can't prey on the holiest site in judaism the temple mount what is going on i don't want further that conversation and actually we're going next to specifically to the us embassy and where in jerusalem it's opening because that's significant to all of this now opens up one too i think three or four i'm not sure what's going on with those lines at eight seven seven nine seven zero two nine nine nine is the phone number here few colons now open eight seven seven nine seven zero two nine nine nine grabbed them quickly as broadcast live from jerusalem.

king david jerusalem solomon israel donald trump andreas lem us
"david jerusalem" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"david jerusalem" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"And these guild of a machado the better feel the better well what would you rather have a ton fraser and third and taurus at second or machado at third and whoever at second whoever second yeah i i want machado peak lose uh i know the yankee will be too much right hand it but but these are not talking about regular i had the hidden so uh yeah i think they gave uh any uh any decent pictures though hit uh i think is no brain of a there's no way baltimore here has gone to trade directly to the yankees in the way now the you're you're you're right because the the one side is he's not going to do it the sam bases gonna go go crazy is sending him in his vision and we're gonna see him all the time from a business standpoint we might get four prospects who could all be allstars that we control for a while he's these these a cheap guy so we're getting talent the stock at a cost established for awhile or do we say no and we we send uh machado elsewhere and kno get the same kind of package at the yankees are offering here there might be other team they really want him they don't have the depth that the yankees have like we can give you our best prospect but that at all we got the next geiszer you'll class able there are ways away let's go to david in brooklyn david you're on the fan yeah hi tony you know it's good to talk to you right now it's uh i have a few things to talk about it's an array not david jerusalem that you know what tony and used to be when i was back in brooklyn boom and car and then the morning getting me through the morning now it's totally page so you know after you share it's good it's good so i wanted to talk a little bit about the yankees first thing i wanted to talk really about chance to have but frazier i want to back up he watch i'm a few reasons the astros ed carlos stuff dropped last year be not necessarily did he played that well for them he's a leader datino leader adding it's crazy to.

machado baltimore yankees david jerusalem tony astros machado peak brooklyn frazier
"david jerusalem" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"david jerusalem" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"One one or two five obsessive tweet from people saying you know what we've had enough of the bullies in the middle east at the president who is definitely a takenoprisoners let's get into actions aiba president samedi decide hey did what that action like would like you know he's doing stuff okay name of things capitals and stuff they said david jerusalem is recognized as a capital of israel and if you'll like that you to bull a you know what and i'm sure they'll be a very tempered response to that and everything's gonna be just fine bottom line is we have a toy drought this friday from six amdl six pm for the kids love to see down there public toys for thoughts mike you want to give us a little insight on the edge roussin situation the law passed in 1994 and els passed by the house by three hundred seventeen votes in the senate passed it by ninety three votes by clinton course signed it deal only place in the head of the sixmonth review every six months the president of the only one it can stop it the since then because of her be six months the president has to late late president bush also promised or so opera did as well that law was passed 1994 so every six months presidents ago a are we going to do this are not an the president's yeah we're going to do this we gonna say at this time we're going to get it on but why why why now well there is certainly no heath over there now so maybe we should trust the with what's been working obviously has not been worked for him crowded about park so this is strictly out of the desire for world peace paneuropean oh i've not painted expert batter will of promised to do in the unexpected it they are no we are were not a safety but at the nearby so we promise to do we we get world peace by officially declaring a that's how we all get along in the fate of what fellow to bring wealth the if the we did promise the view that we have atlanta part who said he was gonna do we're fulfilling our promises lord emilee hitherto they believe it is right now the sheet that ranasinghe though done talking about those those muddle of a standard any better no less terrified that i was the muslims.

president david jerusalem israel the house senate sixmonth review bush clinton atlanta six months sixmonth