17 Burst results for "David Hubel"

"david hubel" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

05:27 min | 6 months ago

"david hubel" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"I don't want to go down a rabbit hole but I think as much as you're. I'm sure the listeners. Appreciate this but you know everything in. The brain is an abstraction right. I mean they're. They're the sensory apparatus. There are the is in years nose and skin and taste all that are taking information and with interception taking information from sensors inside the body. The enteric nervous system for the got. I've got Sensory neurons that intimate my liver on etc taking all that and the brain is abstracting that in the same way that if i took a picture of your face and hand it to you. I'd say you'd say yeah. That's me but if i were an abstract artist doing a little bit more what the brain does where if i took a patent paper. Maybe i could do this terrible artists and i could just mix it up and i let's say i would make your eyes like water bottles but flip them upside down. I'd sorta signing fruits and objects to the different features that you're facing on show. Tsa lex that's you see. That's not me and i'd say no. But that's my abstraction of you but that's what the brain does the space time relationship of the neurons that fire that encode your face has have no resemblance to your face right and think people don't really i don't know if people have fully internalized that but the day that i not sure i fully internalized that because it's weird to think about all neurons can do is fire in space and in time different neurons in different sequences perhaps with different intensities is not clear the action potential was all or none although neuroscientist linked to talk about that even though it's been published in nature a couple of times the action potential for a given neuron doesn't always have the exact same way form people. It's in all the textbooks. But you can modify that way for was. I mean there's a lot of fascinating stuff with with your science about the fuzziness of all the Of the transfer of information from your yard. I mean we we certainly touch upon it every time we all try to think about the difference. Gene artificial neural networks in biological neural networks. But can we maybe linger a little bit on this On the circuitry the getting at so the brain is just much stop. Firing and it forms abstractions that fascinating beautiful like layers upon layers upon layers of obstruction. And i think it Just like when you're programming programming python it's fish on sparring to think that the neath at all it ends up being zero so ones and the computer doesn't know about stupid python or windows lennox dona knows about the zeros and ones in same way with the brain. Is there something interesting to you are fundamental you about the circuitry of the brain that allows for the magic. That's in our mind to emerge. How much do we understand. I mean maybe even focusing on the vision system is is there something specific about the structure division system the circuitry of it that allows for the complexity the vision system to emerge or. Is it all just a completely attic. Messily understand it's definitely not all a chaotic mess that we don't understand if we're talking about vision and because i'm a vision scientists Stick division will because in the beauty of the visual system. The reason david hubel On the nobel prize was because they were brilliant and forward thinking and adventurous and all that good stuff but the reason that the visual system is such a great model for addressing..

david hubel nobel prize
"david hubel" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

The Darin Olien Show

07:45 min | 7 months ago

"david hubel" Discussed on The Darin Olien Show

"But you know in general most people can't do that so. He studied. The genes and the genetic pathways that lead to these evolutions of the visual system and half of the class was about that. It was really really cool. The other half of the class was about how the folks the the pupil of the I in the FO via the I changed and changes in animals that occupy different where we niches or habitats. And so you you and I both have a around central phobia a via. is an area of the I that has a very high concentration of photoreceptors which are basically like pixels. So your phobia has ninety percent of the pixels in your eye, and then the periphery of your eye has ray few simple way to look at this as regardless how go to report your vision if you move your hand out to the side of your head, extend your arm if you're listening to this extended outside and wiggle your fingers out there, and at some point, you'll be able to see those fingers but you can't. Really. Distinguish the individual fingers until you move it in front of you, and then you get I can see for instance, I'm willing four. So. Our peripheral vision is very low acuity are central vision is very high acuity. Turns out that. The elephant also has a high acuity area of its I, but it shaped like a J. Not A dot. and. The reason shaped like Jay is because it wants to visualize the tip of its trunk to be able to grab things out of trees yet. and. The sloth has a phobia. He's high density high resolutionary of its retina, and it's at the top of its is because it hangs upside down and likes to view things on the jungle floor. Exactly. So I'm glad to hear that you're laughing and smiling because I experienced this incredible sense of delight when I heard about this, I was like there's no way. This is true but it's absolutely true of me and the best one of all I think is the diving birds. So dining birds have a horizontal what's called visual streak so they fly along and they need to monitor the horizon. But they also have a pupil because they're going to die for fish and they have to adjust for the refractory index of the water for the non You know what? For those that don't know refractory index is where you see something underwater not wear that thing actually is shifted and their meal depends on it. So they're flying along monitoring the horizon very carefully. They see the fish they're monitoring that, and then they make a calculation to adjust their dive so they can get it and I was like, okay, that's it. I got say. All right. This is so cool and so you think about. People always go human evolution in the Cosmos and the galaxies for me. That was the thing that was as exciting. I think for somebody who is interested in astronomy and the the galaxy. Mother Nature is genius. Unbelievable. Because it's adaptive. They need this it corresponds to how they move their body trunk. So there's this connection like home. Get it. Amazing. So I was like vision I'm going to study vision. Turns out that was a good decision because vision visual neurosciences we call it has a rich history and a lot of people have worked in that and there's a a lineage in science. So there were great labs to go to to work on this stuff. So I I was fortunate to fall under the umbrella of said, a two guys named David, Hume Sorenson Weasel won the Nobel Prize for identifying brought neural plasticity in the visual system maze and Torsten Still Alive David unfortunately passed away. But when I was a first year graduate student, I got a chance to meet David Hubel and chatted with him and. I was just like thrown into this fantasy land of visual neuroscience, and these are the guys that that discovered that the brain from childhood until about age twenty five is very plastic, it can change really easily. And after that, it can change. Also, we can talk about how to do that. At any age, but it takes some different. You have to engage some different parameters or you gotta do some extra things. So just real briefly about the is the is are not connected to the brain. The is our brain. This is I think one thing that I'm when a minute what yet the is our brain, the neural retina, this three layered structure at the back of your eye and your I, our central nervous system there. So your central nervous system is your brain and all the stuff inside your spinal cord. Then there's nervous system outside the brain and spinal cord that's called peripheral nervous system. The is are two pieces of brain that got squeezed out of the skull early in development. And there's a genetic program that make sure. So now anytime you look at somebody. Yeah. Right. People is released the MTA. Blue my mind right now it's crazy but it's it's you know people say the eyes are the window to the soul. Anything about Seoul's I mean I I like to think I know a little bit about my own you know but The. Eyes are Brown. From the brain they are during development their Swedes Dow. Come from what's called the IMBRIANI Cup it's for the Aficionados out there. It's derivative the. Lawn and it gets squeezed out if you WANNA check me on this stuff. Go where. And it's back there you know in your in your skull, but it's also out there in the world your eyes are the only two pieces brain they're outside your skull. Dude. How have I never heard this before? How is the world not? Hearing about it before holding what it is most scientists are They're in their lives you know they're not. Come on we just need to pause world pause right now. So for years, maybe all most of my life people have been asking me what kind of foods do you eat? What kind of exercises do do? What kind of water should I drink all of these things and so much more. We put into a twenty one day program. So that can take you through a theme every day of Knowledge Action, and then eating this delicious meals working out getting support anchoring in these new habits. So you can do what so that you can kick ass so you have the energy the. Vitality to live the kind of life that you really want. That's what it's all about. So all in this APP we have grocery lists, we have education about real hydration and what greater oxygenation and the balance of Elkin Ization all of these things we are diving into as your heading down this hero's journey of implementation into a new life to give you the kind of life that you actually want. So join my tribe all you have to do is go to one to one tribe dot com sign up and he gets. Free days join me on this hero's journey. Join the tribe. and. So you ask why why would there be an entire genetic program to making sure that there are too low pieces of central nervous system, the brain that are outside the skull. And the reason is. The brain is in a container called the skull. It means it's a no what's going on in the outside world be the extent of your beyond the extent of your skin. So you can get touched by way of skin or wind. You know I could maybe sense you say you will smell sherp smell is neurons in the brain are sensing volatile chemicals. We call them volatile because they drift in the in the wind and they go in and we can decipher Oh, smells like smoke smells like food smells good smells like a mates mosaic but so that's at.

David Hubel Seoul Nobel Prize Jay graduate student Elkin Ization Brown Torsten Still Hume Sorenson
"david hubel" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

08:16 min | 8 months ago

"david hubel" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"You express the idea that it's possible that some day. There will be some kind of medication that can enhance learning. You didn't start out to figure that out I don't think you started out to try to understand how the brain works. Right correct correct. Yes. I mean. What I I only realized later that that what we'd the work we've been doing for so many years might even have some clinical relevance which made me sort of excited but my interest in neuroscience was really driven by. An interest, not just even how the brain works but how we see very specific question because to that. Yeah I mean it was I. think it was sort of an effort to merge my interests in both art and science because you know when I grew up as a little girl I. I love both my dad was on air nautical engineer and my mom was a an artist And very serious painter and I love both and I went to college You know thinking I would somehow I thought astrophysicists and then I realized that I just didn't could not. I couldn't do it I just couldn't do it. It was too complicated. So you chose the brain which is totally free. Exactly. So then I thought okay. Chemistry I'll do chemistry and I love chemistry. But then by the time I was getting to be in my junior senior year. I also realize that you know physical chemistry was was not something I. Thought would be really fun for me to do for my entire life and I still was taking these wonderful art and visual perception courses, and and. You know sculpture courses and things, and I, went to my chemistry professor. And I said, you know, I, I love I just don't know what to do I love both things but I really am interested in how the brain processes visual information. And miraculously key pointed me to to. People with whom I could do my my honors undergraduate thesis work and they turned out to be David Hubel and Torsten Visa who many years later received the Nobel Prize. In medicine. Or physiology for their work on studying brain mechanisms vision. But you know nobody knew that at the time and I went to. Work with them and watch them do experiments and read and I just thought that was it. You know that was the end I knew that I wanted to study how the central connections of the brain lead to perception. and. That, led you into what we've been talking about somehow. Somehow because. Yeah because you want it I mean. So once I learn something about these. Unbelievably Complex but. Beautiful circuits. For that underlie vision I wanted to know how do you wire them up I mean how the world do these connections even get formed and development so I, kind of want to go all the way back and ask what are the brain mechanisms for developmental circuit formation and that's really what I'm still working on. It show interesting dead here I'm talking to somebody. Who is really driven by curiosity how does nature work at its most basic level and you save for later whether or not? It's going to be applicable to becoming a pill of some kind, the curiosities engine much more important to you absolutely, and I worry very much about the viability of that kind of curiosity driven research now. I think. Many fundamental discoveries. Lead and you can think of many examples you know lead. Later even unanticipated ways to applications translational applications whether it's in medicine or even in other fields and who knows what we're studying now really will help people who have neurodegenerative disorders. Will. But you know it's it's far from that at the moment I. Really Look at my own. Contributions not in a really personal way, but as as has helping to build a framework for. The future and actually I see one of my major responsibilities as training. The next generation of scientists who will continue to build on that framework, but if you don't have a fundamental framework to build on then in the future. There will be no translational discoveries and I I worry that our country has not. Things we're already there and. So, many mysteries remain. To be discovered in unraveled and there's nothing more fun than being the first to see it. Carly you've been doing for the last couple of decades. That's really interesting. Called Bio X. can you tell me a little bit about that? I would love to. But if I tell you I'd have to kill you. Why sports to be too? Well, the accent bioethics is the secret. Why use it? So. Yes. Exactly. Why is it x? So it's bio plus let X. Equal Chemistry Physics Engineering. Biology together everything else? Yes. So this is a Stanford program and it's really almost a way of thinking now that. Encourages Faculty and students to. Collaborate across disciplines in order to try to answer big questions that are. Not Answerable. Within your own lab or with one technique and there are so many of those really big questions now that have to do especially. In the theme of human, health and the life sciences but bioethics is a mechanism to encourage people to find the collaborators they need in order to answer their questions should I've seen over time? Is that? This kind of bringing together of different disciplines is probably what's going to be necessary to be able to look. Even deeper into nature. But when I also have thing I think I've observed. Is that the more you bring together people, far-flung disciplines, the more you have a problem in. Communication and getting them to understand one another. To to use the same term in different ways and that kind of thing how do you handle then what what really hard? Yes it's really hard. I mean I mean just from my own experience I you know I mean when we made the discoveries that these immune molecules were being used by the neurons. To regulate PR- The synoptic pruning and stability. On I started to read about what these immune molecules, what the equivalent functions of these molecules is in the immune system. I. Really. became I fell into despair because you know I had always thought that the nervous system is so complicated. I was really happy. I would never have to learn about anything in the immune system. You. Always. Always get what you fear most. So. You have these two disciplines. Easily remarkable and complex right now you've got to scientists. Each one has spent a lifetime studying within that person's silo. Yes, and now they have to collaborate in detail over some new kind of.

neurodegenerative engineer Nobel Prize Stanford David Hubel professor Torsten Visa
"david hubel" Discussed on Good For You

Good For You

08:20 min | 8 months ago

"david hubel" Discussed on Good For You

"Try and sleep when people are sleeping you'll shift much much quicker. So but light is the quickest way to set these rhythms without question. A lot of people jetlagged at home especially now with the endorsed. Feel miserable disarmed depressed anxious. Well, you're jetlagged except Your jet lagging yourself in your apartment or home I have so many questions for you. I can do more rapid fire if you want now we're going to do I'm GonNa, make you do this. Again, I'm going to do publicly attack you if you don't the. The last last last last last massing I swear is about an sexual trauma and there's something called Family Constellation which I know is thought of, is like complete like phooey but there is something to me too. I don't know if it's nature and nurture. Family constellations when you serve learn about the trauma of your ancestors and learn what fears and phobias you've perhaps inherited heights is something that I my guess is universal. Some are more afraid than others There is that a study where mice you might have actually done this study where mice got electrocuted every time they smelled cherry blossoms and their offspring when they smell cherry blossoms would recoil babies are afraid of pictures of spiders even they don't consciously know what a spider is. You know these things that were sort of wired to be afraid of and how it's kind of specific to people. My ancestry goes back to west. Virginia Coal Mines and You know whether this is just family Laura Legend whatever like we're all kind of CLAUSTROPHOBIC and big banging sounds sort of We all have missed a phony and sort of you know which. Are Theory is that has to do with our ancestors being in coal mines and mine explosions and stuff like that I. Just I'm curious if there's any science to the Family Constellation, will there some emerging evidence that learning can be inherited and these you know the original experiments were done in these like these little flat worms there really boring species. But I, guess if you like flat worms there, really interesting but where they would shock them and then their offspring would respond to shock they they would learn to kind of responses, responses to things even though the babies had never been exposed to that show. Sort of trans generational trauma in worms of all things, and then there are some recent studies in mice led the Cherry, blossoms study That some of this could be inherited in mice. Here's what we know for. Sure. We inherit genes from? Mom and dad, however, those genes are subject to what we call epigenetics regulation. So some of that genetic regulation can be in utero. So if our mom was really stressed, right, it can cause release of, for instance, the the adrenals the adrenal glands can release testosterone to it can like can masculine is fetuses if it's really extreme, but under more normal conditions if like mom is really stressed, the baby might come out more aggressive because as. More testosterone exposure during development things like that. There's There's also some really interesting stuff on what's called genomic imprinting. We love the idea that we get half genes for mom and half from dad and you know parents are always say, oh, that's exactly like you and that's exactly like you're that's like I'm being exactly what my dad or exactly like my mom turns out. The woman at Harvard in Katherine. Do Lock and she had a post doc in Chris Greg. WHO's now at the University of Utah and there others who've done beautiful studies showing that in the brain there are some cells that are genetically identical to mom and mom only were dad and dad only. So there are parts of your brain that very likely are genetically identical to one parent or the other. So the idea that we're just a mix of both pairing. That's falling away I. Think the modern genetics tells us that that's probably not true. What's hardwired and what's learned that seems to be kind of general theme running through everything today and it's a it's a it's a wonderful thing because it's the most interesting theme in all of neuroscience really because it embodies everything but. Here's what we know for. Sure if. A series of grandparents and parents and children are stressed in a particular way. The hormones in the neuro chemicals that are secreted could have a very profound influence on those offering. We know that there is, for instance, influenza in the first trimester of the mom gets a flu. Can. Predispose the offspring to certain kinds of neurologic issues. Later now does that mean that everyone that gets flu during the first trimester can have a child that somehow messed up no of course not but it shifts the bias towards more probability that there will be these neurologic syndromes so. Immune infection. Immune compromise or infection trauma. It's all translated into chemical responses in the body and so I do think that offspring can inherit some of this stuff I m. I meant to raise this earlier kind of. Add to this topic something that's very related. I think it's useful for people that if they're thinking about their brain in their nervous system to think about what's non-negotiable in what's negotiable, what's unique to the individual what's inherited and I think vision provides a beautiful example so The biologists torn some Rusal and David Hubel they discovered this critical period plasticity won the Nobel Prize for that. They also won the Nobel Prize for showing that. The cells the neurons in the I respond to little circles. That's the only thing they see the world is bunch of little circles to the I. That information is then passed to the brain where those little circles are aligned into little lines. So everyone kind of construct. So kind of outline of everything they look at all animals do this humans are very depending on facial expressions? So all humans have a face area. Some people like my post doc adviser were terrible at recognizing faces. Some people are phenomenal at and now looking face masks. But everyone has neurons that respond to these little DOTS, these little lines and faces some people better than others. That's all true. That's all non-negotiable cross our species, but then it starts to get into some really interesting nuance. There was a study that was published in nature years ago asking kind of classic question in euro sites that relates directly to what you're asking which is. Do. We have what are called grandmother selves. Do we have neurons in our brain that represent my grandmother for me and your grandmother for you in particular not all grandmothers but your grandmother, my grandmother and it's amazing because it turns out that people have these cells. I have a neuron in my brain that when it fires, I think of my grandmother or see an image of her in my mind's eye. Okay. When I look at a picture of her that neuron fires. There's a sort of funny but not. So but really important aspect of this study which was that they brought in a subject. They were showing them lots of different faces and their this subject unlike all the other subjects had neurons that only responded to the face of Jennifer Aniston. neuroscientists know about these about this discovery was published in the Journal. Nature which is our kind of super bowl of publishing very, very stringent journal. Very High Quality Journal maybe the Most High Quality and stringent journal. So this particular subject, I don't recall off the subject was male or female. Has a neuron in their head assuming the subject is still allowed. They're walking around out there and when they think about Jennifer Aniston that neuron only that neuron and maybe a few other neurons around it. Is electrically active when that neuron electrically active they think of Jennifer Aniston, they see her in their minds i. so does that mean that everyone has a cell that represents Jennifer Aniston No. In fact, if I'm talking about someone right now named Jennifer Aniston and you don't know who that is which is. Seems like a pretty low probability event. But if there's somebody out there, who's he talking about? They don't have such a cell. So what this means is that everybody's brain has certain things that are common to all of us and everybody's brain has real estate in neurons that are tuned specifically to their unique experience. Okay. So I have Jennifer Aniston South right because you know who she is. If you close your eyes, you can imagine who she is and what she looks like probably even citizens say this that means for sure that you have a representation of Jennifer Aniston in your head as the firing of neurons in a particular sequence. Yes. But is it one little sell?.

Jennifer Aniston influenza Nobel Prize testosterone Virginia utero Katherine Harvard University of Utah Jennifer Aniston. Immune infection Chris Greg High Quality Journal David Hubel Rusal the Journal
"david hubel" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

05:52 min | 9 months ago

"david hubel" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Where you know like I say this because I'm a resident Oakland, it might stick out a little bit more. It's a little bit more unusual just based on the demographics, right? So There you know that kind of high level context. Has To do with memory has to do with the general space you're in recognition of your of your landscape. regularities in that landscapes. So some of this stuff really is learning my scientific great grandparents. Because they train the people that train me are two guys named David Hubel and They won Nobel Prize. Basically, for describing this, what's called hierarchical visual system of visual system that works. That creates very complex perceptions with a ton of meaning I mean, think about your child's face your dogs a tremendous meaning for you and less for other people but still more meaning than a of a brick for anybody. And they figured out that that complexity is built up from very simple basic elements and those elements are what I mentioned before dark versus light edges are the edges moving. Et Cetera et. CETERA. If I have this right. There's there's the protective mechanisms right from height and things coming at you. At speed for safety reasons, and then there is the meaning making experiences, right? Like the used your dog but could we use? The Red Ferrari but could we also use like if the frontal muscles are squinting or compressed like the little frown muscles you know that there's something there to pay attention to it and I can't get out of my head, the low road and the high road where the low road is the is the fast information that's coming through the yes or the. Classic. Definition about this was sort of what and where pathways. So one pathway for looking at where things are, and that's very fast and indeed the neurons that carry that information or faster because they're bigger. So neurons that are big and fat can carry information really fast because they transmit their big pipes carry more water much faster than small pipes cover so. That system is designed to be fast. It's the system that if you're biking or walking along the street and you blink and be hits your eyelid, all of a sudden but you don't remember actually seeing the be coming out you. It just happens blow your conscious detection your those fast reflexes are mediated by that wear pathway. The what pathway is slower it's a slower more analytic system is still very fast. Mind you but it's it's definitely slower and keep in mind that faces in particular for humans. Are. An especially important stimulus because of the rich information they convey about other people's Moods and safety etc, and there's a woman at Mit and there are other labs as well but it's really nancy can wishers lab at MIT that pioneered this field. Over, many decades and has done beautiful work showing there. We really all have dedicated areas of our brain that are designed for the analysis of faces and facial expression, old world primates, rhesus macaque monkeys, and gorillas they have these as well. Animals like dogs and cats who knows probably for dog and cat faces or for dog and cat body postures right? They might pay attention to other things but they're probably more smell oriented than humans but faces earn particularly important stimulus for humans for so many obvious reasons and so we dedicate a lot of neural real estate to them. Okay. So this is a pretty concrete question and then I've got more. Nuance. COMPLICATED QUESTIONS GONNA get into the camera help. People down regulate some anxiousness of fearsome paraly- stuff you know it's so that they can. Express themselves. Either thoughts or actions more eloquently. But the first part is, what is the faster system? Is that the ocular system or is it the Gosh what's the? What's the word for smelling? Olfactory factory. which is the faster system. I'm glad you asked that because a lot of people get this one backwards it's definitely the visual system. You're. You're you're biased aren't you? Well? No, it it. It is just by sheer speed. There's there's a fact. There's a fact although I call it a kind of a factoid because it's more of a misleading fact and and so I'm trying to you know and no one really claims this fact. So it's it's fine. I'm I don't feel like I'm insulting anyone The the olfactory information. So you know if your retinas detecting photons, your your nose, you got neurons does believe it or not there live there their olfactory neurons freak for smell, they detect volatile chemicals that are floating around in the environment. So there you know if you smell a nice steak or cookies baking or something those molecules and chemicals are floating in the air and you're smelling them and you've got risk receptors that detective voters and that that information is conveyed to an area of the brain we call the CORTEX although it's a more primitive area of the cortex than the visual Cortex CORTEX is just the outer shell. But It is true that smell information bypasses intermediate stages of processing however. The neurons that carry that information transmitted slowly. So just because they go through fewer stations doesn't mean it arrives at its location I nor does it mean that the information is used quickly now that's true for humans. A. Scent Hound is mainly reliant on as the name suggests sent in order to navigates its environment a guy who he's no longer a faculty member at Berkeley. He did great work there just that he got recruited away to another university..

MIT David Hubel Nobel Prize Oakland Ferrari Nuance faculty member Berkeley nancy
"david hubel" Discussed on The Joe Rogan Experience

The Joe Rogan Experience

03:48 min | 10 months ago

"david hubel" Discussed on The Joe Rogan Experience

"It's so interesting because if I let's just say with that same statement hello my name is Andrew. There's a neuron in cortex that responds when I say that, and when I want to say that, but if I just change it slightly and I say. Hello My name is Andrew I make it a question. There's a right next door that's encodes that turns out. There is a map of inflection so regardless of language. There's a map of it's not quite meaning, but there's a map of intonation and inflection in the brain, so in theory, because that map is so regular across cultures. He's looked now in China in Chinese, speaking people in speaking people. And people who have a second language is even has some interesting data about people who have up speak. They're really annoying. I. Hate that show. Yeah, that's a lot near where you live yet. That's a San Francisco Tech. Thing is it yeah, it's like what they're doing is letting. You know that they're one of the tribe. Okay, and we're all in this together, and I think like you and you can trust me because I'm unoriginal well, it might reflect a subtle brain damage. I think the data show that it's a distortion of the of the regular map I think it's the same thing as a southern accent I think you're just fitting in with your environment because I know people that have adopted that shit once they've gotten into the tech world and my case, fuck face. You didn't use to talk like that or the people that go to. England start speaking with a broken leg Madonna. Did she do that? Yes, she pop culture carefully s she did. Yeah. I'm moving to Texas. I'M GONNA start saying y'all two weeks in. Give myself two weeks. Tryout y'all stay well. Some of this stuff is learned. Are you moving? Your I've heard rumors of that but okay. Sorry to hear sorry for California congratulations Texas. They're you know these maps have some regularities across people? Because when we're born into the world, you know we are not a completely clean slate. There's a kind of a map that expects the world including language to be a certain way, and we can't expect that we're going to be born in China, or born in France or born in California or northern California for that matter, so the map is. What we call semi malleable, it's not a rigid concrete hardwired map. So what makes you think this up speak is like damage, will so I asked Eddie about this Eddie Chiang? My friend, this neurosurgeon, who has of premiere world, not kind of He's the world expert on speech and language in the neural transformations, and how it controls the Franks all that stuff. And I, said what's with up? Speak Thing he said. Yeah, you know we see that sometimes and I'm concerned about that. And when a neurosurgeon tells you their concern, you kind of go. Hey, what are you concerned about any gets? There's something wrong with the map. and. So maybe, that's. Could be because of upbringing and people you know. The brain is plastic as adults to and not in the same way. It's plastic and childhood but. You know if you're forced to learn another language, your your brain will fundamentally shift. Neural plasticity is a real thing and I think. It's interesting. You raised this kind of cultural component. Because actually it was Eddie's. Adviser Mike Murphy Nick was really the one who discovered adult neural plasticity in the seventies and eighties and Mike. Actually scientific great grandparents David Hubel interns and Weasel won the Nobel Prize for showing there are critical periods these periods of development after which the brain cannot change and they had important implications for emily opium an ice stuff. It came along and said you know I don't buy that. And he started doing experiments with students and post docs where they would create an. An essential need or contingency like if the animal doesn't eat unless it learns something, then.

Andrew Eddie Chiang California Texas Franks San Francisco Tech China Mike Murphy Nick Weasel Nobel Prize David Hubel England opium France
"david hubel" Discussed on Precisione: The Healthcast

Precisione: The Healthcast

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"david hubel" Discussed on Precisione: The Healthcast

"Precision healthcare from the brightest people in the world. Today we have an amazing guests on the show. One of my most favorite people actually and I'm super excited to speak with. I'm so glad that he agreed to be on the show. We have Dr Dan Siegel today. Dr Daniel Siegel is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the Ucla School of Medicine and the Founding Co Director of the Mindful Awareness Research Center at Ucla he is also the executive director of the Mindset Institute which focuses on the development of mine site teaches insight empathy and integration in individuals families and communities. Dr Siegel has published extensively for both. The professional and lay audiences is five New York Times. Bestsellers are aware the science and practice of presence. Mind A journey to the heart of being human brainstorm the power of purpose of the teenage brain in two books with Tina Pain. Bryson the whole brain child in no drama discipline. His other books include the developing. Mind the pocket guide to interpersonal neurobiology. Mine site which is one of my personal favorites. The mindful brain the mindful therapist and also with Tina Pain Bryson the yes brain and the power of showing up. Which was I think just actually recently released. January twenty twenty. Dr Siegel also serves as the founding editor for the Norton Professional Series on interpersonal neurobiology which contains over seventy books and he may not even know it but he is one of the more heavily referenced doctors in our Second Edition of The textbook of Integrative gastroenterology which came out a few months ago and We love all of his work and wanted to make sure we share all of this type of discussion. Especially when we're talking about how to optimize whole health and gut health so Dr Siegel. Welcome to the show. Dr Saying it's great to be here with you thank you. Let's jump right into it. Can you tell everybody a little bit in a couple of minutes about yourself and how you came about doing what you do and how we got to this place? Sure well first of all. Thanks for having me on your on cast. And it's a great opportunity to think about health and you'd for me in terms of how things got started. When I was in college I was actually studying biochemistry trying to study how Salmon could go from being hatched an freshwater to saltwater interested in enzymes and molecules life in general. And you know. How do we maintain a healthy life? How does that salmon survived that transition from the freshwater saltwater but at the same time as a young student I was also working as a volunteer on the suicide prevention service and there I learned about the importance of emotional communication that could allow people who are in a suicidal moment in their lives with thinking. I have no desire to live. I'm you've any my life. I'm on the phone now. The way you communicated with them about their inner life could make all the difference between life and death ruined the end so I became really devoted to thinking about how our relationships and our inner life of emotions and thoughts somehow related to the molecules of health. Yen's we have other ways that we're maintaining homeostasis and so when I went to medical school. I thought it'd be a great opportunity to combine this love people and love of mechanisms biology but it turned out so well because for some reason the professors. I had I went to a research institution and they were very focused on the science. You know but some thought that the science should eliminate the subjective and this was really disturbing to me so I ended up dropping out of school and ultimately decided to come back to the same institution. And when I did I made up this word. Mind Site for the idea that you have a perceptual ability. The site part of that word to see the subjective inner life of the mind you know our feelings thoughts hopes dreams longings desires all the inner texture that it's hard to measure like he would an x ray or a test tube but it's equally really though used the word subjective so. I went back to school and essentially studied the physicians. Who were my teachers? Many of them really renowned scientists big fancy degrees and some of them Nobel Prizes and I noticed that the ones who had mine site had patients who seemed to do better and the ones who didn't have mind site. Their patients were isolated. And didn't feel trust. You know in this observing as just kind of an anthropological study as a student being immersed in the medical world. So you know this is now. We're talking about starting school. Seventy eight dropping out eighty and then come back in eighty one so we're talking about basically the early eighties and what. I entered pediatrics. After medical school and then switched over psychiatry. It was a time when psychiatry itself was being dominated by this view. That anything going on with your mind must be as Apocryphal said. Just a brain issue. That was set. Twenty Five Hundred Years Ago and William James the father of modern psychology reaffirmed that an eighteen ninety in a book called principles of psychology and this view while it seems crazy accepted by a lot of people in science and even in medicine to me seem missing. Something very profound to just equate mind as brain activity so I went on a journey essentially to build on all the different sciences. I was trained in you know strange neuroscience with David Hubel from from my school. I was trained in biochemistry of course but then I became trained in attachment research setting relationships and so what I did basically since the eighties and nineties was to try to create a way where you could bring all the sciences together into one framework and understand the nature of reality and I needed a name for its I called it interpersonal neurobiology and it basically used his window Wilson. The biologist would might call conciliates that you see common ground across usually independent feels. So that's what we do. You know the main textbook that I I wrote the developing mind. That now finished the its third edition over twenty years later now. You're basically positive. Some basic notions of health of with the mind is.

Dr Daniel Siegel Tina Pain Bryson Ucla School of Medicine Mindful Awareness Research Cen Tina Pain Founding Co Director New York Times David Hubel Ucla executive director Mindset Institute clinical professor Yen Salmon founding editor William James Wilson The textbook of Integrative ga
"david hubel" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

09:03 min | 1 year ago

"david hubel" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"Diseases at the age than any other aspect of brain science. I think for all of those reasons seasons from impact to methods to general scientific curiousity all the way back to evolution vision has played a central role role in driving essentially scientific interest in how the brain works. And did you into Xanadu a post doc at Harvard yes. I was a graduate student at Harvard Medical School with Mars Livingstone and we both did post. Docs with David Hubel at Harvard Medical School as well when we were in his lap and was just me Zana and David for about five years of four and a half years before we got our first jobs less and so we were very tight unit with David and essentially we learn to think for her so now we're many years in the past where you're talking about and in this paper that use shared with me that we're going to talk about today. You're examining some new methods that are being used a non human mm-hmm in primates to study vision even in more detail. Would you just tell us a little bit about why this this is so important. Yeah so what we're trying to do is we're trying to apply what we know of vision to creating device that can take information from a camera camera and stick it into the visual system so that a blind person can see what the camera in a very similar way or the same way that they see he with their realize when they're not blind so that is the fundamental thrust of the project linus is very common about about three percent of the world have damage or dysfunction in their phobia. Now Phobia is very central part of your visual field. If you hold out your thumb in front of you you're some up and with your elbows straight looking at your thumbnail. Your thumbnail sized piece of vision is just point. One percent of your visual field was about twelve hundred square degrees original field in your thumbnails. Roughly about once or degree it's not precise precise but that's more or less accurate so you're talking about one thousands of your visual field. Is that tiny little piece. That's the size of your thumbnail yet. That's the only place in your entire visual field. The you've ever really seen it's the only place where you have. Twenty twenty vision or have ever had twenty twenty vision is the only place that matters when you put your glasses on the only places that that matters if you don't need and so this tiny piece of vision which in the retinas called the phobia and which for the rest of vision takes up virtually half of of your visual processing. Neurons is absolutely critical to vision and that presents a problem and it presents chance and opportunity. The problem is that if you just damage this one little place which is what happens. In macular degeneration in age related macular degeneration generation is the most common form of blindness senior citizens. It's the second most common form of blindness in the world and phobia dysfunction in general from age related related macular degeneration and other forms of macular degeneration affects three to five percent of the world. There's nothing you can do about it. There is no way to fix this. So all of these people have this. There's no ameliorative therapy accepted. Try and use other types of vision and enhance vision so the opportunity a -tunities here is while this very tiny piece of the retina. It's very tiny piece of the visual field. That we make a lot of Hay with in normal vision since we only need this tiny little piece for most of what we do for vision anyway. If we can just fix that one tiny piece we should be able to take someone who's profoundly blind and actually give keep them in island of sparing in this area. And maybe they can really see well in. This actually happens when you have age. Related macular degeneration. What typically happens is I often don't know you have it for a long time? especially if there's damage in the periphery because your brain fills in and even when you're starting to get damaging your phobia your Beijing. It gets worse. But you can often I lindsay sparing pretty much okay. You don't need a cane can make way around with without extraordinary measures. So these these islands of sparing are really important because as soon as you lose the last one out. You're really very blind. Even though you might have ninety nine percent year vision in the recipe be retina there without this point one percent. You're blind legally blind and your quality of life is affected. You can't read you can't drive. You can't see your grandchild's enchants face. All of these things are what happens the opportunity here as we just fix this one. Little piece are provided island of sparing there. We could actually really improve the quality of life for a very large percentage of the people on the planet who have problems. So that's what we set out to do and the way we did. This was to consider what we knew about the digital system and this stems from a new discovery that again comes out of visual neuroscience. It's and nowhere else and it was kind of a joint discovery by the labs of Jose. Manuel Alonso at State University of New York School of optometry in Manhattan and also laboratory David Fitzpatrick who is at the Max Planck Institutes Florida. They published two different papers papers in the same issue of nature. Two Thousand Sixteen and what they found was that the brain sends information from the I into the brain and the optic nerves and then that goes to a part of the phthalates which is the object in the very center of the brain called the foulness. Since you can think of the Thelma's kind of a waste stations were all the incoming. Information goes a lot of the outgoing information goes incoming information than goes there and it gets sent from the Fallas to the part of the CORTEX needs to say. Hey Mr ambitious the optic nerves connect to the alles. A specific place called the ladder Nicholas Nucleus and from there that part of the phthalates projects ax neurons into the CORTEX. Now what's interesting in the visual system. Is that the Organization of this information is maintained leaned in the same way it's maintained in the retina. You think about what the retina does the rent is basically a camera Lucinda reading device so your eyeball think of it as a blackbox of the hole in it and light comes in the whole and there's a lens but even if you've got the lens if you just put lighter pupil in a camera lucid you'll get an image on the back the wall and the whole small enough with a big pupil you and land. You can get the same thing you can focus an image optima the world onto the back of the eye and when you have a photosensitive of neurons are photoreceptors that actually takes at light and transducers it into electrical signals and that's what goes into the brain but these neurons are related to each other in space in the same way that the visual world is laid out so it's called Retina topic organization and it just means that Objects in the world that are next to each other are close to each other on the retina and faraway. They're far away. Essentially it's a movie picture. The neurons of your retina are organized. So that parts of the movie that are next to each other are next to each other just like the elements in a camera will be or that pieces of film and again Mo- they're not scrambled. They're organized in a way. That's it's easy to look at. Because that's the way the world organized same in the brain and that organization from layer to layer as you go into the brain for the first several layers players. It's Retina topically organized so we can know if a recording from a neuron Janna or neurons in the CORTEX that the neuron next door is going to be as late out in this image of the world in a pattern that makes sense and matches the incoming movie of the life of the person some with the eyeball. This got US thinking. Okay so we. We already knew that there was this retina topic organization and and we knew that for a long time even before he will weasels. Seminal work talking about how. The CORTEX was organized. We knew that the GORTEX was written a topic. Marshall Talbot discovered that many many decades ago. So it's red and topically organized. And what the Alonso Fitzpatrick labs discovered. was that it turns out. The input from the fan is not just top league organized but it split for every he point in space individual world. There's four different inputs. There's an on input and an off input if you're looking at a star in the sky by the neurons in the on center of this point in the of your retinal field that sees that starr will be firing because it's a white spot on a black background on the other hand if if you look at a white sheet of paper with a period just typed in the middle of it and you look at it with the same piece of retina now the off channels would.

Harvard Medical School David Harvard David Hubel graduate student Mars Livingstone Twenty twenty Alonso Fitzpatrick Beijing Manuel Alonso US Zana Marshall Talbot starr Nicholas Nucleus Thelma Mo David Fitzpatrick Jose Max Planck Institutes Florida
"david hubel" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"david hubel" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"Review the key ideas. Steve is fantastic. Have you back on brains Hans. After all this time I think the last time I saw you an Susannah had just moved to New York. That's right yeah. How long have you been there now? been here about five and a half years now. Well I didn't realize it was that long. You both have your own lab right. That's correct and we continue to collaborate a lover. Yes we have our own independent laboratories and how many kids have you got these days. Got Three kids okay. I think when I first met shoes his anna was pregnant with your youngest. Yep that could be your Nova now. It had been nine years ago. Oh well anyway. It's good to get to talk to you before we start talking about your work that you're on working on right now. Would you mind mind just giving my listeners. Sort of a background about why vision. Research has sort of a special place in neuroscience it kind of in some wastes an iconic area of neuroscience. Yeah so it has an important history. In in neuroscience because neuroscience France was in a sense officially born when the the neurobiology department at Harvard Medical School was formed it was the first of the neurobiology departments armaments so as a feel it kind of got its name then and of course there were neuroscientist before then. For example. Kind of the patron in Saint of neurosciences. Ramon Kahal Santiago Monica from Spain. Who did some of the first very important anatomy and developed the neuronal doctrine trend the idea that neurons did everything some of his most famous drawings or of the I though I think is always captured the interests of a biologist? Even going back to Darwin win. WHO's major problem in kind of explaining how a body could evolve from nothing was to explain organs of perfection like the I.? An entire chapters in books are dedicated to this very question. How can you possibly evolve something? So very specialized imperfect as an. I'm all without design. So in biology itself I think is been of interest in neuroscience is have been of interest from the beginning and in the very first neurobiology department. Two of the central people in it were David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel who got the Nobel Prize for mapping the visual Cortex and discovering several aspects of a fundamental critical processing and the CORTEX is the part of the brain being. That's very special to. It's not special to humans but it's in a sense the most special thing about humans that makes them different in terms of their brain from other animals animals. More than other parts of the brain by developing the systems and methods. They did to study the visual system especially the primary visual cortex of the brain. They kind of laid the road map for how to study. All pieces of CORTEX. Everywhere in the brain and so- visual systems systems neuro. Physiology has been the cornerstone of all corneal physiology and a lot of physiological measurements. It's in the brain. It's been where a lot of the methods of come from is where a lot of the series of computation come from in those computations aren't just visual. They're also used in auditory and other systems so those systems in those studies borrow from what we learned in vision. It's the most important of our senses physiologically and there's probably as much for more research to visual physiology and.

Ramon Kahal Santiago Monica Susannah Steve Saint of neurosciences Harvard Medical School Nobel Prize Torsten Wiesel New York France David Hubel Spain
"david hubel" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"david hubel" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"Stephen Suzanne. I really appreciate you coming on the show today. I thought that you might start Out By introducing yourselves very briefly in telling us about how you got into neuroscience. Susanna would you like to go first maintenance Santa Martinez Conde and I am the Director Director of the laboratory of visual neuro science at the Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix Arizona. I got started in science on undergraduate in experimental psychology in Spain. After I got my bachelor's degree I started graduate school in the field of our visual nor science also in Spain at the University of Santiago de Compostela when I graduated from Graduate School in Nineteen Ninety six I almost immediately after when to the US for a post doc with David Hubel who got the Nobel prize in medicine and physiology for his discoveries from the visual system and now in his laboratory as opposed to look at Harvard Medical School for about five years. Then I moved to England University College London where I had my first independent faculty position with my own research stretch program and seven years ago. I moved my lap from London to the barrel where I am. Now you're focuses on vision. Yes might training being in visual neuroscience. And that's the main core of my research program. Although in recent years have been getting more interested into into both perceptual and cognitive aspects of our experience. How about you Steve? So I started off as an undergraduate at the University of California California Santa Cruz after being raised on the Hawaiian island of Maui and I- triple majored in college in psycho biology biology and psychology achieve. I had a great job as a firefighter. I wanted to stay in it as long as I could. So I kept taking on extra majors in order to stay there. So I basically just took all of the neuroscience courses purses. UCSE had to offer in doing so ended up doing a lot of research. Because I had a lot of time to do homework at the fire department so I ended up doing some research and publishing it and I got into Harvard neurobiology for graduate school where I got my PhD with Margaret Livingstone. From there I ended up staying at Harvard Medical School with David. Hubel as a post doc working also on visual neuro physiology. I also did a short post doc with Zach Main at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York working on the factory system as well as in blood flow in micro circulation of the brain before taking my first job at University College London where I had my first laboratory starting at the same time Santa. Did we both move back at the same time to the United States here at the baron or logical suits seven years ago. We don't have very much time today. So I'm going to just cut right to the chase. Why are you studying magic? I mean your book slides of mine is the first book about the neuroscience of Magic. So I've got to ask why magic well. Magic affords us the opportunity to use very special very repower full cognitive illusions that magicians have developed over the centuries and Millennia and take them to laboratory. I mentioned that my background is in in Russia in the field of vision. We see very often that there is. There's very productive dialogue between the visual arts visual sciences and oftentimes collusion's that we study in the laboratory they have not been created by scientists and they are the work of artists painters sculptors and so on on and they allow us to discover very fundamental neural principles underlying perception. In the case of magic we can establish a similar dialogue lock in the Arts and sciences and look at who the artists are of cognitive illusions..

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory UCSE England University College Lon Graduate School Harvard Medical School David Hubel Zach Main Santa Martinez Conde United States Spain Stephen Suzanne Director Director Santa Cruz Barrow Neurological Institute Nobel prize University of Santiago Arts and sciences Susanna Harvard Arizona
"david hubel" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

11:49 min | 1 year ago

"david hubel" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Two hundred two hundred the great American I often said that if you have circumstances in counties or cities well it's all one party rule instead of fighting the other party they fight with each other I don't care if it's Clermont county bother county city Cincinnati versus family county there's like no Republicans in Allen county and I office anymore so the Democrats fight with the Democrats but something unique is happening Clermont county my good friend in your station waves in their car or inquire wrote a column wild west Clermont county GOP snobs X. congresswoman Janish mad backs disgraced former commissioner David Hubel a man with his finger on the pulse is Chris Hicks is the chair of the union township Republican Party the largest township in Clermont county and Chris Hicks welcome again to the bill Cunningham show Chris how are you I'm doing fantastic Mr coming and it's a pleasure to be on your show well once again one of the principles I've noticed over the years is that when Democrats can't fight Republicans they find other Democrats when Republicans can't fight Democrats because there are none in Klamath county your fight Republicans but this is unique explain how it's impossible that the Clermont county Republican Party snobs Jeannie she met the back a disgraced former commissioner David Hubel how is that possible well I think that's a good that's a good question I don't know how it's possible but it happened so you have in Clermont county by the way I'm the I'm the head of the union township public reporting Clermont county which is the largest part of the overall plan my county Republican Party and we have an endorsement product at the very back room very secretive tries to control the outcome of the elections in which there's such an actor chamber in Clermont county at the Clermont county Republican Central Committee adores David you pull a person who I think what I think of the Monday before Thursday endorsement meeting pled guilty to fraud on election petition that caused him to not be able to run for commissioner and have a drink of messed up so I violated my first amendment rights and have to find it in mission of responsibility you've got a bunch of open meetings violations Houston founded summary judgment he's done any was working a deal to try to get one point eight million dollars in tax money to pay for his buffalo ranch and turned it into a preserve that would basically be only for his use however I get the door hold this up so on Thursday of last week the Klamath county GOP looked at qualified candidates to become a state house representatives and just seven to ours before that the person they endorsed pled guilty to election fraud correct in the end and get the lead out you both running for Senate against the guy named Kerry Johnson it was the point is that the point of senator at this time in the end but basically what happened really is every every candidate that had any support from Columbus got snubbed by the Republican Party so it can't be screen doors David you bowl and then over us supports Jean Schmidt and a guy named Alan Freeman and John Parker for commissioner and they all got totally snubbed for the party in its infinite wisdom under the leadership of party chair Greg Simpson basically put up a big middle finger to Columbus and told him we're gonna go our own way and we're gonna see it will be interesting to see what the impact of failed on crime accountability to get anything in the state budget and so forth what Columbus will not give crap to Clermont county because they keep giving the middle finger to Columbus and when you when your door someone like David usable who's got a somewhat checkered past the demonstrates that you don't care about the conscious of the voters you and you said to me off there is something interesting that all political parties hold out on election day and they give the individuals Republican or Democrats kind of a sheet or who to vote for any Clermont county you're saying Chris six that that is the mark of the beast that that if you are a Republican and you get that you know who not to vote for almost the for the for the funny thing well if the backcourt in Clermont county anybody from Plymouth county that if it's a very tightly controlled political system and you get handed a card on the primary day and they count on the party count on St voters this roadmap court then the party does very little to inform voters are like you know who these people are and now they put in a situation where that car at the top of their card is somebody who's been convicted of an election related crime and down that card or people that are all on the outs with Columbus so so that card to me it's going to be the market is just going to become toxic I can't imagine what kind of air campaign promoting the gonna happen thankfully if I were candid I want want to be on the court at this point how did David do you will get the endorsement want to just get sentenced on election fraud plus see it other difficulties with the other violations how's it possible they could look at him and say the voters in Clermont counters to put enough to do what we're telling I I again I don't get it I'm I'm kind of a pariah of the party and former county I think that blasting of one party control are one of the concerns of one party control but if we don't clean up our own malfeasance where it's gonna rule it'll slip away from us and we've had to politicians plead guilty to crimes Republican politicians do it this year so Pat monger engineer is out of office because he was convicted of a crime David you pull that off their teeth are convicted of a crime I told you off there when this happened the reaction of the Sr depends on the party that actually call themselves restore colder the secret return the party called the circle there masterstroke idea that Willie was to put in our party constitution a harsh clause that said that if any committee member of the Republican Party basically rad about any crime of an elected Republican official they would be suspended from the party reaction to politicians plead guilty and be discouraged it's got a change we gotta get real conservatives get rid of the fact of times and really clean up the Republican Party I'm actually very excited that the the if you remember the old Happy Days they had a joke on you jumping the shark I think the party is really jump the shark on this one and now it's created an alignment of a lot of force is helpful the Senate caucus the people that support me that say this is just ridiculous we got up and this car market on the party and hopefully build something better stronger and more responsive to the electorate you know Chris six chairman of the Union County Republican Party I've noticed this happens in small rural counties such as what's going on in Pike County with the sheriff Charles reader when you're fifty miles or eighty miles from Cincinnati there's no media I would assume Clermont county doesn't have its own newspaper Klamath county doesn't have its own TV stations there's no radio stations the message then get out a lot of times in the smaller rural areas unless it is covered like in Pike County the sheriff did away with ending you anything he wants to get away well nobody's covered in this thing hi my account is close close enough to Cincinnati but it's rare to get media puts spotlight on things in Batavia because it's kind of a ride to go out there is something not done but you would think that the Republicans in Clermont county and I am I right in saying there's no Democrat selected anywhere county wide there might be a couple counsel people and like Milford or something but boards but it's all Republicans at the county level and all the important positions so it ought to be a well run cohesive principled county with conservative principles it should be about the constitution should be about looking after taxpayer dollars but instead of that individuals running for office in Clermont county look after themselves at the expense of the party and audibly all hell's going to break loose well and and I in when your blaster of one party control you have to hold yourself to the highest possible standards I mean that that's a trust we have to have with the voters that they know that if we find somebody doing some corrupt recorded within the party in officer out get rid of them we're going to clean that up that's a that's a bond that Victor the cross even different policy views within the party now real quick well we we do have a newspaper Klamath county called the Clermont sign I think people should subscribe to it so we get more coverage but right now they are there you know the biggest single advertisers the government so so that that's about the media that we have in Clermont county I have a Facebook page called fix what's called dot com which is all the political intrigue in Clermont county and that is really shaken things up because of the it's a place where people can get informed on what's going on and actually see the you know the the the plea deals and stuff like that that are happening with some of our politicians that aren't necessarily going to be reported in the Cincinnati media absolutely Sir going forward is there any hope for change in Clermont county or not at the at the end of the day absolutely the jump the shark moment I think it's absolutely going to change I would have thought it would've been pushing on it on on we've got to move our party towards honesty and integrity for a walk for a couple years now like I thought there'd be more change faster but right now the the forces that are sort of this you know will endorse or criminal at the top of our ticket they think that they're you know being successful there high fiving each other in the hallways but they don't realize what they've done between householders people in the Senate caucus and I'm gonna be out there fighting for we got it and validate this card we got to move to an environment where we inform voters in the primer we're talking about in the primary teachers book Republican voters they have the right to have honest choice in the primary without bombs on the scale all the time so I I am absolutely convinced I'm gonna keep plugging away and I'm absolutely convinced that's going to change the clamor candy and we're all waiting for that sun rise to calm you know normally when a local party that is complete control endorses a candidate that is tantamount to election because I I can assume no Democrats going to win a state Senate seat and Democrats going to win a state rep C. correct absolutely and and in our county that call or the the pull cord that now it's been made toxic by with the parties done that card it had been the gold standard if you got your name on that card you were pretty much guaranteed like ninety percent chance you're going to get elected and we're gonna see what's happening now a lot of these politicians that one party county what you find to Willie is sometimes people these politicians are very thin skin because they're not used to real challenges are not restart tough questions so they run screaming from tough questions because it's been based on an insider network system will get your name just enough you know what to get your name on that card and you're good to go and you're going to get elected and it's gonna change now because boy they have a line you know all these Columbus forces I think are on high alert on we got at some point cookware my kind of been known to be in a duty county politically for a long time RT and I think now it's kind of jump the shark so much that it's gonna we're gonna see what happens over the next couple of months before the March seventeenth primary but I think a lot of money going to come and say and we got to clean this party up in grammar cat genie Schmidt has been a member of the clan my county GOP Central Committee for about forty years why wasn't why wasn't she endorsed by the group she's been a member of for forty years I think there's a couple things going on there Willie I think there's a brake system that happens you know I personally think it's you know at some point genius let needs to move on you know she's she's been been there done that type of thing we need new talent and new cool what's happened in in this situation is just is just wrong if it's not based on merit and qualifications the person that got endorsed the routine she met with a guy named Joe deals gerbils runs around talking about being a big business owner but all of those businesses are closed door flaps so so we can you know who knows skills no experience and I'm not sure that Jean Schmidt.

Clermont county Cincinnati Allen county commissioner David Hubel GOP Janish
"david hubel" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"david hubel" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"During the twentieth century spirit especially during the mid and later twentieth twentieth century from the likes of david hubel and torsten visable michael merson atkin to eleanor maguire. Now the work of each of those individuals is fascinating dating and i would love to come back and and look at them in greater detail. There's some wonderful work there regarding <hes> how how we see the world some of the very basic questions about the human experience <hes> how how we perceive the world and how's it processed in the brain are explored by by by their work but the interesting thing is. Is there still something of a controversy about exactly how plastic the adult human brain is if much at all like for most of the history of neuroscience up until until very recently a lot of experts believed that the human adult brain had almost no plasticity fixed in stable but at the same time it's obvious as the adults can learn new things and adapt yeah we can change and we don't have to undergo a catastrophic brain injury for it to happen right so exactly how much potential oh for change in plasticity is there in the adult brain and in what areas like it appears much easier for adults to learn and adapt in some ways than it does in others his language acquisition as we talked about as a classic example <hes> children are just so so much better at learning a language than adults are another one is certain aspects of music learning be right about perfect pitch shropshire. Yes yeah you have to get it early or you're not gonna. You're not gonna get it later on yeah. This is a commonly cited example example. <hes> roberts singer middle see i don't. I don't do music like that. You know adults do unless you've you've trained on it before or you were in a roughly six years old. So if you have this skill known as perfect pitch you should be able to recognize or produce not just tones relative of two other tones but like you could call out a node and the person would know what that pitch actually was. They could sing it or they recognize it. In hearing it yeah i my my a reaction to that. Question is the same as the other day when my son asked me what thursday plus thursday equals and it was just like can't that just broke my brain a little bit to even try and answer that question sounds like a three thursday probably but yeah so supposedly the ideas if you teach children to recognize pitches in an absolute sense before for their roughly six years old or so they they can potentially acquire. This skill is just like you've gotta. You've gotta get going within that window. Yeah i feel like i'm i'm wasting see my time reading the hobbit to my son we should be. We should be working on this pitch thing well. There are all kinds of things potentially like this that you don't even know about. Maybe you should be teaching your son at this is critical age you know before the window doesn't close but gets very narrow yeah well. I mean there's a lot of the discussion of this out there in in parenting forums and actual <hes> ah you know peer reviewed <hes> <hes> child rearing material just about yeah. These are the ages of childhood when you want to throw a bunch of different activities at them you want them to have some sort of musical training some sort of <hes> <hes> training in another language etc like this. This is when the when the windows are open so oh you want to just throw as much stuff through there as possible but i mean. Wouldn't it be great if you could be like that again as an adult. We're talking about the the desire to be peter pan. Are there things that we could do to make the adult brain a learning and adaptation machine like the young child's brain a lot of people have been asking that question and so..

david hubel michael merson atkin eleanor maguire peter pan torsten six years
"david hubel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:49 min | 2 years ago

"david hubel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I saw your mind going there. Up presence. Yes. Yes. I'm actually have a choice. So presence with the press so showing up and this this idea of presence in the book aware, you could see this exciting moment, we have in science in that book where we can understand what presence is and how to cultivate, its own Starbucks. The idea is your kid get really upset and frustrated can happen. And so you can have an immediate reaction. And if you just think about a wheel where presences in the hub of the wheel where you're aware in a receptive open way, but on the rim. You have all the different thoughts. Feelings and reactions you can have. So if you've done the work of this wheel of awareness practice, what you can do for my website. And it's in the book what you do basically is you're able to see I just reacted to my child in Starbucks with don't do that. Like that. And if you then come off the rim, and this is something you do focus on the breath. And if you've done the wheel practice, then drop yourself into the hub and from the hub, you're able to get down your child's level and say you really can't pull that down. That's not. Okay. So you stop dangerous behavior. But now what you're doing? Is you connect before you redirect? So this is the difference between a master of parenting or a disaster. Use the gotten his way of thinking about right because parents just react reactivity. Just incr- creates more reactivity in the child receptivity presence with us apparent invite your child to be present for what's going to change. So connect before you redirect the way Tina Bryson other author and I- phrase that and there's all sorts of fun things. Parents like name it to tame it, right? So if you have the capacity to save your child, I know you're really frustrated that you can't put all these toys off the shelf and you identify the frustration. There's even brain studies that show that the activation. That's all there in heightened emotional moment. If you use other centers of the brain to name, what that internal state. It is frustration anger fear. Shame. The whole system becomes more clebrated it becomes more in balance. So named detainment is a fun thing to phrase that you can use, but actually has a huge amount of science behind in fact, everything I write as a scientist and clinician educator is science based. And so this is why I think people find it so acceptable because I try to translate the science for everyday use like the Starbucks. Well, the. The guiding premises sort of informing the whole brainchild is the MoMA trying to just get through or actually the moments for great teaching expanse. Great parenting moments. If you can if you could mess them by doing just these kind of things and some of it indeed comes from understanding the way your child's brain operates, not necessarily the same as an adult brain operates. Let's talk a little bit about that left brain right brain upstairs, brain downstairs, brain, but pack that a little bit right? And you know. Parents when they learned about the brain realize as the first time this ever happened. It was Mary, and I were actually getting ready to think about writing the book, and I was teaching parents about these parts of the brain. And I do it with a hand model. Right. So you put your thumb in the middle put your fingers over the top. And you have a pretty daughter says don't say this. So but a handy model of the brain. Sorry baddie. Anyway, I can't help myself sometimes, but it's useful. It's really useful. And so I was teaching in the workshop and a mom said because I said, look there's a higher part of the brain Tina, Bryce, I know call it the upstairs brain and the lower parts Olympic thumb and the brain stem, which is in your palm, the downstairs part and the way these coordinate with each other makes all the difference. And if you've had a difficult childhood set of experiences that you haven't made sense of it can make the system more vulnerable to flipping out flipping your, and I give the example of what happened to me with my son young. And so the next day after I teach this class flipping you're living the prefrontal region, higher brain, not coordinating the whole system, and then acting in ways like I was my son is mom comes in the next morning. And she says that handle the brain changed everything I said. What do you mean? She goes. Well, first of all I had a very difficult childhood. She tells me, and I said, okay. And she goes, and I understand understand this hand modeled the brain that it's not my fault. But it is my responsibility. And it was amazing that elaborate more she said that she doesn't have to beat yourself up more for these call them low road behaviors flipping you're like what I do with my son. Instead, you can use it just as you're saying not just saying oh this such burden being a parent, but those challenging moments are actually invitations for growth opportunity to learn. And she was able to see that the hand model is basically this where tension goes neural firing flows and neural connection grows. So the reason you as a parent wanna know about your brain is because you can actually use your attention to get your brain to fire in a different way. And then to rewire in a way that I call integrative to link different parts of the brain together. Every study shows that is the basis of wellbeing. So all of my writings about this process of the linking of different parts of that integration. So in your question about the hand of the brain. You know, you got one hundred billion neurons all over the place trillions of connections overwhelming. How can you teach apparent is busy? Anyway, about the brain. It goes like this integration in the brain is health in your child. Period. And when you have integration a relationship you stimulate integration. Your child's brain period, and every form of regulation you can name regulating. Attention emotion mood, memory morality behavior, all those forms of called executive function. They all depend on integration, the brain. So what we try to do in. All these books is basically say to parents, you can trust your intuition. And here's a little bit of science to help you the way if you have your relationship pattern of communication be honoring differences in promoting linkages. That's integration. You will give your child to kind of experiences that are actually going to shape the way they're braid grows in an integrative way. And that's what your job is to be present for your child to integrate in a relationship to help them become integrated inside their body and their. Bring understanding that children's brains tend to be right brain more dominant that they're more about emotions, and they more about that. And when you say connected redirect instead of trying to logically. You know to argue your child or legislate your child out of emotion. It's about connecting to that emotion. I restating it back to them in the logical way. That right. Exactly. Exactly. Right. And you know, I gotta say so interesting about the way you just phrased that is when I do the science editing and do the development stuff that's like for graduate school. And then I write these parenting books. So just that phrase the reality is something like this the sensations of the body arise up into the brain in the head with a dominant influence on the right side. You're absolutely right. And the right side of the brain is really tuned into nonverbal signals, non verbal communication. Interesting even the right side of the brain is dominant for a sense of self and autobiographical memory. Whereas the left is actually a little more distant from the body. It hasn't motions for sure. But a little more distant from the body, and it can be using linguistic symbols language much more than nonverbal. That's in the right? So when you look at the studies of brain scans. And you say name it to tame where does that come from? It comes from literally showing a photograph, which is a nonverbal signal the right hemisphere get super activated. That's what you see in the brain scan. And then you have the person name their emotional state or what they see photograph and the whole system calms down when the left and the right work together when it becomes integrated it achieves harmony when they're not working together. Then it's either chaos or rigidity, that's the amazing pattern. So for parents, basically, the fun thing. That's so affective. You say chaos things being totally. Out of control and unpredictable or rigidity things being shut down. Those are the two banks outside the river of harmony, and this all comes from a mathematical analysis, I did years ago of looking complex systems, basically, but understanding and thinking about what well being composed of. So here's the simple statements, even wellbeing comes from integration. So when we talk about these parts of the brain and hand model all this stuff. It's all about integration and amazingly integration in the body and integration relationships go hand in hand. Another important thing. You talk about about the brain how experience actually physiologically changes the brain. And. I mean, that's really profound. Interesting stuff and talk a little bit about what the implications of that are for parents who are trying to understand. Yeah. Well, in my own experience when I was in medical school, the person who taught me neurosciences professor named David Hubel and in one thousand nine hundred eighty one when I was in medical school. He won the Nobel prize for discovering that experience shapes the structure of the brain. So when I was in medical school. This is like we celebrated his Nobel prize, and it was like awesome. And so this was just what I was taught. And yet when I entered paediatrics psychiatry people seem to not know that and they seem to be saying the only thing that happens is the brain doesn't work well because of jeans and give them medication because that's the only thing that's gonna really help genetically not well formed brain. And it was just amazing. You weren't allowed to talk about how experience shape the brain. Because. Because of partly what happened in the fifties. And sixties when unfortunately my field child mental health had accused parents of children with schizophrenia or autism as being the cause of those conditions. And that was the saddest travesty that happened. So it's an understandable pushing away from that. And it went to the further extreme which they said when I was in training paediatrics psychiatry. You're not supposed to talk about experience shaping the brain. We're supposed to figure out which medication you would prescribe for someone. Fortunately, at some genetic reason their brain wasn't working. Well, so when I went to attach research, it was inspired by my professor, Hugo David Hubel for discovering that in fact experience shapes bring.

Starbucks Nobel prize Tina Bryson David Hubel professor schizophrenia scientist Mary executive Bryce
"david hubel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:47 min | 2 years ago

"david hubel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm actually a toy store. So yeah. Would the pres- so showing up and this this idea of presence in the book aware, you could see this exciting moment we have in science in that book where we can understand what presence is and how to cultivate, its own Starbucks. The idea is your kid get really upset and frustrated this can happen. And so you can have an immediate reaction. And if you just think about a wheel where presences in the hub of the wheel where you're aware in a receptive open way, but on the rim. You have all the different thoughts. Feelings and reactions you can have. So if you've done the work of this wheel of awareness practice, what you can do for my website. And it's in the book what you do basically is you're able to see I just reacted to my child in Starbucks with don't do that. Like that. And if you then come off the rim, and this is something you do focusing on the breath. And if you've done the wheel practice, you then drop yourself into the hub and from the hub able to get down on your child's level and say, you really can't pull that down. That's not. Okay. So you stop dangerous behavior. But now what you're doing? Is you connect before you redirect? So this is the difference between a master of parenting or a disaster. The way of thinking about it, right because parents just react reactivity. Just incr- creates more reactivity in the child receptivity presence with apparent invites your child to be present for what's going to change. So connect before you redirect the way Tina Bryson other co author and I- phrase that and there's all sorts of fun things like name it to tame it. Right. So if you have the capacity to save your child, I know you're really frustrated that you can't put all these toys off the shelf and you identify the frustration. There's even brain studies that show that the activation. That's all there in a heightened emotional moment. If you use other centers of the brain to name, what that internal state is frustration anger fear. Shame the whole system becomes more Quebrada becomes more imbalance. So name it to tame. It is a fun thing to phrase that you can use but actually has a huge amount of science behind it. In fact, everything I write as a scientist and clinician educator is science base. And so this is why I think people find it so excessively because I try to translate the science for everyday use the Starbucks. Well, the guiding premises in sort of informing the whole brainchild is the moment you were trying to just get through or actually the moments for great t. Teaching experience great parenting moments. If you can if you could mess by doing just these kind of things and some of it indeed comes from understanding the way your child's brain operates, not necessarily the same as an adult brain operates. Let's talk a little bit about that left brain, right brain and upstairs brain downstairs, brain. But let's unpack that a little bit. Right. And you know. Parents when they learned about the brain realize as the first time this ever happened. It was Mary, and I were actually getting ready to think about reading the book, and I was teaching parents about these parts of the brain. And I do it with a hand model. Right. So you put your thumb in the middle put your fingers over the top. And you have a pretty daughter says don't say this. So but a handy model of the brain. Sorry baddie. Anyway, I can't help myself. But it's useful. It's really useful. And so I was teaching in a workshop and a mom said because I said, look there's a higher part of the brain Tina Bryson, I know call it the upstairs brain and the lower parts the limbic thumb and the brain stem, which is near palm the downstairs part and the way these coordinate with each other makes all the difference. And if you've had a difficult childhood set of experiences that you haven't made sense of it can make the system more vulnerable to flipping out flipping your, and I give the example of what happened to be with my son was young. And so the next day after I teach this in class about flipping you're living. The prefrontal region is higher brain coordinating the whole system, and then acting in ways like I active as my son is mom comes the next morning. And she says that handle the brain changed everything I said. What do you mean? She goes. Well, first of all I had a very difficult childhood. She tells me, and I said, okay. And she goes, and I understand by understanding this hand model of the brain that it's not my fault. But it is my responsibility. And it was amazing that elaborated more. She said that she doesn't have to beat yourself up more for these. I call them low road behaviors flipping your lid, like what I do my son. Instead, you can use it just as you're saying not just saying, oh this such a burden being a parent, but those challenging moments are actually invitations for growth, and it's an opportunity to learn and she was able to see that. So the hand model is basically this where tension goes neural firing flows and neuro connection grows. So the reason you as a parent want to know about your brain is because you can actually use your attention to get your brain to fire in a different way. And then to rewire in a way that I call integrative to link different parts of the brain together. Every study shows that is the basis of wellbeing. So all of my writings about this process of the linking of differentiated parts, call that integration. So your question about the handball of the brain. You know, you got one hundred billion neurons all over the place trillions of connections overwhelming. How can you teach a parent is busy anyway about the brain? It goes like this integration in the brain is health in your child. Period. And when you have integration in a relationship, you stimulate integration in your child's brain period, and every form of regulation, you can name regulating. Attention emotion mood, memory morality behavior, all those forms of called executive function. They all depend on integration, the brain. So what we try to do. And all these books is basically say to parents, you can trust your intuition. And here's a little bit of science to help you along the way. If you have your relationship the pattern of communication be honoring differences in promoting linkages. That's integration. You will give your child to kind of experiences that are actually going to shape the way they're braid grows in an integrative way. And that's what your job is to be present for your child. So you can integrate a relationship to help them become integrated inside their body and their brain understanding that children's brains tend to be right brain more dominant that they're more about emotions, and they're more about that. And when you say connected redirect instead of trying to logically. You know to argue your child or legislate your child out of an emotion. It's about connecting that emotion. I restating it back to them in the logical way that right? Exactly. That's exactly right. And you know, I gotta say so interesting about the way, you just phrased that is, you know, when I do the science editing and do the developing mind and stuff. That's like for graduate school. And then I write these parenting books. So just that phrase the reality is something like this the sensations of the body arise up into the brain in the head with a dominant influence on the right side. You're absolutely right. And the right side of the brain is really tuned into nonverbal signals nonverbal communication, interestingly, even the right side of the brain is dominant for a sense of self and autobiographical memory. Whereas the left is actually a little more distant from the body. It hasn't motions for sure. But a little more distant from the body, and it can be using linguistic symbols language much more than nonverbal. That's in the right? So when you look at the studies of brain scans. And you say name where does that come from? It comes from literally showing the photograph which is a nonverbal signal the right hemisphere get super activated. That's what you see in the brain scan. And then you have the purse. Listen name their emotional state or what they see photograph and the whole system calms down when the left and the right work together when it becomes integrated it achieves harmony when they're not working together. Then it's either chaos or rigidity, that's the amazing pattern. So for parents, basically, the fun thing. That's so affective. You say chaos things being totally out of control and unpredictable or rigidity things being shut down. Those are the two kind of banks outside the river of harmony, and this all comes from a mathematical analysis, I did years ago of looking at complex systems, basically, but understanding and thinking about what well being composed of. So here's the simple statement, Stephen wellbeing comes from integration. So when we talk about these parts of the brain and a hand model all this stuff. It's all about integration and amazingly integration in the body and integration and relationships. Go. Hand in hand. Another important thing. You talk about about the brain how experience actually physiologically changes the brain. And. Yeah. I mean, that's really profound. Interesting stuff talk a little bit about what the implications of that are for parents who are trying to understand. Yeah. Well, in my own experience when I was in medical school, the person who taught me neuroscience, professor named David Hubel and in nineteen eighty one when I was in medical school. He won the Nobel prize for discovering that experience shapes the structure of the brain. So when I was in medical school. This is like we celebrated his Nobel prize, and it was like awesome. And so this was just what I was taught. And yet when I enter pediatrics and psychiatry people seem to not know that and they seem to be saying the only thing that happens is the brain doesn't work well because of jeans and give them medication because that's the only thing that's gonna really help genetically not well formed brain. And it was just amazing. You weren't allowed to talk about how experience shape the brain. Because. Partly what happened in the fifties. And sixties went unfortunately, my field child mental health head accused parents of children with schizophrenia or autism as being the cause of those conditions. And that was the saddest travesty that happened. So it's an understandable pushing away from that. And it went to the further extreme which they said when I was in training paediatrics psychiatry. You're not supposed to talk about experience shaping the brain. You were supposed to figure out which medication you would prescribe for someone. Fortunately, at some genetic reason their brain wasn't working. Well, so when I went to attach research, it was inspired by my professor, Hugo David Hugo for discovering that in fact experience shapes bring so for me, it wasn't like something new. It was what it was how I was trained to.

Starbucks Tina Bryson Nobel prize professor schizophrenia scientist Hugo David Hugo Mary Stephen David Hubel executive
"david hubel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:47 min | 2 years ago

"david hubel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I saw your mind going up presence. Yes. Yes. I'm actually have a Toy Story. So. Yeah. With the city so showing up and this idea of presence in the book aware, you can see this exciting moment, we have in science in that book where we can understand what presence is and how to cultivate, its own Starbucks. The idea is your kid get really upset and frustrating this can happen. And so you can have an immediate reaction. And if you just think about a wheel where presences in the hub of the wheel where you're aware in a receptive open way, but on the rim. You have all the different thoughts. Feelings and reactions you can have. So if you've done the work of this wheel of awareness practice, which you can do for my website. And it's in the book what you do basically is you're able to see I just reacted to my child in Starbucks with don't do that. Like that. And if you then come off the rim, and this is something you do focusing on the breath. And if you've done the wheel practice, then drop yourself into the hub and from the hub, you're able to get down your child's level and say you really can't pull that down. That's not. Okay. So you stop dangerous behavior. But now what you're doing? Is you connect before you redirect? So this is the difference between a master of parenting or a disaster. He's gotten his way of thinking about it. Right because parents have just react reactivity. Just incr- creates more reactivity in the child receptivity presence with us apparent invite your child to be present for what's going to change. So connect before you redirect Tina Bryson other other and I- phrase that and all sorts of fun things like name it to tame it if you have the capacity to save your child, I know you're really frustrated, and you can't put all these toys off the shelf and you identify the frustration. There's even brain studies that show that the activation. That's all there in a heightened emotional moment. If you use other centers of the brain to name, what that internal state. Is frustration anger fear? Shame. The whole system becomes more Quillet it becomes more imbalance. So name it to tame. It is fun thing to phrase that you can use. But it actually has a huge amount of science behind it. In fact, everything I write as a scientist and clinician educator is science based. And so this is why I think people find it so acceptable because I try to translate the science for everyday use like the Starbucks. Well, the the guiding premises and sort of informing thoughts the whole brainchild is the moment to trying to just get through actually the moments for great teaching expansion. Great parenting moments. If you can if you could mess them by doing just these kind of things and some of it indeed comes from understanding the way your child's brain operates, not necessarily the same as an adult brain operates. Let's talk a little bit about that left brain right brain up stairs, brain downstairs, brain. But pack that a little bit right? And. Parents when they learned about the brain realize as the first time this ever happened. It was Mary, and I were actually getting ready to think about writing the book, and I was teaching parents about these parts of the brain. And I do it with a hand model. Right. So you put your thumb in the middle fingers over the top. And you have a pretty daughter says don't say this. So a handy model of the brain. Sorry baddie. Anyway, I can't help myself sometimes, but it's useful. It's really useful. And so I was teaching in the workshop and a mom said because I said, look there's a higher part of the brain Tina Bryson, I know call it the upstairs brain and the lower parts Olympic thumb and the brain stem, which is near palm the downstairs part and the way these coordinate with each other makes all the difference. And if you've had a difficult childhood set of experiences that you haven't made sense of it can make the system more vulnerable to flipping out flipping your lit. And I give the example of what happened to me with my son was young. And so the next day after teach this class about flipping you're leading the prefrontal region is higher brain, not coordinating the whole system, and then acting in ways like I active. My son is mom comes the next morning. And she says that handle the brain changed everything I said. What do you mean? She goes. Well, first of all, I had a very difficult child that she tells me, and I said, okay. And she goes, and I understand by understanding this hand model of the brain that it's not my fault. But it is my responsibility. And it was amazing that elaborated more. She said that she doesn't have to beat yourself up more for these. I call them low road behaviors flipping. You're like what I do with my son. Instead, you can use it just as you're saying not just saying oh this such burden being apparent, but those challenging moments are actually invitations for growth. It's an opportunity to learn and she was able to see that. So the hand model is basically this where tension goes neural firing flows and neuro connection grows. So the reason you as a parent wanna know about your brain is because you can actually use your attention to get your brain to fire in a different way. And then to rewire in a way that I call integrated to link different parts of the brain together. Every study shows that is the basis of wellbeing. So all of my writings about this process of the linking of different parts of that integration. So in your question about the hand of the brain. You know, you got one hundred billion neurons all over the place trillions of connections. It's overwhelming. How can you teach parent busy anyway about the brain? It goes like this integration in the brain is health in your child. Period. And when you have integration in a relationship, you stimulate integration in your child's brain period, and every form of regulation, you can name regulating. Attention emotion mood, memory morality behavior, all those forms of called executive function. They all depend on integration, the brain. So what we try to do. And all these books is basically say to parents, you can trust your intuition. And here's a little bit of science to help you the way if you have your relationship the pattern of communication be honoring differences in promoting linkages. That's integration. You will give your child to kind of experiences that are actually going to shape the way their brain grows in an integrative way. And that's what your job is to be present for your child integrate in a relationship to help them become integrated inside their body and their. Understanding that the children's brains tend to be right bring more dominant that they're more about emotions, and they more about that. And when you say connected redirect instead of trying to logically. You know to argue your child or legislate your child out of an emotion. It's about connecting to that emotion. I restating it back to them in the logical way. That right. Exactly. Exactly. Right. And you know, I gotta say so interesting about the way you just phrased that is when I do the science editing and do the developing mind stuff that's like for graduate school. And then I write these parenting books. So just that phrase the reality is something like this that sensations of the body arise up into the brain in the head with a dominant influence on the right side. You're absolutely right. And the right side of the brain is really tuned into non verbal signals nonverbal communication, interestingly, even the right side of the brain is dominant for a sense of self and autobiographical memory. Whereas the left is actually a little more distant from the body. It has emotions for sure, but a little more. Distant from the body, and it can be using linguistic symbols language much more than nonverbal. That's in the right? So when you look at the studies of brain scans, and you say name detainment where does that come from? It comes from literally showing a photograph which is a non verbal signal the right hemisphere get super activated. That's what you see in the brain scan. And then you have the person name their emotional state or what they see in the photograph and the whole system calms down when the left and the right work together when it becomes integrated it achieves harmony when they're not working together. Then it's either in chaos or rigidity, that's the amazing pattern. So for parents, basically, the fun thing. That's so affective. You say chaos things been totally out of control and unpredictable or rigidity things being shut down. Those are the two banks outside the river of harmony, and this all comes from a mathematical analysis, I did years ago of looking at complex systems, basically. But understanding and thinking about what well being composed of. So here's the simple statements, even wellbeing comes from integration. So when we talk about these parts of the brain and a hand model all this stuff. It's all about integration and amazingly integration in the body and integration relationships go hand in hand. Another important thing. You talk about about the brain is how experience actually physiologically changes the brain. And. I mean, that's really profound. Interesting stuff and talk a little bit about what the implications of that are for parents who are trying to understand. Yeah. Well, in my own experience when I was in medical school, the person who taught me neuroscience, professor named David Hubel and in nineteen eighty one when I was in medical school. He won the Nobel prize for discovering that experience shapes the structure of the brain. So when I was in medical school. This is like we celebrated his Nobel prize, and it was like awesome. And so this was just what I was taught. And yet when I entered paediatrics psychiatry people seem to not know that and they seem to be saying the only thing that happens is the brain doesn't work well because of jeans and give him medication because that's the only thing that's gonna really help a genetically not well formed brain. And it was just amazing. You weren't allowed to talk about how experience shape the brain. Because. Because of partly what happened in the fifties and sixties win. Unfortunately, my field child nettle health head accused parents of children with schizophrenia or autism as being the cause of those conditions. And that was the saddest travesty that happened. So it's an understandable pushing away from that. And it went to the further extreme which they said when I was in training, pediatrics sokaiya Trie. You're not supposed to talk about experience shaping the brain were supposed to figure out which medication you would prescribe for someone fortunate. Some genetic reason their brain wasn't working. Well, so when I went to attach research, it was inspired by my professor Hugo David for discovering that in.

Starbucks Tina Bryson Nobel prize professor Trie schizophrenia scientist Mary David Hubel executive Hugo David
"david hubel" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"david hubel" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"But the complex require the bar to be moving and moving at right angles to the RN tation of the bar, then we get the more calm. Inflec- cells, we call him specialize complex, so and I'm blessing over lots and lots of detail, but we get the specialized complex, which then have requirement for movement only in it's the civic direction. What we call directionally selective? So so that we see a hierarchy of so when we get to the one spreading out from the input layers from lateral genetic Hewlett nucleus in both upward and downward direction. So we go from centers around so that come in. So that have receptive field or accent than have receptive feel centers, surround them to neurons which have the orientations, but. Requirement the simple cells, and then we go from there to the complex so that have requirement or anticipation of bar or edge has to be moving to even more complex. So where the bar has to be moving. But only in a specific direction are all those still in the one. Or are you talking about other areas? I'm talking only about the one right now only about the one. And it's in the one that we also see for the first time information from the two is coming together. Both and I obviously the information between the do I get separate, but it's also kept separate in the lateral genetic Hewlett nucleus. And then the information from the two is is combined an area the one, but we find an area of anyone. So that respond primarily just one I or the other other cells that respond. Equally to both is the bulk of the cells will respond better to one item in the other. We call that ocular dominance. Now, what is important about information coming from both is well, this is the basis for seeing things in depth, and you choir both is to do that. So for example, if you simply oppose your two index fingers close one eye separate the fingers, keep your head steady. Now, try to oppose the two fingers more often than not you'll miss very significantly doing that. Whereas you have both eyes open. You can do it easily. That's depth perception all of that going on right in area v one. So we have a hierarchy of cells. What we do. Also is we have hierarchy in terms of ocular dominance how equally. Cell is driven by both is and so on and so forth. And so what we have in the courts exit been modules. They're called, hyper Collins in which we have all the machinery necessary to analyze a bit of visual space. So we find that needs module all across the visual cortex telling us, then about what is going on in particular part of visual space, you with me still, okay because it's getting complicated. But it's all there in area the one so one of the great features of and this was a wonderful work carried out by two physicians initially at Johns Hopkins University and then at Harvard Medical School, Torsten weasel and David Hubel. And for this word big won the Nobel prize in the early eighties. It was spectacular work. And it really showed for the first time. How we begin to Anna? Allies sensory information coming in and the general principle is that you begin to take pieces if you will of the visual image and co those pieces in various neurons sort of an distraction process, if you will at least, that's the way I think of it in the further along the visual system, you go..

Collins Nobel prize Johns Hopkins University Anna Torsten weasel David Hubel Harvard Medical School
"david hubel" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:19 min | 3 years ago

"david hubel" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"The basis of practice based learning and associative memory was these connections between nerve cells in the brain because tanti knew that there are other scientists who had observed the slowing of the passage of nerve impulses through the gray matter in the brain and so he hypothesized that maybe what's going on in that slowdown is that there's difficulty for the impulses to cross the gaps between neurons these gaps that we now call synapses or synoptic fishers and based on that assumption tanti argued that the way the brain adapts the way it learns through practice and creates associations between things the way it sort of enacts its plastic potential is by kind of exercise when you perform repetitious activity in the brain the same pathways of neurons repeatedly communicate with each other and by doing this you cause a kind of hypertrophy or strengthening of the connections between those specific neurons the more you do a certain thing in the brain the easier that thing becomes to do in the brain and then the next year in eighteen ninety four the spanish niro scientists santiago ramon kahal who i've thought before we should do a whole episode on this guy perhaps he also speculated that learning was based on the creation and strengthening of connections between niran 's i feel like this is something that has been i think over the years has been so well demonstrated or not really demonstrated illustrated with animations and and art that i have it like well ingrained in my head like when people talk start talking about synapses firing i picked yeah maybe i also kind of think of it in terms of of playing an instrument like the physical act of playing an instrument of linking you know of finger movements on say at trumpet or french horn to the note that you're playing and then linking those in order to create the notes in a particular tune uhhuh which of course is is both literally a snap dick learning exercise but also kind of an illustration of what's going on like making this connecting it to that and then leading onto the next note yeah we we've learned this in the modern age in so it's easy for us to picture but we should appreciate how how interesting of an insight this was her for the people at the time because there were also competing hypotheses in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century like birla and book till show that in the first couple of decades of the twentieth century the this idea of the sort of learning through quote reduced resistance exercise synapses the that idea was pretty widely accepted in that first couple of decades and then for a while it really went into decline this the synoptic model of plasticity due to a rise in the popularity of competing ideas about all this weird stuff about the equa potential version of the brain but anyway in the late nineteen forties it came back it was sort of rehabilitated by scientists like the polish neuroscientist jersey kohinoor ski in the canadian psychologist donald hebb and head was particularly influential and then experimental evidence accumulated during the twentieth century fair especially during the mid and later twentieth century from the likes of david hubel and torsten visable michael mercer neck and eleanor maguire now the work of each of those individuals is fascinating and i would love to come back and look at them in greater detail there's some wonderful work there regarding how how we see the world i mean some of the very basic questions about the human experience how how do we perceive the world and how's it processed in the brain or explored by by by their work but the interesting thing is there still something of a controversy about exactly how plastic the adult human brain is if much at all like for most of the history of neuroscience up until very recently a lot of experts believed that the human adult brain had almost no plasticity you know that was fixed and stable but at the same time it's obvious the adults can learn new things and adapt yeah we can change and then we don't have to undergo catastrophic brain injury for it to happen right so exactly how much potential for change in plasticity is there in the adult brain end in what areas like it appears much easier for adults to learn and adapt in.